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How To Start Metformin

A Comprehensive Guide To Metformin

A Comprehensive Guide To Metformin

Metformin is the top of the line medication option for Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. If you must start taking medication for your newly diagnosed condition, it is then likely that your healthcare provider will prescribe this medication. Taking care of beta cells is an important thing. If you help to shield them from demise, they will keep your blood sugar down. This medication is important for your beta cell safety if you have Type 2 Diabetes. Not only does Metformin lower blood sugar and decrease resistance of insulin at the cellular level, it improves cell functioning, lipids, and how fat is distributed in our bodies. Increasing evidence in research points to Metformin’s effects on decreasing the replication of cancer cells, and providing a protective action for the neurological system. Let’s find out why Lori didn’t want to take Metformin. After learning about the benefits of going on Metformin, she changed her mind. Lori’s Story Lori came in worrying. Her doctor had placed her on Metformin, but she didn’t want to get the prescription filled. “I don’t want to go on diabetes medicine,” said Lori. “If I go on pills, next it will be shots. I don’t want to end up like my dad who took four shots a day.” “The doctor wants you on Metformin now to protect cells in your pancreas, so they can make more insulin. With diet and exercise, at your age, you can reverse the diagnosis. Would you like to talk about how we can work together to accomplish that?” “Reverse?” she asked. “What do you mean reverse? Will I not have Type 2 Diabetes anymore?” “You will always have it, but if you want to put it in remission, you are certainly young enough to do so. Your doctor wants to protect your beta cells in the pancreas. If you take the new medication, Continue reading >>

Guideline: Diabetes Treatment Should Start With Metformin

Guideline: Diabetes Treatment Should Start With Metformin

Metformin should be the first drug of choice in oral therapy for type 2 diabetics who don't respond to diet and lifestyle changes, according to a new guideline. A second agent can be added if metformin monotherapy fails to control hyperglycemia, but there's insufficient evidence to recommend one secondary agent over another, Amir Qaseem, MD, PhD, director of clinical policy at the American College of Physicians, and colleagues wrote in the organization's new guideline for the management of type 2 diabetes, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. "We found that most diabetes medications reduced blood sugar levels to a similar degree," Qaseem said in a statement. "However, metformin is more effective compared to other type 2 diabetes drugs in reducing blood sugar levels when used alone and in combination with other drugs." There are currently 11 classes of drugs approved for treating hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes, the researchers wrote, and most patients receive more than one class of diabetes medication. To determine the optimal treatment strategy with these agents, Qaseem and colleagues conducted a comparative safety and effectiveness analysis of studies published between 1966 and April 2010. All three recommendations in the guideline are strong and based on high-quality evidence, they said. First among the guidelines: Put patients on oral therapy when diet, exercise, and weight loss have failed to control hyperglycemia. There are no data as to the best time start oral therapy; instead, clinicians should take into account other complicating factors including life expectancy, microvascular and macrovascular complications, risk for adverse events related to glucose control, and patient preference, they wrote. The patient's HbA1c target should also be based on an Continue reading >>

10 Things You Should Know

10 Things You Should Know

View as slideshow Metformin is a Workhorse for Type 2 Diabetes Metformin, also known by the brand names Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and others, has been available for the oral treatment of type 2 diabetes since 1995. Metformin helps to control blood sugar (glucose) levels and is sometimes used in combination with insulin or other medications. Metformin is a true workhorse for diabetics: a study in JAMA Internal Medicine showed that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes who were initially started on metformin were less likely to need other diabetic drug treatments to control their blood sugar. In fact, metformin is recommended in guidelines as the first-line drug treatment for new patients. Metformin is Truly Lifesaving We know that starting type 2 diabetes treatment with metformin helps to prevent the need for additional diabetes medications in the long-term. But what else does it do? A study from the Annals of Internal Medicine demonstrated that starting diabetes treatment with metformin is also linked with a lower long-term risk of heart attack, stroke, and death than starting with a sulfonylurea, like glyburide or glipizide. However, researchers can't say whether the difference is due to extra risk from sulfonylurea drugs, added benefits from metformin, or both. Diabetes is Expensive but Metformin is Affordable A generic form of both regular-release and extended-release metformin is available at your pharmacy. However, prices will vary from city to city, and even pharmacy to pharmacy. There are several different strengths of metformin, too. It may be that instead of taking the 1,000 mg (1 gram) tablet of metformin per dose you could take two 500 mg tablets and save money. Always ask for the least costly version of generic metformin, as some generics ma Continue reading >>

Starting Metformin - What To Expect?

