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How To Manage Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes definition and facts Risk factors for gestational diabetes include a history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, There are typically no noticeable signs or symptoms associated with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause the fetus to be larger than normal. Delivery of the baby may be more complicated as a result. The baby is also at risk for developing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Following a nutrition plan is the typical treatment for gestational diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight and following a healthy eating plan may be able to help prevent or minimize the risks of gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes, or high blood sugar levels, that develops during pregnancy. It occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies. It is usually diagnosed in the later stages of pregnancy and often occurs in women who have no prior history of diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is thought to arise because the many changes, hormonal and otherwise, that occur in the body during pregnancy predispose some women to become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by specialized cells in the pancreas that allows the body to effectively metabolize glucose for later usage as fuel (energy). When levels of insulin are low, or the body cannot effectively use insulin (i.e., insulin resistance), blood glucose levels rise. What are the screening guidelines for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy (see Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes sometimes develops when a woman is pregnant. It’s when the blood glucose level (blood sugar level) of the mother goes too high during pregnancy. Having an elevated blood glucose level during pregnancy can cause problems for your baby—if it’s left untreated. Fortunately, doctors are vigilant about checking for gestational diabetes so that it can be identified and effectively managed. A pro-active treatment plan helps you have a good pregnancy and protects the health of your baby. Gestational Diabetes Symptoms Gestational diabetes doesn’t often cause noticeable symptoms for the mother. Other types of diabetes (eg, type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes) do cause symptoms such as increased thirst, but that is hardly ever noticed in gestational diabetes. Because there aren’t often symptoms, it’s very important to be tested for a high blood glucose level when you’re pregnant. (Your doctor will most likely test you for gestational diabetes sometime between the 24th and 28th week. You can learn more about the diagnostic process here.) Then your doctor will know if you need to be treated for gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Causes and Risk Factors Gestational diabetes develops when your body isn’t able to produce enough of the hormone insulin during pregnancy. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells. Without enough insulin, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps gestational diabetes. The elevated blood glucose level in gestational diabetes is caused by hormones released by the placenta during pregnancy. The placenta produces a hormone called the human placental lactogen (HPL), also Continue reading >>

How To Manage Gestational Diabetes Without Medication

How To Manage Gestational Diabetes Without Medication

Expert Reviewed Gestational diabetes is a bit different from the other forms of diabetes you may have heard about. Gestational diabetes occurs during pregnancy, a time where your body is going through a number of pretty radical changes. One of those changes is in the levels of blood sugar, also known as blood glucose levels. From 4% to 9.2 % of women have gestational diabetes during pregnancy.[1] It does not necessarily mean that you or your baby have the more common form of diabetes and it does not mean that you or your baby will have diabetes after your baby is born.[2] Most women are tested for gestational diabetes around the 28th week of gestation. Although you should talk to your doctor about your gestational diabetes during your normal visits, there are some ways you can manage it at home. For the most part, treatment of gestational diabetes is controlled through diet, increased physical activity, and sometimes, medication or insulin shots. Continue reading >>

Managing Gestational Diabetes

Managing Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is diagnosed during pregnancy when your body cannot cope with the extra demand for insulin production resulting in high blood glucose levels. Gestational diabetes is managed by monitoring blood glucose levels, adopting a healthy eating plan and performing regular physical activity. Effective management of gestational diabetes will reduce the risk of complications during pregnancy and the birth of your baby. Your healthcare team including your doctor, specialist, dietician and Credential Diabetes Educator, can help you with blood glucose monitoring, healthy eating and physical activity. There are three basic components in effectively managing gestational diabetes: monitoring blood glucose levels adopting a healthy eating pattern physical activity. Gestational diabetes can often initially be managed with healthy eating and regular physical activity. However, for some women with gestational diabetes, insulin injections will be necessary for the rest of the pregnancy. Approximately 10 – 20% of women will need insulin; however, once the baby is born insulin is no longer needed. This is safe for both you and your baby. After the baby is born, gestational diabetes usually disappears. A special blood glucose test (Oral Glucose Tolerance Test) (OGTT) is performed six weeks after delivery to ensure that blood glucose levels have returned to normal. However, women who have had gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life and should be tested for diabetes at least every 2 – 3 years. If gestational diabetes is not well looked after (blood glucose levels remain high) it may result in problems such as a large baby, miscarriage and stillbirth. A large baby can create the risk of injury at delivery, caesarean delivery, Continue reading >>

