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How To Protect Eyes From Diabetes

5 Tips For Preserving Your Vision

5 Tips For Preserving Your Vision

Whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you run the risk of developing diabetic retinopathy, which accounts for 12,000 to 24,000 new cases of blindness each year. But you don’t have to become one of these scary statistics if you keep tight control over your blood glucose (sugar), and follow these simple preventive measures. Monitor changes in your vision. This can be done both during your yearly visit to your eye care professional, and also at home. Make a note of vision on a daily basis--that way if anything out of the ordinary arises, you’ll be able to identify it immediately. If you are new to diabetes, you will have some vision abnormalities as glucose is regulated by treatment (pills or insulin, or both), but if you notice blurred vision and you have had diabetes for a length of time, it might be a signal you need to keep tighter control of your glucose levels. Keep your A1C level under 7%. A1C is a test you have during a visit to your endocrinologist to determine how well-controlled your diabetes has been during the previous 2-3 months. For most people, if your A1C is under 7%, it means you’re doing a good job keeping the amount of sugar in your blood in your target range. Keeping your blood glucose in this target range means less damage to the delicate blood vessels around your eyes. Control blood pressure. People with diabetes have a greater chance of having high blood pressure, which can cause eye blood vessel damage. The combination of high blood pressure and the presence of too much glucose can wreak havoc on your vision. Keep your blood pressure at 130/80 or under, and you’ll decrease the chances of vision impairment. Get your eyes checked. This means visiting your eye care professional each year, and having a dilated eye exam. The Beetham Eye In Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Eyes For Diabetics In Lake Forest Laguna Woods

Treatment Of Eyes For Diabetics In Lake Forest Laguna Woods

Home Your Eye Health Eye Diseases Diabetes and Eyesight How to Take Care of Your Eyes if You Have Diabetes How to Take Care of Your Eyes if You Have Diabetes People with diabetes are at an increased risk of developing specific ocular diseases, such as glaucoma , diabetic retinopathy and cataracts . Fortunately though, proper blood glucose control can minimize this risk. If you have diabetes, our professional and compassionate eye doctors at South County Eye Care will keep watch on your eyes to help preserve your long-lasting vision. Dr. Justin Michaels and Dr. Lucy DeMoss are experienced in providing expert eye care services for people with diabetes, in our Lake Forest office. In general, vision problems due to diabetes indicate that blood glucose levels are not being kept within a normal range. When blood sugars run high, extra stress is put on your eyes, (in addition to many other parts of the body, such as the heart and kidneys). Proliferative diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema are the two primary ocular conditions that can result. In contrast, when diabetes is controlled well and blood glucose levels are maintained within the goal parameters that your physician advises, eye complications can be prevented. If you have diabetes, vision loss is not inevitable. Read on for more information about how to be proactive and take the best care of your eyes. Top Ways to Keep Your Vision Sharp With Diabetes When signs of diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma and cataracts are detected at a very early stage, the progression of these diseases can be slowed or halted. As symptoms are usually not experienced until the diseases have advanced, a comprehensive eye exam is the only reliable way to detect the onset of diabetic eye complications, and an early diagnosis = early tre Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Diabetic Retinopathy: Q&a

Diabetes And Diabetic Retinopathy: Q&a

Q&A Menu To find the Q&As most helpful to you, please click on one of these subjects: How Does Diabetes Affect Eyes? Q: How does diabetes affect your eyes? — L.L., Connecticut A: Diabetes causes problems in the retina with what are collectively called microvascular abnormalities. The small blood vessels develop microaneurysms and leak blood. New blood vessel growth (neovascularization) occurs. Unfortunately, these blood vessels are weak and also leak. These leaks (hemorrhages) can cause irreversible damage to the retina and permanent vision loss. Patients with controlled diabetes do better than those with uncontrolled diabetes. However, even a person whose diabetes is under perfect control can still develop diabetic retinopathy — hence, the need for yearly retinal exams. — Dr. Slonim Q: Does diabetic retinopathy get progressively worse? — F.R. A: Yes. When left unrecognized and untreated, diabetic retinopathy can get worse and eventually lead to blindness. Diabetic retinopathy can even get worse despite use of the best treatments that currently exist for it. — Dr. Slonim Q: My father has type 2 diabetes and he is seeing double. We went to the hospital about a week ago and they said the diabetes had affected a nerve on the right eye. Can medicine get his sight back to normal? — W.C. A: Diabetes can affect any one of the three cranial nerves that are responsible for movement of the eyes. Diabetes is one of the more common conditions associated with sixth nerve (Abducens nerve) palsies. Paralysis of this nerve affects the lateral rectus muscle that allows the eye to look outward. There is no specific medicine for this. The paralysis can be temporary and last a few months or it can be permanent. — Dr. Slonim Q: Can diabetes cause you to have eye infections suc Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Protect Your Eye Health With Diabetes

