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How To Take Olive Oil For Diabetes

The Extra Virgin Olive Oil Is Also A Cure For Diabetes

The Extra Virgin Olive Oil Is Also A Cure For Diabetes

The extra virgin olive oil is also a cure for diabetes An Italian study found that adding olive oil to foods reduces the glycemic index of meals, or wheelies post-prandial blood glucose, helping to protect against cardiovascular complications and microvascular diabetes The study evaluated whether fat quality, in the context of meals with high (HGI) or lowglycemic index (LGI), influences postprandial blood glucose (PPG) response in patients with type 1 diabetes. Current guidelines for the treatment of type 1 diabetes advised to calculate the units of insulin to be administered with meals, based on the carbohydrate content of the foods that will be eaten (the so-called 'count carbs'). However this system, despite the efforts made by patients, does not always prove effective in controlling blood glucose levels in an optimal way. And the reasons are many. The most important element, however, is the glycemic index of foods consumed and the fiber content of a particular food. The same group of researchers of the SID, the authors of the work published in Diabetes Care, in a previous study had shown that even in the post counts of carbohydrates a correction that takes into account the glycemic index of foods helps to improve glycemic control. But of course, to influence the absorption of carbohydrates also contribute other macronutrients that they become part of a meal, in particular proteins and fats. And 'ever more evident the role that dietary fats play in influencing blood sugar levels after a meal. In general the fats tend to delay the gastric emptying times and this should in theory result in an attenuation of the peak of postprandial glucose. E 'was also shown that the glycemic index of certain foods can be reduced after totalising with fat. According to a randomized cr Continue reading >>

Olive Oil For Diabetes, Recommended Intake, Blood Sugar And Benefits

Olive Oil For Diabetes, Recommended Intake, Blood Sugar And Benefits

Healthy Diet Plans >> Diabetic Diet >> Olive Oil Diabetes is a metabolic disorder where the body cannot effectively utilize the food that has been digested for energy. Type 1 diabetes concerns the auto-immune system and little can be done to prevent it. Type 2 diabetes on the other hand, is related to family history, age, obesity and other lifestyle factors like stress and lack of exercise. Diet, along with exercise, plays a big role in prevention of type 2 diabetes and in its management. In this regard, the benefits of olive oil for diabetes management are indisputable. Numerous researches have been done on the link between diabetes and olive oil and there is a growing body of evidence that suggests that olive oil can play a role in preventing diabetes. To understand how olive oil benefits diabetics we must first understand diabetes and its effect on blood sugar. Our blood contains some amount of sugar. The level of sugar in the blood is lowest in the morning when we wake up. It rises after we eat from the food we digest. It continues to fluctuate throughout the day. A healthy body regulates the level of sugar in the blood so that it remains within a narrow range. If the level of sugar falls too much, a condition known as hypoglycemia, lethargy sets in and it can even cause unconsciousness, brain damage and death. If the level of blood sugar is too high, a condition known as hyperglycemia, it can damage different parts of the body like the eyes, kidneys and the nervous system. After we have eaten and the food has been digested, the hormone insulin helps the body to utilize the sugar which has been extracted from the food. This prevents the levels of sugar from climbing too high. A diabetics body on the other hand, does not produce enough insulin or is abnormally resis Continue reading >>

Can Olive Oil Be Used To Treat Diabetes Type 2?

Can Olive Oil Be Used To Treat Diabetes Type 2?