Check Your Knowledge: Diabetes And Pregnancy

Check Your Knowledge: Diabetes And Pregnancy

November is Diabetes Awareness Month. How much do you know about diabetes during pregnancy? Check your knowledge below! Diabetes can affect women during their childbearing years. Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose (blood sugar) levels are above normal. Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose, or sugar, for our bodies to use for energy. The pancreas, an organ that lies near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin to help glucose get into the cells of our bodies. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn't make enough insulin or can't use its own insulin as well as it should. Having diabetes during pregnancy can impact the health of both the mother and her unborn baby. If a woman has poor control of her diabetes during pregnancy, which means that her blood sugar levels are often above normal, this increases the chances for problems for her baby, such as a baby growing too large, which may lead to complications during delivery. It also can cause serious complications for the woman. Working to keep blood sugar in control (in the normal range) before and during pregnancy can help prevent these problems. What are the 3 common types of diabetes? Type 1: The pancreas makes little or no insulin (a hormone in the body to help get glucose (sugar) into the cells of the body) so the body can't use blood sugar for energy. Type 2: The body either makes too little insulin or the insulin that is made is unable to help cells use blood sugar for energy. Gestational: This is a type of diabetes that is first seen or diagnosed in a pregnant woman. Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that is similar to type 2 but it is first seen or diagnosed when a woman is pregnant. What are possible problems for the baby from blood sugar that is not well controlled in a pre Continue reading >>

9 Efficient Home Remedies For Gestational Diabetes

9 Efficient Home Remedies For Gestational Diabetes

nucific.com Visit Site Some of the most effective home remedies for gestational diabetes include the use of vitamin D, vitamin C, astragalus, dietary scheduling, protein, whole food carbs, a sugar-free diet, flaxseed, and exercise. What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes is the least common type of diabetes and affects pregnant women, normally in their third trimester, and is characterized by high blood sugar levels, just like other forms of diabetes. The symptoms of gestational diabetes are generally minimal or mild, but can still cause complications for both mother and child, so should not be ignored. Although the symptoms typically fade after pregnancy, it still increases an individual’s risk of developing Type 2 diabetes later in life. The cause of diabetes, including gestational, is the insulin receptors in the body not functioning properly, which causes massive spikes and plunges of blood sugar, which can be very inconvenient, and even fatal in severe situations. Children born to a mother who suffered from gestational diabetes without treatment is much more likely to experience childhood obesity and is a likely candidate for diabetes, jaundice, or other health concerns. As with other forms of diabetes, there is no formal cure for gestational diabetes, merely treatment options like a G.I. diet, exercise, or insulin therapy. However, due to the complications of having an infant in the womb, many people steer away from insulin therapy and instead choose natural or herbal remedies to treat gestational diabetes. These remedies can either be used alone or in conjunction with other more traditional treatment methods of gestational diabetes. Below are some of the most popular and effective home remedies for gestational diabetes. Please consult a medical profe Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management Guidelines

