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How To Manage Diabetes

Diabetes Management

Diabetes Management

The term diabetes includes several different metabolic disorders that all, if left untreated, result in abnormally high concentration of a sugar called glucose in the blood. Diabetes mellitus type 1 results when the pancreas no longer produces significant amounts of the hormone insulin, usually owing to the autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. Diabetes mellitus type 2, in contrast, is now thought to result from autoimmune attacks on the pancreas and/or insulin resistance. The pancreas of a person with type 2 diabetes may be producing normal or even abnormally large amounts of insulin. Other forms of diabetes mellitus, such as the various forms of maturity onset diabetes of the young, may represent some combination of insufficient insulin production and insulin resistance. Some degree of insulin resistance may also be present in a person with type 1 diabetes. The main goal of diabetes management is, as far as possible, to restore carbohydrate metabolism to a normal state. To achieve this goal, individuals with an absolute deficiency of insulin require insulin replacement therapy, which is given through injections or an insulin pump. Insulin resistance, in contrast, can be corrected by dietary modifications and exercise. Other goals of diabetes management are to prevent or treat the many complications that can result from the disease itself and from its treatment. Overview[edit] Goals[edit] The treatment goals are related to effective control of blood glucose, blood pressure and lipids, to minimize the risk of long-term consequences associated with diabetes. They are suggested in clinical practice guidelines released by various national and international diabetes agencies. The targets are: HbA1c of 6%[1] to 7.0%[2] Preprandial blood Continue reading >>

How Can You Manage Your Diabetes?

How Can You Manage Your Diabetes?

The goals of diabetes management are to: Keep your blood sugar levels as near normal as safely possible by balancing food intake with physical activity and medication. Help slow or possibly prevent the development of diabetes-related health problems. Here are five tips to remember when managing your diabetes: Test your blood glucose as recommended by your health care professional. Take your medicine as prescribed by the doctor-- be it tablets (pills) or injectable medicines like insulin. Make healthy food choices. Be physically active. Learn all you can do to manage your diabetes and live a healthier life. Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes

Managing Diabetes

The Diabetes ABCs It’s important for people with diabetes to know their “ABCs” A = A1c The A1c is a blood test done by your doctor that measures the average of your blood sugar for a two to three month period. This test along with daily monitoring of your blood sugar is the best way to know how well controlled your diabetes is. A normal A1C is 4-6 percent for the person without diabetes. For people with diabetes: Good control is measured at 6-7 percent, which isequal to an average daily blood sugar of 150-180. A need to make changes is measured at 7-8 percent. A potential danger is measured above 8 percent. This level isequal to a daily average blood sugar of over 200. So no longer can we say that keeping the blood sugar around 200 is okay– you are causing damage to your body at this level. This test should be done every six months if you are in good control and every three months if you are not in good control. B = Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure (hypertension) often occurs with diabetes. With diabetes, your blood pressure should be less than 130/80. If your blood pressure is higher than this, you may be damaging many of your body’s organs. C = Cholesterol Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance made in the liver and found in certain foods, such as food from animals, like dairy products, eggs, and meat. People with diabetes should have their blood cholesterol checked at least once every year. Since having diabetes already puts you at risk for heart disease, it's especially important to keep your cholesterol levels in check. Your overall cholesterol level needs to be under 200 but more importantly is the types of cholesterol. Low density lipoproteins (LDL): LDL, also called "bad" cholesterol, can cause buildup of plaque on the walls of arteries. The more Continue reading >>

Tips For Managing Type 1 And 2 Diabetes At Home

Tips For Managing Type 1 And 2 Diabetes At Home

Diabetes home care management facts Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition associated with abnormally high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. The main types of diabetes mellitus are type 1 (insulin deficiency; formerly called juvenile diabetes) and type 2 (insulin resistance). Type 1 diabetes requires insulin therapy as well as controlled nutrition and exercise. Type 2 diabetes is best treated with weight reduction, the proper diabetic diet, and exercise. When these measures do not control the blood sugar, oral medications and/or injectable therapies (including insulin) are prescribed. The main goal of diabetes care is to control blood glucose levels in order to prevent the serious complications of diabetes. Glucose levels should be lowered into the normal range, while avoiding low blood sugar whenever possible. It is essential to monitor the effects of treatment on blood glucose levels to avoid overtreatment or undertreatment. Two kinds of home blood glucose monitoring exist. The first type uses a reagent strip. The second type uses a reagent strip and glucose meter. Use of the glucose meter has become more common due to higher reliability than strips alone. Glucose can also be measured in the urine but no longer has a significant role in home testing. Ketoacidosis is a serious but preventable complication from inadequate treatment of diabetes. This dangerous condition is identified by testing for the urine for ketones. People with diabetes should discuss monitoring in detail with their health-care professional, and have clearly defined goals for blood sugar control. Choices for blood glucose meters should be discussed with your physician and any caregivers. The optimal meter accounts for characteristics of the patient which impact usability, such as visual impa Continue reading >>

