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How To Manage Diabetes Type 1

The Management Of Type 1 Diabetes

The Management Of Type 1 Diabetes

Go to: ABSTRACT Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterized by progressive pancreatic beta-cell loss resulting in insulin deficiency and hyperglycemia. Exogenous insulin therapy is essential to prevent fatal complications from hyperglycemia. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial and its long-term follow up, the Epidemiology of Diabetes and its Complications study, demonstrated that stringent glycemic control with intensive insulin therapy can prevent or postpone progression of microvascular disease and reduce risk for macrovascular disease and all-cause mortality. In addition, data obtained from the T1D Exchange, a registry of T1D patients founded in 2010, has become an invaluable resource for scientists worldwide, facilitating collaboration and accelerating understanding of prevailing diabetes practices. Insulin therapy using rapid- and long-acting insulin analogues is the mainstay of management of T1D. Insulin delivery is achieved subcutaneously using multiple daily injections or subcutaneous insulin infusion using insulin pumps. Effective management also involves use of self-monitoring of blood glucose using improved blood glucose meters, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices, and newer insulin pumps with integrated sensor-augmented systems. Addressing psychosocial aspects of T1D plays a crucial role in effective disease management. Strategies to manage T1D are rapidly evolving. In addition to newer insulins, adjunctive non-insulin therapies such as use of incretin agents and SGLT-2 and combination SGLT-1/2 inhibitors are being actively pursued. CGM technology combined with glucose prediction algorithms has allowed for the development of artificial pancreas delivery systems which are actively being tested in clinical trials. Cellular rep Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes (previously called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes) is usually diagnosed in children, teens, and young adults, but it can develop at any age. If you have type 1 diabetes, your pancreas isn’t making insulin or is making very little. Insulin is a hormone that enables blood sugar to enter the cells in your body where it can be used for energy. Without insulin, blood sugar can’t get into cells and builds up in the bloodstream. High blood sugar is damaging to the body and causes many of the symptoms and complications of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2—about 5% of people with diabetes have type 1. Currently, no one knows how to prevent type 1 diabetes, but it can be managed by following your doctor’s recommendations for living a healthy lifestyle, controlling your blood sugar, getting regular health checkups, and getting diabetes self-management education. Shakiness Nervousness or anxiety Sweating, chills, or clamminess Irritability or impatience Dizziness and difficulty concentrating Hunger or nausea Blurred vision Weakness or fatigue Anger, stubbornness, or sadness If your child has type 1 diabetes, you’ll be involved in diabetes care on a day-to-day basis, from serving healthy foods to giving insulin injections to watching for and treating hypoglycemia (low blood sugar; see below). You’ll also need to stay in close contact with your child’s health care team; they will help you understand the treatment plan and how to help your child stay healthy. Much of the information that follows applies to children as well as adults, and you can also click here for comprehensive information about managing your child’s type 1 diabetes. Causes Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistak Continue reading >>

How To Manage Type 1 Diabetes In A Healthy Way

How To Manage Type 1 Diabetes In A Healthy Way

Hiya Gorgeous, One of my biggest priorities is to help readers with chronic health issues thrive. And, a challenge that many of my readers (or the people they love) face is diabetes. So, last week we focused on type 2 diabetes and this week we’re shining a light on type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is something my team and I often talk about behind-the-scenes. That’s because our Crazy Sexy Dietitian, Jen Reilly, is mom to a very special young man with this health challenge. Her son, Jake, was diagnosed at age two. Whereas type 2 diabetes is often the result of insulin resistance and can sometimes be reversed with weight loss, exercise and a healthy diet, type 1 diabetes is the result of an autoimmune response where the body attacks and kills the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. Unfortunately, it can’t be reversed. Learn how technology, planning, prepping & high-protein plant foods can help you manage type 1 #diabetes. @Kris_Carr Even though there’s nothing that can prevent type 1 diabetes, Jen has made use of the amazing technology available and found some incredible plant-powered tricks to help her son thrive. And in honor of November being Diabetes Awareness Month, she’s here to share her nutrition and mama bear expertise with all of you. Although, these tips apply to adults, as well. Take it away, Jen! Thanks, Kris. While finding out that you or your child has a chronic health issue like diabetes is scary at first, it quickly becomes part of your daily routine. We’ve found a way to make sure Jake has a normal, healthy and happy life regardless of his diagnosis. And, the same goes for anyone with type 1. But before we get to the tips that’ll help you manage this health challenge, let’s cover some basics. The symptoms of type 1 are very subt Continue reading >>

