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How To Manage Type 2 Diabetes

Managing Type 2 Diabetes In Patients Not Controlled On Metformin

Managing Type 2 Diabetes In Patients Not Controlled On Metformin

The incidence and prevalence of diabetes (and especially type 2 diabetes) are increasing worldwide. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that worldwide 171 million people suffered from diabetes in 2000, and predicts that by 2030 their number will increase to more than 300 million.1 Due to the initially often silent course of the disease and thus late diagnosis, and also because of gross undertreatment of hyperglycaemia and additional cardiovascular risk factors, diabetes is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Microvascular complications – such as retinopathy, neuropathy and nephropathy – and macrovascular disease cause human suffering, but are also a major burden to healthcare resources worldwide. The ultimate goal of diabetes therapy is to prevent micro- and macrovascular disease in order to improve life expectancy and quality of life. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT)2 and UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS)3 demonstrated that lowering glycaemia, which can be measured as glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), leads to fewer microvascular complications – mainly retinopathy and nephropathy – in type 1 as well as type 2 diabetes, with the lowest risk being with HbA1c values in the normal range. Glycaemia also plays a role in macrovascular disease, as demonstrated by studies such as the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) trial,4 but the relationship is less pronounced, leaving even well-controlled diabetics at an increased cardiovascular risk5 due to the contribution of other risk factors for macrovascular disease, such as hypertension, hypercoagulability and dyslipidaemia. Despite major efforts to attract attention to the importance of glycaemic control, levels of HbA1c remain problematic, especially in type Continue reading >>

Living With Type 2 Diabetes

Living With Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a disease in which your pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or your body does not properly use the insulin it makes. As a result, glucose (sugar) builds up in your blood instead of being used for energy. Your body gets glucose from foods like bread, potatoes, rice, pasta, milk and fruit. To use this glucose, your body needs insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps your body to control the level of glucose (sugar) in your blood. The good news You can live a long and healthy life by keeping your blood glucose (sugar) levels in the target range set by you and your health-care provider. You can do this by: Eating healthy meals and snacks Enjoying regular physical activity Monitoring your blood glucose (sugar) using a home blood glucose meter* Aiming for a healthy body weight Taking diabetes medications including insulin and other medications, if prescribed by your doctor Managing stress effectively * Discuss with your health-care provider how often you should measure your blood glucose (sugar) level. Who can help you? Your health-care team is there to help you. Depending on your needs and the resources available in your community, your team may include a family doctor, diabetes educator (nurse and/or dietitian), endocrinologist, pharmacist, social worker, exercise physiologist, psychologist, foot care specialist, eye care specialist. They can answer your questions about how to manage diabetes and work with you to adjust your food plan, activity and medications. Remember, you are the most important member of your health-care team. Get the support you need A positive and realistic attitude towards your diabetes can help you manage it. Talk to others who have diabetes. Ask your local Diabetes Canada branch about joining a peer-support group or taking p Continue reading >>

Behavioral Programs To Help Manage Type 2 Diabetes

Behavioral Programs To Help Manage Type 2 Diabetes

Is This Information Right For Me? This summary is for you if your health care professional has said you have type 2 diabetes. This summary will tell you what researchers have found about behavioral programs to help manage type 2 diabetes. It does not cover specific treatments for diabetes. What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Diabetes (also called "diabetes mellitus") is a condition in which your body has trouble controlling the level of sugar (or glucose) in your blood. Insulin is a hormone that your body needs to use the sugar for energy. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body cannot use insulin well and may not make enough insulin. Having low insulin causes sugar to build up in your blood, and your blood sugar level gets too high. It is important to manage diabetes because high blood sugar can cause serious health issues over time. Your health care professional can help you make a plan to manage your diabetes. Your health care professional may also suggest a behavioral program to help you learn how to manage your diabetes. How Is Type 2 Diabetes Managed? You can manage the effects of diabetes on your health by trying to keep your blood sugar level within a healthy range. Your health care professional can help you set a goal for your blood sugar level and make a plan to manage your diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes are often able to manage their diabetes by changing their diet, being more physically active, maintaining a healthy weight, and taking diabetes medicines. Some people with type 2 diabetes may also need to take insulin shots. It is important to follow your management plan every day. What Are Behavioral Programs for Diabetes? In behavioral programs for diabetes, a trained provider helps you learn to manage your diabetes. Some behavioral programs are one-on-one. Some Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

