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Press & Social Media

Press & Social Media

Press & Social Media To receive email updates about this page, enter your email address: A Snapshot: Diabetes In The United States Error processing SSI file Continue reading >>

Diabetes Quick Facts

Diabetes Quick Facts

The Big Picture More than 30 million people in the United States have diabetes, and 1 in 4 of them don’t know they have it. More than 84 million US adults—over a third—have prediabetes, and 90% of them don’t know they have it. Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States (and may be underreported). Type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90% to 95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes; type 1 diabetes accounts for about 5%. In the last 20 years, the number of adults diagnosed with diabetes has more than tripled as the American population has aged and become more overweight or obese. Risk You’re at risk for developing prediabetes or type 2 diabetes if you: Are overweight Are age 45 or older Have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Are physically active less than 3 times a week Have ever had gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant) or given birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians/Alaska Natives, Pacific Islanders, and some Asian Americans are at higher risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. American Indians/Alaska Natives are twice as likely as whites to have diabetes. During their lifetime, half of all Hispanic men and women and non-Hispanic black women are predicted to develop diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is thought to be caused by an immune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistake). Known risk factors for type 1 diabetes include: Family history (having a parent, brother, sister with type 1 diabetes) Age (it’s more likely to develop in children, teens, and young adults) In the United States, whites are more likely to develop type 1 diabetes than African Americans and Hispanic/Latino Americans. You’re at risk for developing gestational diabetes (diabetes w Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease marked by higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. It is caused by the body’s inability to produce or use insulin, a hormone that acts to move glucose out of the blood and into cells to be used as energy. There are two types of diabetes: • Type 1 diabetes, also known as juvenile diabetes, is an autoimmune disease in which the body does not produce the hormone insulin. There is no known way to prevent type 1 diabetes, which represents 5% of diabetes cases. • Type 2 diabetes is the most common form, representing about 95% of all diabetes cases. It usually begins with insulin resistance, where the body does not use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. But over time, the pancreas loses its ability to produce enough insulin to keep blood sugar at normal levels. Type 2 diabetes is preventable. Prediabetes, also referred to as impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose, is a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. People with prediabetes have a much higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, as well as an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Without intervention efforts, up to 30 percent of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within five years5, and up to 70 percent will develop diabetes within their lifetime6. A 2016 study by UCLA found 13 million adults (46 percent of all adults in California) to have prediabetes or undiagnosed diabetes. An additional 2.5 million adults have diagnosed diabetes. Altogether, 15.5 million adults (55 percent of all California adults) have prediabetes or diabetes.7 Liquid sugar is a unique driver of today’s skyrocketing type 2 diabetes and obes Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Statistics Report

National Diabetes Statistics Report

The National Diabetes Statistics Report is a periodic publication of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that provides updated statistics about diabetes in the United States for a scientific audience. It includes information on prevalence and incidence of diabetes, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, deaths, and costs. These data can help focus efforts to prevent and control diabetes across the United States. Note This publication is not subject to copyright restrictions; please duplicate and distribute copies as desired. Citation Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Health and Human Services; 2017. Continue reading >>

Resources And References

Resources And References

Diabetes Type 2: Nothing Sweet About It Module 14 Resources American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists www.aace.com American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) diabeteseducator.org 1 800 338 3633 American Diabetes Association 1-800-DIABETES (1 800 342 2383) CDC Native Diabetes Wellness Program www.cdc.gov/diabetes/projects/diabetes-wellness.htm Diabetes Dictionary dLife.com TV online programming www.dlife.com/dlife_media/tv Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International www.jdrf.org 1 800 533-CURE (1 800 533 2873) National Diabetes Education Initiative www.ndei.org National Diabetes Education Program www.ndep.nih.gov; www.yourdiabetesinfo.org 1 888 693-NDEP (1 888 693 6337) National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse diabetes.niddk.nih.gov 1 800 860 8747 National Diabetes Statistics, 2015 National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: www2.niddk.nih.gov/ National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK-NIH) National Institutes of Health (NIH) www.nih.gov/ Merck Medicus Conversation maps training program merckmedicus.com 1 800 489 5119 World Health Organization Diabetes Programme Facts and Figures, 2016 References Abraham T, Fox C. (2013, August). Implications of rising prediabetes prevalence. Diabetes Care Aguilar M, Bhuket T, Torres S, et al. (2015). Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in the United States, 2003–2012. JAMA 313(19):1973–74. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.4260. Retrieved February 20, 2016 from Ahmed, A. (2002). History of Diabetes Mellitus. Saudi Medical Journal 23(4):373–78. American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO). (2016). Diabetic Retinopathy. Preferred Practice Pattern Guidelines. Retrieved from American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE). (2011, Mar/Apr). Medical Guidelines for Clini Continue reading >>