There were two studies that I had found on PubMed, which I can't seem to locate again. One showed a study done that expressly demonstrated how olive oil stimulates the inceptors of the liver to function effectively, thereby helping to reverse Type II Diabetes. The second study showed the details of how olive oil stimulates the islet cells of the pancreas, and actually causes them to produce insulin, thereby reversing type I Diabetes. I was wondering if you're familiar with these two? If so, you might want to post them on your site, because this is amazing information, and very true. I have experienced the blood glucose lowering effects of olive oil in myself as well. So this is tried and true information, and it would help diabetics enormously, if they knew. Also, I have seen several studies that show the emulsifying power of olive oil, especially when used in conjunction with lecithin, to reverse fatty liver and break down gallstones. We have a reference page with the articles you may be referring to. I wish olive oil could have the miraculous effects you read about. Instead the studies have involved small numbers of subjects, rats or cell cultures. Diet is definitely important in diabetics but there are no large well controlled studies in humans which show olive oil can treat diabetics. The fact that it has helped one or two or even hundreds of people does not make it "tried and true" information; there may be thousands who it hasn't helped. This conclusion has not yet held up to the scrutiny of the scientific method. Diabetes control may be improved by substituting carbohydrate calories with fat or protein calories something which has been knows for decades - see the OmniHeart trial article on the reference page. We know how to cure the vast majority of adult onset Continue reading >>

Olive Oil In The Prevention And Management Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis Of Cohort Studies And Intervention Trials

Olive Oil In The Prevention And Management Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis Of Cohort Studies And Intervention Trials

Olive oil in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies and intervention trials 2Nutrition and Obesity Group, Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Basque Country (UPV/EHU) and Lucio Lascaray Research Center, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain 3CIBER Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBERobn), Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain 3CIBER Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBERobn), Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain 4Health Research Institute of Palma (IdISPa), University Hospital Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Spain 1Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Nuthetal, Germany 2Nutrition and Obesity Group, Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Basque Country (UPV/EHU) and Lucio Lascaray Research Center, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain 3CIBER Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBERobn), Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain 4Health Research Institute of Palma (IdISPa), University Hospital Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Spain 5Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna,, Vienna, Austria *Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, Nuthetal 14558, Germany. E-mail: [email protected] Received 2016 Oct 26; Revised 2017 Jan 25; Accepted 2017 Feb 2. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license ho Continue reading >>

Olive Oil And Diabetes

Olive Oil And Diabetes

During my Masters in Nutrition I had to do one project on my choice of chronic condition and a dietary factor that can help improve that condition. Like most of my projects I chose type 2 diabetes to focus on. Previously I’d learned about oleocanthal, an ingredient in olive oil that is highly anti-inflammatory. And since diabetes is an inflammatory condition I was curious to investigate if using olive oil in a diabetes diet would be beneficial. And I was surprised at what I learned, the benefits were even greater than I expected. Olive oil is very good for diabetes! I did a literature review of the latest research from 2004-2014 and looked at 10 randomized trials, the highest level of study. Seven of those studies far outweighed the benefits of a high carbohydrate diet in their benefits, and the other three showed equivalent results. So what does this all reveal and how can it help you? Olive Oil Helps Diabetes In 3 Ways Reduces Glucose and a1c Helps cholesterol Reduces inflammation Let’s explore how… Components of Olive Oil Olive oil is a monounsaturated fat. The best type of olive oil is extra virgin olive oil and like all fats, olive oil is made up of fatty acids, mostly containing oleic acid at a rate of 55-83%. It also contains 36 known phenolic compounds; these are various compounds that have beneficial effects to our health. As I also mentioned above, it contains one particular compound called oleocanthal that helps reduce inflammation. Researchers have found that oleocanthal has the same anti-inflammatory response in the body as NSAID ibuprofen. It’s not as potent but it doesn’t have any side effects like NSAIDs either, so that’s a great thing. So all in all, it’s got some great components that help improve our health and have great benefits for di Continue reading >>