8 Ways To Protect Your Eye Health With Diabetes

Everyday Solutions are created by Everyday Health on behalf of our partners. More Information Some of the content in this special section was created or selected by the Everyday Health editorial team and is funded by an advertising sponsor. The content is subject to Everyday Healths editorial standards for accuracy, objectivity, and balance. The sponsor does not edit or influence the content but does suggest the general topic area. Additional content was created by or on behalf of the sponsor and was not reviewed by the Everyday Health editorial team. This content is labeled to show that the sponsor is the source (e.g. "Sponsored by" or "Provided by"). 8 Ways to Protect Your Eye Health With Diabetes How to Keep Your Eyes Healthy With Diabetes When your blood sugar levels soar, the tiny blood vessels in your eyes can suffer serious damage. Over time, diabetes that is not well controlled can lead to permanent vision loss from diabetic retinopathy , in which damage to blood vessels in the retina causes fat, fluid, and blood to leak out. You can lower your risk of eye complications, however, by practicing good diabetes management and taking other self-care steps, says Catherine Meyerle, MD, assistant professor of ophthalmology at the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute in Baltimore. Here's what you need to know to keep your eyes healthy and prevent vision loss if you have diabetes. Partner With Your Eye Doctor on Diabetes Care An eye doctor who knows you have diabetes will be better prepared to offer appropriate screenings to look for any changes caused by diabetes and treatment to reduce your risk for vision loss . Good communication with your eye doctor is essential to detect the source of visual changes and to initiate timely treatment to preserve vision, Dr. Meyerle say Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Eye Health: What You Can Do To Protect Your Eyes

Diabetes And Eye Health: What You Can Do To Protect Your Eyes

Eye health is often one of the last things we think of when we consider diabetes management, and that may be because diabetes can affect the eyes without noticeable signs or symptoms. Over time, high blood sugar damages the tiny blood vessels in the eyes causing them to leak or bleed which if gone untreated may lead to blindness. There are several different types of diabetic eye disease and they include diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular edema, glaucoma and cataracts. According to the National Eye Institute (NEI) at the National Institute of Health (NIH) “Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes and a leading cause of blindness among working-age adults” and “between 40 and 45 percent of Americans diagnosed with diabetes have some stage of diabetic retinopathy” (1). The good news is that there are several effective preventative measures and treatment options for diabetic retinopathy, as long as it is detected early. Just like getting your A1C checked, an eye exam should be a regular part of your diabetes care. Here are the most important things you can do to keep your eyes healthy: See an eye care professional at least once a year. Your eye care professional can look into your eyes and assess if treatment is needed long before you may notice a change in vision. According to the NEI “early detection and treatment can reduce the risk of blindness by 95 percent”(1). Most insurance plans cover a visit to an eye doctor so call or go online to find out what they offer. If you experience any changes in vision report them to your provider. According to the America Optometric association the common symptoms of diabetic retinopathy are: “Seeing spots or floaters, blurred vision, having a dark or empty spot in the cen Continue reading >>

Top Five Steps To Help Prevent Diabetic Eye Diseases

Top Five Steps To Help Prevent Diabetic Eye Diseases

If you have diabetes, you are at higher risk of developing certain eye diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma and cataracts. The good news is that you can preserve your vision and reduce your chances of eye disease. Follow these steps now to make sure you preserve your vision in the years to come. 1. Get a comprehensive dilated eye examination from your ophthalmologist at least once a year In its early stages, diabetic eye disease often has no symptoms. A dilated eye exam allows your ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.) to examine more thoroughly the retina and optic nerve for signs of damage before you notice any change to your vision. Regularly monitoring your eyes’ health allows your ophthalmologist to begin treatment as soon as possible if signs of disease do appear. 2. Control your blood sugar When your blood sugar is too high, it can affect the shape of your eye’s lens, causing blurry vision, which goes back to normal after your blood sugar stabilizes. High blood sugar can also damage the blood vessels in your eyes. Maintaining good control of your blood sugar helps prevent these problems. 3. Maintain healthy blood pressure and cholesterol levels High blood pressure and high cholesterol can put you at greater risk for eye disease and vision loss. Keeping both under control will not only help your eyes but your overall health. 4. Quit smoking 5. Exercise Exercise is good for your eyes. It’s also good for your diabetes. Regular exercise can help your eyes stay as healthy as possible while helping to control your diabetes. If you have diabetes, you can preserve good vision. Make sure you actively manage your disease with your Eye M.D. so that you reduce your risk of eye disease. Continue reading >>