The Surprising Truth About Prediabetes

The Surprising Truth About Prediabetes

It’s real. It’s common. And most importantly, it’s reversible. You can prevent or delay prediabetes from developing into type 2 diabetes with simple, proven lifestyle changes. Amazing but true: 86 million American adults—more than 1 out of 3—have prediabetes. What’s more, 90% of people with prediabetes don’t know they have it. Could this be you? Read on to find out the facts and what you can do to stay healthy. Prediabetes Is a Big Deal Don’t let the “pre” fool you—prediabetes is a serious health condition where blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as diabetes. Prediabetes puts you at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. Many people don’t realize that type 1 and type 2 are different kinds of diabetes. About 90%-95% of people with diabetes have type 2; about 5% have type 1. Type 1 is caused by an immune reaction and can’t yet be prevented; type 2 can be prevented or delayed through lifestyle changes. Type 1 often starts quickly and has severe symptoms; type 2 is a gradual disease that develops over many years. Type 1 occurs most often in children, teens, and young adults; type 2 occurs most often in older people (though increasingly children, teens, and young adults are developing the disease). Prediabetes can develop into type 2 diabetes, but not type 1. You can have prediabetes for years but have no clear symptoms, so it often goes undetected until serious health problems show up. That’s why it’s important to talk to your doctor about getting your blood sugar tested if you have any of the risk factors for prediabetes, which include: Being overweight Being 45 years or older Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Being physically active less t Continue reading >>

Get Active! | Living With Diabetes | Diabetes | Cdc

Get Active! | Living With Diabetes | Diabetes | Cdc

To receive email updates about this page, enter your email address: Physical activity is very important for people with diabetes! Good news its not as hard as you might think to be more active. If you have diabetes , being active makes your body more sensitive to insulin (the hormone that allows cells in your body to use blood sugar for energy), which helps manage your diabetes. Physical activity also helps control blood sugar levels and lowers your risk of heart disease and nerve damage . Being physically active can be fun. When its possible, go outside with a friend, connect, and enjoy the weather. Lowering LDL (bad) cholesterol and raising HDL (good) cholesterol The goal is to get at least 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity physical activity. One way to do this is to try to fit in at least 20 to 25 minutes of activity every day. Also, on 2 or more days a week, include activities that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms). Examples of moderate-intensity physical activities include: These activities work your large muscles, increase your heart rate, and make you breathe harder, which are important goals for fitness. Stretching helps to make you flexible and prevent soreness after being physically active. Find out more by reading tips for being active with diabetes [PDF 240 KB] . Finding an activity you enjoy and having a partner helps you stick with it. Find something you like. Exercising by doing something you enjoy is important because if you dont like it, you wont stick with it. Find an activity that you and your health care provider agree you can do regularly for the best results. Start small. If youre not already physically active you should begin slowly and work your way up to the desired level. For example, Continue reading >>

North Carolina’s Guide To Diabetes Prevention And Management

North Carolina’s Guide To Diabetes Prevention And Management

Manage weight | Live tobacco free | Participate in lifestyle change programs | Participate in diabetes education | Adhere to treatment plan | Get adequate sleep Introduction The number of North Carolinians who have or who are at risk for diabetes is growing. The financial burden, human suffering and loss of productivity that are a part of this disease are real and will get worse if more people do not take action now. While diabetes can present challenges on a daily basis, it is now evident that steps can be taken to prevent or delay the onset of diabetes or manage existing diabetes with or without complications. All North Carolinians have a role in these efforts. We can all have a positive impact on the lives of those at risk for or with diabetes. This guide includes basic information about diabetes, its effects on the North Carolina population, and suggestions on how individuals can prevent and manage the disease. The guide also includes specific strategies for community groups, employers and health care providers to help people manage their risk for developing diabetes, gain and maintain control of diabetes, and reduce risks for diabetes-related complications. North Carolina’s Guide to Diabetes Prevention and Management 2015- 2020 Sustained high blood glucose levels over time can cause damage to blood vessels, resulting in serious health complications such as high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke, blindness, kidney failure and amputations.2 Persons with diabetes also have an increased risk for other diabetes complications: hearing loss, sleep apnea, periodontal disease, certain forms of cancer including colorectal and breast, sexual dysfunction and cognitive impairments including dementia.3 There are four primary types of diabetes: prediabetes; type 1 d Continue reading >>

