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How Was Your Child Diagnosed With Diabetes

If Your Child Is Diabetic... Will You Know?

If Your Child Is Diabetic... Will You Know?

vgajic via Getty Images As a parent, I sometimes nag — and I’ll bet that you do, too. For instance, how often do you say things like this? “I don’t want to hear your excuses. You’re not too tired — go take out the trash.” “You just went to the bathroom. You can hold it until the end of the movie.” “You don’t need a snack or another drink of water. Go back to bed.” “Don’t talk to me in that tone of voice. Go to your room.” I know I’ve said all these things at one time or another. But here’s the thing: If you’re saying them all the time, there’s a chance that your child isn’t simply being demanding, irritable, or lazy. Instead, your child may be displaying symptoms of diabetes. These days, we’re all aware that there’s an epidemic of diabetes in adults. But diabetes rates aren’t just soaring in grownups; they’re rising in kids, too. A recent study found that the incidence of Type 1 diabetes in kids up to 9 years of age jumped by 21 percent between 2001 and 2009. During the same time, the incidence of Type 2 diabetes among children between 10 and 19 rose by 30.5 percent. Currently, more than 200,000 American kids have diabetes — and if the trends continue, that number will keep rising. So if you’re a parent, diabetes definitely needs to be on your radar. Here’s a look at what this disease is and how to spot it. Understanding Diabetes There are two types of diabetes that kids or adults can develop. Here’s a quick look at each one. Type 1 diabetes — what we used to call “juvenile” diabetes — typically strikes kids, teens, and young adults. It causes insulin-producing cells in the pancreas to die, preventing the body from getting blood sugar into cells. Genes play a big role in Type 1diabetes, but rising rates als Continue reading >>

What I Wish I’d Known When My Child Was Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

What I Wish I’d Known When My Child Was Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

Oh, the things I would tell myself if I could go back seventeen years to the time of my daughter’s Type 1 diabetes diagnosis and have a good talk with me. That might not do me much good now, but it might do you a whole lot of good. So here, parent/caretaker new to this life with Type 1 diabetes, is my letter back to me, helping me see what I could not then, pointing out some things that – I hope – might make this road smoother for you. Dear Scared, Confused, Nervous, Determined Parent/Caretaker of a Child With Diabetes, This is me, speaking to you from the future. I’ve seen you go through a lot and I’ve helped you figure some things out. I’m back to share them with you so the road through life can be smoother. I’m good that way. And Deloreans work! So, here goes: 1) It’s okay to cry. But only for a while. Yes, you’ve been dealt a trauma that is nearly unfathomable to just about the rest of the world. Remember how you felt the first time you walked out of that pharmacy with the pile of filled prescriptions in your arms? Overwhelmed and oh-so-very-sad. But in time it’s important to move on from those tears. If you find you are still crying regularly a good six months into this, find someone to talk to. Consider a small dose of personal therapy. Because this is your new life; your “new normal.” And anything you can do to accept it and be good with it is only going to help your child do just that. 2) The internet is only good for some stuff. Like, finding friends. And programs. And cool blogs and digital magazines to read. If you are using Google or Facebook to find out things like “what should my son’s carb ratio be,” or “how many times a night should I be checking?” do what Bob Newhart said in this skit. STOP IT. You have a medical team. Continue reading >>

