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How To Manage Diabetes

How To Manage Gestational Diabetes

How To Manage Gestational Diabetes

I was pregnant with my first child when I went to my doctor's office for the routine screening for gestational diabetes at 28 weeks. I drank the sugar solution, and the nurse tested my blood sugar. I failed. Then I had to take the three-hour glucose tolerance test, but the nurse told me, "Your sugar isn't too high. I'm sure you'll pass." I didn't. I remember feeling scared and wondering what this meant for me and my baby, but a diagnosis of gestational diabetes doesn't have to be scary. It just means some extra monitoring, changes to your diet and perhaps some additional medication to keep your blood sugar stable and your baby safe. Gestational diabetes is quite common. Two to 10 percent of pregnant women develop the condition. According to the Mayo Clinic, the placenta, which connects your baby to your blood supply, produces high levels of various hormones. Almost all of them impair the action of insulin in your cells, which raises your blood sugar. As your baby grows, the placenta produces more and more insulin-blocking hormones. For most women, this isn't an issue because their pancreas just secretes enough insulin to keep their blood sugar stable. But when a woman has gestational diabetes, her pancreas can't keep up with the rise in blood sugar, which can affect the growth and welfare of her baby. After my diagnosis, I wanted to know what I needed to do to keep my baby safe. My doctor first referred me to a nutritionist, who taught me how to adjust my diet in order to eat a specific number of carbohydrates to keep my blood sugar stable. I was also encouraged to exercise because it lowers your blood sugar by stimulating your body to move glucose into your cells, where it's used for energy. I also learned how to monitor my blood sugar. My doctor told me to test four t Continue reading >>

12 Ways To Manage Diabetes During Pregnancy

12 Ways To Manage Diabetes During Pregnancy

A healthy pregnancy is a priority for every mother-to-be, but for women who have diabetes, including those who are diagnosed with gestational diabetes, their health care can become more complex. Women with diabetes who are diagnosed prior to pregnancy have a higher risk for complications, including miscarriage and birth defects. As the pregnancy progresses, women with diabetes are at risk for high blood pressure, preeclampsia, eclampsia, preterm and prolonged labor, cesarean section and its associated complications. Up to 9.2 percent of women have gestational diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and for these women in particular, their babies have a higher risk for high birth weight and shoulder dystocia, a complication during delivery. Babies born with low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) will likely have to be in the NICU for a few days after birth. The good news is that with a plan, healthy strategies and support, you can control your diabetes, have a healthy pregnancy, and deliver a healthy baby. Follow these expert tips: 1. See your doctor before you get pregnant. If you have diabetes and plan to conceive, you should talk to your doctor to make sure your A1C levels are normal, talk about medication if it’s necessary or ask for a referral to a nutritionist. Women with Type 1 diabetes should ask their doctors about a kidney function test, a thyroid test and an eye exam because other conditions can worsen, said Dr. Lois Jovanovic, an endocrinologist and clinical professor of medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. 2. Lose weight. One of the best ways to ensure you will have a healthy pregnancy is to make sure you start out at a normal weight. If your pregnancy was unplanned— Continue reading >>

How To Manage Diabetes With Basal-bolus Insulin Therapy

How To Manage Diabetes With Basal-bolus Insulin Therapy

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way the body produces and uses insulin. Basal-bolus insulin therapy is a way of managing this condition. In type 1 diabetes, the production of insulin is affected. In type 2 diabetes, both the production and use of insulin are affected. In people without diabetes, insulin is produced by the pancreas to keep the body's blood sugar levels under control throughout the day. The pancreas produces enough insulin, whether the body is active, resting, eating, sick, or sleeping. This allows people without diabetes to eat food at any time of the day, without their blood sugar levels changing dramatically. For people with diabetes, this doesn't happen. However, a similar level of blood sugar control can be achieved by injecting insulin. Injections can be used throughout the day to mimic the two types of insulin: basal and bolus. People without diabetes produce these throughout the day and at mealtimes, respectively. What is a basal-bolus insulin regimen? A basal-bolus insulin regimen involves a person with diabetes taking both basal and bolus insulin throughout the day. It offers them a way to control their blood sugar levels. It helps achieve levels similar to a person without diabetes. Advantages There are several advantages to using a basal-bolus insulin regimen. These include: flexibility as to when to have meals control of blood sugar levels overnight they are helpful for people who do shift work they are helpful if travelling across different time zones Disadvantages The downsides to a basal-bolus regimen are that: people may need to take up to 4 injections a day adapting to this routine can be challenging it can be hard to remember to take the injections it can be hard to time the injections it's necessary to keep a supply of insulin w Continue reading >>

Contact Us To Find Out Which Community Is Right For You .