What To Eat When You Have Type 1 Diabetes

What To Eat When You Have Type 1 Diabetes

It's important to eat a healthy diet when you have type 1 diabetes. That doesn't mean you can't enjoy tasty food, including some of your favorites. With type 1 diabetes, your body stops making insulin. So you take insulin every day either through shots or a pump. It’s also key to track your blood sugar levels. Insulin is only part of the picture. Diet and exercise also play important roles in helping keep your blood sugar levels stable. When you make healthy food choices and eat consistent amounts through the day, it can help control your sugars. It can also lower your chance of diabetes-related problems like heart disease, kidney disease, and nerve damage. Some experts used to think there was a "diabetes diet." They thought people with diabetes had to avoid all foods with sugars or stop eating certain other foods. But when you have type 1, you can eat the same healthy diet as everyone else. Follow some general guidelines: Eat less unhealthy fat. Cut back on the saturated fats you find in high-fat meats like bacon and regular ground beef, as well as full-fat dairy like whole milk and butter. Unhealthy fats raise your chance of heart disease. With diabetes, you face higher-than-average odds of getting heart disease. Make smart food choices to lower that risk. Get enough fiber. It may help control your blood sugar. You can get fiber from whole grains, beans, and fruits and vegetables. Try to get 25-30 grams a day. Those high-fiber foods are always better choices than low-fiber carbs such as refined 'white' grains and processed sugary foods. Carbohydrates are your body's main source of energy. You get them from many foods, like grains (pasta, bread, crackers, and cookies), fruits and vegetables, dairy products, and sugars. Carbs raise your blood sugar levels faster than Continue reading >>

Sick Day Management Tips When Your Child Has Type 1 Diabetes

Sick Day Management Tips When Your Child Has Type 1 Diabetes

Having a sick child can be challenging—getting time off work and securing a last-minute doctor's appointment isn't always easy. But when your sick child also happens to have type 1 diabetes, it presents a separate set of complications relating to insulin and blood glucose (blood sugar) management. This article covers some important considerations to keep in mind the next time your child with type 1 diabetes feels under the weather. Checking Blood Glucose and Ketones Even the most common ailments, such as a cold or flu, can cause your child's blood glucose levels to rise. Plus, some over-the-counter medications can cause blood glucose levels to increase even more. Complicating matters, your child's blood glucose levels may actually drop too low if he or she is vomiting or has stopped eating. You just can't be certain how an illness will affect your child's blood glucose—that's why it's important to check their levels more often than you normally would. A general guideline to shoot for is to check their blood glucose every 2 to 3 hours, but remember—that's a guideline. Your child may require more or fewer checks, depending on your health care professional's recommendations. In addition to checking blood glucose levels, you also need to check for the presence of ketones in the urine. In people with type 1 diabetes, common illnesses can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, a condition characterized by acidic blood caused by the release of too many ketones. Ketones are released when your body doesn't have enough insulin, so it's important to check your child's urine regularly (usually every 4 hours) until there are no ketones detected. If ketones are still present, that's a sign that your child needs more insulin. There are 2 ways to check ketones: using urine ketone strips Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management Classes: Type 1

Diabetes Management Classes: Type 1

Managing type 1 diabetes effectively requires a plan that's best for you, including insulin therapy, exercise, carbohydrate counting, checking blood sugar levels, and emotional support. You can learn more and achieve good control by attending one of the following type 1 diabetes classes: Mastering Your Diabetes An intensive four-day course designed to teach self-management skills to insulin-dependent participants. A Trip to the Supermarket This diabetes education class is offered in both English and Spanish. Come join us for “A Trip to the Supermarket!” During this 2 hour interactive diabetes education program, we will show you how to shop wisely and make healthy food choices at the grocery store using the basic principles of nutrition. Basal Bolus Insulin Therapy and Carbohydrate Counting This diabetes education class is designed to introduce patients to Basal Bolus Insulin Therapy. Carbohydrate counting is also covered. Basal/Bolus Terapia de Insulina y Cuenta de Carbohidratos Esta clase esta diseñada para presentar al paciente la terapia de insulina, Basal - Bolus y a la vez ayudar al paciente a mejorar su conocimiento y destrezas relacionadas con la nutrición. Continuous Glucose Monitoring Learn about the newest way to monitor your glucose level. This three-part diabetes education program will teach you about the different new devices -- and how to use them. Diabetes Made Simple Have you ever wondered what causes diabetes? How insulin really works? What happens to blood sugars when you exercise? All these questions and more are answered in our comprehensive diabetes education class. Domine La Diabetes Esta clase le ayudará a comprender de la manera más simple, los conceptos y herramientas que usted necesita para controlar su diabetes exitosamente. Insulin Pu Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Treatment

