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How To Make Glucose Syrup Recipe

Glucose Syrup - Wikipedia

Glucose Syrup - Wikipedia

Glucose syrup, also known as confectioner's glucose, is a syrup made from the hydrolysis of starch . Glucose is a sugar . Maize (corn) is commonly used as the source of the starch in the US, in which case the syrup is called " corn syrup ", but glucose syrup is also made from potatoes and wheat , and less often from barley , rice and cassava . [1] p.21 [2] Glucose syrup containing over 90% glucose is used in industrial fermentation , [3] but syrups used in confectionery contain varying amounts of glucose , maltose and higher oligosaccharides , depending on the grade, and can typically contain 10% to 43% glucose. [4] Glucose syrup is used in foods to sweeten, soften texture and add volume. By converting some of the glucose in corn syrup into fructose (using an enzymatic process), a sweeter product, high fructose corn syrup can be produced. Depending on the method used to hydrolyse the starch and on the extent to which the hydrolysis reaction has been allowed to proceed, different grades of glucose syrup are produced, which have different characteristics and uses. The syrups are broadly categorised according to their dextrose equivalent (DE). The further the hydrolysis process proceeds, the more reducing sugars are produced, and the higher the DE. Depending on the process used, glucose syrups with different compositions, and hence different technical properties, can have the same DE. The original glucose syrups were manufactured by acid hydrolysis of corn starch at high temperature and pressure. The typical product had a DE of 42, but quality was variable due to the difficulty of controlling the reaction. Higher DE syrups made by acid hydrolysis tend to have a bitter taste and a dark colour, due to the production of hydroxymethylfurfural and other byproducts. [1] p.26 Th Continue reading >>

Baking - How Do I Make Liquid Glucose From Powdered Glucose - Seasoned Advice

Baking - How Do I Make Liquid Glucose From Powdered Glucose - Seasoned Advice

How do I make liquid glucose from powdered glucose I recently decided to make something that required liquid glucose, 140g of it. No problem in general, but for some reason none of my usual suppliers had stock (even tried pharmacies). The closest I found was glucose powder. Unfortunately, having no clue how to "re-hydrate" the powder to a liquid form, I experimented. :-) I can safely say that 100g glucose powder was way to much as a substitute for 140g of liquid glucose (which I expected). However, I was wondering if any of you had a convenient method of turning powdered glucose into the wonderfully thick and sticky liquid glucose, in case I ever find myself in that position. Chemically speaking, saying "liquid glucose" is inaccurate. To explain, at normal temperatures, glucose is a solid; depending on the isomer/chiral form , melts at ~150C, and is a liquid above that temperature when not under pressure. ...What you want is a solution (syrup) with water. Glucose also dissolves in nonpolar solvents for other 'liquid' solutions. zanlok Nov 30 '12 at 18:50 Well, the answer is "it depends." This is pretty much the same as asking, "I have sugar, and I want sugar syrup. How much water do I add?" It depends on the concentration you're looking for. If you're looking for a 24% solution, it's 24 grams of glucose in 76 grams of water. A 30% solution is 30 grams of glucose in 70 grams of water, etc, etc. Unless you have some chemical reason to avoid dextrin, you can just substitute corn syrup. The only reason they use glucose in Europe is because they don't have our superabundance of corn. I live in South Africa, and unfortunately corn syrup is not generally available. We base most of our syrups and sugars off sugar cane. brianb Aug 25 '11 at 17:11 Sorry, forgot to ask. What is c Continue reading >>