What Its Like ... To Have Your Child Diagnosed With Diabetes

What Its Like ... To Have Your Child Diagnosed With Diabetes

The subject who is truly loyal to the Chief Magistrate will neither advise nor submit to arbitrary measures. Managing Type 1 diabetes is a balancing act, trying to match the amount of insulin you inject to the amount of carbohydrate being eaten, then factoring in the amount of energy the body uses. I sat on the hospital bed, crying. It was after 9 p.m. and my two-and-a-half-year-old son, now two full hours past his bedtime, was in my lap. He hadn't been feeling well and must have been exhausted. But there he was, arms wrapped around me, gently patting my back while whispering in my ear: "It's okay, Mommy. It's okay." If the shock of the news hadn't brought me to tears, this tiny act of compassion surely would have. My son had just been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. This is the autoimmune disease in which the body destroys the cells in the pancreas that create insulin, the hormone that allows the body to use the carbohydrates in the food we eat for energy. Since his body could no longer do this on its own, my son would need to be injected with insulin at least four times a day for the rest of his life. Needles. Four times a day. Forever. Any mother whose child receives immunizations knows the anxiety that goes along with needles, and that's just a few of them at various milestones. The thought of this becoming a daily occurrence in the minutes and hours after diagnosis left me shattered and overwhelmed. At that moment, I wanted nothing more than to have my husband there with us, to hug me and tell me we would get through it together. But there was our four-year-old daughter, sleeping at home and blissfully unaware of the change our family was undergoing, and he couldn't leave to be with us. My son and I were waiting to be discharged so that we could leave one hospital Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 1 diabetes develops gradually, but the symptoms may seem to come on suddenly. If you notice that you or your child have several of the symptoms listed below, make an appointment to see the doctor. Here’s why symptoms seem to develop suddenly: something triggers the development of type 1 diabetes (researchers think it’s a viral infection—read this article on what causes type 1 diabetes, and the body loses its ability to make insulin. However, at that point, there’s still insulin in the body so glucose levels are still normal. Over time, a decreasing amount of insulin is made in the body, but that can take years. When there’s no more insulin in the body, blood glucose levels rise quickly, and these symptoms can rapidly develop: Extreme weakness and/or tiredness Extreme thirst—dehydration Increased urination Abdominal pain Nausea and/or vomiting Blurry vision Wounds that don’t heal well Irritability or quick mood changes Changes to (or loss of) menstruation There are also signs of type 1 diabetes. Signs are different from symptoms in that they can be measured objectively; symptoms are experienced and reported by the patient. Signs of type 1 diabetes include: Weight loss—despite eating more Rapid heart rate Reduced blood pressure (falling below 90/60) Low body temperature (below 97º F) There is an overall lack of public awareness of the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes. Making yourself aware of the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes is a great way to be proactive about your health and the health of your family members. If you notice any of these signs or symptoms, it’s possible that you have (or your child has) type 1 diabetes. A doctor can make that diagnosis by checking blood glucose levels. Continue reading >>

That’s How We Found Out...

That’s How We Found Out...

One of the questions we get asked most is, “how did you know?”. Interestingly, I’ve never met a parent of a child with type I that hasn’t told me their 'diagnosis' story. It seems to be a right of passage. I’ve avoided telling our story on the site so far... But today I think I’m ready to share. Arden turned two years old on July 22nd 2006. A few weeks later she had her two year well visit with our pediatrician. Everything looked great, she got her immunizations and we went home. The next day Arden seemed sick, she had a slight fever and was lethargic, I assumed that was from the inoculations. When she didn't get better after a few days I took her back to the doctors office. Arden was then diagnosed with Hand, Foot and Mouth disease (HFMD). A common illness for infants and small children. What was strange about the diagnosis was that she already had HFMD previously and it’s supposed to be one of those things you get once and then build a natural defense against, like chicken pox. I was really hoping she would start feeling better fast because we were leaving for a family vacation in three days and I wanted Arden to be able to enjoy the beach. Arden had been urinating more then usual for about a week, not in frequency but volume. I attributed this to her recent switch from bottles to cups, as she was drinking more and it just seemed to make sense. The next day I realized that I couldn’t remember when her last bowel movement was. Later that day she finally had one but it was dry, actually crushable, like dirt that was barely held together by moisture. That is when I started to really worry, I called the pediatrician and we agreed that she was dehydrated from being sick and that I’d begin to push liquids. This moment is the first time I failed as Arden’ Continue reading >>

My Daughter's Diabetes Diagnosis

My Daughter's Diabetes Diagnosis

As school let out for Christmas Break, I started noticing some physical changes in my 10 year old daughter, Lily. I didnt think much of them at first. In fact, these changes registered more as fleeting thoughts. Once I could explain them away, I was satisfied. We have always joked about Lilys bladder of steel because she never has used a public restroom and can hold it all day. So as we went shopping for new Christmas lights.and had been in the store a whole 10 minutes, Lily started complaining that we needed to go because she had to go to the bathroom. I thought she was just bored and wanted me to hurry up, so I was annoyed. Later that same day, I also noticed she had to pee 3 times while we were playing a board game. But, since I wasnt looking for something to be wrong with her, I just figured it was because she was drinking more than usual. Which she was! She was getting up at night and asking for drinks. I put it down to the dryness in the air because we were now running our furnace. Again, I didnt make much of this. One day right before Christmas, Lily was playing our Wii Fit, and I heard it proclaim, Youve lost 4 pounds! Alarm bells finally started ringing! My daughter was only 71 pounds to start with, so she shouldnt be losing weight. I instantly started asking her questions about it. Was she trying to lose weight? Did she think she was fat? My mind went that route first. After all, she was at the age where girls started noticing changes in their bodies and becoming concerned about how they look. But, I quickly knew that wasnt it. She was eating like a hog, seriously. She was hungry all the time. Then I thought it could have been from playing basketball. After all, her basketball season had just ended the week before. Maybe all that exercising had made her lose Continue reading >>