Contact Us To Find Out Which Community Is Right For You .

Be well. Take power over diabetes. Eskaton is here to help manage diabetes for you and your loved ones. At our communities, we provide a comprehensive method to diabetic management to empower you. Our program includes these key elements: Understand diabetes to give you control Education is key to understanding how diabetes affects your body. We involve you and your family in creating your personalized plan of care. Know the importance of diet We feature diabetic-friendly options at every meal. We’ll teach you how to choose wisely. Watch the video of Eskaton Chef Kary Saunders prepare healthy eating options including sliders, salads, fish, snacks and even dessert. Effectively communicate with team members Residents and families benefit by knowing what to report and what questions to ask. Manage your medications and supplements We’ll assist you in taking the right medications at the right time. Understand the importance of exercise Be active. We’ll show you how and give you opportunities. If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with diabetes, here are some available resources: Continue reading >>

5 Tips To Get Your Diabetes Under Control

5 Tips To Get Your Diabetes Under Control

Controlling your diabetes is a daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly challenge, but the effort is worth it. Right away you'll feel better and have more energy.The payoff? You'll live better longer with less risk of problems from diabetes like heart attacks, strokes, kidney failure, even blindness. The key to managing your diabetes is to keep your blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. It sounds tough, but there are simple steps you can follow. Spot Check Your Sugar You and your doctor will have set a schedule to test your blood sugar. Add an extra check on top. Maybe at breakfast one day, lunch the next, and so on. It's like popping in unannounced. "If you're a supervisor and your workers know that you're only going to come once a day to check on them, chances are they're going to be well-behaved during that particular time and the rest of the day you're going to be doing other things," says Sethu Reddy, MD, chief of the adult diabetes section at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. "If you spot check, you have a much better sense of how things are going." Use that information to adjust your eating and exercise to gain even better control if you need to. Count Carbs They can quickly send your blood sugar on a roller-coaster ride. That's why it's so important to keep track. Most women need 35-45 grams of carbs per meal while guys need 45-60 grams, says Jessica Crandall, a dietitian and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. A cup of rice or pasta is about 45 grams. To make the most of them, pair your carbs with a protein, like nuts. Opt for high-fiber carbs. Both will slow digestion so you feel full without raising blood sugar. "Fiber is really important for blood-sugar control, but it's also a Roto-Rooter to clear out cholesterol building in Continue reading >>

Tips To Better Manage Diabetes

Tips To Better Manage Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is becoming one of the most commonly diagnosed diseases in the United States today. Each year, a whopping 1.4 million people hear the bad news that they have Type 2 diabetes. As they do, they join an estimated 29.1 million people already struggling to manage their disease. As they do, they join an estimated 29.1 million people already struggling to manage their disease. But what many of these individuals do not know is that some simple lifestyle tweaks along with the aid of modern technology can vastly reduce the time spent managing their disease. If you have just been diagnosed or have been told you are pre-diabetic, read on to learn five tips that will help make managing diabetes so much easier! Tip 1: Make some dietary adjustments. The best place to start simplifying your daily management tasks is with what you eat and drink. Most Americans take in vastly more sugar than is healthy, so the benefit here is that, as you adjust what you eat and drink, you will be improving your overall health as well as any symptoms of your disease. Experts recommend these as key components of a healthy diet: Fresh fruits. Fresh non-starch vegetables. Non-processed whole grains. Beans and legumes. Lean meats and proteins. Low-fat or nonfat dairy foods. Here, avoiding sugary sodas and fast foods is especially important, as these tend to be loaded with just the kinds of ingredients your disease responds least well to. Tip 2: Tackle the scale. Going on a “diet” is no fun! In fact, new research clearly shows that dieting as a temporary weight loss solution typically does not work and can actually cause more weight gain over the long-term. Instead, begin with Tip 1 here and begin to transform your daily nutrient intake as a means to stabilize and then lower your weight ov Continue reading >>