Olive Oil And Coconut Oil | Super Fats Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Olive Oil And Coconut Oil | Super Fats Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Author's Perspective: The fat phobia is very powerful. Most of us have been taught or told that fat is bad. So, for years, I avoided adding fat to my meals. But, after I did some research and discovered the health benefits of plant oils such as extra virgin olive oil and coconut oil, I became more comfortable with adding fat to my meals. Gradually, I learned to accept that fat was good and that I needed to eat fat on purpose! :-) Extra virgin olive oil is a super fat because it provides anti-inflammatory and glucose stabilization benefits, both of which are beneficial to people with Type 2 diabetes. In addition, extra virgin olive oil is a super fat because it contains phytonutrients called polyphenols, which are well-known to have anti-inflammatory properties. The anti-inflammatory strength of olive oil rests on its polyphenols. These anti-inflammatory compounds contain several well-researched anti-inflammatory nutrients, including the following: Anthocyanidins (cyanidins, peonidins) Flavones (apigenin, luteolin) Flavonols (quercetin; kaempferol) Flavonoid glycosides (rutin) Lignans (pinoresinol) These anti-inflammatory nutrients help to decrease inflammation markers, such as homocysteine, C-reactive protein (CRP), TNF-alpha, interleukin 1-beta, thromboxane B2, and leukotriene B4. This provides health benefits to people with systemic diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Heart disease reduction has been identified in numerous studies of the Mediterranean Diet, which uses olive oil. This reduction in heart disease is due to a significant decrease in total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, and an increase in the HDL:LDL ratio; and a decrease in blood pressure. Olive oil contains heart-healthy fat in the form of oleic acid, Continue reading >>

Cooking With Diabetes Tip: Use Olive Oil

Cooking With Diabetes Tip: Use Olive Oil

Olive oil is an excellent way to add flavor to a dish while watching the nutritional content (important for people with diabetes). As a cook and cookbook author, I have a lot of experience with olive oils, so I thought I'd share some of this with you as you strive to eat well with diabetes. Several years ago when I was serving on the board of directors of the Connecticut Women's Culinary Alliance, I hosted an olive oil tasting party for fellow food writers, food editors, chefs, and others interested in networking and learning more about food and its presentation. Since it was in the dead of winter and a major snowstorm was brewing, I doubted if we'd have a great attendance at the early evening tasting. I collected 35 bottles of olive oil, priced from $2.49 a bottle to $38.99, that would encompass a wide range of flavor from fruity to peppery, mild to intensely strong. More than 40 women showed up that snowy evening. As you've likely found yourself, there's a dazzling array of olive oils available from Italy, France, Spain, Greece, Morocco, Turkey, Tunisia, and California. Since most of us only have one or two bottles of olive oil in our kitchen at any given time, this was a chance to try many olive oils at one time and was worth braving the elements. After spending an hour or so dipping small squares of bread into dishes of extra-virgin olive oil, then lettuce leaves, we found some old and some new favorites. But before you run to the store to buy new olive oils to try, take a few moments to learn about olive oil. When olives ripen, they change colors from green to violet and then to black, and can be pressed for their oil at any stage of the ripening process. This is why olive oils have differences in flavor, viscosity, and color. Virgin olive oil is the most sought a Continue reading >>

Olive Oil Blunts Glucose Response In Type 1 Diabetes

Olive Oil Blunts Glucose Response In Type 1 Diabetes

Olive Oil Blunts Glucose Response in Type 1 Diabetes Encouraging results for fending off type 2 diabetes, too With commentary by lead study author Angela Rivellese, M.D., professor of applied dietetic sciences at Federico II University in Naples. Adding olive oil to a meal improves glucose response in those with type 1 diabetes, researchers in Italy have found. Olive oil may slow blood sugar rise following a high-glycemic meal in those with type 1 diabetes. Our study shows for the first time that the type of fat significantly influences post-prandial glycemic response in patients with type 1 diabetes, said lead author Angela Rivellese, M.D., professor of applied dietetic sciences at Federico II University in Naples. In short, extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is better than butter. Study subjects who consumed meals with 37 grams of EVOO (2.5 tablespoons) showed an approximate 50% reduction in early, after-meal blood glucose response compared with those who consumed meals with either 43 grams of butter (2.9 tablespoons) or meals deemed low-fat (half-a-tablespoon of EVOO). The EVOO meals were also associated with a significant delay in the time it took for blood glucose to peak compared with the butter and low-fat meals. The EVOO benefit was seen only in meals with a high glycemic index (HGI); it did not apply to meals with a low glycemic index (LGI). HGI foods cause a rapid rise in after-meal blood glucose levels, while LGI foods result in a slower and steadier release of glucose, which leads to healthier blood glucose readings. The study, which suggests that carbohydrate-counting alone may not result in optimal glucose control, has important clinical implications for those with type 1 diabetes, the authors wrote, because it demonstrates that the combination of carbohydrate Continue reading >>