Diabetes Management Guidelines

Source: American Diabetes Association. Standards of medical care in diabetes—2016. Diabetes Care. 2016;39(suppl 1):S1-S106. Available here. Refer to source document for full recommendations, including class of recommendation and level of evidence. Jump to a topic or click back/next at the bottom of each page Diabetes in Pregnancy (Gestational Diabetes) Glycemic Targets in Pregnancy Pregestational diabetes Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) Fasting ≤90 mg/dL (5.0 mmol/L) ≤95 mg/dL (5.3 mmol/L) 1-hr postprandial ≤130-140 mg/dL (7.2-7.8 mmol/L) ≤140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L) 2-hr postprandial ≤120 mg/dL (6.7 mmol/L) ≤120 mg/dL (6.7 mmol/L) A1C 6.0-6.5% (42-48 mmol/L) recommended <6.0% may be optimal as pregnancy progresses Achieve without hypoglycemia Recommendations for Pregestational Diabetes Pregestational type 1 and type 2 diabetes confer greater maternal and fetal risk than GDM Spontaneous abortion Fetal anomalies Preeclampsia Intrauterine fetal demise Macrosomia Neonatal hypoglycemia Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia Diabetes in pregnancy may increase the risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes in offspring later in life Maintain A1C levels as close to normal as is safely possible Ideally, A1C <6.5% (48 mmol/L) without hypoglycemia Discuss family planning Prescribe effective contraception until woman is prepared to become pregnant Women with preexisting type 1 or type 2 diabetes Counsel on the risk of development and/or progression of diabetic retinopathy Perform eye exams before pregnancy or in first trimester; monitor every trimester and for 1 year postpartum Management of Pregestational Diabetes Insulin is the preferred medication for pregestational type 1 and type 2 diabetes not adequately controlled with diet, exercise, and metformin Insulin* management during pre Continue reading >>

How To Deal With Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

How To Deal With Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

While all else may be going just fine, some expecting mothers start developing high blood sugar levels between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. This is known as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Similar to other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes affects how your cells use sugar (glucose). Up to 9.2 percent of pregnant women suffer from this problem, according to a 2014 analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In fact, it is recommended that all women get tested for gestational diabetes at the beginning of the third trimester. The exact cause of GDM is unknown, but the hormonal changes during pregnancy play a key role. During pregnancy, the body produces larger amounts of some hormones like human placental lactogen, estrogen and hormones that increase insulin resistance. These hormones affect your placenta and also interfere with the action of insulin, the hormone that regulates your blood sugar. Women over the age of 25 who suffer from high blood pressure, have a family history of diabetes and were overweight before becoming pregnant are at a higher risk of developing GDM. Also, women who have previously given birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds or had an unexplained miscarriage or stillbirth are at a higher risk. Some of the mild symptoms of gestational diabetes may include fatigue, blurred vision, excessive thirst and excessive need to urinate. Developing GDM during pregnancy doesn’t mean that you will have diabetes after delivery. In most cases, the blood sugar levels of pregnant women with gestational diabetes tend to return to normal within a few hour or days post delivery. However, it is recommended that women who had gestational diabetes during pregnancy get tested for diabetes every 2 to 3 years as they are at an increa Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a condition marked by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that are discovered during pregnancy. It is defined as carbohydrate intolerance. About two to 10 percent of all pregnant women in the U.S. are diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Am I at risk for gestational diabetes? These factors increase your risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy: Being overweight before becoming pregnant (if you are 20% or more over your ideal body weight) Family history of diabetes (if your parents or siblings have diabetes) Being over age 25 Previously giving birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds Previously giving birth to a stillborn baby Having gestational diabetes with an earlier pregnancy Being diagnosed with pre-diabetes Having polycystic ovary syndrome Being African-American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian-American, American Indian, or Pacific Islander American Keep in mind that half of women who develop gestational diabetes have no known risk factors. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is caused by some hormonal changes that occur in all women during pregnancy. The placenta is the organ that connects the baby (by the umbilical cord) to the uterus and transfers nutrients from the mother to the baby. Increased levels of certain hormones made in the placenta can prevent insulin—a hormone that controls blood sugar—from managing glucose properly. This condition is called "insulin resistance." As the placenta grows larger during pregnancy, it produces more hormones and increases this insulin resistance. Usually, the mother’s pancreas is able to produce more insulin (about three times the normal amount) to overcome the insulin resistance. If it cannot, sugar levels will rise, resulting in gestational dia Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus And Pregnancy