Type 1 Diabetes Treatment

Type 1 diabetes develops when the immune system attacks the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. When these cells don't work properly, the body can no longer produce insulin. People with type 1 diabetes therefore require lifelong insulin therapy. Other medications and lifestyle changes may also help people manage the disease. Insulin Delivery Insulin cannot be taken orally because the stomach's digestive juices will destroy the hormone. It must instead be taken by injection, using an insulin pen or a syringe, or through an insulin pump. Computerized insulin pumps have digital displays and are about the size of a cell phone. They also consist of an insulin reservoir and a catheter that is usually inserted into abdominal fat with a needle (it can also be inserted into the hips, thighs, buttocks, or arms). The pump continuously injects a pre-programmed small amount of insulin into the body (known as basal insulin), and the user programs a higher dose whenever food is eaten (known as a bolus dose of insulin). There's also a rapid-acting form of insulin, Afrezza, that can be inhaled through the mouth using an inhaler. Types of Insulin There are several different types of insulin, which vary based on how quickly they start working, when they peak in action, and how long they last. Rapid-acting insulin, such as Afrezza, Humalog (insulin lispro), Apidra (insulin glulisine), and Novo Rapid and NovoLog (insulin aspart), starts working about 15 minutes after administration, peaks after about one hour, and continues to work for two to four hours, according to the American Diabetes Association. Regular (short-acting) insulin, such as Humulin R and Novolin R, starts working after about 30 minutes, peaks after two to three hours, and continues to work for three to six hours. Continue reading >>

Treating & Managing Type 1 Diabetes

Treating & Managing Type 1 Diabetes

Understanding type 1 diabetes is the first step to managing it. Get information on type 1 diabetes causes, risk factors, warning signs, and prevention tips. Type 1 diabetes requires lifelong treatment to keep blood sugar levels within a target range. For those with diabetes, an insulin shot delivers medicine into the tissue between your skin and muscle. Follow these steps when injecting insulin. If you have diabetes, a fear of needles or an impression that injections equate to failure can keep you from gaining the benefits of injectable medicines. Learn how overcoming the fear of injections can lower your risk for diabetes complications. It's important to eat a healthy diet when you have type 1 diabetes. Learn what to eat and why it matters. Diabetes doesn't have to limit your child. Learn how to help manage your child's disease, at and away from home. Well-controlled blood sugars help children with diabetes grow and develop normally. See guidelines for your child's blood sugar level. Continue reading >>

A Day-to-day Guide For Managing Type 1 Diabetes

A Day-to-day Guide For Managing Type 1 Diabetes

Intro It’s normal to feel overwhelmed about managing type 1 diabetes, especially when life gets busy. After all, dealing with diabetes isn’t always convenient. While each day is different, adding some simple strategies into your daily routine can help you to stay on track and live well with type 1 diabetes. Morning Rise, shine, and check your blood sugar Check your blood sugar as soon as possible after you wake up. This will give you an idea of what your blood sugar was like overnight. You can correct it right away with food or insulin if you find that it’s too high or too low. You may also consider recording your blood sugar levels and other important information in a diabetes journal. This can help you can keep of track of how well your diabetes is controlled from day to day. Start your day with a healthy breakfast Eating well is an important part of managing type 1 diabetes. Start your day off right with a nutritious breakfast that follows your healthy eating plan. A healthy plan for type 1 diabetes typically includes foods from each food group, such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean protein, and healthy fats. Since you’re taking insulin, you should also include a moderate amount of healthy carbohydrates at each meal. This will prevent your blood sugar from dropping too low. Make sure to keep track of your carbs and match your intake with your insulin dosage, if needed. You can record this information in your diabetes journal. Some quick and easy breakfast ideas for people with type 1 diabetes include scrambled eggs, oatmeal with low-fat milk, or a fruit and yogurt parfait. Don’t forget to test your blood sugar before and after each meal, including breakfast. Take your medications Remember to take your insulin and any other medications. For busy Continue reading >>