Starting Metformin - What To Expect?

If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. I thought I'd post this thread on the new message board as I'd really like some help! I'm due to start taking Metformin sometime this week (as soon as my doctor receives the letter from my endo asking her to prescribe it!) I was just wondering what I could expect. I've read the stories about more frequent trips to the toilet (!), but I was wondering how soon I could expect to feel better with the metformin. Will I stop craving carbs? I'm hoping it will help me to lose weight or at least take the edge of the cravings away to make it easier for me to change my eating habits. Anyhelp from my cysters on metformin would be gratefully received! I have been on metformin for 4 months now. At first I had diarreaha all the time. Now I only have it if I eat and drink dairy products. I don't crave carbs as bad now and I lost 6lbs in 3 months without exercising. Now i'm excersicing. So hopefully it will come off faster now. If you have anymore questions feel free to e-mail me directly at [emailprotected] I've been on Metformin 1000 mg for 3.5 weeks now and have only had the poops 5 times. I still don't know what all they hype is about diahreah, I'm CONSTIPATED! I can say that the 1st day I took Met, I noticed a difference in the way I felt. I felt better, happier and more energetic. The only thing is that my tummy feels funny like diahreah cramping, but then just gas comes out. I have lost 13 lbs in less than 3 weeks on Metformin. I have also been low carbing. If I eat too many carbs or sugar, that is when the diahreah kic Continue reading >>

Metformin For Diabetes

Metformin For Diabetes

Take metformin just after a meal or with a snack. The most common side-effects are feeling sick, diarrhoea and tummy (abdominal) pain. These symptoms usually pass after the first few days of treatment. Keep your regular appointments with your doctor and clinics. This is so your progress can be checked. About metformin Type of medicine A biguanide antidiabetic medicine Used for Type 2 diabetes mellitus Also called Bolamyn®; Diagemet®; Glucient®; Glucophage®; Metabet®; Sukkarto® Available as Tablets and modified-release tablets; oral liquid medicine; sachets of powder Insulin is a hormone which is made naturally in your body, in the pancreas. It helps to control the levels of sugar (glucose) in your blood. If your body does not make enough insulin, or if it does not use the insulin it makes effectively, this results in the condition called sugar diabetes (diabetes mellitus). People with diabetes need treatment to control the amount of sugar in their blood. This is because good control of blood sugar levels reduces the risk of complications later on. Some people can control the sugar in their blood by making changes to the food they eat but, for other people, medicines like metformin are given alongside the changes in diet. Metformin allows the body to make better use of the lower amount of insulin which occurs in the kind of diabetes known as type 2 diabetes. Metformin can be given on its own, or alongside insulin or another antidiabetic medicine. There are a number of tablets available which contain metformin in combination with one of these other antidiabetic medicines (brands include Jentadueto®, Competact®, Komboglyze®, Janumet®, and Eucreas®). Taking a combination tablet like these can help to reduce the total number of tablets that need to be taken each d Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Metformin is a drug prescribed to manage blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. You may have heard that metformin can also help you lose weight. But is it true? The answer is a resounding maybe. Here’s what you should know about what metformin can do for weight loss, as well as why your doctor may prescribe it for you. According to research, metformin can help some people lose weight. However, it’s not clear why metformin may cause weight loss. One theory is that it may prompt you to eat less by reducing your appetite. It may also change the way your body uses and stores fat. Although studies have shown that metformin may help with weight loss, the drug is not a quick-fix solution. According to one long-term study, the weight loss from metformin tends to occur gradually over one to two years. The amount of weight lost also varies from person to person. In the study, the average amount of weight lost after two or more years was four to seven pounds. Taking the drug without following other healthy habits may not lead to weight loss. Individuals who follow a healthy diet and exercise while taking metformin tend to lose the most weight. This may be because metformin is thought to boost how many calories you burn during exercise. If you don’t exercise, you likely won’t have this benefit. In addition, any weight loss you have may only last as long as you take the medication. That means if you stop taking metformin, there’s a good chance you will return to your original weight. And even while you’re still taking the drug, you may slowly gain back any weight you’ve lost. In other words, metformin may not be the magic diet pill some people have been waiting for. It has been shown to reduce weight in some, but not others. One of the benefits of metformin Continue reading >>