How To Manage Diabetes On A Sick Day

How To Manage Diabetes On A Sick Day

Thank you for watching our video about managing diabetes on a sick day. Please take a moment to answer the questions below. Your responses will be kept confidential and are for research purposes only. Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital Of Chicago Institutional Review Board We are asking you to take part in a research study being done by Parag Shah at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago (Lurie Children’s). Providing Home Based Education For Families You are being asked to take part in this survey because you have just watched a video showing you how to do certain tasks related to your health care. If you choose to be in the study, you will complete a survey. This survey will help us learn more about how useful these videos are in helping our families. The survey will take about 5 minutes to complete. Being in this study is optional and voluntary. You do not have to take this survey if you do not want to. The answers that you provide in the survey may still be used if you stop the survey and do not finish. Any question you do not answer will not be collected. You can skip questions that you do not want to answer or stop the survey at any time. The survey is anonymous, and no one will be able to link your answers back to you. Please do not include your name or your child’s name or other information that could be used to identify you or your child in the survey responses. There are no direct benefits to you for taking this survey. The information learned from this survey will help the researchers learn more about the utility of video based education. This survey is being done online. The information that you provide in the survey will not be linked to your computer, email address, or other electronic identifiers. Information provided in this Continue reading >>

How To Crush Your Ride Despite Diabetes

How To Crush Your Ride Despite Diabetes

Image courtesy of Team Novo-Nordisk/BrakeThrough Media At this moment, about 30 million Americans—nearly 10 percent of the population—are living with diabetes. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention projects that up to one in three Americans will have diabetes by 2050. Scientists are still trying to figure out what exactly is going on (diet and lifestyle certainly play large roles), but one thing is for certain: A lot of people are living with a fairly complex condition, and the situation will worsen. In a nutshell, diabetes is a human energy crisis condition. Type 1 develops when the body cannot make any insulin, the hormone that controls blood sugar. Type 2 develops when the body cannot produce enough insulin, or the insulin being produced does not work properly. Insulin manages your blood glucose levels by moving sugars from food you eat into your cells; without it, that fuel remains in the bloodstream, where it damages organs and tissues. It’s fatal without treatment. Fortunately, diabetics can use pharmaceutical insulin to mimic the body’s natural process. But it’s a balancing act: They have to carefully synchronize their insulin injections and blood sugar levels, factoring in the food they’ve eaten and their physical activity. As one might imagine, that can make daily living—let alone bike riding—a challenge. With the right steps, however, it’s a challenge you can meet. We solicited advice and wisdom from successful cyclists living and competing with diabetes, including pros racing for Team Novo Nordisk, a global all-diabetic sports team of cyclists, triathletes, and runners; Team Skyline Pro Cycling; and Colavita/Bianchi p/b Fine Cooking. Here’s what they told us about riding while diabetic. Form Your Team and Plan of Attack The first s Continue reading >>

How To Manage Diabetes During Illness

How To Manage Diabetes During Illness

Battling a cold, getting over an injury or undergoing surgery is no fun for anyone. For people with diabetes, managing blood sugar is an extra concern. The stress of illness or injury can cause blood sugar to rise and make insulin less effective. This can lead to serious problems, including diabetic coma. That’s why it’s important to know what to do when illness strikes. Manage medicine When you’re sick, your blood sugar can be high even if you’re not eating much. So it’s especially important to take your diabetes medicine on time. You might need extra medicine. If you take diabetes pills, you may also need to take insulin until you’ve recovered. And if you already take insulin, you may need more than usual. Monitoring glucose When you’re ill, check your blood glucose often. Have someone help you if you can’t do it yourself. You may need to check ketones, too. Record the results in case you need to report them to your healthcare provider. Food and fluids Try to follow your diabetes meal plan. Drink plenty of calorie-free fluids, especially water. These fluids help rid your body of extra glucose and prevent dehydration. If you can’t eat or keep down enough solid food, you may need to have some soup or drink beverages that contain sugar, such as apple juice. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have questions about your food and beverage intake. Be prepared The best way to cope with illness is to develop a sick-day plan before you get sick. Work with your diabetes care team to find out what type of diabetes medicine to take while sick and how much you will need. Ask how often you should check blood glucose and ketones. Check with your healthcare provider about over-the-counter, sugar-free cold medicines that are safe for you to take. Also list alterna Continue reading >>