Preventing Vision Loss From Diabetes

Preventing Vision Loss From Diabetes

When was the last time you noticed how wonderful it is to enjoy the simplest of life’s pleasures – like reading books and watching TV? We’re so busy with the “big things,” the little things often go unnoticed. Unless you’re like a retired schoolteacher and patient of VSP network doctor, Anastasios Fokas, OD. Dr. Fokas’ patient had been recently diagnosed with diabetes. Troubling enough, for sure. But, no one told her that a common effect of the disease is a specific eye condition - diabetic retinopathy. And it’s no little thing at all. In fact, diabetic retinopathy now affects 5 million Americans and causes 24,000 new cases of blindness each year. For Dr. Fokas’ patient, the timing of her eye exam couldn’t have been better. She went in thinking it was just an ordinary exam to get new glasses. But, the 67-year-old retiree got a lot more – the gift of vision saved. That’s because Dr. Fokas noticed that the newly diagnosed diabetic already had signs of retinopathy in the form of weakened blood vessels that were leaking various fluids into the retinas of her eyes. That leaking impairs vision, and if left unchecked, ultimately causes blindness. Dr. Fokas was relieved his patient came in when she did. Although some damage had already been done, he caught the condition in time to do something about it. He referred her to a specialist, who used a state-of-the-art laser technique to correct the leaking vessels. The patient also got a prescription for new medications to help her condition. Now, with her sight protected and diabetes closely monitored, Dr. Fokas’ patient has a whole new outlook on the “little things.” Says the doctor: “Each time I see her, she tells me how wonderful it is to still be able to read books and watch television at night! Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Eyes

Diabetes And Your Eyes

Diabetic eye disease, caused by diabetes, is a leading cause of blindness and vision loss. Because of the high risk for eye disease, all people with type 2 diabetes should receive an annual dilated eye exam. For people with type 1 diabetes, an annual dilated exam is recommended after they have had diabetes for 5 years. Pregnant women with diabetes should see their eye doctor during the first three months of pregnancy and may need follow-up visits. Continue reading >>

Got Diabetes? 3 Ways To Protect Your Eyes

Got Diabetes? 3 Ways To Protect Your Eyes

Video / Diabetes / Managing Blood Sugar / Got Diabetes? 3 Ways to Protect Your Eyes Got Diabetes? 3 Ways to Protect Your Eyes Got Diabetes? 3 Ways to Protect Your Eyes (1:15) People with diabetes are at greater risk for retinopathy because of persistent high blood sugar levels. In this video, Robin Miller, MD, offers critical prevention and treatment tips. H, I'm Dr. Miller. One of the most common complications of diabetes is retinopathy. That happens when chronically high blood sugar damages the tiny blood vessels of the retina and that's why diabetes is a leading cause of blindness. But here's some good news 90% of diabetes related eye disease is preventable. Controlling your blood sugar is a smart place to start. Also follow these tips, lose that belly fat. Abdominal fat is especially bad because it releases hormones that lead to insulin resistance and blood sugar problems that can damage your eyes and other organs, don't postpone insulin therapy. The biggest miss about diabetes is that you should wait as long as possible before beginning insulin therapy but for people who need them insulin injections are the most effective way for preventing diabetes complication that's just retinopathy. Get an annual eye exam, that will ensure eye problems are caught and treated in the earlier stages. Laser eye treatments can be used to stop damage to the retina. Medication can also help. I'm Dr. Miller, for more ways to take care of your diabetes check out all our smart tips. Continue reading >>

