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How To Stop Weight Loss In Diabetes

Losing Weight With Diabetes: What Prevents It And Causes Weight Gain

Losing Weight With Diabetes: What Prevents It And Causes Weight Gain

I recently was included in a discussion on a Facebook group for athletes with diabetes about how hard it can be to lose weight through exercise. While I would never claim to have all the answers on this topic, here are some ideas about what can make you gain weight or keep you from losing weight with diabetes, based on my decades of professional and personal experience with diabetes and weight management, and what you can do about it. Insulin My former graduate student with type 1 diabetes went on an insulin pump and promptly gained about 10 pounds, even though his blood glucose control improved only marginally. Why did this happen to him (and why does it happen to so many other insulin users)? As a naturally occurring anabolic hormone, insulin promotes the uptake and storage of glucose, amino acids, and fat into insulin-sensitive cells around your body (mainly muscle and fat cells). It doesn’t matter whether it’s released naturally, injected, or pumped—all insulin and insulin analogues have these same effects. Going on intensive insulin therapy is associated with fat weight gain (1), for people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Some of the weight gain comes from that if you’re using insulin to keep your blood glucose in control, you’ll be keeping and storing all of the calories that you’re eating instead of losing some glucose through urine (during hyperglycemia). Unfortunately, this realization has led some people to try skipping or limiting their insulin use to help them lose weight (2), but that is a dangerous practice that can lead to loss of excess muscle mass and life-threatening conditions like DKA. The best way to balance your insulin use and your body weight, in my opinion, is to be physically active to keep your overall insulin levels lower. I Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Is 'reversible Through Weight Loss'

Type 2 Diabetes Is 'reversible Through Weight Loss'

Many doctors and patients do not realize that weight loss can reverse type 2 diabetes. Instead, there is a widespread belief that the disease is "progressive and incurable," according to a new report published in the BMJ. This is despite there being "consistent evidence" that shedding around 33 pounds (15 kilograms) often produces "total remission" of type 2 diabetes, note Prof. Mike E. J. Lean and other researchers from the University of Glasgow in the United Kingdom. The thrust of their paper is that greater awareness, when combined with better recording and monitoring of remissions, could result in many more patients no longer having to live with type 2 diabetes and a massive reduction in healthcare costs. The global burden of type 2 diabetes has nearly quadrupled over the past 35 years. In 1980, there were around 108 million people with the disease, and by 2014, this number had risen to 422 million. The vast majority of diabetes cases are type 2 diabetes, which is a disease that results when the body becomes less effective at using insulin to help cells to convert blood sugar, or glucose, into energy. Excess body weight is a main cause of this type of diabetes. In the United States, an estimated 30.3 million people, or around 9.4 percent of the population, have diabetes - including around 7.2 million who do not realize it. Diabetes accounts for a high portion of the national bill for taking care of the sick. The total direct and indirect cost of diagnosed diabetes in the U.S. was estimated to be $245 billion in 2012. In that year, of the $13,700 average medical spend for people with diagnosed diabetes, more than half (around $7,900) was directly attributed to the disease. Treatment 'focuses on drugs' Prof. Lean and colleagues note that the current management guideli Continue reading >>

How To Lose Weight And Prevent Diabetes In 6 Minutes A Week

How To Lose Weight And Prevent Diabetes In 6 Minutes A Week

I believe regular movement and exercise is essential to health. As Stephan Guyenet pointed out in a recent blog post, our paleolithic ancestors had a different word for exercise: “life“. They naturally spent a lot of time outdoors in the sun, walking, hunting, gathering, and performing various other physically-oriented tasks. They had no concept of this as “exercise” or “working out”. It was just life. But while exercise contributes to health in several different ways, it’s not very effective for weight loss. Or, more specifically, I should say that low-intensity, “cardio” – which is how most people exercise – is not effective for weight loss. Why cardio doesn’t work How could this be? There are three main reasons: caloric burn during exercise is generally small; people who exercise more also tend to eat more (which negates the weight regulating effect of exercise); and, increasing specific periods of exercise may cause people to become more sedentary otherwise. In an example of the first reason, a study following women over a one-year period found that in order to lose one kilogram (2.2 pounds) of fat, they had to exercise for an average of 77 hours. That’s a lot of time on the treadmill just to lose 2 pounds! In an example of the second reason, a study found that people who exercise tend to eat more afterwards, and that they tend to crave high-calorie foods. The title of this study says it all: “Acute compensatory eating following exercise is associated with implicit hedonic wanting for food.” I love it when researchers have a sense of humor. In an example of the third reason, one study assigned 34 overweight and obese women to an exercise program for 8 weeks. Fat loss at the end of the study was an average of 0.0kg. Not very impressive. Continue reading >>

