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How To Reduce Fasting Blood Sugar

Fasting Blood Sugar Levels

Fasting Blood Sugar Levels

Tweet Fasting, as the name suggests, means refraining from eating of drinking any liquids other than water for eight hours. It is used as a test for diabetes. After fasting, a carbohydrate metabolism test is conducted which measures blood glucose levels. Glucagon during fasting When fasting the hormone glucagon is stimulated and this increases plasma glucose levels in the body. If a patient doesn’t have diabetes, their body will produce insulin to rebalance the increased glucose levels. However people with diabetes either don’t produce enough insulin to rebalance their blood sugar (typically in type 1 diabetes) or their body is not able to use the insulin effectively enough (typical of type 2 diabetes). Consequently when blood glucose levels are tested, people with diabetes will have blood sugar levels significantly higher than people who do not have diabetes. What is the fasting blood sugar test used for? The fasting blood sugar test is also used to test the effectiveness of different medication or dietary changes on people already diagnosed as diabetic. Fasting tests The fasting test should be conducted on two separate occasions to ensure consistent results and in order to avoid a false diagnosis. This is the case as increased blood glucose levels may be as a result of Cushing’s syndrome liver or kidney disease, eclampsia and pancreatitis. However many of these conditions are often picked up in lab diagnostic tests. Fasting test results The results of a fasting test with respect to glucose levels in the body are as follows: Normal: 3.9 to 5.5 mmols/l (70 to 100 mg/dl) Prediabetes or Impaired Glucose Tolerance: 5.6 to 7.0 mmol/l (101 to 126 mg/dl) Diagnosis of diabetes: more than 7.0 mmol/l (126 mg/dl) The American Diabetes Association reduced the level of diagno Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Ginger On Fasting Blood Sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, Apolipoprotein B, Apolipoprotein A-i And Malondialdehyde In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

The Effects Of Ginger On Fasting Blood Sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, Apolipoprotein B, Apolipoprotein A-i And Malondialdehyde In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

Go to: Introduction Diabetes mellitus can be defined as a group of metabolic diseases characterized by chronic hyperglycemia resulting from impaired insulin action/secretion and is classified into two major categories, type 1 and type 2. Type 2 diabetes accounts for >90% of diabetes and is resulting in impaired function in carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism. Effective control of hyperglycemia in diabetic patients is critical for reducing the risk of micro- and macro-vascular diseases (1). The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions and has affected 6.4% of adults worldwide in 2010 (2). The global prevalence for all age groups was estimated to be 4.4% in 2030 (3). The number of patients suffering from diabetes, among the 25-64 years old Iranians is 7.7%, equal to 2 million patients, which half of them are not aware of their disease. As well as, 6.8%, equal to 4.4 million of Iranian adults have impaired fasting glucose (4). Dyslipidemia (lipid abnormalities) resulting from uncontrolled hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in diabetic patients is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease (5). Recently, attention has been focused on the relationship between production of free radicals, especially reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the pathogenesis as well as progression of diabetes mellitus. Mechanisms that contribute to the formation of free radicals in diabetes mellitus may include metabolic stress resulting from changes in energy metabolism, inflammatory mediators and impaired antioxidant defense mechanisms (5). Hyperglycemia increases oxidative stress through the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which results in an imbalance between free radicals and the antioxidant defense system o Continue reading >>