Managing Gestational Diabetes

Managing Gestational Diabetes

I have gestational diabetes. Will I see my doctor more often? Once you know you have gestational diabetes, you'll probably see your healthcare provider at least every two weeks. If you take insulin or another medication, you may need to see your provider once a week. In your third trimester, you may have one or more ultrasound exams to check how your baby is growing. If you take medications to control your diabetes, you may also have a fetal nonstress test once or twice a week. This is a safe test which measures your baby's movements and heartbeat. It's important to go to all your prenatal appointments, even if you're feeling well. Your provider will need to monitor you and your baby regularly and may adjust your treatment plan based on the results of your tests. What will I need to do if I have gestational diabetes? The key to managing your condition is tracking your blood sugar levels. This helps you take control of your condition and be sure that your treatment plan is working. Your healthcare provider will show you how to test your own blood sugar using a special device. This involves pricking your finger with a small surgical blade called a lancet. Although some women find it unpleasant at first, it isn't usually painful. Your provider will tell you how often to test your blood sugar. Usually, you need to test yourself first thing in the morning before you eat or drink anything, and then one or two hours after each meal. If you have trouble controlling your blood sugar, you may need to test more often. If your blood sugar is normal most of the time, you may be able to test less often. Your provider will also recommend lifestyle changes to help you to manage your gestational diabetes. Your blood sugar levels will show if these changes are working. What lifestyle cha Continue reading >>

How To Crush Your Ride Despite Diabetes

How To Crush Your Ride Despite Diabetes

Image courtesy of Team Novo-Nordisk/BrakeThrough Media At this moment, about 30 million Americans—nearly 10 percent of the population—are living with diabetes. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention projects that up to one in three Americans will have diabetes by 2050. Scientists are still trying to figure out what exactly is going on (diet and lifestyle certainly play large roles), but one thing is for certain: A lot of people are living with a fairly complex condition, and the situation will worsen. In a nutshell, diabetes is a human energy crisis condition. Type 1 develops when the body cannot make any insulin, the hormone that controls blood sugar. Type 2 develops when the body cannot produce enough insulin, or the insulin being produced does not work properly. Insulin manages your blood glucose levels by moving sugars from food you eat into your cells; without it, that fuel remains in the bloodstream, where it damages organs and tissues. It’s fatal without treatment. Fortunately, diabetics can use pharmaceutical insulin to mimic the body’s natural process. But it’s a balancing act: They have to carefully synchronize their insulin injections and blood sugar levels, factoring in the food they’ve eaten and their physical activity. As one might imagine, that can make daily living—let alone bike riding—a challenge. With the right steps, however, it’s a challenge you can meet. We solicited advice and wisdom from successful cyclists living and competing with diabetes, including pros racing for Team Novo Nordisk, a global all-diabetic sports team of cyclists, triathletes, and runners; Team Skyline Pro Cycling; and Colavita/Bianchi p/b Fine Cooking. Here’s what they told us about riding while diabetic. Form Your Team and Plan of Attack The first s Continue reading >>

How We Manage Diabetes During Exercise (part 1)

How We Manage Diabetes During Exercise (part 1)

Team Novo Nordisk athletes train and race like any other athlete, but living and racing with diabetes requires a different approach. Here’s how we do it. WATCH: HOW WE MANAGE DIABETES (PART 1) We are Team Novo Nordisk. We live with diabetes. Team Novo Nordisk is a global all-diabetes sports team of cyclists, triathletes and runners, spearheaded by the world’s first all-diabetes professional cycling team. We train and race like any other athlete, but living and racing with diabetes requires a different approach. Here’s how do it. What is your sport and when did you start competing? Pro rider Joe Eldridge: My sport is cycling. I first got into cycling as a way to manage my diabetes and that led me to racing. Women’s Team rider Morgan Brown: My sport is cycling. I first started competing when I was 18 years old. Were you diagnosed before or after you became a competitive athlete? Women’s Team rider Morgan Brown: I was diagnosed with diabetes before I became a competitive athlete. Pro rider Joe Eldridge: I was always competitive, and when I was diagnosed with diabetes I had to figure out how I could be competitive again. Women’s Team rider Morgan Brown: When I first started my sport, the challenges I faced were: I had poor management of my diabetes, so I was really inconsistent. And for me, that’s what made me start managing my diabetes better- my inconsistency on the bike. I’d have great days on the bike and really bad days on the bike, and it always related to my blood sugar not being where it needed to be. Pro rider Joe Eldridge: I learned that I needed to check my blood sugar, and I always needed to have food with, in case I needed it, in case my blood sugar was too low, I’d have to eat something. Or I’d have to take insulin if my blood sugar wasn’ Continue reading >>