Diabetes Mellitus And Pregnancy

Practice Essentials Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance of variable degree with onset or first recognition during pregnancy. A study by Stuebe et al found this condition to be associated with persistent metabolic dysfunction in women at 3 years after delivery, separate from other clinical risk factors. [1] Infants of mothers with preexisting diabetes mellitus experience double the risk of serious injury at birth, triple the likelihood of cesarean delivery, and quadruple the incidence of newborn intensive care unit (NICU) admission. Gestational diabetes mellitus accounts for 90% of cases of diabetes mellitus in pregnancy, while preexisting type 2 diabetes accounts for 8% of such cases. Screening for diabetes mellitus during pregnancy Gestational diabetes The following 2-step screening system for gestational diabetes is currently recommended in the United States: Alternatively, for high-risk women or in areas in which the prevalence of insulin resistance is 5% or higher (eg, the southwestern and southeastern United States), a 1-step approach can be used by proceeding directly to the 100-g, 3-hour OGTT. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for gestational diabetes mellitus after 24 weeks of pregnancy. The recommendation applies to asymptomatic women with no previous diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus. [2, 3] The recommendation does not specify whether the 1-step or 2-step screening approach would be preferable. Type 1 diabetes The disease is typically diagnosed during an episode of hyperglycemia, ketosis, and dehydration It is most commonly diagnosed in childhood or adolescence; the disease is rarely diagnosed during pregnancy Patients diagnosed during pregnancy most often present with unexpected Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Has your doctor diagnosed you with gestational diabetes (GD or GDM), a form of diabetes that appears only during pregnancy? While it might feel overwhelming at first, it turns out that this pregnancy complication is much more common than you might think. In fact, up to 9.2 percent of pregnant women have GD, according to a 2014 analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Know that with careful monitoring and treatment, it can be managed, and you can have a safe and healthy pregnancy. READ MORE: What causes gestational diabetes? Who's most at risk? What are the symptoms? How is it diagnosed? What are the complications? How can you prevent gestational diabetes? How is it treated? What happens to mom and baby after birth? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes usually starts between week 24 and week 28 of pregnancy when hormones from the placenta block insulin — a hormone produced in the pancreas that regulates the body's metabolism of fats and carbs and helps the body turn sugar into energy — from doing its job and prevent the body from regulating the increased blood sugar of pregnancy effectively. This causes hyperglycemia (or high levels of sugar in the blood), which can damage the nerves, blood vessels and organs in your body. Who’s most at risk for gestational diabetes? While researchers aren't certain why some women get gestational diabetes while others don’t, they do know that you may be at an increased risk if: You are overweight. Having a BMI of 30 or more going into pregnancy is one of the most common risk factors for gestational diabetes because the extra weight affects insulin's ability to properly keep blood sugar levels in check. You have a higher level of abdominal fat. Recent research published in the American Di Continue reading >>

Management Of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

Management Of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

Gestational diabetes mellitus is a common but controversial disorder. While no large randomized controlled trials show that screening for and treating gestational diabetes affect perinatal outcomes, multiple studies have documented an increase in adverse pregnancy outcomes in patients with the disorder. Data on perinatal mortality, however, are inconsistent. In some prospective studies, treatment of gestational diabetes has resulted in a decrease in shoulder dystocia (a frequently discussed perinatal outcome), but cesarean delivery has not been shown to reduce perinatal morbidity. Patients diagnosed with gestational diabetes should monitor their blood glucose levels, exercise, and undergo nutrition counseling for the purpose of maintaining normoglycemia. The commonly accepted treatment goal is to maintain a fasting capillary blood glucose level of less than 95 to 105 mg per dL (5.3 to 5.8 mmol per L); the ambiguity (i.e., the range) is due to imperfect data. The postprandial treatment goal should be a capillary blood glucose level of less than 140 mg per dL (7.8 mmol per L) at one hour and less than 120 mg per dL (6.7 mmol per L) at two hours. Patients not meeting these goals with dietary changes alone should begin insulin therapy. In patients with well-controlled diabetes, there is no need to pursue delivery before 40 weeks of gestation. In patients who require insulin or have other comorbid conditions, it is appropriate to begin antenatal screening with nonstress tests and an amniotic fluid index at 32 weeks of gestation. Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus is widely practiced despite lack of evidence that it prevents adverse perinatal outcomes. Although the disorder affects approximately 2.5 percent of pregnant women1 and has been the subject of extensive res Continue reading >>