10 Blood Sugar–lowering Foods

10 Blood Sugar–lowering Foods

Adapted from The Carb Sensitivity Program It is no exaggeration—balancing your blood sugar could be a matter of life or death. Chronic high blood sugar levels are toxic to your body, destroying organs and blood vessels and paving the way to a heart attack, type 2 diabetes, stroke, dialysis, nerve damage, erectile dysfunction, or even blindness. The good news? Out-of-control sugar levels can be reigned in and regulated with the right foods. Here are most potent blood sugar-lowering foods so you know how to lower blood sugar levels naturally. Blood Sugar Benefit: A groundbreaking study published in the Journal of Nutrition in 2010 found a daily dose of the bioactive ingredients from blueberries increases sensitivity to insulin and may reduce the risk of developing diabetes in at-risk individuals. That's important because too many carbs produces too much insulin, which could lead to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Adding blueberries to daily smoothies for six weeks also improves insulin sensitivity, so feel free to eat healthy doses of the superfood fruit, too. Added Perk: Low in naturally occurring sugars, blueberries are also packed with antioxidants that fight damage from free radicals, accelerated aging, and diseases like cancer and Alzheimer's. Blood Sugar Benefit: Don't let the fat content of avocados fool you—they're still good for you! Avocados are full of monounsaturated fat, the kind that helps slow the release of sugars into the bloodstream, prompting less insulin release, and can even help to lower your cholesterol. Added Perk: Avocados contain beta-sitosterol, a compound that could help quell inflammation after an intense workout. Just limit yourself to one-quarter of an avocado at a time to avoid calorie overload. Or, try avocado oil drizzled on a Continue reading >>

Vinegar Ingestion At Bedtime Moderates Waking Glucose Concentrations In Adults With Well-controlled Type 2 Diabetes

Vinegar Ingestion At Bedtime Moderates Waking Glucose Concentrations In Adults With Well-controlled Type 2 Diabetes

Given the importance of maintaining acceptable blood glucose concentrations, there is much interest in identifying foods and diet patterns that will help individuals with diabetes manage their condition. Based on previous data indicating that vinegar ingestion at mealtime reduces postprandial glycemia (1–4), the aim of this pilot study was to examine whether vinegar ingestion at bedtime reduces the next-morning fasting glucose concentration in individuals with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS— Four men and seven women (aged 40–72 years) diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (by a physician) who were not taking insulin completed the study. Participants provided a clinically determined A1C reading from a recent (<2 months) blood analysis. All participants gave written informed consent, and the study was approved by the institutional review board at Arizona State University. Participants maintained 24-h diet records for 3 days and measured fasting glucose at 0700 h for 3 consecutive days with a calibrated glucometer before the start of the study. Participants were instructed to continue usual prescription medication use during the study. Utilizing a randomized crossover design with a 3- to 5-day washout period between treatments, participants followed a standardized meal plan for 2 days, consuming either 2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar or water at bedtime with 1 oz cheese (8 g protein, 1 g carbohydrate, and 1.5 g fat). The standardized meal plan was designed to reflect the individual's typical diet. Participants were instructed to record all foods and beverages ingested during each 2-day treatment period. Fasting glucose was recorded with a calibrated glucometer by each participant during the trial: at baseline (day 0) and day 2 at 0700 h. These results were download Continue reading >>

How To Reduce Fasting Blood Sugar

How To Reduce Fasting Blood Sugar

The HbA1c (3-month marker of blood sugar levels) also began to decrease by 8% after 12 weeks, although it did not reach statistical significance. But its her choice and your choice what goals to shoot for. Soon enough the same was seen in Type 2 When your blood sugar spikes it's important to bring it down quickly. Here are some things you could try to reduce this occurrence:. Another study found that almond consumption could increase insulin sensitivity in people with Nov 27, 2013 About your high fasting levels, you could try adjusting the timing of your meds. Absolutely! Check out our 10 tips to lower your blood sugar naturally. com/health_blog/diabetes-3/ways-to-lower-your-blood-sugar-and-reduce-your-risk-of-diabetesIn addition, a 2013 study in the British Journal of Nutrition found that those who increased their consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages during a six-year period were 1. Control Stress Levels. Monitor Your Blood Sugar Levels. Recognizing signs of high blood sugar levels and knowing how to lower them can help you prevent these complications and increase the quality and length of your life. How we eat and “when” we eat it is just as significant. May 7, 2017 If you're a diabetic, you may find that your blood sugar levels are at their peak in the morning. Here are 3 easy tips on how to lower blood sugar fast. Starting your day this way isn't just alarming: If it becomes a pattern, high cinnamon-powder-on-fasting-glucose. Intermittent fasting is a simple strategy: Eat during a 12-hour window, and May 7, 2017 If you're a diabetic, you may find that your blood sugar levels are at their peak in the morning. 3. Increase Your Fiber Intake. 2 Jul 24, 2017 A high blood sugar reading first thing in the morning can throw off your whole day — and signal a chroni Continue reading >>