This Is Why You Need To Consume 1 Tablespoon Of Olive Oil Every Morning!

This Is Why You Need To Consume 1 Tablespoon Of Olive Oil Every Morning!

THIS is Why You Need to Consume 1 Tablespoon of Olive Oil Every Morning! [emailprotected] | February 10, 2016 | Health A-Z | No Comments Olive oil has been used for many purposes in the human history. Today, besides using it in the kitchen, olive oil is used in medicine, pharmacy and for the purposes of personal hygiene. What makes olive oil super food is the high level of monounsaturated fats, especially oleic acid and different antioxidants. Because of the numerous health benefits, olive oil is also called Mediterranean miracle. There are two types of olive oil. The most used types of olive oil (VOO) are virgin and extra virgin oil (EVOO). The extra virgin olive oil has the highest quality. Also, it keeps most of the natural minerals and vitamins. Because it is the purest, the best way to use it is pouring it over salad or consuming it raw. What happens if you consume 1 tablespoon of olive oil every morning? 1. Anticancer Properties of Extra Virgin Oil Extra virgin olive oils properties are helpful against several cancer types. The two types of cancer that were most often tested were related to the digestive system and breast cancer. EVOO includes oleic acid which is believed that boosts apoptosis and prevents cell proliferation of the cancer cells. Also, EVOO is rich in phenolic antioxidants, such as terpenoids and squalene, which have anticancer properties. One of the causes of Alzheimers is the increased accumulation of beta-amyloid in the brain. A team of experts at the University of Louisiana at Monroe discovered that oleocanthal, a compound found in extra virgin olive oil, has power to control the level of beta-amyloid and significantly increase the cleansing. Moreover, the natural phenols in extra virgin oil help to reduce neuroinflammations. Extra virgin oliv Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Olive Oil Consumption In Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Benefits Of Olive Oil Consumption In Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Worldwide, type 2 diabetes is at epidemic proportions, with over 300 million already having the condition with an estimated rise to 600 million diagnosed cases by the year 2030. Information regarding reduced risk of type 2 diabetes is fairly common. However, finding information regarding treatment and management for an individual who already has type 2 diabetes can be somewhat more difficult. Therefore, this article is designed as a mini literature review of sorts, pointing to some of the recent research around olive oil and its potential benefits for use as a dietary intervention in type 2 diabetes treatment. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER) is a central mediator for pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. An in vitro study published in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 2016, investigated if tyrosol, an antioxidant polyphenolic compound found in olive oil, could protect against beta-cell dysfunction. Researchers found that tyrosol did in fact protect against beta-cell ER stress-induced cell death, suggesting that it should be explored as a therapeutic agent for improving insulin resistance and diabetes. Insulin resistance (IR) is one of the major contributors to difficulties in maintaining blood glucose control. A study published in Diabetologia, 2015, randomized 642 patients to either an olive oil enriched Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) (35 percent fat; 22 percent from monounsaturated fat) or a low-fat diet (less than 28 percent fat) to determine whether dietary intervention effects tissue-specific IR and beta-cell function. The study found that both diets improved IR, however, liver IR is improved more through a low-fat diet, while muscle IR and muscle+liver IR could benefit more from the olive oil enriched MedDiet. At this point there Continue reading >>