5 Tips To Get Your Diabetes Under Control

5 Tips To Get Your Diabetes Under Control

Controlling your diabetes is a daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly challenge, but the effort is worth it. Right away you'll feel better and have more energy.The payoff? You'll live better longer with less risk of problems from diabetes like heart attacks, strokes, kidney failure, even blindness. The key to managing your diabetes is to keep your blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. It sounds tough, but there are simple steps you can follow. Spot Check Your Sugar You and your doctor will have set a schedule to test your blood sugar. Add an extra check on top. Maybe at breakfast one day, lunch the next, and so on. It's like popping in unannounced. "If you're a supervisor and your workers know that you're only going to come once a day to check on them, chances are they're going to be well-behaved during that particular time and the rest of the day you're going to be doing other things," says Sethu Reddy, MD, chief of the adult diabetes section at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. "If you spot check, you have a much better sense of how things are going." Use that information to adjust your eating and exercise to gain even better control if you need to. Count Carbs They can quickly send your blood sugar on a roller-coaster ride. That's why it's so important to keep track. Most women need 35-45 grams of carbs per meal while guys need 45-60 grams, says Jessica Crandall, a dietitian and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. A cup of rice or pasta is about 45 grams. To make the most of them, pair your carbs with a protein, like nuts. Opt for high-fiber carbs. Both will slow digestion so you feel full without raising blood sugar. "Fiber is really important for blood-sugar control, but it's also a Roto-Rooter to clear out cholesterol building in Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

How To Stabilize Your Blood Sugar

How To Stabilize Your Blood Sugar

Life with type 2 diabetes can sometimes seem like an hourly or even minute-by-minute effort to stabilize your blood sugar. All of the recommendations and drugs you’ve been given as part of your type 2 diabetes treatment plan are intended to help you reach — and keep — healthy blood sugar levels most of the time. But doctors are learning that to control type 2 diabetes well, better information about why blood sugar matters and how to manage it is essential. The Facts About Diabetes and Blood Sugar As the American Diabetes Association (ADA) explains, your body needs sugar (glucose) for fuel, and there’s a fairly complicated process that makes it possible for your body to use that sugar. Insulin, which is made by the pancreas, is the hormone that enables the cells in your body to take advantage of sugar. Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body isn’t able to remove sugar from your blood. This can happen if your body stops being sensitive to insulin or if it starts to respond in a delayed or exaggerated way to changes in your blood sugar. Diabetes is signaled by an elevated blood sugar level of more than 126 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) for a fasting blood test, or more than 200 mg/dL at any time during the day. It can also be indicated by a hemoglobin A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher, a measure of the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin in the blood during the past two to three months. (Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells that transports oxygen throughout the body. So an A1C of 6.5 means that 6.5 percent of your red blood cells have sugar attached to them.) Unchecked high blood sugar gradually damages the blood vessels in your body. Over the long term, this slow, progressive harm can lead to a dangerous loss of sensation in your legs and fe Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management: How Lifestyle, Daily Routine Affect Blood Sugar

Diabetes Management: How Lifestyle, Daily Routine Affect Blood Sugar

Diabetes management requires awareness. Know what makes your blood sugar level rise and fall — And how to control these day-to-day factors. Keeping your blood sugar levels within the range recommended by your doctor can be challenging. That's because many things make your blood sugar levels change, sometimes unexpectedly. Following are some factors that can affect your blood sugar levels. Food Healthy eating is a cornerstone of healthy living — with or without diabetes. But if you have diabetes, you need to know how foods affect your blood sugar levels. It's not only the type of food you eat but also how much you eat and the combinations of food types you eat. What to do: Learn about carbohydrate counting and portion sizes. A key to many diabetes management plans is learning how to count carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are the foods that often have the biggest impact on your blood sugar levels. And for people taking mealtime insulin, it's crucial to know the amount of carbohydrates in your food, so you get the proper insulin dose. Learn what portion size is appropriate for each type of food. Simplify your meal planning by writing down portions for the foods you eat often. Use measuring cups or a scale to ensure proper portion size and an accurate carbohydrate count. Make every meal well-balanced. As much as possible, plan for every meal to have a good mix of starches, fruits and vegetables, proteins and fats. It's especially important to pay attention to the types of carbohydrates you choose. Some carbohydrates, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains, are better for you than are others. These foods are low in carbohydrates and contain fiber that helps keep your blood sugar levels more stable. Talk to your doctor, nurse or dietitian about the best food choices and Continue reading >>

Patient Guide To Managing Your Child's Type 1 Diabetes

Patient Guide To Managing Your Child's Type 1 Diabetes

This Patient Guide is designed especially for parents of children with type 1 diabetes. Here, you'll learn about some of the most important aspects of managing your child's condition. Taking care of a child who has type 1 diabetes can be very difficult because it requires constant attention. You need to make sure your child is eating the right foods at the right times and injecting the right amount of insulin at the right times. Plus, you have to alert the people who spend a lot of time with your child—such as teachers and coaches—to your child's condition. It's a lot of work. The goal of this Guide is to help you understand type 1 diabetes so you can effectively address the needs of your child. In it, you'll find information on: If you take the time to learn all you can about type 1 diabetes, you'll be better able to respond to the unique needs of your child. We hope this Patients' Guide is a useful resource that helps answer some of your questions about type 1 diabetes management. However, always follow your doctor's specific recommendations. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management