17 Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar Without Medications

17 Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar Without Medications

Type 2 diabetes has become a global epidemic. But did you know that it’s not just preventable but also reversible? If you have Diabetes Type 2, we have for you a bunch of helpful tips on how to bring down blood sugar. While some of us are genetically at a risk of diabetes Type 2, it is largely a lifestyle disorder today. By changing your lifestyle, you can learn how to lower blood sugar levels naturally — without the need for medication. Most diabetes medications are nothing more than a temporary-fix. They don’t address the underlying reason behind high blood sugar, which is driven by the environment. Diet and lifestyle changes can reverse diabetes, unlike medications which only treat the symptoms. The key: Make a positive change to the way you eat, sleep, stay active, and manage stress. So, let’s learn how to bring down blood sugar through 15 easy, natural ways. How To Lower Blood Sugar Naturally: 17 Actionable Tips 1. Cut Back On Carbohydrates A diet high in processed carbs adds to the sugar load in your diet. This is because all carbs get broken down into sugars upon digestion. This leads to increased blood sugar and weight gain. Avoid all carbs with a high glycemic index. We recommend a Low Carb-High Fat or LCHF diet to reverse diabetes. Ideally, only 10% of your daily caloric intake should come from carbs. The right carbs for any diabetic are fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. Brown rice, quinoa, buckwheat, amaranth and millets are some whole grains that work. 2. You Need More Of The Good Fats Afraid how will you survive when cutting back on the belly-filling carbs? This is where the good fats step in. Healthy fats that provide Omega 3 fatty acids are your friends. Not only will they keep you full for longer, they will also improve your heart health Continue reading >>

Controlling Blood Sugar In Diabetes: How Low Should You Go?

Controlling Blood Sugar In Diabetes: How Low Should You Go?

Diabetes is an ancient disease, but the first effective drug therapy was not available until 1922, when insulin revolutionized the management of the disorder. Insulin is administered by injection, but treatment took another great leap forward in 1956, when the first oral diabetic drug was introduced. Since then, dozens of new medications have been developed, but scientists are still learning how best to use them. And new studies are prompting doctors to re-examine a fundamental therapeutic question: what level of blood sugar is best? Normal metabolism To understand diabetes, you should first understand how your body handles glucose, the sugar that fuels your metabolism. After you eat, your digestive tract breaks down carbohydrates into simple sugars that are small enough to be absorbed into your bloodstream. Glucose is far and away the most important of these sugars, and it's an indispensable source of energy for your body's cells. But to provide that energy, it must travel from your blood into your cells. Insulin is the hormone that unlocks the door to your cells. When your blood glucose levels rise after a meal, the beta cells of your pancreas spring into action, pouring insulin into your blood. If you produce enough insulin and your cells respond normally, your blood sugar level drops as glucose enters the cells, where it is burned for energy or stored for future use in your liver as glycogen. Insulin also helps your body turn amino acids into proteins and fatty acids into body fat. The net effect is to allow your body to turn food into energy and to store excess energy to keep your engine running if fuel becomes scarce in the future. A diabetes primer Diabetes is a single name for a group of disorders. All forms of the disease develop when the pancreas is unable to Continue reading >>