Symptoms

Symptoms

Print Overview Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of diseases that affect how your body uses blood sugar (glucose). Glucose is vital to your health because it's an important source of energy for the cells that make up your muscles and tissues. It's also your brain's main source of fuel. If you have diabetes, no matter what type, it means you have too much glucose in your blood, although the causes may differ. Too much glucose can lead to serious health problems. Chronic diabetes conditions include type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Potentially reversible diabetes conditions include prediabetes — when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes — and gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but may resolve after the baby is delivered. Diabetes symptoms vary depending on how much your blood sugar is elevated. Some people, especially those with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, may not experience symptoms initially. In type 1 diabetes, symptoms tend to come on quickly and be more severe. Some of the signs and symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Increased thirst Frequent urination Extreme hunger Unexplained weight loss Presence of ketones in the urine (ketones are a byproduct of the breakdown of muscle and fat that happens when there's not enough available insulin) Fatigue Irritability Blurred vision Slow-healing sores Frequent infections, such as gums or skin infections and vaginal infections Although type 1 diabetes can develop at any age, it typically appears during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 diabetes, the more common type, can develop at any age, though it's more common in people older than 40. When to see a doctor If you suspect you or your child may have diabetes. If you notice any poss Continue reading >>

About Prediabetes & Type 2 Diabetes

About Prediabetes & Type 2 Diabetes

Eighty-six million Americans now have prediabetes—that’s 1 out of 3 adults! Of those 86 million, 9 out of 10 of them don’t even know they have it. Without intervention, many people with prediabetes could develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. With numbers like that, it’s important to learn about prediabetes and take action. Read the National Diabetes Statistics Report to learn more about the toll that diabetes is taking in the United States. Continue reading >>

What’s New In Diabetes

What’s New In Diabetes

The latest from the Division of Diabetes Translation, including new resources, programs, campaigns, and website updates. MMWR: Kidney Failure Decreasing in People with Diabetes In the November 3 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, data from Incidence of End-Stage Renal Disease Attributed to Diabetes Among Persons with Diagnosed Diabetes — United States and Puerto Rico, 2000–2014 show a 33% decrease in kidney failure among US adults with diabetes. Can improved diabetes care reinforce this positive trend? Read the report to learn more. Related: New Diabetes Podcasts A Cup of Health – Detecting Diabetes (4:16) A Minute of Health with CDC – Detecting Diabetes (0:59) Watch Season 2 of “Your Health with Joan Lunden and CDC” The mini-series that informed millions of American viewers about diabetes and prediabetes earlier this year is back for a second season. Building on the success of Season 1, these 26 new video segments explore diabetes-related issues in depth, from reversing prediabetes to what to make for dinner. Watch here. Puppies, Prediabetes, and Prevention A new lighthearted public service announcement (PSA) campaign, developed in partnership with the American Medical Association, American Diabetes Association, Ad Council and CDC, offers viewers a “perfect way to spend a minute”: take a prediabetes risk test while watching adorable animal videos. The PSAs feature loveable creatures and encourage people to visit DoIHavePrediabetes.org to discover how they can lower their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Watch the campaign videos here. National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017 Fast Facts: 30.3 million people have diabetes (9.4% of the US population) Diagnosed: 23.1 million people Undiagnosed: 7.2 million (23.8% of people with diabetes Continue reading >>