Types Of Glucose Syrup Substitutes

Types Of Glucose Syrup Substitutes

Glucose syrup is another name for corn syrup and is common in a wide variety of foods. Dietary restrictions, personal preference or sound logic might lead you to want to avoid glucose syrup in your diet. Several substitutes can replace the flavor of the glucose syrup. Many of these are easy to find or prepare. Sweets almost always have some sort of glucose syrup. Substitute non-nutritive sweeteners for glucose syrup. Brand names for these sweeteners include Equal and Splenda; the active ingredient in these are aspartame and sucralose. These products have no calories and are therefore ideal for diabetics and as replacements in beverages such as coffee and cold foods that do not require baking. To make your own concoction of a glucose syrup substitute, combine 2 cups of white sugar, 3/4 cups water, 1/4 tsp. cream of tartar and a dash of salt in a large pan. Stir all the ingredients together and bring the temperature up so a strong boil is present in the pan. Then, reduce the heat to a simmer and let sit for 3 minutes. Uncover the pan and let it sit until it reaches a soft, buttery consistency. Simple syrup, a popular mixture used in a plethora of cocktails and baking recipes, is a suitable substitute for glucose syrup. Simple syrup is simply one part water to one part sugar. You usually make it by bringing water to a boil, adding the sugar slowly and mixing the concoction until you have added the suitable amount of sugar. Honey is a natural sweetener that you can use in place of glucose syrup. Honey is a sweeter ingredient than corn syrup but its use will cause minimal change to the flavor profile of your recipe. Use it as a replacement in equal parts, as you would use the glucose syrup. Continue reading >>

Homemade Corn Syrup - Homegrown In The Valley

Homemade Corn Syrup - Homegrown In The Valley

Ever find yourself in the middle of your holiday baking, sure that you have enough corn syrup and find out that low and behold you are either out or do not have quite enough for your recipe? Me Too!This is a perfect substitution for store-bought corn syrup! Let me try to answer a few questions you may have about corn syrup: Q: Can anything be substituted for the store bought corn syrup? A: Yes! depending on what you are using it for and if it calls for dark or light corn syrup you have a few options. Honey is an option that should work in most recipes and you can make your own corn syrup to get you through. Q: Is the homemade corn syrup the exact same as the store bought? A: Not the exact same. We are only trying to create a substitute version. Store bought corn syrup is stabilized to avoid the sugar crystallizing. Homemade corn syrup can get some of the sugar to crystalize after it cools down. It will work in most recipes but if you are a serious candy maker you may want to stick with store bought for those hard candies or specialty recipes. But your average person can use the homemade in most of your baking/cooking. Q: What do I do if my corn syrup does crystallize? A: Usually gently reheating it and adding just a little bit of hot water to it will be enough to liquify those sugar crystals I have TWO recipes for you today. I use them both. The first is my in a pinch, middle of a recipe rescue, and the second one is my make my own large batch plan ahead recipe. Continue reading >>

Invert Sugar Recipe | By Pastry Chef Author Eddy Van Damme

Invert Sugar Recipe | By Pastry Chef Author Eddy Van Damme

An advantage a professional pastry chef has is that certain key ingredients are readily available. One of these ingredients is invert sugar. Although invert sugar is close in chemical composition to honey, it is not found on most grocery store shelves. The good news is that homemade invert sugar is quickly made by anyone. For countless confectionary or baking applications, a corn syrup substitute or replacement can be invert sugar. Invert sugar is used extensively in confectionary for preparations such as ganache, jellies, fudge, and taffy and in the preparation of sorbets and ice cream. Its ability for controlling crystallization and creating a smoother mouth feel in these products is the main reason why it is used in the first place. Invert sugar is hygroscopic which leads to a reduction of available water in food preparations, resulting in a longer shelf life of countless products. It lowers the spread of bacteria and basically acts as a preservative. The humectant properties of invert sugar are high and will keep products such as fillings for chocolates and fudge much longer moist and tender. Invert sugar also contributes to the Maillard reaction (caramelizing) and consequently will aid the browning process. Also utilized in certain baked goods like Madeleines and brioche where invert sugar is used to increase tenderness and moistness. For all the above mentioned attributes of invert sugar the one I am most excited about is that invert sugar intensifies aromas, especially in sorbet and certain chocolate ganache applications. With so many desirable attributes in confectionary and baking, the question why use invert sugar, is no longer a mystery. For many years confectioners and pastry chefs have added glucose and or corn syrup into boiled sugar applications to preve Continue reading >>