When A Child Is Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

When A Child Is Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

When a Child is Diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes When a Child is Diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes LHSC / // Resource Centres / Diabetes / Understanding the Diagnosis of Diabetes / When a Child is Diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes Once your child has been diagnosed, you and your child will meet the members of your childs diabetes care team and start learning how to manage the diabetes. This is called diabetes education. The team may include a doctor, nurse, dietitian, and social worker. They will set up a diabetes education program with you and explain the roles of each member of the team. It may be helpful to bring paper and a pen and take notes at each meeting with this team. The first step is to learn the skills needed to take care of the diabetes: how to draw up and inject insulin, how to measure blood glucose/sugar levels accurately, how to begin to plan meals and snacks. Older children will be part of this education program. For younger children, age-appropriate teaching will need to occur at a separate time. School-aged or older siblings and others intimately involved in the day-to-day care of the child such as babysitters or grandparents may also be involved in this program. In many centres, this education program takes place on an out-patient basis, in some centres, even in the home. Your diabetes team will help deal with any of the doubts, questions, or worries you may have. For example, some people have trouble believing that a serious condition can be identified after just a few tests.Hearing the diagnosis can be stressful, and it can lead to many strong emotions, ranging from anger to denying that your child is ill. You may find it helpful to meet with a social worker to help you through this difficult time. For most families, it will taketwo orthree days to learn Continue reading >>

How Did You Know Your Child Had Type 1 Diabetes? Know The Symptoms (it Could Save A Life)

How Did You Know Your Child Had Type 1 Diabetes? Know The Symptoms (it Could Save A Life)

How Did You Know Your Child Had Type 1 Diabetes? Know The Symptoms (It Could Save a Life) By: Rachelle Stocum / Blog Parents of children with diabetes will hear this question asked a million times. And each time you tell your story the story gets shorter and shorter. You begin to leave out details. Details that may one day save another child’s life. I wrote this for a couple of reasons. The first reason was to document the details and help other families who are searching for answers to unexplained symptoms. The second reason was to really get my emotions off my chest, and reflect. December 30, 2016 is a day I will never forget. This date will now be forever know to us as Carter’s “dia-versary.” This was the day my seven year old son Carter was diagnosed with Type one Diabetes. I still tear up when I say or even write those words… my son was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. The week before Christmas my son Carter had so many complaints. He’s not a whiny kid by any means so this was unusual for him. He’s actually the most compliant child I know. When I ask him to do something he does it. So when he first complained of a stomach ache I thought he was coming down with the flu. It seems reasonable that a child would get sick in December. So I tried to wake him up but it was really hard. He was groggy and didn’t want to wake up. Once he was finally woke up I told him that I didn’t want him to eat anything until I was able to get grandma’s monitor and test his blood sugar. He drank some water but understood what I was asking of him. He didn’t complain or cry even though he was hungry. I knew that was bad because when I was pregnant with him I had gestational diabetes. My blood glucose only ran about 120 from what I can recall, and I knew normal was around Continue reading >>

Why Do You Think Your Child Has Type 1 Diabetes?

Why Do You Think Your Child Has Type 1 Diabetes?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Why do you think your child has type 1 diabetes? Discussion in ' Parents ' started by Pinson , Sep 15, 2009 . This is a question I would like to ask to the parents of children with T1 diabetes: Why do you think you child has type 1 diabetes? I am interested not only by "rational" answers, for example related to the genetic links, but also by any other ideas/beliefs you may have (even if they appear "silly"), regarding the cause of your child's condition. I am also interested in thoughts and feelings you may have had, of religious or cultural or any other nature, and also ideas that crossed your mind even a few seconds, that have led you to link the diabetes of your child with something that happened I would be very grateful if you would like to share this with me, with us. I would like to ask people who will participate to this discussion to avoid any jugement, and not to make attempts to demonstrate that participant's ideas are not founded. So...I believe my child has type one diabetes because when he was a little, he was affected by severe asthma. He was prescribed oral cortisone many times, which saved his life, but I believe that this medication is the cause of his T1D. One of the possible side-effect of cortisone is T1D, this is a fact stated by the manufacturer of the oral cortisone taken by my child. On the other hand, I have always wondered if the difficult delivery I (and my child) experienced (long hours, forceps), may explain why my child has type 1 diabetes. Thank you for taking the time to read my post. My son was diagnosed at the age of 7yr 3mths, i believe his condition may have been bought on by a series of events in his young life. St Continue reading >>

How Did You Find Out About Your Childs' Diabetes?