How To Manage Diabetes On A Sick Day

How To Manage Diabetes On A Sick Day

Thank you for watching our video about managing diabetes on a sick day. Please take a moment to answer the questions below. Your responses will be kept confidential and are for research purposes only. Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital Of Chicago Institutional Review Board We are asking you to take part in a research study being done by Parag Shah at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago (Lurie Children’s). Providing Home Based Education For Families You are being asked to take part in this survey because you have just watched a video showing you how to do certain tasks related to your health care. If you choose to be in the study, you will complete a survey. This survey will help us learn more about how useful these videos are in helping our families. The survey will take about 5 minutes to complete. Being in this study is optional and voluntary. You do not have to take this survey if you do not want to. The answers that you provide in the survey may still be used if you stop the survey and do not finish. Any question you do not answer will not be collected. You can skip questions that you do not want to answer or stop the survey at any time. The survey is anonymous, and no one will be able to link your answers back to you. Please do not include your name or your child’s name or other information that could be used to identify you or your child in the survey responses. There are no direct benefits to you for taking this survey. The information learned from this survey will help the researchers learn more about the utility of video based education. This survey is being done online. The information that you provide in the survey will not be linked to your computer, email address, or other electronic identifiers. Information provided in this Continue reading >>

How To Beat Type 2 Diabetes With Diet And Lifestyle Changes

How To Beat Type 2 Diabetes With Diet And Lifestyle Changes

It's no secret that type 2 diabetes is on the rise in the United States and around the world. But if you've been diagnosed with diabetes, there's a lot you can do to improve your health — and the best place to start is likely by making some changes to your lifestyle. “Basic principles of good health like eating right, exercising regularly, and maintaining a healthy weight can be as effective as medicine in the management of type 2 diabetes for most people,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, CDE, lead medical nutrition therapist at Nebraska Medicine in Omaha. That's backed up by the Look AHEAD study, a large clinical trial funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The researchers found that over a four-year period, changes like eating a healthier diet and getting more exercise led to weight loss and improved diabetes control in 5,000 overweight or obese participants with type 2 diabetes. A December 2016 review in Diabetologia similarly found through 28 studies that participants who were able to achieve about 150 minutes per week of moderate activity lowered their risk of type 2 diabetes by 26 percent compared with nonactive participants. If you're ready to make positive changes to help control diabetes, here's how to get started. Improve Your Diet to Help You Treat Type 2 Diabetes Naturally Keeping close tabs on your diet is a major way to help manage type 2 diabetes. A healthy diet for people with type 2 diabetes includes fresh or frozen fruit and vegetables, whole grains, beans, lean meats, and low-fat or fat-free dairy. Focus on eating fruit and non-starchy vegetables, like broccoli, carrots, and lettuce, and having smaller portions of starchy foods, meats, and dairy products. Be especially careful about loading Continue reading >>

How Can You Manage Your Diabetes?

How Can You Manage Your Diabetes?

The goals of diabetes management are to: Keep your blood sugar levels as near normal as safely possible by balancing food intake with physical activity and medication. Help slow or possibly prevent the development of diabetes-related health problems. Here are five tips to remember when managing your diabetes: Test your blood glucose as recommended by your health care professional. Take your medicine as prescribed by the doctor-- be it tablets (pills) or injectable medicines like insulin. Make healthy food choices. Be physically active. Learn all you can do to manage your diabetes and live a healthier life. Continue reading >>