13 Foods That Won’t Raise Blood Glucose

13 Foods That Won’t Raise Blood Glucose

Part 1 of 15 A healthy diet is essential to reversing prediabetes. There are no foods, herbs, drinks, or supplements that lower blood sugar. Only medication and exercise can. But there are things you can eat and drink that have a low Glycemic Index (GI). This means these foods won’t raise your blood sugar and may help you avoid a blood sugar spike. In addition to diet changes, staying or becoming active is also important. Learn which foods you can add to your diet plan. You may be able to prevent prediabetes or type 2 diabetes by adding more of these foods, spices, and drinks into your diet. Eat them as healthy alternatives to sugar, high GI carbohydrates, or other treats. Want more info like this? Sign up for our diabetes newsletter and get resources delivered right to your inbox » Part 2 of 15 Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) are important components of a healthy blood sugar eating plan. They can improve insulin sensitivity. They can also help increase feelings of satiety, and have a healthy impact on blood pressure and inflammation. MUFAs are a key nutrient in avocados. Studies have shown avocados can lower the risk of metabolic syndrome. This is a group of risk factors that can increase the risk of diabetes. It can also raise the risk of blood vessel disease like heart disease and stroke. Avocados also have a low GI. For a unique, diabetes-friendly dessert, try making Oh She Glow’s natural, no sugar added, raw avocado chocolate pudding. Part 3 of 15 Protein helps the body maintain and repair itself. Since protein doesn't impact blood sugar levels, it doesn't have a GI ranking and won’t raise blood sugar levels. Protein also increases satiety, so relying on protein to feel full instead of bread, rice, or pasta may be Continue reading >>

How To Control Fasting Blood Sugars

How To Control Fasting Blood Sugars

Your body produces a hormone called insulin that helps control your blood glucose levels so that they remain stable. A normal fasting blood sugar falls between 70 and 100 milligrams per deciliter. If your fasting glucose level is between 100 and 125 milligrams per deciliter, you have impaired fasting glucose, a type of prediabetes. This multiplies your chances of getting diabetes, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. Talk to your healthcare provider to learn about changes you can make if your fasting blood sugar levels are above the healthy range. Give Your Diet a Makeover Center your diet on high-fiber, low-fat foods, such as whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Simultaneously, cut down on refined carbohydrates, sweets and animal products. According to the Harvard School of Public Health, evidence shows that diets rich in whole grains protect you from diabetes, while diets rich in refined carbohydrates increase your risk of diabetes. To keep your blood sugar in balance, MayoClinic.com advises eating the same quantity of food with the same proportion of proteins, fats and carbohydrates at the same time each day. Focus on low-glycemic foods to achieve a more stable blood sugar. The glycemic index measures how quickly a food is likely to boost your blood sugar. Good fats, such as nuts, seeds and liquid vegetable oils, can also reverse the development of diabetes. Avoid processed meat and sugary drinks, and choose poultry, fish, water, tea or coffee instead. Get Your Body Moving Inactivity negatively affects your blood sugar levels and promotes diabetes. In contrast, making your muscles work harder improves their ability to utilize insulin and absorb blood sugar. This enables your insulin-making cells to function with less stress. Choose activities such Continue reading >>

How To Lower Morning Blood Sugar

How To Lower Morning Blood Sugar

Determine your target fasting blood glucose range. Normally, a range of 90 to 130 milligrams per deciliter is chosen, but you may be instructed by your doctor to aim as low as 70 milligrams per deciliter. Lowering your blood sugar reduces your risk for diabetic eye damage and kidney damage, according to the American Diabetes Association. Get a good night's sleep. Sleeping less than seven hours or more than nine hours a night increases the body's production of the stress hormone cortisol and is associated with elevated fasting blood glucose levels, according to the November 2007 issue of "Diabetologia." Sleep apnea, restless leg syndrome, menopausal hot flashes and the pain associated with nerve damage from diabetes may contribute to decreased sleep quality. Making a habit of going to bed eight hours before you must wake up is a crucial habit to develop. Check your dinner menus. Reduce the portion size of high glycemic carbohydrates such as refined sugar, white flour and white rice--which cause spikes in your blood sugar -- and increase your portions of foods with omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon and olive oil, and low-glycemic carbs such as brown rice, lentils and other whole grain foods. Take the dog for a walk. A vigorous stroll for 10 to 20 minutes late in the evening may be enough to reduce your fasting blood glucose. If you don't have a dog, ask a neighbors if they would like you to walk their pets or take your favorite person for a before-bed walk around the neighborhood. If you take insulin, be sure to calculate this exercise regimen when selecting your bedtime, long-acting dose. Nibble at night. A bedtime snack that contains a small amount of a low-glycemic carbohydrates, such as half an apple, together with a source of protein and fat, such as a tablespoon o Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your Fasting Blood Sugar