Just Starting Metformi N...what Should I Expect?

Just Starting Metformi N...what Should I Expect?

Just Starting Metformi n...What should I expect? pcos is a hard thing to deal with and it takes many tries to get your meds right with that said i was on metformin for about a year it did nothing for me except cause stomach issues but that passed after a couble of weeks also used clomid when i was ttc it did not work either come to find out i also had endometroisis really bad so had to have hysterectomy so now i have been trying to find natural supplements to help with my pcos because i still have my ovaries, i think i finally found the right thing it is really helping and especially with the unwanted hair it is called inositol I've been on it for a month now (500 mg/day) but haven't really seen any changes or results perhaps because it's a low dosage. I went to my endo yesterday (after seeing one who didn't listen to my concerns and automatically put me on metformin) and he thinks I have PCOS due to my high testosterone, glucose, acne, weight gain, etc. I've been cutting my carbs, walking two to three miles four times a week and absolutely no change which is frustrating. He wants me to try 1000 mg/day which I'm starting today and will hopefully start to see some changes with that. I'm just sick and tired of feeling sick and tired all the time :( I've been on metformin for the past six years but I was never all that good about taking it - I had the problems with diarrhea and gas that a lot of you others have talked about. Lately I've tried to be better about taking it and I've noticed that the problem symptoms go away (mostly) if I'm consistent with it, but if I miss a day or so I am in trouble. One of the things that helped me the most was when my Mom was doing her Master's program she did an eighty-page paper on PCOS and had me edit it for me... a lot of the stuff sh Continue reading >>

Therapeutic Use Of Metformin In Prediabetes And Diabetes Prevention

Therapeutic Use Of Metformin In Prediabetes And Diabetes Prevention

Go to: Pathophysiology and Diagnosis of Prediabetes The defects in glucose metabolism that underlie type 2 diabetes begin many years before the diagnosis of diabetes is made [6, 7]. The development of insulin resistance, in which the action of insulin on glucose metabolism is blunted, occurs early in the pathogenesis of dysglycaemia. Increased secretion of insulin initially compensates for the presence of insulin resistance; however, a simultaneous and progressive loss of β-cell mass and β-cell function limits the ability of the pancreas to maintain euglycaemia by increasing insulin secretion [8]. The early manifestations of prediabetic dysglycaemia represent one or both of [9]: impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), in which postprandial glucose control is impaired but fasting plasma glucose (FPG) is normal; impaired fasting glucose (IFG), in which a chronic elevation of FPG occurs in the absence of a deterioration in postprandial glucose control. Table 1 shows the usually accepted diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of prediabetes based on measurements of glycaemia [4, 8–10]. A simple blood test is sufficient to diagnose IFG, while a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is required for the diagnosis of IGT. The originally used cutoff level for IFG (110 mg/dL [6.1 mmol/L]) was reduced to that shown in Table 1 (100 mg/dL [5.6 mmol/L]) by an Expert Committee of the American Diabetes Association in 2003, in order to equalise the prognostic impact of diagnosis of IFG or IGT, in terms of the future risk of diabetes in a subject with either condition [11]. It should be noted that the World Health Organization (WHO) diagnostic criteria for IFG retains the 110 mg/dL (6.1 mmol/L) cutoff value for diagnosing IFG [12]. Diagnostic criteria from the American Diabetes Associatio Continue reading >>