More than 30 million Americans have diabetes (about 1 in 10), and 90% to 95% of them have type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes most often develops in people over age 45, but more and more children, teens, and young adults are also developing it. Causes Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas that acts like a key to let blood sugar into the cells in your body for use as energy. If you have type 2 diabetes, cells don’t respond normally to insulin; this is called insulin resistance. Your pancreas makes more insulin to try to get cells to respond. Eventually your pancreas can’t keep up, and your blood sugar rises, setting the stage for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. High blood sugar is damaging to the body and can cause other serious health problems, such as heart disease, vision loss, and kidney disease. Symptoms & Risk Factors Type 2 diabetes symptoms often develop over several years and can go on for a long time without being noticed (sometimes there aren’t any noticeable symptoms at all). Because symptoms can be hard to spot, it’s important to know the risk factors for type 2 diabetes and to see your doctor to get your blood sugar tested if you have any of them. Getting Tested A simple blood test will let you know if you have diabetes. If you’ve gotten your blood sugar tested at a health fair or pharmacy, follow up at a clinic or doctor’s office to make sure the results are accurate. Management Unlike many health conditions, diabetes is managed mostly by you, with support from your health care team (including your primary care doctor, foot doctor, dentist, eye doctor, registered dietitian nutritionist, diabetes educator, and pharmacist), family, and other important people in your life. Managing diabetes can be challenging, but everything you do to improve y Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Who should not take FARXIGA? Do not take FARXIGA if you: are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA What are the possible side effects of FARXIGA? FARXIGA may cause serious side effects including: Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose Continue reading >>

6 Rules To Help Manage Type 2 Diabetes

6 Rules To Help Manage Type 2 Diabetes

Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:00 Loaded: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Subtitles captions settings, opens captions settings dialog captions off, selected Captions Audio Track Fullscreen This is a modal window. Captions Settings Dialog Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. Text Color White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan Transparency Opaque Semi-Opaque Background Color Black White Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan Transparency Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window Color Black White Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan Transparency Transparent Semi-Transparent Opaque Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Proportional Sans-Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Serif Casual Script Small Caps Defaults Done Andre says that he was “stunned” to learn that he has type 2 diabetes. The fire department captain and paramedic says he leads an active life and eats healthily, so learning he had the condition was a “slap in the face.” Dr. Phil says he can relate to Andre because he was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 25 years ago. He says he has been successfully managing it ever since, and putting a support system in place has been key. “It began with my wife Robin. She learned what my challenges were and what she could do to help me stick to my treatment plan,” he says. “It takes a full treatment team to get the right balance of diet and exercise and in some situations, medication.” Dr. Phil has now partnered with AstraZeneca for the On It Movement in hopes o Continue reading >>

How New Research Hopes To One Day Manage Type 2 Diabetes Without Medication

How New Research Hopes To One Day Manage Type 2 Diabetes Without Medication

An experimental treatment for Type 2 diabetes, which aims to allow patients to manage their disease without taking medication, has entered its third round of clinical trials at St Joseph's Healthcare London. It means the program will be accepting new patients for the third time since it began in 2015. Doctor Irene Hramiak is an endocrinologist at St Joseph's Healthcare London and a researcher with the Lawson Research Institute who has been working on the exploratory treatment since the beginning. What the researchers are saying Under normal circumstances, Type 2 diabetes is treated with insulin and doctors will add other drugs as the disease progresses and the symptoms worsen. Under the experimental treatment, patients in the early stages of Type 2 diabetes are subjected to a new diet and exercise regimen. Then they're given a combination of drugs to help bring their blood sugar levels back to near-normal levels, allowing the pancreas to rest and reset itself and hopefully put the disease into remission. "That's exactly what we're trying to do is to sort of do a reset, you know as you push your computer's reset button and see if the pancreas will be able to function normally for a period of time." About 1 in 10 people in Ontario suffers from some form of diabetes and most of them are taking medication. Researchers hope their work will one day give millions of people new treatment choices. What the patients are saying Type 2 diabetes runs in Greg Ackland's family, so he wasn't surprised when he got his diagnosis at age 46. "I don't think it was really a question of if I become a diabetic, but a question of when I become a diabetic," he said, noting the treatment has made him more hopeful when it comes to living with the disease and getting more years out of his life. "I Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a condition where the body produces insulin but the insulin is ineffective, or there is not enough insulin, or both. It accounts for approximately 85 per cent of people with diabetes and while it is usually seen in adults, it is increasingly being seen in teenagers and children. Regular physical activity, a healthy eating plan, maintaining a healthy waist and stress management are the cornerstones of managing type 2 diabetes. How do you get type 2 diabetes? While the cause of type 2 diabetes is currently unknown, research indicates that there are a range of associated risk factors. Only some of these risk factors can be changed. Risk factors which cannot be changed include: having a family history of diabetes being over 40 being of Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander, Melanesian, Polynesian, Chinese or Indian subcontinent descent being a woman who has had gestational diabetes or who has polycystic ovary syndrome having a mental health condition having a history of heart disease. Risk factors which can be changed include: being overweight, that is having a waist measurement over 80 cm for women and over 94 cm for men being physically inactive not following a healthy eating pattern smoking having high cholesterol or blood pressure. Diabetes WA (external site) has developed a test to find out if you are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Signs and symptoms Statistically, for every person diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, there is another who is undiagnosed. This is because they may not experience any signs, or the signs are too vague to bring about a visit to the doctor. Signs of type 2 diabetes may include: thirst frequent urination lethargy or being very tired blurred vision possible weight gain infections or wounds that don't improve constant hunger Continue reading >>