Losing Weight Can Prevent And Cure Type 2 Diabetes

Losing Weight Can Prevent And Cure Type 2 Diabetes

Gaining weight is highly stressful to your body. Sooner or later it is likely to break down in response to the stress and “give up” trying to cope with the abuse. Western medicine marks such a tipping point with the label type 2 diabetes, which essentially means your ability to regulate blood sugar is more or less broken. In reality, it was heading that direction as your fasting blood sugar elevates above 90. A new study shows that taking off a significant chunk of weight over a two-year period can reverse the diabetes and/or prevent it, even if you still have more weight to lose. This new study is consistent with my clinical observations. Many people following the Leptin Diet and actually engaging the process of weight loss have no trouble ridding themselves of type 2 diabetes. Emphasis needs to be placed on the phrase “engaging the process of weight loss.” While it is my belief, based on considerable science, that the Leptin Diet is the most effective and safest way to lose weight over the long haul, losing weight in any manner seems to be of benefit. It is also important to understand that you do not need to reach a goal weight to prevent or reverse type 2 diabetes. While it is important for your own personal metabolic health that you do reach an appropriate goal weight sooner or later, this is not required for most people in order to prevent or reverse type 2 diabetes. In other words, if you can simply get your body going in the right direction and take off a significant chunk of weight, then you have created a metabolic environment within your body that is far less likely to have or develop type 2 diabetes. All you have to do is keep consistently moving in the right direction. This is very encouraging because it means you do not have to be perfect before yo Continue reading >>

Keeping The Pounds On: Causes Of Unexplained Weight Loss

Keeping The Pounds On: Causes Of Unexplained Weight Loss

Our society is obsessed with weight, if you haven’t noticed. More than two thirds of US adults are overweight or obese, there are more diet books published than we can count, and, of course, we have the privilege of watching shows like The Biggest Loser to help keep us in line. And according to government statistics, more than 85% of people with Type 2 diabetes are overweight. So it stands to reason that much of the focus of managing Type 2 diabetes is based on reaching and staying at a healthy weight. It’s important to note that thin people can get diabetes too, and not just Type 1 diabetes. In a 2008 study published in the journal Diabetes Care, adults age 60 to 79 years old with a body-mass index (BMI) of less than 18.5 (which is considered to be underweight) were 30% more likely to get Type 2 diabetes than adults with a “normal” BMI of 18.5 to 24.9. In a society where being thin equates with beauty, youth, intelligence, and success, there is often little sympathy or patience for people who are too thin and who desperately want to gain weight. If you’ve struggled with losing weight and keeping it off, you know all too well how challenging that can be. People who want to gain weight often face the same kind of battle. And to have diabetes on top of that can make it doubly difficult. First things first: identify the cause If you have diabetes, are underweight, and would like to gain weight, it’s helpful to first have a talk with your doctor. Make sure there are no health or medical reasons for you being underweight (especially if you’ve recently lost weight without trying) such as having an overactive thyroid, a digestive disorder (such as Crohn disease), or cancer, for example. A physical exam, blood work, and other tests may be needed to rule out certai Continue reading >>

Is Weight Loss Caused By Diabetes Dangerous?

Is Weight Loss Caused By Diabetes Dangerous?

Ask the experts I have a friend that is 35 and has diabetes. For the past eight years, his weight has always been in check and if anything he may have been a little overweight. Just recently, he has lost a lot of weight and he told me that he weighs less than he did in high school. I think he looks too thin and I am concerned about his health with him being a diabetic. Should there be a concern and what kind of advice can you give me to pass on to him. Doctor's response We often assume weight loss is good and healthy. A slow steady intentional weight loss using nutritional change and exercise is associated with beneficial effects on the heart, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. In addition, weight loss can reduce "insulin resistance" and make muscles and fat tissues more sensitive to circulating insulin levels in the blood. What type of diabetes causes weight loss? A reduction in insulin resistance is problematic because insulin is needed to help glucose enter these tissues to be metabolized. If these tissues are resistant to insulin, higher than normal levels are needed for this process to occur. This is often the case in Type 2 diabetes. As a result, a vicious cycle occurs, the higher the insulin levels are, the harder it is to lose weight (insulin is anabolic, and is a hormone that likes to store fat). On the other hand, the heavier a person is, the more likely they are to have higher insulin levels. As you can see, the cycle is often hard to break. What causes unintentional weight loss in diabetes? While intentional weight loss in people with diabetes is usually a good thing, unintentional weight loss is not. If blood sugars are very high, patients with diabetes tend to urinate a lot, and this results in dehydration as a possible cause of weight loss. Also, mus Continue reading >>