2010 Aaha Diabetes Management Guidelines For Dogs And Cats

2010 Aaha Diabetes Management Guidelines For Dogs And Cats

Renee Rucinsky, DVM, ABVP (Feline) (Chair) | Audrey Cook, BVM&:S, MRCVS, Diplomate ACVIM-SAIM, Diplomate ECVIM-CA | Steve Haley, DVM | Richard Nelson, DVM, Diplomate ACVIM | Debra L. Zoran, DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVIM | Melanie Poundstone, DVM, ABVP - Download PDF - Introduction Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a treatable condition that requires a committed effort by veterinarian and client. This document provides current recommendations for the treatment of diabetes in dogs and cats. Treatment of DM is a combination of art and science, due in part to the many factors that affect the diabetic state and the animal's response. Each animal needs individualized, frequent reassessment, and treatment may be modified based on response. In both dogs and cats, DM is caused by loss or dysfunction of pancreatic beta cells. In the dog, beta cell loss tends to be rapid and progressive, and it is usually due to immune-mediated destruction, vacuolar degeneration, or pancreatitis.1 Intact females may be transiently diabetic due to the insulin-resistant effects of the diestrus phase. In the cat, loss or dysfunction of beta cells is the result of insulin resistance, islet amyloidosis, or chronic lymphoplasmacytic pancreatitis.2 Risk factors for both dogs and cats include insulin resistance caused by obesity, other diseases (e.g., acromegaly in cats, hyperadrenocorticism in dogs), or medications (e.g., steroids, progestins). Genetics is a suspected risk factor, and certain breeds of dogs (Australian terriers, beagles, Samoyeds, keeshonden3) and cats (Burmese4) are more susceptible. Regardless of the underlying etiology, diabetic dogs and cats are hyperglycemic and glycosuric, which leads to the classic clinical signs of polyuria, polydipsia (PU/PD), polyphagia, and weight loss. Increased fat mobi Continue reading >>

Living Healthier With Diabetes

Living Healthier With Diabetes

Diabetes is a rapidly growing health problem. Currently, more than 21 million people in the United States have diabetes. Without care, diabetes can lead to complications that include kidney failure, eye problems, nerve damage, heart disease and high blood pressure, stroke, and more. The good news: although diabetes is a lifelong condition, by taking action you can live a healthy life. Whether you’re newly diagnosed with diabetes or have been living with it for some time, these steps are key to keeping diabetes under control: Keep your blood sugar (glucose) levels well controlled: Test your blood sugar to be sure it is in the target range set by you and your doctor. Take blood sugar medication as prescribed by your doctor. Eat a healthy diet. The right nutrition is key to preventing, delaying, or better managing diabetes. Aim for a healthy weight. If you're overweight, losing as little as 7 to 15 pounds can make a big difference in your health. Stay or become more physically active. Try walking for 30 minutes at least 5 days a week. If you have diabetes, learn how to manage it with Care for Diabetes. If you don’t have diabetes, find out if you’re at risk. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management

Diabetes Management

The term diabetes includes several different metabolic disorders that all, if left untreated, result in abnormally high concentration of a sugar called glucose in the blood. Diabetes mellitus type 1 results when the pancreas no longer produces significant amounts of the hormone insulin, usually owing to the autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. Diabetes mellitus type 2, in contrast, is now thought to result from autoimmune attacks on the pancreas and/or insulin resistance. The pancreas of a person with type 2 diabetes may be producing normal or even abnormally large amounts of insulin. Other forms of diabetes mellitus, such as the various forms of maturity onset diabetes of the young, may represent some combination of insufficient insulin production and insulin resistance. Some degree of insulin resistance may also be present in a person with type 1 diabetes. The main goal of diabetes management is, as far as possible, to restore carbohydrate metabolism to a normal state. To achieve this goal, individuals with an absolute deficiency of insulin require insulin replacement therapy, which is given through injections or an insulin pump. Insulin resistance, in contrast, can be corrected by dietary modifications and exercise. Other goals of diabetes management are to prevent or treat the many complications that can result from the disease itself and from its treatment. Overview[edit] Goals[edit] The treatment goals are related to effective control of blood glucose, blood pressure and lipids, to minimize the risk of long-term consequences associated with diabetes. They are suggested in clinical practice guidelines released by various national and international diabetes agencies. The targets are: HbA1c of 6%[1] to 7.0%[2] Preprandial blood Continue reading >>

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