Simple Syrup | Recipe | Chefsteps

Simple Syrup | Recipe | Chefsteps

Simple syrup is simply sugar dissolved into water. The syrup provides an easy way to add dissolved sugar to any recipe. At room temperature (68 F / 20 F), you can dissolve about 67 g of sucrose into 33 g of water to make 100 g of simple syrup. Chefs and bartenders often refer to this as a two-to-one simple syrup. A less-concentrated simple syrup, using a one-to-one ratio, is also common. If you want to prepare a more concentrated syrup, then you must increase the temperature of the water to increase its ability to dissolve sugar. In fact, it's always easier to dissolve the sugar into hot water and then cool the syrup, as we do in this recipe. The not-so-simple thing is to make sure the syrup doesn't become grainy. This can happen in several ways. You cool the syrup too far. The solubility of sugar decreases with temperature, and so the excess sugar crystallizes. You leave the simple syrup uncovered. Water evaporates and the solution eventually becomes concentrated beyond the point of saturation. Sugar crystals start to form at the surface, where evaporation is happening more quickly. You stir a simple syrup that's close to its saturation point. Sometimes that's enough to cause fine crystals to suddenly form. The solution? Raising the temperature of the syrup, adding a bit more water, or doing both are the easiest ways to re-dissolve these crystals. Or, you can add glucose -- a sugar that doesn't readily form crystals. Corn syrup is another ingredient that slows the nucleation and growth of sugar crystals. By adding just a little bit to a nearly saturated simple syrup, the solution is less likely to become grainy over time. This is why pastry chefs often add glucose to recipes that contain a lot of sugar, like caramel, meringues, and sorbets. These recipes all contain s Continue reading >>

How To Make Sugar Syrup

How To Make Sugar Syrup

Two Methods: Simple Syrup Variations Community Q&A A basic sugar syrup is about as simple as it gets: combine sugar and water, heat, and stir until dissolves. For cooks that enjoy experimentation, there are plenty of tips for avoiding sugar crystals, extending shelf life, or adding other flavors. Either way, you'll end up with a great sweetener for cocktails, coffee, or candied fruit. Spoonful vodka (optional to extend shelf life) Choose your sugar. White, granulated sugar is the default for simple syrup, but you do have other options. Superfine sugar reduces the risk of crystallization. A raw brown sugar such as turbinado or demerara creates a brown, molasses-flavored syrup good for rum or bourbon cocktails. [1] Do not use confectioner's sugar (powdered sugar). This usually contains cornstarch, which does not dissolve in water. The syrup will be cloudy or grainy. Measure water and sugar. Measure the sugar and water and combine in a saucepan. Use an equal amount of both ingredients for a basic syrup. For a more concentrated syrup, use up to twice as much sugar as water. A more concentrated syrup has a higher risk of crystallizing back into solids, but will last longer in the fridge. Some bartenders prefer a concentrated syrup because it can sweeten a cocktail without adding too much water. For greater accuracy, measure ingredients by weight on a kitchen scale. Using volume measurements (cups or milliliters) won't cause major issue, but you'll end up with about the amount of sugar. [2] Heat and stir. Turn on the heat under your sugar-water mixture. Stir until all the sugar crystals have dissolved. The sugar usually dissolves within a few minutes, but a large batch may take longer. Do not let the mixture boil. If you lose too much water, the sugar may not be able to diss Continue reading >>

Bongtaste : Liquid Glucose Or Glucose Syrup Without Using Cream Of Tartar.

Bongtaste : Liquid Glucose Or Glucose Syrup Without Using Cream Of Tartar.