The 101 On Type 2 Diabetes

The 101 On Type 2 Diabetes

By Jane Wynne, Hunter College Nutrition Student, and Lisa Zarny, MS, RD, CD-N, Clinical Nutrition Manager We look forward to meeting you. Give our staff a call at 203-276-7286. It's important for Americans to be aware of the risk of developing diabetes and what can be done to prevent or treat this disease. Type 2 diabetes is caused by insulin resistance, or one’s body’s inability to use insulin properly. It is associated with increased age, obesity, family history of diabetes, gestational diabetes, and physical inactivity. However, type 2 diabetes can be avoided, treated, and even controlled by adapting to good health practices. Below are some helpful tips to help decrease the risk of diabetes and be kind to your body. 1. Eat your greens. By making some small adjustments to your meal options, diet can make a significant difference in type 2 diabetes. Limiting refined carbohydrates and focusing on high-fiber complex carbohydrates are important in treating and preventing diabetes. These two carbohydrate choices slowly release in the body, maintaining blood sugar levels and preventing the production of too much insulin. For example, substituting brown rice or whole grain bread instead of white, bran flakes instead of cornflakes, and leafy greens instead of corn can easily improve your blood sugar. 2. Move. Exercising has a surplus of health benefits, including improvement in our heart health, bone density, muscle strength, skin complexion, immune function, sleep patterns, and of course, prevention of diabetes. 3. Check the scale. After increasing your fruit and vegetable intake and exercising more, you may be tightening your belt instead of loosening it this Thanksgiving! Since being overweight or obese is a major risk factor of developing diabetes, losing even a small Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes (previously called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes) is usually diagnosed in children, teens, and young adults, but it can develop at any age. If you have type 1 diabetes, your pancreas isn’t making insulin or is making very little. Insulin is a hormone that enables blood sugar to enter the cells in your body where it can be used for energy. Without insulin, blood sugar can’t get into cells and builds up in the bloodstream. High blood sugar is damaging to the body and causes many of the symptoms and complications of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2—about 5% of people with diabetes have type 1. Currently, no one knows how to prevent type 1 diabetes, but it can be managed by following your doctor’s recommendations for living a healthy lifestyle, controlling your blood sugar, getting regular health checkups, and getting diabetes self-management education. Shakiness Nervousness or anxiety Sweating, chills, or clamminess Irritability or impatience Dizziness and difficulty concentrating Hunger or nausea Blurred vision Weakness or fatigue Anger, stubbornness, or sadness If your child has type 1 diabetes, you’ll be involved in diabetes care on a day-to-day basis, from serving healthy foods to giving insulin injections to watching for and treating hypoglycemia (low blood sugar; see below). You’ll also need to stay in close contact with your child’s health care team; they will help you understand the treatment plan and how to help your child stay healthy. Much of the information that follows applies to children as well as adults, and you can also click here for comprehensive information about managing your child’s type 1 diabetes. Causes Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistak Continue reading >>

Diabetes Basics

Diabetes Basics

A person has diabetes when their blood glucose, also known as blood sugar, is too high. The most common types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is when your body does not make insulin. It is usually diagnosed in young adults and children. People with this type of diabetes must take insulin every day to stay alive. Type 2 diabetes is when a person’s body does not use or make insulin well. It is usually diagnosed in middle aged and older people. Gestational diabetes develops in some women during pregnancy. About one out of every eleven Americans has diabetes. It can cause blindness, heart disease, kidney failure and lower-extremity amputations. In the United States, it is the seventh leading cause of death. Symptoms of diabetes include increased thirst, increased urination, increased hunger, fatigue, blurred vision, numbness or tingling in the feet or hands, sores that do not heal and unexplained weight loss. If you think you think you may have diabetes, you should contact your healthcare provider for follow up and possible testing. It is possible to live well with diabetes with proper blood sugar monitoring and control. Our caregivers under the supervision of our Care Managers can assist clients managing diabetes through medication administration, glucose testing and other services. If you want to read more about diabetes and how to manage it, the following websites are excellent resources: For information about Care Management services, contact our Care Coordinator, Jenni Paddock at 414.963.2600. Continue reading >>

Ak-ibis - Health Indicator Report Other Resources - Diabetes: Prediabetes Prevalence

Ak-ibis - Health Indicator Report Other Resources - Diabetes: Prediabetes Prevalence

More Information and References for Diabetes: Prediabetes Prevalence '''References:'''1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Diabetes Statistics Report: Estimates of Diabetes and Its Burden in the United States, 2017. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2017.[About Prediabetes & Type 2 Diabetes | Diabetes | NDPP. [Accessed September 11, 2017.3. Tabak AG, Herder C, Rathmann W, Brunner EJ, Kivimaki M. Pre-diabetes: a high-risk state for diabetes development. Lancet. 2012;379(9833):2279-2290. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(12)60283-94. Tuso P. Prediabetes and lifestyle modification: time to prevent a preventable disease. The Permanente Journal. 2014;18(3):88-93. doi:10.7812/TPP/14-0025. Rich PA, Shaefer CF, Parkin CG, Edelman SV. Using a quantitative measure of diabetes risk in clinical practice to target and maximize diabetes prevention interventions. Clinical Diabetes. 2013;31(2):82-89. doi:10.2337/diaclin.31.2.826. American Diabetes Association. Diagnosing diabetes and learning about prediabetes. Accessed September 11, 2017.7. Knowler WC, Barrett-Conner E, Fowler SE, et. al. Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group. Reduction in the incidence of type 2 diabetes with lifestyle intervention or metformin. N Eng J Med. 2002;346:393-403. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa0125128. Albright A, Gregg EW. Preventing type 2 diabetes in communities across the U.S.: the National Diabetes Prevention Program. Am J Prev Med. 2013;44(4):S346-S351. doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2012.12.0099. Evergreen Economics. Memorandum: Medicaid claims before and after self-management training. May 30, 2014.10. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). National Diabetes Prevention Program.[Accessed September 12, 2017.11. Knowler WC, Fowler SE, Hamman RF, Christophi CA, et al. Diab Continue reading >>

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