How To Lower Your Fasting Blood Sugar

Edit Article Three Methods:Avoiding Early Morning Glucose SpikesReducing Your Glucose Levels with Lifestyle ChangesReducing Your Glucose Levels with Dietary ChangesCommunity Q&A Your fasting blood sugar level, also known as your glucose level, indicates how well your body manages your glucose levels without food in your system. High levels of fasting glucose indicates that your body has a hard time keeping its glucose level stable on its own. It could also indicate that an adjustment needs to be made to the insulin or medication you already take if you have been diagnosed with diabetes. Besides insulin, there are also some other things you can do to help your body maintain its glucose, such as exercise and diet changes. This is especially true if your fasting sugar levels are just slightly above normal and you are not considered diabetic yet. 1 Avoid late night snacks. If you have diabetes and you are continually getting spikes in your nighttime fasting sugar levels, you may need to change your eating schedule. Eating foods late at night that contain a lot of sugar or that can be converted into sugar easily, such as simple carbohydrates, can cause your fasting sugar level to soar. There are some diabetics that snack before bed to prevent their blood sugar from getting too low, which is called hypoglycemia. However, regular bouts of hypoglycemia indicate that you should have your medication and insulin schedule adjusted by your doctor.[1] 3 Adjust your insulin schedule. If you take insulin regularly and you are experiencing morning spikes in your blood sugar, then you should talk to your doctor about this problem. They should work on adjusting your schedule or the amount or type of insulin you take to account for this spike. Do not adjust your insulin schedule without fi Continue reading >>

The Dawn Phenomenon – T2d 8

The Dawn Phenomenon – T2d 8

The occurrence of high blood sugars after a period of fasting is often puzzling to those not familiar with the Dawn Phenomenon. Why are blood sugars elevated if you haven’t eaten overnight? This effect is also seen during fasting, even during prolonged fasting. There are two main effects – the Somogyi Effect and the Dawn Phenomenon. Somogyi Effect The Somogyi effect is also called reactive hyperglycaemia and happens in type 2 diabetic patients. The blood sugar sometimes drops in reaction to the night time dose of medication. This low blood sugar is dangerous, and in response, the body tries to raise it. Since the patient is asleep, he/she does not feel the hypoglycaemic symptoms of shakiness or tremors or confusion. By the time the patient awakens, the sugar is elevated without a good explanation. The high blood sugar occurs in reaction to the preceding low. This can be diagnosed by checking the blood sugar at 2am or 3am. If it is very low, then this is diagnostic of the Somogy Effect. Dawn Phenomenon The Dawn Effect, sometimes also called the Dawn Phenomenon (DP) was first described about 30 years ago. It is estimated to occur in up to 75% of T2D patients although severity varies widely. It occurs both in those treated with insulin and those that are not. The circadian rhythm creates this DP. Just before awakening (around 4am), the body secretes higher levels of Growth Hormone, cortisol, glucagon and adrenalin. Together, these are called the counter-regulatory hormones. That is, they counter the blood sugar lowering effects of insulin, meaning that they raise blood sugars. The nocturnal surge of growth hormone is considered the primary cause of the DP. These normal circadian hormonal increases prepare our bodies for the day ahead. That is, glucagon tells the liver Continue reading >>