How To Gain Weight If You Have Diabetes

How To Gain Weight If You Have Diabetes

Expert Reviewed Weight loss can be a symptom of diabetes. Because your body is unable to make use of sugar in the blood, those calories that would normally be utilized are lost. Even though you might be eating a normal amount of food, this loss of sugar and calories due to diabetes will still cause you to lose weight.[1] However, you can still work with your diabetes and maintain a healthy weight. Continue reading >>

Your Game Plan To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Your Game Plan To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes prevention is proven, possible, and powerful. Taking small steps, such as eating less and moving more to lose weight, can help you prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and related health problems. The information below is based on the NIH-sponsored Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) research study, which showed that people could prevent or delay type 2 diabetes even if they were at high risk for the disease. Follow these steps to get started on your game plan. If you are overweight, set a weight-loss goal that you can reach. Try to lose at least 5 to 10 percent of your current weight. For example, if you weigh 200 pounds, a 10-percent weight-loss goal means that you will try to lose 20 pounds. Research shows that you can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing weight by following a reduced-calorie eating plan and being more active each day. Find ways to be active every day. Start slowly and add more activity until you get to at least 30 minutes of physical activity, like a brisk walk, 5 days a week. Keep track of your progress to help you reach your goals. Use your phone, a printed log, online tracker, app, or other device to record your weight, what you eat and drink, and how long you are active. Ask your health care team about steps you can take to prevent type 2 diabetes. Learn about other ways to help reach your goal, such as taking the medicine metformin. Also, ask if your health insurance covers services for weight loss or physical activity. It’s not easy to make and stick to lifelong changes in what you eat and how often you are active. Get your friends and family involved by asking them to support your changes. You can also join a diabetes prevention program to meet other people who are making similar changes. Set a weight-loss goal If you are ov Continue reading >>

The Dilemma Of Weight Loss In Diabetes

The Dilemma Of Weight Loss In Diabetes

People with diabetes receive mixed messages about weight loss from magazines, newspapers, friends, family, and, yes, even health professionals. Few subjects have accumulated as much misleading and potentially dangerous folklore as the subject of obesity. A common message is that losing weight is just a matter of willpower, and if you have been losing weight and reach a plateau, it's because you've lost your willpower and are no longer following your diet. Furthermore, for people with type 2 diabetes, the message often is that weight loss is the answer to improving glucose control: “If you just lose 20 lb, you won't need insulin.” What does research tell us about these issues, and what should our messages as health professionals be to people with diabetes? Obesity is a serious worldwide problem and is associated with the risk of developing diabetes. Today, more than 1.1 billion adults worldwide are overweight, and 312 million of them are obese.1 In the past 20 years, the rates of obesity have tripled in developing countries that have adopted a Western lifestyle, with the Middle East, Pacific Islands, Southeast Asia, India, and China facing the greatest increase. Consequently, the number of people with diabetes in these countries is expected to increase from 84 million in 2000 to 228 million by 2030. Thus, preventing obesity is a high priority for the prevention of diabetes and other chronic diseases. According to some obesity researchers, it may not be possible to decrease the current numbers of overweight and obese people in the United States, but we need to try to slow or prevent the increase that has been occurring at an alarming rate.2 The hope is that slowing the rising prevalence of obesity will also slow the diabetes epidemic. Can this be accomplished? Thus fa Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: 8 Steps To Weight-loss Success