How Did You Find Out About Your Childs' Diabetes?

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. How did you find out about your childs' diabetes? Grace was just recently diagnosed about three weeks ago. She was not sick at all at the time. Actually, the only signs of anything being a little wacky was her craving water all the time and peeing in my bed a few times. So, I called the Dr. about it and he told me to bring her in right away to test her sugar. It came as a huge shock to me to find out that she has diabetes. I'm just curious how you all found out? Was your child sick at all or did you find out the annual checkup? My stepdaughter was diagnosed last week. About 2 weeks ago on a weekend when we had her we noticed she was really tired, not eating well, and drinking a lot. We asked her Mom about it and she said "She's been like this for a week or so, she's just tired". My husband told Mom to take her to the doctor then to rule out anything medically wrong, but she never did. Well, after we had her it bothered us that entire week then afterwards as to what it could be. I researched on line, we talked to her teacher at school, and we racked our brains. We didn't know if something emotional was happening to her or what. All we knew was that she was going to get braces on her top teeth in March and we didn't know if that was bothering her. Well, our visit came up 5 days later again on a Friday (for 5 hours we had her that night) and when we took her home my husband took her inside, came back out and had a really weird look on his face. I asked what was wrong and he said she had wet her pants! She is 8 and NEVER had this problem ever. We just both sat there in silence and fear. We knew something was terribly wrong. I told my husband to get back in the house Continue reading >>

How Our Daughter’s Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis Changed Her Life—and Ours

How Our Daughter’s Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis Changed Her Life—and Ours

I suspect that every parent has something they’re particularly worried about, something they work especially hard to protect their children from. For my husband, who spent his summers during high school and college restoring old houses, that something was lead paint. For me, that something was melanoma, after my father died of the disease. You control what you can control—you make your kids take off their shoes when they enter the house, to keep the lead dust outside; you slather them with sunscreen to protect them from the midday sun. But then something comes along, a bolt from the blue, that makes you realize you have no control at all. This happened to us at the end of August, 2012, when our six-year-old daughter, Bisi, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. I first felt the chill of unease that something was wrong at a summer picnic with friends. Twice Bisi had to race behind a tree to pee, with an urgency that reminded me of when she was first wearing underwear rather than diapers. But she was at summer camp, and swimming two or three times a day. Probably, we told ourselves, she was just drinking too much chlorinated pool water. We left at the end of the week for our annual vacation on Block Island. So often as a parent, your mind jumps to the worst possibility, and it turns out you’re just being silly. But there’s the other side of the coin, too, when the symptoms are right in front of you, and you work to believe that nothing’s wrong. Over the weekend, we started to worry more and more. Bisi’s energy level—never very high—was even lower than usual, and it was clear she’d lost weight (something we’d noticed but again blamed on summer camp). We started obsessively searching her symptoms on the Internet after Bisi and her older brother went to bed, Continue reading >>

Parents Talking Type 1: Brooke Wheeler

Parents Talking Type 1: Brooke Wheeler

Diabetes is a disease that affects the whole family, especially when a child is diagnosed. Parents of children diagnosed with diabetes face overwhelming, and sometimes frightening, questions such as: How can I strike the balance between caring and hovering? Will she ever be able to eat sweets again? How will I ever be able to let him go out on his own? This is the latest in our occasional series from parents of children with diabetes, illustrating the emotions, challenges and successes each family faced upon diagnosis. _______________________________________________________ Name: Brooke Wheeler, mother of Carson, age 6, diagnosed at 21 months From: Gretna, Neb. The story I am sharing is of when our life with diabetes began . . . Friday afternoon, Nov. 7, 2008, the day our 21-month-old son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. It is a day that is still so vivid in my memory. My husband and I were getting ready to take our son Carson to the doctor. Our main concern was that he had been drinking excessively, which in turn had him completely wetting through diapers in very short periods of time. On top of that, he had been quite irritable for months and had been sleeping more frequently. The night before we took him to the doctor, he had a strange incident in which he vomited after dinner and was very lethargic afterward. It did not appear to be a stomach illness or food related—there seemed to be no explanation. All of these symptoms were a slow progression; they did not pop up overnight. However, by the time we decided to take him in, it had become quite obvious to both my husband and me that something just wasn’t right. Before we left our house, I hopped onto WebMD and typed in his symptoms. One of the results that immediately came up was type 1 diabetes. My husband an Continue reading >>