Managing My Type 2 Diabetes Without Medications

Managing My Type 2 Diabetes Without Medications

If you have type 2 diabetes, you can manage it well without any drugs — without any oral medications and without insulin. If you have type 1 diabetes, you will always have to take insulin injections, but you can likely use less than you do now. To manage diabetes well means keeping your blood sugar level down in the same range as that of people who don’t have diabetes. The way we check this level is the A1C (sometimes called glycated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1c, or HbA1c). This test tells you what your average blood sugar level was during the previous two or three months by using a drop of blood about as small as that you use on your regular fingerstick tests that tells you what your level is right then. When you manage your diabetes well, it is well controlled. It is normal. We know that the normal A1C level is 6.0 or below. See “The Normal A1C Level.” An A1C level of 6.0 or below means that your diabetes is in remission. It does not mean that you have cured it. If you relax your vigilance, your A1C level will go above 6.0 again, and you will again put yourself at risk of the terrible complications of uncontrolled diabetes. You can use drugs to bring your A1C level down to normal. That’s a good thing. But this strategy does have its costs, and those costs aren’t just money out of your pocket or your checkbook. The worst of those costs are the potential side effects of the drugs. All drugs can have side effects. The systems and the organs of our bodies are so interconnected that no drug can target just one part of it without having some effect elsewhere. Sometimes we find that the side effects are helpful, but we can also find that they are harmful. Sometimes they are subtle and affect only a few people, but sometimes they are serious. All of the drugs that w Continue reading >>

How To Manage Type 2 Diabetes

How To Manage Type 2 Diabetes

Edit Article Once you have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes you need to learn how to manage the disease. You can live a normal, long and healthy life with type 2 diabetes, if you live a healthy lifestyle. High glucose levels causes damage to nerves, kidneys, blood vessels, and eyes. Once diabetes has been diagnosed, then you need to monitor your health closely. 1 2 Follow the food plan as outlined by your physician or dietitian. Acquire the habit of eating slowly to prevent overeating without feeling hungry or deprived to avoid gaining weight. You will feel satisfied with less food; Google "eating slowly" to learn more about it (How and why it works). If you follow a low glycemic diet, you should focus on foods that are below 55. Regulate your carbohydrates throughout the day, eating about the same amount at each meal. Your dietitian or doctor should give you the amount of carbohydrates you should eat each day. Many diabetic diets have you eat three meals and three small snacks throughout the day. 3 Walk at least 20 to 30 minutes most days of the week. Other types of exercise that can help regulate glucose are biking and swimming. You may wish to break your walk into two or three sessions a day, 10 to 15 minuets each. 4 5 Inspect your feet every day to check for bruising, sores, or blisters. Diabetes damages the nerves, with the damage often beginning with the feet decreasing circulation and sensation. 6 See your diabetes team once or more a year: Primary care (or an endocrinologist): twice a year. Podiatrist: once a year for a thorough foot exam. Ophthalmologist: once a year for a thorough eye exam. (Psychologist: if you often eat unhealthily.) 7 Ask your doctor about lowering your blood sugar and the need for insulin or snacks for your sleep (night or day): not eat Continue reading >>