Type 2 Diabetes: 8 Steps To Weight-loss Success

Losing weight is at the top of many people's to-do lists. But for those with type 2 diabetes, weight control is especially important. “Carrying excess body fat increases the body's resistence to insulin, making blood glucose management more challenging,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, CDE, past 2009 national president of health care and education for the American Diabetes Association. "According to the World Health Organization, 90 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese." In fact, research indicates that the longer someone has a high body mass index or BMI (a common measure of being overweight or obese), the greater their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. It’s no secret that losing weight — and keeping it off — isn’t easy. But it is possible, and the benefits for those with diabetes are great. So how do you get started? Experts say the right way to lose weight is to incorporate a healthful diet into your overall diabetes management plan. Diabetes Diet Control: Steps to Success Here's how to get started on the path to weight-loss success: Get physical. Exercise can help keep off the weight. “Research shows that people who increase physical activity along with reducing calorie intake will lose more body fat than people who only diet,” says McLaughlin, now a certified diabetes educator at Nebraska Medicine, Children's Hospital and Endocrine Clinics, in Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska. For confirmation, look at the National Weight Control Registry (NWCR), a database of 10,000 men and women who have lost a significant amount of weight and kept it off. Only 10 percent reached and maintained their weight-loss goal without exercise. Most people in the register chose walking as their form of exercise. Eat breakfast. The most effective diabetes die Continue reading >>

How To Put On Weight When You Have Diabetes

How To Put On Weight When You Have Diabetes

Not everybody with diabetes needs to lose weight. Some people have the opposite problem; the pounds just won’t stay on. Although certainly a great source of calories, filling up on hot fudge sundaes isn’t the best way to fill out your frame if you have diabetes. Before we talk about some healthful strategies for weight gain, it is important to make sure your efforts to add a few pounds are not sabotaged by out of control blood glucose numbers. If your glucose level is very high, all the extra calories in the world won’t have the desired effect. When the body perceives it is starving –that is essentially what occurs when it can’t use all the glucose building up in the blood stream– glucose (energy or calories) spills into the urine. So instead of keeping those precious calories to add muscle and some fat you will end up losing weight. If you are losing weight and your glucose levels are in good control then a visit to your health care provider is in order to look for other causes of weight loss. The old adage says; to gain a pound a week, add 500 calories a day to your current calorie level. Now new research tells us that this isn’t entirely accurate, but it is still a good place to start. You can find out about how many calories you are eating now by using any one of a hundreds of nutrition management websites on the internet: Caloriecount.com, Myfitnesspal.com and Fitday.com are three options. One of the first things to look at when you are trying to gain weight is low calorie foods to eliminate. Plain beverages such as black coffee or tea, broth soups, low calorie salads all fill you up without providing much in the way of calories. All of your food chooses should be as calorie dense as possible. If you like salads for example, keep the lettuce to a mini Continue reading >>

How Much Weight Do I Need To Lose To Prevent Diabetes?

How Much Weight Do I Need To Lose To Prevent Diabetes?

Q. How can a blood test determine if I have prediabetes? How much weight do I need to lose to bring my numbers down? A. Doctors typically perform one of three blood tests to diagnose prediabetes, a condition marked by blood sugar (glucose) levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to qualify as diabetes. While prediabetes often leads to full-fledged Type 2 diabetes, many people can hold the condition in check if they lose a relatively small amount of weight and increase their physical activity, said Dr. Rhonda Bentley-Lewis, an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. “I stress to my patients that we’re not talking about a huge amount of weight,” she said, “just 5 to 7 percent of one’s body weight” — or 10 to 14 pounds for someone who weighs 200 pounds. Two of the tests require fasting, which helps prevent results being distorted by a prior meal and provides “an even baseline,” Dr. Bentley-Lewis said. One, the fasting plasma glucose test, checks blood glucose levels after an 8 to 10 hour fast; results of 100 to 125 milligrams per deciliter indicate prediabetes. The other, the oral glucose tolerance test, is the most sensitive. It checks blood glucose levels after fasting and then two hours after you consume a sweetened drink; levels of 140 to 199 after the drink indicate prediabetes. A third test, the A1C test, may be the most convenient because it doesn’t require fasting. It measures your average blood glucose levels over the past two to three months; results of 5.7 percent to 6.4 percent, which indicate the percentage of red blood cells that have glucose attached to them, indicate prediabetes. Though doctors often repeat a test to confirm a diabetes diagnosis, they do not always do so for a prediabetes diagnosis, Dr. Continue reading >>