Protecting Your Eyes From Diabetes

Protecting Your Eyes From Diabetes

Eyes are delicate. Diabetes can do major damage to them, causing poor vision and even blindness. Fortunately you can prevent this complication, and if it does develop, there are now good treatments. How does the eye work , and how does diabetes interfere? Light comes in through the pupil, the black circle in the middle of the front of the eye. Light passes through the lens which directs it to the retina, a thin layer of tissue containing nerve cells that actually do the seeing. Those cells transmit signals down the optic nerve to the brain, which figures out what we are looking at. Most of the retinal nerves are called rods. They see only black and white and sense movement. More detailed vision, such as reading, driving, and making out colors and shapes, is done by cells called cones. Cones are mostly located in the macula, an area in the retinas center about the size of this capital O. Only the macula sees detail. Thats why you have to be looking directly at something to see it well. -- Keep an eye on your vision! Learn about preventive steps and treatments for diabetic retinopathy from retinal specialist Dr. Charles Wykoff. >> In diabetes, high blood sugar levels damage the tiny blood vessels, called capillaries, that feed the nerves in the retina. This damage is called diabetic retinopathy (pronounced ret-in-OP-a-thee) or DR for short. DR develops in stages and can cause visual loss, including blindness. Last week I interviewed Dr. G. Robert Hampton , a leading ophthalmologist and retina surgeon. Dr. Hampton explained that DR damages eyes in several ways. Poor blood supply can cause nerve cells to stop working well. This may or may not cause noticeable symptoms. Later, fluids, fats, and protein can leak from blood vessels into the retina. Dr. Hampton compares this l Continue reading >>

Faq’s: How To Protect Your Eyes If You Have Diabetes

Faq’s: How To Protect Your Eyes If You Have Diabetes

Do you know that diabetes can affect your eyes too? Yes, diabetes can cause many complications including those of the eyes. It is believed that uncontrolled diabetes can severely affect eyes and is one of the leading causes of vision loss in adults. High blood glucose levels and poorly controlled diabetes can damage tiny blood vessels of the eyes which can affect the eyes and vision. It may need immediate medical attention, however, you can reduce your risks by being aware of the condition. Here are some FAQ’s related to eye care for diabetics: How can I protect my eyes from diabetes? The best way to protect your eyes from diabetes is to prevent diabetes and maintain normal blood sugar levels. Follow a healthy routine and keep a check on your health with regular screening. Maintain ideal body weight to reduce the risk of diabetes and other health problems. See a doctor regularly and get yourself checked if you have diabetes. Check your blood sugar levels and know your risks. If you are in the pre-diabetic or diabetic range, focus on maintaining your blood sugar levels. Take the prescribed treatment. Health tips for you: Follow a healthy diet and lifestyle to stay fit Have balanced meals that include fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grains Avoid refined, processed and high sugary food to prevent sudden spikes in blood sugar levels Exercise regularly for at least 20 to 30 mins every day. It not only helps to maintain blood sugar but also improves blood circulation and helps to manage weight Quit smoking and drink only moderately or best avoid completely What are my risk factors if I am diabetic? Increasing age, being overweight and conditions like high blood pressure, high cholesterol are some of the contributing factors that determine your risk. Similarly; pregnancy, Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

What is Diabetic Retinopathy? Diabetic retinopathy is a condition in which diabetes damages the blood vessels in the eye and causes them to leak. This can result in vision complications and even vision loss. What Are the Causes? Individuals with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are at risk for diabetic retinopathy, which occurs when elevated levels of blood sugar weaken the blood vessels in your eyes. In turn, these weak blood vessels leak fluid into your eye and blur your vision. Who Gets Diabetic Retinopathy? People with diabetes who do not keep their blood sugar under control are the most likely candidates to develop diabetic retinopathy. What Are the Symptoms? Many diabetics do not display symptoms of retinopathy, and when symptoms like blurry or obstructed vision do occur, it generally means the disease has progressed to a fairly severe point. If you have diabetes, it’s extremely important for you to get an eye exam with dilation once a year, so your doctor can look for signs of retinopathy. In some cases, your doctor will perform a test called a fluorescein angiography. This test uses dye to track circulation in your retinas and could provide a more definitive diagnosis. How Can Diabetic Retinopathy Be Treated? Diabetic retinopathy is far easier to treat and has fewer complications when caught early. Of course, maintaining a healthy diet and exercising regularly will help prevent and fight off the effects of diabetic retinopathy, but there is no sure-fire fix. Surgery may help with serious cases of diabetic retinopathy. Laser treatment has proven to be very effective at sealing leaking blood vessels, but success of this surgery can vary depending on how long the leak has been there. Can Diabetic Retinopathy Be Prevented? The most effective way to reduce your risk of d Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