12 Tips For Coping With Gestational Diabetes

12 Tips For Coping With Gestational Diabetes

My first pregnancy was pretty smooth sailing until the seventh month when I learned I had Gestational Diabetes. Common among Hispanics and women over 35, Gestational Diabetes (GD) is a condition in which women without previously diagnosed diabetes have high blood glucose levels during pregnancy, especially during third trimester. Although doctors aren’t sure why, women who are black, Hispanic, American Indian or Asian have an increased risk for developing gestational diabetes. In my case, I had eaten pretty healthy (I certainly wasn’t binging on sweets or desserts) and with medical counseling I learned my diagnosis was most likely hormonally based, meaning my placental hormones caused a rise in blood sugar not mater what I ate. For those of you diagnosed with GD, I’m not going to lie…it’s not a walk in the park, but it is manageable and the diagnosis forces you to be healthy during pregnancy (and not gain a ton of weight). Here are some things that helped me cope with GD and deliver a healthy baby in spite of having it (be sure to check with your doctor before you implement anything new into your GD self-care routine): 1. Seek a second opinion. Although I love my ob-gyn, I also saw an Endocrinologist at Northwestern who specializes in Diabetes and Gestational Diabetes. I did this for my second pregnancy and I would highly recommend it. I wish had done so for my first pregnancy. 2. Develop strategies to cope with GD “pain points.” The mandatory 2 hour fasting between meals was killer. Take a nap during those two-hour fasting windows if you can or keep yourself busy to make the time go by quickly. The fasting is what truly bothered me (and the continuous finger pricking). I only gained 25 pounds with my second pregnancy so being on the GD diet for nine month Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Many women develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy. Here is what you need to know to plan for or manage gestational diabetes. Before you schedule an appointment, it would be helpful to gather as much information as possible about the issues that are concerning you. We suggest you talk with family members and request medical records. What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that happens during pregnancy. Unlike type 1 diabetes, gestational diabetes is not caused by having too little insulin. Instead a hormone made by your placenta keeps your body from using the insulin as it should. This is called insulin resistance. Blood sugar (glucose) then builds up in your blood instead of being absorbed by the cells in your body. The symptoms of gestational diabetes usually go away after delivery. But sometimes they do not, or you may have a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes later. What causes gestational diabetes? Healthcare providers do not know what causes gestational diabetes, but they do know what happens. The placenta gives your growing baby nutrients and water. The placenta also makes several hormones to keep the pregnancy healthy. These hormones include: Estrogen Progesterone Cortisol Human placental lactogen These hormones can affect how your body uses insulin (contra-insulin effect). This usually begins about 20 to 24 weeks into your pregnancy and could lead to gestational diabetes. During pregnancy, more fat is stored in your body, you take in more calories, and you may get less exercise. All of these things can make your blood sugar (glucose) levels higher than normal and possibly lead to gestational diabetes. As the placenta grows, it makes more of the hormones. The risk for insulin resistance becomes greater. Normally you Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. When you are pregnant, high blood sugar levels are not good for your baby. About seven out of every 100 pregnant women in the United States get gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is diabetes that happens for the first time when a woman is pregnant. Most of the time, it goes away after you have your baby. But it does increase your risk for developing type 2 diabetes later on. Your child is also at risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Most women get a test to check for diabetes during their second trimester of pregnancy. Women at higher risk may get a test earlier. If you already have diabetes, the best time to control your blood sugar is before you get pregnant. High blood sugar levels can be harmful to your baby during the first weeks of pregnancy - even before you know you are pregnant. To keep you and your baby healthy, it is important to keep your blood sugar as close to normal as possible before and during pregnancy. Either type of diabetes during pregnancy increases the chances of problems for you and your baby. To help lower the chances talk to your health care team about A meal plan for your pregnancy A safe exercise plan How often to test your blood sugar Taking your medicine as prescribed. Your medicine plan may need to change during pregnancy. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

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