Getting The Diagnosis: Jens Story

Getting The Diagnosis: Jens Story

Brought to you by Lilly Diabetes | Disney It wasnt just hot that summer it was, literally, the hottest summer I could remember. Thats why it didnt seem TOO weird that James was so very thirsty. It seemed very logical to me! I remember looking at James and thinking that he didnt look quite right. He seemed a little bit pale, sluggish and distracted. But then I also remembered my pediatricians guidelines on when to bring your child to the doctor. Like many first-time parents, when James was an infant I brought him in for every little sniffle. The pediatrician set me aside and said, If he has a high fever that wont come down or persists for several days, or if he cant keep anything down and seems dehydrated, or if he is having trouble breathing, or if he is very lethargic then bring him in. Those were her guidelines. And that July (although I was a bit thrown by lethargic), I wasnt sure he really qualified. But then things started getting really inconvenient. Soon, it wasnt JUST the constant drinking and frequent daytime potty incidents the NIGHTS became horrendous. It was during a midnight sheet change that I noticed something peculiar about James room. His urine smelled sweet. It was two oclock in the morning and I googled sweet urine. Every single reference pointed to diabetes! The very next day I called the pediatrician for an appointment and secured one the last appointment of the day. When I finally saw the nurse, I indicated that I thought that James might have diabetes. She decided to do a blood sugar reading. This young nurse poked his finger and put the blood onto the large test strip. When the results flashed, her face turned white and she left without a word. Moments later the doctor appeared and told us in no uncertain terms that James had diabetes and that h Continue reading >>

Stories Of Diagnosis - Circle Of Moms

Stories Of Diagnosis - Circle Of Moms

Valerie - posted on 11/10/2008 ( 75 moms have responded ) I would love to know how all of you found out your child had diabetes. My baby started throwing up about two days before diagnoses. The doctor thought it was a virus and told me to give her juice and pedialite to make sure that she didn't dehydrate. Two days later, she was like a rag doll. I took her to the doctor. She was do dehydrated anyway that they couldn't get an IV in or anything. They managed to get a little blood from her which would later determine that she had diabetes. They stuck a feeding tube down her to get fluid in her. Her pediatrician was off that day, but heard what was going on and came in and stayed with us until we left that night. I love her! They had just put some pedialite on the IV when she came running in and them to take it off and told us that she had Juvenille Diabetes. Her sugar was 1500. We stayed there for the next few hours waiting on a helicopter to come and get her to take her somewhere that they could treat her. She left on a helicopter without me, which literally killed me. 2 hours later we arrived at the hospital where she was at. She had about 5 tubes going out of her. We stayed in intensive care for a day and a half, then were transferred to a room where we were educated for the next two days tirelessly on everything from giving shots to what we were giving her to how to feed her. It seems like yesterday when all of this happened. I am thankful for everyday that I have her because I know how close she was to slipping out of this life. Two weeks after this happened we literally CELEBRATED her one year birthday. It was a very emotional time, as you can imagine. My son was diagnosed at his pediatrician's office at age 18. He was having the weight loss, the thirst, the lethar Continue reading >>

Could Your Child Have Diabetes?

Could Your Child Have Diabetes?

More than 15,000 children are diagnosed with type 1 every year. Make sure you know the telltale signs -- they're all too easy to dismiss. When Chloe Powell started begging for one more drink of water every night, her father, Charles, thought his then 7-year-old was using a common bedtime stall tactic. "I was irritated that she wouldn't go to sleep," admits Dr. Powell, who's a family physician in Dallas. With all she was drinking, he wasn't surprised when she began wetting the bed. But when Chloe couldn't make it through a conversation without having to use the bathroom, he became concerned. "I figured she had a urinary-tract infection, and she'd take some antibiotics and feel better," says Dr. Powell. He wasn't at all prepared for what his daughter's urine test showed: a dangerously high level of sugar that was a clear indicator of type 1 diabetes. In an instant, Chloe, now 10, went from being a kid who never thought twice about the foods she ate or the energy she burned to one who'd face a lifetime of carbohydrate counting, finger pricks, and insulin injections. A Disease on the Rise Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder that causes the body's immune system to mistakenly destroy healthy cells in the pancreas that produce the hormone insulin. (Type 2, on the other hand, occurs when the body doesn't respond to the insulin that's being made.) Insulin ensures that sugar (glucose) in the bloodstream gets into the body's cells where it's needed for energy; without insulin, sugar builds up in the blood, which can be deadly. It's important to begin insulin therapy as soon as possible because high blood-sugar levels can cause permanent vision and nerve problems as well as damage to blood vessels, increasing the risk of heart attack, stroke, and kidney disease. Since the 198 Continue reading >>

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