Diabetes Management

Diabetes is a serious disease in which your blood glucose (blood sugar) is too high. Diabetes affects almost every part of your body. Diabetes can lead to heart attack; stroke; eye problems that can lead to trouble seeing or going blind; nerve damage that can cause your hands and feet to hurt, tingle, or feel numb – some people may even lose a foot or a leg; kidney problems that can cause your kidneys to stop working; and gum disease and loss of teeth. These are the different types of diabetes: Type 1 Diabetes. The body does not make insulin. Insulin helps the body use glucose from food for energy. People with type 1 need to take insulin every day. Type 2 Diabetes. The body does not make or use insulin well. People with type 2 often need to take pills or insulin. Type 2 is the most common form of diabetes. Gestational Diabetes. This may occur when a woman is pregnant. It raises her risk of getting another type of diabetes, mostly type 2, for the rest of her life. It also raises her child's risk of being overweight and getting diabetes. It is important to take good care of yourself and your diabetes so that you can feel better and help avoid other health problems caused by diabetes. When you manage your blood glucose levels, you are likely to have more energy, be less tired and thirsty, and urinate less frequently. Other advantages to managing your health are that you may have fewer problems with your eyesight, feet and gums, heal better, and have fewer skin or bladder infections. Involve the help of others to help you take care of your diabetes. Seek help from a large network of people who are experts on you and/or your health, including doctors, diabetes educators, eye doctors, mental health counselors, nurse practitioners, social workers, dentists, dietitians, foot Continue reading >>

Tips For Managing Diabetes

Tips For Managing Diabetes

Although some try to dismiss it as just a touch of sugar, diabetes is a serious condition that occurs when levels of glucose in the blood are too high, a situation that is linked with a lengthy list of worrisome health problems. According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, nearly 10 percent of Americans had diabetes as of 2015. Interestingly, seniors are more likely to find themselves battling this condition. The institute reports that roughly 25 percent of people over the age of 65 are diabetic. If you’re a diabetic, there are things that you can do to protect your health, including incorporating these tips for managing diabetes into your life. Tips for Managing Diabetes If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, controlling your blood sugar is vital. Fortunately, employing these useful tips for managing diabetes can make that easier. Educate Yourself Knowledge is power, so take time to learn what diabetes is and the impact it has on the human body. Talk with your doctor and other health professionals to learn how to manage your condition. Don’t be afraid to ask questions and explore potential treatments. Learn when and how to check your blood sugar and take your medications properly. Monitor Your Diabetes ABCs Diabetes can increase your risk of a heart attack and stroke, so it’s important to be alert for red flags that could signal a problem. Monitoring your diabetes ABCs means keeping an eye on the following: A1C: A blood test that measures your average blood sugar level over a three-month period, the A1C gives you a better understanding of how your glucose levels are doing over time. When they are too high, your heart, blood vessels, kidneys, feet, and eyes can be damaged. Determining whether you are on track with your A1C Continue reading >>

4 Steps To Manage Your Diabetes For Life

4 Steps To Manage Your Diabetes For Life

This publication has been reviewed by NDEP for plain language principles. Learn more about our review process. Actions you can take The marks in this booklet show actions you can take to manage your diabetes. Help your health care team make a diabetes care plan that will work for you. Learn to make wise choices for your diabetes care each day. Step 1: Learn about diabetes. What is diabetes? There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes – Your body does not make insulin. This is a problem because you need insulin to take the sugar (glucose) from the foods you eat and turn it into energy for your body. You need to take insulin every day to live. Type 2 diabetes – Your body does not make or use insulin well. You may need to take pills or insulin to help control your diabetes. Type 2 is the most common type of diabetes. Gestational (jest-TAY-shun-al) diabetes – Some women get this kind of diabetes when they are pregnant. Most of the time, it goes away after the baby is born. But even if it goes away, these women and their children have a greater chance of getting diabetes later in life. You are the most important member of your health care team. You are the one who manages your diabetes day by day. Talk to your doctor about how you can best care for your diabetes to stay healthy. Some others who can help are: dentist diabetes doctor diabetes educator dietitian eye doctor foot doctor friends and family mental health counselor nurse nurse practitioner pharmacist social worker How to learn more about diabetes. Take classes to learn more about living with diabetes. To find a class, check with your health care team, hospital, or area health clinic. You can also search online. Join a support group — in-person or online — to get peer support with managing your Continue reading >>

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