LIQUID GLUCOSE OR GLUCOSE SYRUP WITHOUT USING CREAM OF TARTAR. Liquid glucose, sometimes called glucose syrup, is a liquid sweetener used to keep icings and baked goods moist and soft. It is used for baking..specially fondant making. It is better to buy from market but if you do not get it at stote as it is not easily available. .then you can follow this recipe. Cream of Tartar is a special ingredient of making Glucose Syrup.but it is also not easily available. . so here I made liquid glucose with using simple ingredients.. Combine water and sugar in a heavy large pan. Stir and bring to a boil on medium flame. Add baking powder..mix and stir with whisker or spatula. Add baking soda..mix and continuous stirring. ..otherwise water will come out. Reduce heat to a simmer and put cover on it for 3 minutes to get sugar crystals off the sides of the pan. Uncover and cook until it reaches soft ball stage. Stir often.Cool syrup at room temperature.....store it in Airtight container for 10 to 15 days. Continue reading >>

10 Ways To Use Up Your Jar Of Queen Glucose Syrup

10 Ways To Use Up Your Jar Of Queen Glucose Syrup

10 ways to use up your jar of Queen Glucose Syrup If you have a humble jar of Queen Glucose stashed away at the back of the pantry, this blog is for you! Read on to discover new recipes to make using glucose and why its such a handy baking ingredient. Glucose syrup is typically used in foods to enhance flavour, soften, add volume and prevent crystallisation. There is a tonne of incredible ways to use up that jar of goodness, so weve rounded up 10 amazing ideas to use up that jar of Queen Glucose Syrup , that hopefully become new favourites in your baking repertoire. Home > Blog > Inspiration Alert > 10 ways to use up your jar of Queen Glucose Syrup Marshmallows, what can we say? Pillowy soft, fluffy and irresistible. You may end up using your jar making batch after batch of these Vanilla and Maple Marshmallows. If youve never made your own marshmallows, youre in for a treat. Glucose is the ultimate texture enhancer, not only does it stop crystallisation, it creates a creamier marshmallow and helps keep them soft and squishy for days. If they last that long Glucose is the perfect substitute for corn syrup. Traditionally, Pecan Pie is made with half corn syrup, half sugar to create a smooth textured pie without being overly sweet. This means that delicious pecan flavour shines through without too much caramelisation. Glucose is one of the best binders for Chewy Granola Bars. Its perfect for holding all your ingredients together without the sweetness that honey, sugar or other syrups give. Because Glucose is only 74% sweetness of sugar its perfect for those who prefer their granola bars on the lower end of the sweetness scale. To put it simply, the molecules in glucose stop the other sugars from crystallising, which creates that gritty, icy texture you sometimes find in y Continue reading >>

Homemade Clear White Syrup

Homemade Clear White Syrup

A selection of recipes. - Max M Rasmussen Video recipe - You often need a syrup as a base ingredient in other recipes. The is a short presentation about how to make your own syrup. I present one basic recipe and show 4 variations that you can use as an ingredient in other recipes. usage: often used as basic syrup in sorbet ice and syrup in canned fruit fruit. usage: often used as syrup in canned fruit. usage: Italian meringue, cream puffs, marzipan. cup (100 grams) grape sugar or glucose. cup (100 grams) grape sugar or glucose. Bring water and sugar to a boil. Let it cook until there are no visible sugar crystals left. But be aware that the longer you cook it, the more water will evaporate. So you may risk that a 1:3 syrup becomes a 1:4 instead. 1:1 (1 part sugar to 1 part water) and 1:2 syrup can usually be stored for long periods at room temperature without any problems. When you make 1:3 and 1:4 syrup then it will crystallizes if you just let it stand. You can reheat it and melt the sugar, but that is a hassle. In order to avoid crystallization you mix two different kinds of sugar together in your syrup. Sugar molecules are a bit like Lego bricks. If they are all the same they will easily glue together and form crystals. If they are different they will not. So mixing different types of bricks / molecules prevents that they grow together and crystalize. There must be added more than 20% "foreign" sugar for it to work. You can use both glucose, dextrose or most other sugars. Whatever you can most easily get a hold of. It does not make much difference in the amounts if you are using a syrup or a powder as the foreign sugar. You can add flavor to your syrup as you like. The seeds from a vanilla pod is a good and classical flavour. Citrus zest. A stick of cinnamon. A sta Continue reading >>