Weight Loss

Weight Loss

Great, you have made a decision that will help you stay healthy and may actually reduce your need for diabetes medications. The goal is to lose body fat, not water and definitely not muscle. The slower you lose weight, the greater percentage of body fat loss. The faster you lose, the more muscle you lose and this in turn makes diabetes control harder. A slow steady weight loss of about 1 lb per week/ is best. Now, how are you going to do it? Many people who are overweight don’t acknowledge that they eat more than they should. In order to put on the excess weight, you must have been taking in more fuel (calories) than you used. Excess fuel in the body is stored as fat. By deciding that you need to lose weight, you acknowledge that your previous eating and exercising habits need to change. In order to lose 1 lb in weight, you need to think of the 1 lb as 3,500 calories of stored energy so to use it, you must exercise it off or eat 3.500 calories less. The best way is to burn it off by exercising while eating less so that it is not replenished. Exercise more – Using a pedometer, track the steps you currently take and add 200 per week until you reach 10,000 steps a day (about 5 miles) – the recommended daily activity level for adults. Make activity part of your daily schedule by: Getting off the bus one stop earlier and walking Parking the car at the furthest part of the car park Take the stairs instead of the lift or rollator. Ditch the remote control Do stretching exercises during every commercial break when watching TV Limit the amount of time you watch TV Select your favorite soap opera and decide to do gentle exercise during the full programme Physical activities that burn 100 calories Try to reduce your intake of food by 250-500 calories Eating less – try to r Continue reading >>

How To Reverse A Diabetes Diagnosis By Losing Weight

How To Reverse A Diabetes Diagnosis By Losing Weight

Here's something shocking to think about: 40 percent of Americans are obese — and that number is the highest it's ever been. And here's another jaw-dropping statistic: 29 million Americans have type 2 diabetes. If you fall into either of these categories, the good news is there are simple steps you can take to make lasting changes. For example, you only need to lose 5 percent of your body weight to seriously start reducing your risk for type 2 diabetes. And you only need to lose 1 gram of fat from your pancreas (where your insulin lives) to reverse the symptoms of diabetes, according to one small study. The connection between a small amount of weight loss with a large health benefit is not new. A 2012 study found reducing body mass index (BMI) by just five units could help reverse diabetes, regardless of your initial BMI. Diabetes can be a confusing topic — here are a few things you should know. There are two very different types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes involves the absence of insulin, a critical hormone needed to help control blood sugar levels. It has often been referred to as juvenile diabetes or insulin dependent diabetes. Type 1 diabetes represents a very small percentage of total diabetes cases and has nothing to do with being overweight or obese. The other form is called type 2 diabetes (often referred to as adult onset or noninsulin dependent). Type 2 diabetes makes up 95 percent of all diabetes cases and it’s highly correlated to weight. Individuals with type 2 diabetes produce insulin, but the hormone is not sensitive enough to the rise and fall of blood sugar levels. This form of the disease may start as insulin resistance or prediabetes. Both types of diabetes are serious and can lead to several adverse health outcomes, like nerve damage, impaired Continue reading >>

> Weight And Diabetes

> Weight And Diabetes

A balanced diet and an active lifestyle can help all kids maintain a healthy weight. For kids with diabetes, diet and exercise are even more important because weight can affect diabetes and diabetes can affect weight. This is true for kids and teens with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, the body doesn't use glucose properly. Glucose, a sugar, is the main source of energy for the body. Glucose levels are controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is made in the pancreas. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough insulin. Undiagnosed or untreated type 1 diabetes can cause weight loss. Glucose builds up in the bloodstream if insulin isn't available to move it to the muscles. When glucose levels become high, the kidneys work to get rid of it through urine. This causes weight loss due to dehydration and loss of calories from the sugar that wasn't used as energy. Kids who develop type 1 diabetes often lose weight even though they have a normal or increased appetite. Once kids are diagnosed and treated for type 1 diabetes, weight usually returns to normal. Developing type 1 diabetes isn't related to being overweight, but keeping a healthy weight is important. Too much fat tissue can make it hard for insulin to work properly, leading to both higher insulin needs and trouble controlling blood sugar. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still makes insulin, but the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should and blood sugar levels get too high. Most kids and teens are overweight when they're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese increases the risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Also, weight gain in people with type 2 diabetes makes blood sugar levels even harder to control. People with type 2 diabetes have a condition called ins Continue reading >>

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