Diabetes | The Olive Oil Source

Diabetes | The Olive Oil Source

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the type of fat you eat is more important than your total fat consumption. They recommend eating less saturated fats which are unhealthy. Saturated fats raise blood cholesterol levels. High blood cholesterol is a risk factor for heart disease and people with diabetes are at high risk for heart disease. ADA recommends replacing saturated fats by unsaturated fats. One of the ways to do this is to use olive oil instead of butter, margarine, or shortening when cooking. Keep in mind that all oils are high in calories and watch your consumption! An added advantage is that olive oil is also linked to lower triglyceride levels and may help to offset a propensity for high triglyceride levels that many diabetics suffer from, which puts them at risk for heart disease. There has also been published research reported by ADA in Diabetes Care that indicates olive oil may be beneficial to reducing belly fat and insulin sensitivity. In sum, when researchers fed Type 2 diabetic patients different diets - a high carbohydrate diet, or a diet rich in either saturated fat or olive oil (Mediterranean diet) - the high carb diet increased abdominal fat compared to the fat-rich diets. Of the three diets, the diet rich in olive oil did best, preventing not only belly fat accumulation, but insulin resistance and a drop in adiponectin. Adiponectin, a hormone produced and secreted by fat cells (adipocytes), regulates sugar and fat metabolism, improves insulin sensitivity, and has anti-inflammatory effects on the cells lining the blood vessel walls. Continue reading >>

The Real Story On Olive Oil

The Real Story On Olive Oil

Canola and olive oil are the two most widely used cooking oils in the world today. It wasn’t always this way and it is important to understand how this change occurred, because it wasn’t always for health reasons that this shift took place. Fred Pescatore, MD, MPH, CCN author of The Hampton’s Diet explains what happened, as he helps us learn about The Science of Fats, Fatty Acids and Edible Oils Canola and olive oil are the two most widely used cooking oils in the world today. It wasn’t always this way and it is important to understand how this change occurred, because it wasn’t always for health reasons that this shift took place. For years, we were stuck in the mire of polyunsaturated fats being healthy for us and these two oils were relegated to the back shelf. However, once the shift to monounsaturated fats and omega-3 fatty acids came to be, these two oils quickly rose to prominence. Since many of you are probably sitting there pretty smugly thinking you are being so healthy because these are the only two oils you use; and, since I have spent so much time saying they aren’t, this is the chapter that explains my reasoning. It is a pretty fascinating story so sit back and read this like a good mystery. Carrie, a 44 year old mother of two teenage children came to see me because she was exhausted all the time. She worked and raised her children so she had plenty to be tired about. She had always been a health nut and during our first visit when we discussed some of the basics, the conversation came around to cooking oils. She held up her hand and said don’t worry there doc, I’ve got that under control – I only use olive oil when I am cooking and canola oil for salad dressings. Several years ago I would have applauded her for her heightened awareness o Continue reading >>

Olive Oil And Diabetes

Olive Oil And Diabetes

WHAT IS DIABETES? Diabetes mellitus is one of the leading health problems in the developed countries, and the sixth cause of death. It is one of the major metabolic diseases and it is potentially very serious because it can cause many complications that seriously damage health, such as cardiovascular diseases, kidney failure, blindness, peripheral circulation disorders, etc. There are two types of diabetes mellitus: type-I or insulin-dependent diabetes, found in children and teenagers, and type-II or non-insulin-dependent diabetes, which appears in adulthood, generally from the age of 40 onwards. Insulin is required to control the first type while the second, more frequent type is generally associated with obesity and does not call for insulin treatment. Nowadays a person is considered to be a diabetic when, two hours after an oral overdose of glucose, he or she has a fasting blood sugar level of more than 126 mg/dl, or of more than 200 mg/dl in non-fasting conditions. Glucose intolerance is a situation where a person has high blood sugar levels (between 110 and 125 mg/dl) without any clear signs of disease, but with a major risk of suffering from diabetes in the future. OLIVE OIL AND DIABETES An olive-oil-rich diet is not only a good alternative in the treatment of diabetes; it may also help to prevent or delay the onset of the disease. How it does so is by preventing insulin resistance and its possible pernicious implications by raising HDL-cholesterol, lowering triglycerides, and ensuring better blood sugar level control and lower blood pressure. It has been demonstrated that a diet that is rich in olive oil, low in saturated fats, moderately rich in carbohydrates and soluble fibre from fruit, vegetables, pulses and grains is the most effective approach for diabetics Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Olive Oil For Diabetes