How To Make Sugar Syrup - Simple Syrup Recipe

How To Make Sugar Syrup - Simple Syrup Recipe

It is just sugar and water boiled together. This liquid substance has all the same sweetness of granulated sugar. It is the secret ingredient to the best cold homemade beverages, cocktails, and other drink recipes. It is so much easier to swirl in a prepared translucent liquid than it is to add sugar directly, because the granules dont need to dissolve. It is a basic and indispensable ingredient of cocktail making. Simple Syrup has a multitude of uses and is a great addition to mixed drinks, tea, and coffee! It is perfect for sweetening your cold drinks where regular sugar wouldnt normally dissolve with ease. You will find many uses for simple syrup in your cooking, as it can also be used in sorbets, candying fruits, moistening sponge cakes, etc. With these easy-to-make recipes below, you can make as small or as large a batch as you wish and store it in the refrigerator in a well sealed bottle. It takes less than 5 minutes to make Simple Syrup. So, never purchase it from a store again and do not ever pass up a recipe calling for simple syrup. They dont call it simple for nothing! There are several thicknesses or densities of simple syrup and they have different uses. The thickness depending on the ratio of water to sugar used. The one with more sugar will be more syrupy and sweeter. Follow the measurements listed in your recipe, or use these general guidelines: Thin Simple Syrup A ratio of 3 parts water to 1 part sugar used to glaze cakes and cookies. Medium Simple Syrup A ratio of 2 parts water to 1 part sugar used to make sweeten beverages and iced tea. Thick or Rich Simple Syrup(basic simple syrup) A ratio of 1 part water to 1 part sugar This is used as the basis for cold fruit drinks and cocktails. Also used to make candied fruits. Bartenders usually prefer this si Continue reading >>

Light Corn Syrup Substitute Liquid Glucose - Kolej Universiti

Light Corn Syrup Substitute Liquid Glucose - Kolej Universiti

Corn syrup (glucose syrup) recipe, without tartar, isi corn syrup se maine soan papdi banai hai Sugar - 300 grams Water - 900 ml or 1 litter Lemon - 2 small slice. All i ask is that you please give this video a thumbs up and leave a comment if you wish :) With regards to the temps, please reverse what i said as i mixed up the fahrenheit and celsius.... How to Make Homemade Corn Syrup Substitute This video will teach you how to make corn syrup in a less processed way. This syrup has a good consistency similar to the original corn syrup. This syrup can be used to make various desserts... Sugar syrup(Corn Syrup Substitute)(Glucose Syrup)Recipe without Tarter It is a very simple and easy recipe to make.It can be used to make Cake,Burfi ,laddoo etc PHDMP1002-01. Easy recipe substitute for corn syrup with all properties of natural corn syrup. Anti-crystallizing. For more info: Today I'm going to share my top five sugar... If you enjoyed the video PLEASE give me a thumbs up, it helps me out A TON!!! Hi everyone! Today I am showing you how to make a corn syrup recipe, just in case you don't have any on... Corn Syrup - Simple Recipes - Easy to Learn To Subscribe utubetip Continue reading >>