How To Manage Type 1 Diabetes As You Age

How To Manage Type 1 Diabetes As You Age

1 Use insulin injection to manage the amount of insulin present in your body. If you are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, you will usually be put on insulin injection. Insulin injections provide the body with otherwise missing insulin that helps in the uptake of glucose from the blood stream. That way, the glucose in the blood can be taken to the cells where it is used for the production of energy. Type 1 diabetic patients are advised to use insulin injections everyday to ensure that their blood sugar is controlled. 2 Learn how to inject yourself as soon as possible. You must learn to inject yourself unless you are too young to understand. Learning how to administer insulin to yourself effectively will ensure that you do not suffer from spiked blood sugar every time you are away from someone who can administer your insulin. If you want to administer insulin for your child, you can learn how by following the instructions of your child's doctor. Your child will be taught how to inject him/herself as they grow up and are able to understand. Most children are able to self-administer the injections when they reach the age of 14. 3 Choose how you want to administer your insulin. Insulin is usually injected into the skin using a pump, insulin pen, or syringe. You can choose what method you would prefer to administer your own insulin. Insulin is usually given via injection because it cannot be taken through the mouth. This is because the acid that is in the stomach will destroy the insulin. 4 Choose the best type of insulin to best suit your needs. There are different types of insulin and they all act differently. As you age, your doctor will advise you on the best type for you. Some of them are long acting, meaning that they are released slowly in the body, and this type includ Continue reading >>

Tight Control Of Type 1 Diabetes Saves Lives, But It's Tough

Tight Control Of Type 1 Diabetes Saves Lives, But It's Tough

Here's more evidence that for people with Type 1 diabetes, strict blood sugar control matters – in this case, it actually reduces the risk of early death. But another study reveals the grim reality: Those with the condition still die about a decade sooner than those without. As someone who has lived with Type 1 myself for over 40 years – I was diagnosed in 1973, at age 9 – I can tell you that keeping my blood sugars in control 24/7 is incredibly difficult. And that's despite having the knowledge on how to do it, as well as the health insurance that covers my test strips and insulin pump supplies. Many others with Type 1 diabetes don't, which helps explain the gap between what the studies say is best practice and what happens in real life. Back in 1993, the landmark Diabetes Control and Complications (DCCT) trial demonstrated what many in the field had believed but hadn't proven: If people with Type 1 diabetes strictly controlled their blood sugar levels shortly after being diagnosed they could often avoid the complications that high blood sugar can cause over time. People in the "intensive" treatment group for seven years had dramatically lower rates of eye, nerve and kidney damage. After that study ended, most of the original 1,441 participants have been followed in their regular lives, under the management of their personal physicians. And intensive control is now urged for everyone. The fear of not waking up in the morning because of low blood sugar is a constant in the life of those of us with Type 1 diabetes, and it's one of the main reasons we struggle to stay in control. The study published Tuesday in JAMA, the journal of the American Medical Association, shows that those people now have roughly the same level of blood sugar control, regardless of whether t Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Treatment & Management

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Treatment & Management

Approach Considerations Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) require lifelong insulin therapy. Most require 2 or more injections of insulin daily, with doses adjusted on the basis of self-monitoring of blood glucose levels. Long-term management requires a multidisciplinary approach that includes physicians, nurses, dietitians, and selected specialists. In some patients, the onset of type 1 DM is marked by an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) but is followed by a symptom-free “honeymoon period” in which the symptoms remit and the patient requires little or no insulin. This remission is caused by a partial return of endogenous insulin secretion, and it may last for several weeks or months (sometimes for as long as 1-2 years). Ultimately, however, the disease recurs, and patients require insulin therapy. Often, the patient with new-onset type 1 DM who presents with mild manifestations and who is judged to be compliant can begin insulin therapy as an outpatient. However, this approach requires close follow-up and the ability to provide immediate and thorough education about the use of insulin; the signs, symptoms, and treatment of hypoglycemia; and the need to self-monitor blood glucose levels. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends using patient age as one consideration in the establishment of glycemic goals, with targets for preprandial, bedtime/overnight, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. [5] In 2014, the ADA released a position statement on the diagnosis and management of type 1 diabetes in all age groups. The statement includes a new pediatric glycemic control target of HbA1c of less than 7.5% across all pediatric age groups, replacing earlier guidelines that specified different glycemic control targets by age. The adult HbA1c target of les Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