Benefits Of Olive Oil For Diabetes

Olive oil is a staple of the highly recommended Mediterranean diet. Since the Mediterranean diet is so highly recommended, everyone should go right to their neighborhood grocery store and use olive oil for cooking. Simple, right? Well, in one sense, yes…but is anything ever really that simple? Nutritional Facts about Olive Oil 1 tablespoon of olive oil contains 14 grams of total fat, 2 grams of saturated fats, no fiber, no sugar, no cholesterol and no fiber. It is a good source of Vitamins E and K and no protein—so all the calories come from fats.[1] So far, nothing to get excited overly excited about, is there? What makes olive oil so good to use is the types of fat it contains. It contains 1318 mg of omega-6 fats and 103mg of omega-3 fats. In addition, it contains over 10 grams of either mono- or poly-unsaturated fats—the healthier types of fats. Olive oil also has almost 30 g of phytosterols, a type of plant substance that is chemically similar to cholesterol but helps maintain heart health because it inhibits the absorption of cholesterol from food and lowers the amount of LDL cholesterol, the “bad” cholesterol that is associated with heart disease.[2] Finally, olive oil is rich in antioxidants such as oleocanthal and oleeuropein—those plant substances that can help reduce the oxidative damage caused to our bodies by high levels of blood sugar. What is the Best Form of Olive Oil? It does get upsetting, but the fact is that there are lots of people out there making and selling olive oil with less than 100% olive oil! Olive oil has become so popular, there are many forms of olive oil that are not pure olive oil. So the first thing to do is to buy reputable, well- known brands of olive oil and only buy 100% olive oil—extra virgin olive oil is pressed—it Continue reading >>

Add Extra Virgin Olive Oil To Reduce After-meal Blood Sugar Levels

Add Extra Virgin Olive Oil To Reduce After-meal Blood Sugar Levels

When it comes to controlling blood sugars, individuals generally turn to carbohydrate intake for fluctuating levels. So how may extra virgin olive oil, a fat source, reduce after-meal blood sugars? Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects nearly 10 percent of Americans, with that number expected to grow in the future. The condition cannot only be costly to the wallet, but taxing on health and should not be taken lightly. Essentially, diabetes is when the body cannot efficiently produce energy from food sources. Insulin, a hormone responsible for making energy from sugar (mostly from carbohydrate sources) becomes insufficient in diabetes. The conversion of sugar to energy is unable to be carried out and blood sugars start to rise, a phenomenon known as hyperglycemia, and can harm multiple organ systems if left uncontrolled. But when it comes to controlling blood sugars, individuals generally turn to carbohydrate intake for fluctuating levels. So how may extra virgin olive oil, a fat source, reduce after-meal blood sugars? Olive Oil: What Is It? Running to the store for olive oil might be a little more overwhelming than envisioned, as there are numerous types - including pure olive oil, light olive oil, and virgin olive oil, and extra virgin olive oil (EVOO). Although each can be used interchangeably, EVOO is the highest quality offered. Extra virgin olive oil and virgin olive oil are unrefined, meaning they have not been treated with chemicals or undergone heat manipulation. When it comes to distinguishing between the two, the finger is pointed to the oleic acid content. Though oleic acid can be consumed at a healthy and safe level, too much can be harmful. EVOO, compared to the others, has the least amount of oleic acid content (with no more than one percent) while of Continue reading >>

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