Homemade Sugar Syrup: A Viable Alternative For Glucose Syrup? : Askculinary

Homemade Sugar Syrup: A Viable Alternative For Glucose Syrup? : Askculinary

Edit: Yes, this is possible! Glucose syrup is an invert sugar (meaning it's hygroscopic, i.e., attracts water), and making your own is very simple. The recipe I originally posted (imperial measures) and this one provided by /u/wunderbier (in metric) will both work. As I learned from the ever-helpful and gracious AskCulinary redditors, invert sugar is basically made by boiling sugar in water and an acid (citric acid and cream of tartar both work). More info can be found in this useful wiki . Please remember to be very careful when boiling sugar, make sure your thermometer is calibrated correctly, and keep your hands and feet inside the car at all times. Thanks, everyone! Greetings, from the land of sptzle and jellied meats, where making American treats is a study in MacGyver-like creativity! I need glucose syrup, my friends, but I live in Germany where stores don't carry standard American ingredients, close before the sun sets, and are never open on Sundays. I plan on making some things from the Momofuku Milk Bar cookbook (example cookie recipe) , which calls for glucose (or corn syrup in a pinch), neither of which are readily available here. A basic search for alternatives gave me this cane sugar syrup . *If so, should I use a 1:1 ratio? The cookie recipe doesn't call for much glucose (50 grams), but as I understand it, glucose is not as sweet as standard table sugar, so how heavily could the sugar syrup impact the sweetness? *Does anyone have an opinion on whether this could be used as a substitute in every application of glucose/corn syrup? Note: Pharmacies allegedly carry glukosesirup, so all is not lost if I can't make my own, but I've already been (happily!) forced into self-sufficiency by making my own brown sugar, vanilla extract, and baking powder, so I kinda w Continue reading >>

Liquid Glucose Substitutes

Liquid Glucose Substitutes

Corn syrup is a type of liquid glucose.Photo Credit: Jupiterimages/PHOTOS.com>>/Getty Images Liquid glucose, sometimes called glucose syrup, is a liquid sweetener used to keep icings and baked goods moist and soft. A number of other liquid sweeteners can be used in a 1-to-1 replacement if you don't have liquid glucose, although the end product may taste somewhat different depending on which sweetener you use. Corn syrup is probably one of the best replacements for glucose syrup. It's actually a form of glucose syrup, which can be made from any number of starchy foods, including corn, potatoes or wheat. In the United States, corn syrup is one of the most readily available types of glucose syrup. Light corn syrup is a better replacement than dark corn syrup because the flavor isn't as strong. It has 62 calories and about 17 grams of sugar per tablespoon. Golden syrup is a liquid sweetener more commonly used in the United Kingdom and the Caribbean than in the United States. It's a little thicker and darker in color than glucose or corn syrup and has a stronger flavor, but still makes a good substitute. It's also called cane syrup, cane juice and light treacle. Each tablespoon has 56 calories and about 15 grams of sugar. If you don't have glucose syrup or corn syrup available, you can make a substitute at home. One option is cane sugar syrup, made by mixing granulated cane sugar with water and a small amount of cream of tartar and salt. Cane syrup has about 56 calories and 15 grams of sugar per tablespoon. Another option is to make simple syrup, which is a mix of two parts sugar and one part water heated until the sugar is totally dissolved in the water. Other liquid sweeteners can also be used with varying results. Honey is sweeter than corn syrup and glucose syrup, and m Continue reading >>

Optimising Caramel Recipes With Glucose Syrup Or Dextrose

Optimising Caramel Recipes With Glucose Syrup Or Dextrose

Optimising caramel recipes with glucose syrup or dextrose FOOD & BEVERAGES Applications Innovation Gallery Optimising caramel recipes with glucose syrup or dextrose Tereos Starch & Sweeteners is a valuable partner of the confectionery industry, and supports its customers in recipe development by optimising sweetening formulas. Tereos Starch & Sweeteners has developed Mylose 351, a new and unique glucose syrup with low amounts of mono and disaccharides, and high levels of maltotriose and maltotetraose. It shows interesting effects on process and end-product characteristics in soft caramels. Despite higher water content, caramels with Mylose 351 have a significantly better stability to heat and to hygroscopicity compared to caramels produced with typical glucose syrups. Cooking temperature is also decreased, allowing a reduction in production cost. The company has developed other solutions to reduce costs in caramel, including the partial replacement of skimmed milk powder by dextrose. Continue reading >>

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