requires treatment to keep blood sugar levels within a target range. Treatment includes: Taking several insulin injections every day or using an insulin pump. Monitoring blood sugar levels several times a day. Eating a healthy diet that spreads carbohydrate throughout the day. Regular physical activity or exercise. Exercise helps the body to use insulin more efficiently. It may also lower your risk for heart and blood vessel disease. Regular medical checkups. You will get routine screening tests and exams to watch for signs of complications, such as eye, kidney, heart, blood vessel, and nerve diseases. Not smoking. Not drinking alcohol if you are at risk for periods of low blood sugar. Blood sugars are easier to predict and control when mealtimes, amounts of food, and exercise are similar every day. So getting into a daily routine helps a lot. Diabetic ketoacidosis Some people find out that they have type 1 diabetes when they are admitted to a hospital for diabetic ketoacidosis. If their symptoms are severe, they may need to be treated in an intensive care unit. Treatment for diabetic ketoacidosis includes fluids given through a vein (intravenous, or IV) to treat dehydration and to balance electrolytes, and insulin to lower the blood sugar level and stop the body from producing ketones. The honeymoon period If your blood sugar levels return to the normal range soon after diagnosis, you are in what is called the "honeymoon period." This is a time when the remaining insulin-producing cells in your pancreas are working harder to supply enough insulin for your body. Treatment during this time may include: Keeping in close touch with your doctor. Testing your blood sugar level often, to see if it is rising. Taking very small amounts of insulin or no insulin. Even though you Continue reading >>

10 Tips To Stay Healthy With Type 1

10 Tips To Stay Healthy With Type 1

A Type 1 psychologist shares 7 guidelines from certified diabetes educators, as well as 3 mental tips of her own. Michael J. Fox once said this about living with Parkinson’s disease: “I often say now I don’t have any choice whether or not I have Parkinson’s, but surrounding that non-choice is a million other choices that I can make.” As someone who lives with Type 1, I argue that you can say the same about living with Type 1. You don’t have a choice whether or not you have Type 1 diabetes, but you can make “a million other choices” of how you will live with it. My job is to help others with diabetes make the best choices for themselves. As a cognitive behavior therapist and certified diabetes educator, I specialize in treating the emotional issues of coping with diabetes. I help my patients examine their thoughts and actions toward living with diabetes. The American Association of Diabetes Educators have developed seven key guidelines to help manage diabetes. Called the AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors, they include: -Healthy Eating – Having diabetes means learning how to count carbohydrates and how the foods you eat affect your blood sugar. A healthy meal plan also includes complex carbohydrates, protein, fiber (beans, whole grains, fruits and vegetables), lots of green, leafy vegetables, and limited amounts of heart-healthy fats. -Being Active – Physical activity can help you keep blood sugar levels normal and manage your diabetes. Being active can also improve your mood and reduce your feelings of stress and anxiety. -Monitoring – Checking your blood sugar levels regularly gives you information about your diabetes management. Monitoring helps you know when your blood sugar levels are within your target range and helps you to make choices in what you ea Continue reading >>

Treatment

Treatment

There's no cure for diabetes, so treatment aims to keep your blood glucose levels as normal as possible and to control your symptoms to prevent health problems developing later in life. If you've been diagnosed with diabetes, you'll be referred for specialist treatment from a diabetes care team. They'll be able to help you understand your treatment and closely monitor your condition to identify any health problems that may occur. Type 1 diabetes occurs because your body doesn't produce any insulin. This means you'll need regular insulin treatment to keep your glucose levels normal. Insulin comes in several different preparations, each of which works slightly differently. For example, some last up to a whole day (long-acting), some last up to eight hours (short-acting) and some work quickly but don't last very long (rapid-acting). Your treatment is likely to include a combination of different insulin preparations. Insulin Insulin injections If you have type 1 diabetes, you'll probably need insulin injections. Insulin must be injected, because if it were taken as a tablet, it would be broken down in your stomach (like food) and would be unable to enter your bloodstream. When you're first diagnosed, your diabetes care team will help you with your insulin injections, before showing you how and when to do it yourself. They'll also show you how to store your insulin and dispose of your needles properly. Insulin injections are usually given by an injection pen, which is also known as an insulin pen or auto-injector. Sometimes, injections are given using a syringe. Most people need two to four injections a day. Your GP or diabetes nurse may also teach one of your close friends or relatives how to inject the insulin properly. Insulin pump therapy Insulin pump therapy is an alter Continue reading >>

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