Metformin For Prediabetes

Metformin For Prediabetes

Prediabetes is, for many people, a confusing condition. It’s not quite Type 2 diabetes — but it’s not quite nothing, either. So how concerned should you be about it? For years, the jargon-filled names given to this condition — impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) — may have made the task of taking it seriously more difficult. But in 2002, the American Diabetes Association (ADA), along with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, inaugurated the term “prediabetes” to convey the likely result of not making diet or lifestyle changes in response to this diagnosis. In 2003, the threshold for prediabetes was lowered from a fasting glucose level of 110 mg/dl to one of 100 mg/dl. Then, in 2008, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) began recommending the drug metformin for some cases of prediabetes — specifically, for people under age 60 with a very high risk of developing diabetes, for people who are very obese (with a body-mass index, or BMI, of 35 or higher), and for women with a history of gestational diabetes. The ADA also said that health-care professionals could consider metformin for anyone with prediabetes or an HbA1c level (a measure of long-term blood glucose control) between 5.7% and 6.4%. But according to a recent study, metformin is still rarely prescribed for prediabetes. The study, published in April in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, found that only 3.7% of people with prediabetes were prescribed metformin over a three-year period, based on data from a large national sample of adults ages 19 to 58. According to a Medscape article on the study, 7.8% of people with prediabetes with a BMI of 35 or higher or a history of gestational diabetes were prescribed metformin — still a very low rate for t Continue reading >>

Stopping Metformin: When Is It Ok?

Stopping Metformin: When Is It Ok?

The most common medication worldwide for treating diabetes is metformin (Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage, Fortamet). It can help control high blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. It’s available in tablet form or a clear liquid you take by mouth before meals. Metformin doesn’t treat the underlying cause of diabetes. It treats the symptoms of diabetes by lowering blood sugar. It also increases the use of glucose in peripheral muscles and the liver. Metformin also helps with other things in addition to improving blood sugar. These include: lowering lipids, resulting in a decrease in blood triglyceride levels decreasing “bad” cholesterol, or low-density lipoprotein (LDL) increasing “good” cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein (HDL) If you’re taking metformin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, it may be possible to stop. Instead, you may be able to manage your condition by making certain lifestyle changes, like losing weight and getting more exercise. Read on to learn more about metformin and whether or not it’s possible to stop taking it. However, before you stop taking metformin consult your doctor to ensure this is the right step to take in managing your diabetes. Before you start taking metformin, your doctor will want to discuss your medical history. You won’t be able to take this medication if you have a history of any of the following: alcohol abuse liver disease kidney issues certain heart problems If you are currently taking metformin, you may have encountered some side effects. If you’ve just started treatment with this drug, it’s important to know some of the side effects you may encounter. Most common side effects The most common side effects are digestive issues and may include: diarrhea vomiting nausea heartburn abdominal cramps Continue reading >>

About Metformin

About Metformin

Metformin is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes and sometimes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that it makes doesn't work properly. This can cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). PCOS is a condition that affects how the ovaries work. Metformin lowers your blood sugar levels by improving the way your body handles insulin. It's usually prescribed for diabetes when diet and exercise alone have not been enough to control your blood sugar levels. For women with PCOS, metformin stimulates ovulation even if they don't have diabetes. It does this by lowering insulin and blood sugar levels. Metformin is available on prescription as tablets and as a liquid that you drink. Key facts Metformin works by reducing the amount of sugar your liver releases into your blood. It also makes your body respond better to insulin. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. It's best to take metformin with a meal to reduce the side effects. The most common side effects are feeling sick, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach ache and going off your food. Metformin does not cause weight gain (unlike some other diabetes medicines). Metformin may also be called by the brand names Bolamyn, Diagemet, Glucient, Glucophage, and Metabet. Who can and can't take metformin Metformin can be taken by adults. It can also be taken by children from 10 years of age on the advice of a doctor. Metformin isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to metformin or other medicines in the past have uncontrolled diabetes have liver or kidney problems have a severe infection are being treated for heart failure or you have recentl Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex This medicine usually comes with a patient information insert. Read the information carefully and make sure you understand it before taking this medicine. If you have any questions, ask your doctor. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is a very important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not crush, break, or chew it. While taking the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stool after your body has absorbed the medicine. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Use only the brand of this medicine that your doctor prescribed. Different brands may not work the same way. You may notice improvement in your blood glucose control in 1 to 2 weeks, but the full effect of blood glucose control may take up to 2 to 3 months. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about this. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the Continue reading >>