8 Easy Health Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

8 Easy Health Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body can no longer control the amount of sugar in your blood. It can lead to a number of complications, if it's not managed properly, including heart disease, sight loss and nerve damage. The number of people diagnosed with the condition has risen by 54% in last decade. And experts are warning that type 2 diabetes is fast becoming one of the biggest health crises of our time – with 12 million people at risk of developing the condition. If you've been recently diagnosed, it's easy to feel daunted. But help is at hand. We asked pharmacist Anshu Bhimbat LloydsPharmacy about the best ways to work with your doctor to manage your type 2 diabetes (and even 'reverse' the condition in some cases). He says: "There are a few things that you can do to help manage diabetes and make it a part of your day to day life. Small lifestyle changes can make living with type 2 diabetes easier, delay the progression and support a healthier lifestyle. In some cases, dietary changes and weight loss can even help reverse the insulin sensitivity that people with type 2 diabetes experience." Here are the tips he gives to patients: 1. Cut down on carbohydrates Carbs aren't the enemy – we all need them to survive. But the type and amount you consume can make a difference to your condition. Diabetes UK suggests these ways of including good carbohydrates in your diet, for instance: Choose wholegrain breads and cereals. Have fruit whole, rather than as a juice. Eating an apple with the skin on, for example, will provide more fibre than drinking a glass of apple juice. Try quinoa and couscous as an alternative to pasta. Bhimbat says: "A low carbohydrate diet is highly recommended for people living with type 2 diabetes as it will lower the amount of insulin that the bo Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be treated successfully. If a high blood sugar level is brought down to a normal level, your symptoms will ease. You still have some risk of complications in the long term if your blood glucose level remains even mildly high - even if you have no symptoms in the short term. However, studies have shown that people who have better glucose control have fewer complications (such as heart disease or eye problems) compared with those people who have poorer control of their glucose level. Therefore, the main aims of treatment are: To keep your blood glucose level as near normal as possible. To reduce any other risk factors that may increase your risk of developing complications. In particular, to lower your blood pressure if it is high and to keep your blood lipids (cholesterol) low. To detect any complications as early as possible. Treatment can prevent or delay some complications from becoming worse. Type 2 diabetes is usually initially treated by following a healthy diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and having regular physical activity. If lifestyle advice does not control your blood sugar (glucose) levels then medicines are used to help lower your blood glucose levels. One medicine (usually metformin) is used first but two or even three medicines may be needed. Most of the medicines for type 2 diabetes are given in tablet form. However, some people with type 2 diabetes need insulin injections to help control blood glucose levels. Some people gain a great deal of benefit from insulin injections and these are sometimes used fairly soon after the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes has been made. Insulin injections can be used in combination with other medicines to further improve glucose control. Lifestyle - diet, weight control an Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

When you have type 2 diabetes, physical activity is an important component of your treatment plan. It’s also important to have a healthy meal plan and maintain your blood glucose level through medications or insulin, if necessary. If you stay fit and active throughout your life, you’ll be able to better control your diabetes and keep your blood glucose level in the correct range. Controlling your blood glucose level is essential to preventing long-term complications, such as nerve pain and kidney disease. Exercise has so many benefits, but the biggest one is that it makes it easier to control your blood glucose (blood sugar) level. People with type 2 diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, either because their body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process it, or because their body doesn’t use insulin properly (insulin resistant). In either case, exercise can reduce the glucose in your blood. Muscles can use glucose without insulin when you’re exercising. In other words, it doesn’t matter if you’re insulin resistant or if you don’t have enough insulin: when you exercise, your muscles get the glucose they need, and in turn, your blood glucose level goes down. If you’re insulin resistant, exercise actually makes your insulin more effective. That is—your insulin resistance goes down when you exercise, and your cells can use the glucose more effectively. Exercise can also help people with type 2 diabetes avoid long-term complications, especially heart problems. People with diabetes are susceptible to developing blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack. Exercise helps keep your heart healthy and strong. Plus, exercise helps you maintain good cholesterol—and that helps you avoid arteriosclerosis. Additionally, there ar Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis To diagnose type 2 diabetes, you'll be given a: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates you have diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Normal levels are below 5.7 percent. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — that can make the A1C test inaccurate, your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you fast overnight, and the fasting blood sugar level is measured. Then you drink a sugary liquid, and blood s Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Self-care

Type 2 Diabetes - Self-care

You may not have any symptoms. If you do have symptoms, they may include: Hunger Thirst Urinating a lot, getting up more often than usual at night to urinate Blurry vision Infections Trouble having an erection Red skin rashes in parts of your body Tingling or loss of sensation in your feet You should have good control of your blood sugar. If your blood sugar is not controlled, serious problems called complications can happen to your body after many years. Learn the basic steps for managing diabetes to stay as healthy as possible. Doing so will help keep the complications of diabetes away. Steps include: Also, be sure to take any medicine or insulin as instructed. Your provider will also help you by ordering blood tests and other tests. These help make sure your blood sugar and cholesterol levels are each in a healthy range. Also, follow your provider's instructions about keeping your blood pressure in a healthy range. Your doctor will likely ask you to visit other providers to help you control your diabetes. These providers include a: Dietitian Diabetes pharmacist Diabetes educator Foods with sugar and carbohydrates can raise your blood sugar too high. Alcohol and other drinks with sugar can also raise your blood sugar. A nurse or dietitian can teach you about good food choices. Make sure you know how to have a balanced meal with protein and fiber. Eat healthy, fresh foods as much as possible. Don't eat too much food at one sitting. This helps keep your blood sugar in a good range. Managing your weight and keeping a well-balanced diet are important. Some people with type 2 diabetes can stop taking medicines after losing weight (even though they still have diabetes). Your provider can let you know a good weight range for you. Weight-loss surgery may be an option if you a Continue reading >>

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