Managing Morning Blood Sugar Highs: How To Treat The Top 3 Causes

Managing Morning Blood Sugar Highs: How To Treat The Top 3 Causes

A high blood sugar reading first thing in the morning can throw off your whole day — and signal a chronic problem. Despite their best efforts to control their blood sugar levels, some people simply wake up with elevated blood sugar. Starting your day this way isn't just alarming: If it becomes a pattern, high morning readings can make it difficult to achieve your long-term diabetes management goals. Whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, a morning blood sugar high can be due to several causes. But with a little detective work and the help of your diabetes care team, you can isolate the cause and take steps to correct it. Here are three common scenarios: 1. The Dawn Phenomenon This occurs during the night while you're asleep and the body releases stress hormones. This phenomenon usually occurs between 3 a.m. and 8 a.m. and involves growth hormone, cortisol, and adrenaline, which trigger the production and release of glucose from your liver. The end result of this chemical cascade is an increase in blood sugar. “These hormones are designed to get us up and moving in the morning,” says endocrinologist Renee Amori, MD, assistant professor of medicine in the division of endocrinology at the Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia. While everybody experiences these natural changes in hormone levels, in people with diabetes the body may not adjust appropriately. This can lead to higher-than-normal blood sugar at the start of the day. Testing for these elevated first morning blood sugars is one way to diagnose people with type 2 diabetes. 2. The Somogyi Effect High morning readings can also be caused by the Somogyi effect, a rebound response that occurs when the body overcompensates for a low blood sugar reaction at night. If you take blood sugar–lowe Continue reading >>

Probiotics May Help Reduce Blood Sugar Levels

Probiotics May Help Reduce Blood Sugar Levels

MORE NEW ORLEANS — The microbes that live in your gut may play a surprising role in your blood sugar levels, a small new study from Canada finds. The study involved people who were following the DASH diet, which is recommended for people with high blood pressure. The people on this diet who also consumed probiotics, which are considered "good" bacteria, had a decrease in several measures of blood sugar levels over a three-month period, according to the findings. People with consistently high blood sugar levels may or may not go on to be diagnosed with diabetes; a diagnosis can depend on the results of several tests. Although more research is needed, the findings suggest that adding probiotics to the DASH diet could be used in the future to help protect against diabetes, said Arjun Pandey, a researcher at the Cambridge Cardiac Care Centre in Ontario and the author of the study. [8 Tips to Be a Probiotic Pro] Pandey presented his findings here on Sunday (Nov. 13) at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions annual meeting. The findings have not been published in a peer-reviewed journal. In the study, 80 people with high blood pressure were placed on either the DASH diet or the DASH diet plus probiotic-rich foods. About 15 percent of the participants had prediabetes, Pandey noted, which means their blood sugar levels were elevated but were not considered high enough to warrant a diagnosis of diabetes. The DASH diet, which stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, is one of the most effective non-drug-related methods for improving certain aspects of heart health, including lowering blood pressure, Pandey told Live Science. The people in the study who added the probiotics to their diet did so by replacing certain components of the DASH diet with probio Continue reading >>

Controlling The Dawn Phenomenon

Controlling The Dawn Phenomenon

Do you wake up with a blood glucose level that’s higher than when you went to bed? You might wonder how this could be. Is this “dawn phenomenon” serious, and what can you do about it? Our reader Mishelle commented here, “I don’t eat [much] during the day. [I take metformin morning and night.] My blood sugar is still too high in the morning…sometimes 125–140ish.” How can Mishelle’s glucose levels go up if she didn’t eat anything? She probably has a mild case of dawn phenomenon. Her glucose is going up from sources other than digested food. Some of it is produced by the liver from stored starch and fatty acids. Livers that produce too much glucose are one of the main ways diabetes causes high blood glucose levels. Other organs also produce small amounts of glucose. This is called “gluconeogenesis” for you science freaks out there. Organs do this to keep blood glucose from going too low at night or other times of not eating. From about 2 AM to 8 AM, most people’s bodies produce hormones, including cortisol, glucagon, and epinephrine. All these hormones increase insulin resistance and tell the liver to make more glucose. The idea is to get you enough glucose to get out of bed and start the day. The whole process is apparently started by growth hormones. Everyone has a dawn phenomenon. Otherwise they’d be too weak to get breakfast. But in people without diabetes, insulin levels also increase to handle the extra glucose. People with diabetes can’t increase insulin levels that much, so their early morning blood glucose levels can rise dramatically. Experts disagree on how many people have a dawn phenomenon. Estimates range from 3% to 50% of Type 2s and from 25% to 50% of Type 1s. Is dawn phenomenon a serious problem? It can be serious. According t Continue reading >>

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