On this page: Diabetes and diabetic retinopathy • DR symptoms • Types of diabetic eye disease • Who gets diabetic retinopathy? • Minorities and diabetic eye disease • When is DR a disability? • Eye exam assistance program • Prevention • Diabetic retinopathy videos Diabetic retinopathy — vision-threatening damage to the retina of the eye caused by diabetes — is the leading cause of blindness among working-age Americans. The good news: Diabetic retinopathy often can be prevented with early detection, proper management of your diabetes and routine eye exams performed by your optometrist or ophthalmologist. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), the United States has the highest rate of diabetes among 38 developed nations, with approximately 30 million Americans — roughly 11 percent of the U.S. population between the ages of 20 and 79 — having the disease. About 90 percent of Americans with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, which develops when the the body fails to produce enough insulin — a hormone secreted by the pancreas that enables dietary sugar to enter the cells of the body — or the body becomes resistant to insulin. This causes glucose (sugar) levels in the bloodstream to rise and can eventually damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves or heart, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include obesity, an unhealthful diet and physical inactivity. Unfortunately, the prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes has increased significantly in the United States over the past 30 years. According to data released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in December 2015, there were 1.4 million new cases of diabetes reported in the U.S. in 2014. Though this annual number is d Continue reading >>

Diabetic Eye Disease

Diabetic Eye Disease

What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease is a group of eye problems that can affect people with diabetes. These conditions include diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular edema, cataracts, and glaucoma. Over time, diabetes can cause damage to your eyes that can lead to poor vision or even blindness. But you can take steps to prevent diabetic eye disease, or keep it from getting worse, by taking care of your diabetes. The best ways to manage your diabetes and keep your eyes healthy are to Often, there are no warning signs of diabetic eye disease or vision loss when damage first develops. A full, dilated eye exam helps your doctor find and treat eye problems early—often before much vision loss can occur. How does diabetes affect my eyes? Diabetes affects your eyes when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. In the short term, you are not likely to have vision loss from high blood glucose. People sometimes have blurry vision for a few days or weeks when they’re changing their diabetes care plan or medicines. High glucose can change fluid levels or cause swelling in the tissues of your eyes that help you to focus, causing blurred vision. This type of blurry vision is temporary and goes away when your glucose level gets closer to normal. If your blood glucose stays high over time, it can damage the tiny blood vessels in the back of your eyes. This damage can begin during prediabetes, when blood glucose is higher than normal, but not high enough for you to be diagnosed with diabetes. Damaged blood vessels may leak fluid and cause swelling. New, weak blood vessels may also begin to grow. These blood vessels can bleed into the middle part of the eye, lead to scarring, or cause dangerously high pressure inside your eye. Most serious diabetic eye d Continue reading >>

Pictures Of How To Protect Your Eyes When You Have Diabetes

Pictures Of How To Protect Your Eyes When You Have Diabetes

Working out is a trifecta: Moderate exercise lowers your blood sugar and your blood pressure and raises your "good" HDL cholesterol -- and that's all good news for the blood vessels in your eyes. Even a brisk walk and cleaning the house count as physical activity. Most people should get at least 30 minutes most days. Check with your doctor before you start a new fitness program. Omega-3s in fatty fish like salmon, halibut, albacore tuna, mackerel, and sardines have been linked to lower rates of diabetic retinopathy. Scientists think they help guard against inflammation and the abnormal growth of blood vessels in the eyes. Omega-3s also help your cholesterol, which is good for your blood vessels and therefore good for your eyes. Two servings a week should do it. Stress can raise your blood glucose as well as your blood pressure. Experts say meditation can help you sort out pressing problems from bothersome worries and let go of nagging, useless thoughts. Ease your mind and relieve your body! Check out a mindfulness meditation app, talk to a therapist, or try a group meditation class. Dehydration can raise blood sugar levels. But since sodas and juices may bump up your glucose, sipping on water is safer. If you're not a fan of the plain stuff, infuse it with fruit or herbs (think strawberries and mint) for flavor without a sugar spike. The sun's powerful UV rays can damage your eyes and raise the odds of developing eye problems including cataracts. Since you can't change the fact that you have diabetes, do something about what you can control. Even on cloudy days, wear sunglasses that block at least 99% of UV-A and UV-B rays. Dark, leafy greens such as kale, spinach, romaine lettuce, and collard and turnip greens have a lot of the nutrients lutein and zeaxanthin. These a Continue reading >>

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