Safe Prescribing Of Metformin In Diabetes

Safe Prescribing Of Metformin In Diabetes

Metformin is the first-line pharmacological therapy for type 2 diabetes. It is the only glucose-lowering oral drug that has been shown to reduce mortality in patients with diabetes. The most common adverse effect is gastrointestinal upset. Starting at a low dose and increasing it slowly reduces this risk. Taking metformin with food also helps. Numerous contraindications to the use of metformin are listed in the product information, including reduced renal function. Strict adherence to these recommendations may deny a valuable drug to many patients. Introduction Metformin lowers both fasting and postprandial blood glucose. It reduces hepatic glucose output 1 and increases peripheral glucose uptake, and may delay intestinal glucose absorption. Its use is not associated with weight gain and hypoglycaemia is extremely rare when metformin is used on its own. It lowers triglyceride concentrations and has small but beneficial effects on total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In the UK Prospective Diabetes Study metformin reduced diabetes-related and all-cause mortality, and reduced the risk of myocardial infarction in obese patients with type 2 diabetes when used as first-line therapy. It also reduced the risk of microvascular complications, but was no more effective than insulin or sulfonylureas. 2 A retrospective cohort study from the USA found a lower rate of hospitalisations for myocardial infarction and stroke and a reduced death rate when metformin was used first-line in type 2 diabetes in comparison with a sulfonylurea. 3 Metformin is effective when used with other glucose-lowering drugs. A standard-release (3000 mg/day maximum dose) and an extended-release preparation of metformin (2000 mg/day maximum dose) are available. The extended-release preparation can b Continue reading >>

Starting Metformin-what Can I Expect

Starting Metformin-what Can I Expect

D.D. Family Type 2 due to necrotizing pancreatitis 2005 I know this question has been asked and answered before, but unlike so many of you, this information just does not stay in my head. There is so much info to absorb that my head spins with it all. I'm being switched from Actos to Metformin because I am gaining weight on the Actos. What can I expect with a once a day dosage of Metformin in terms of side effects, but more importantly, how careful do I have to be with my carb intake? I exercise regularly and I try to keep my carbs at a minimum but every now and then I love to have some rice (sometimes brown, but mostly I love Rice Pilaf) and sometimes I like to have a regular soda. How bad is that going to affect my numbers if I do that and will I still have to struggle with my weight like I am on the Actos? Any help would be greatly appreciated, and don't feel badly if you want to talk to me like I'm 5, in fact, I encourage it. Friend T1.5 since Oct 2005 (3 x Novorapid/1 x Lantus) As with most medications there are a ton of side effects which you can find in the printed guide with your Metformin. The most common are stomach aches and softening of stools and it can also affect your breath. This is down to the individual though and by no means common to everyone. Meds: 3 x Novorapid, 1 x Lantus (Glargine) I don't know much about the med. But I wish you great success with it. Kris [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3][COLOR=Magenta]Kris[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT][FONT=Lucida Sans Unicode] I currently take 2000mg of Glucophage XR (Metformin) - been on it for 3+ years. When I first started, the dose was 1000mg and I remember mostly alot of bloating and gas. Eventually your system will get used to it, but I still don't take it on an empty tank ;-) It seems to do its job I guess...altho Continue reading >>

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

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