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How To Make Glucose Syrup For Fondant

10 Ways To Use Up Your Jar Of Queen Glucose Syrup

10 Ways To Use Up Your Jar Of Queen Glucose Syrup

10 ways to use up your jar of Queen Glucose Syrup If you have a humble jar of Queen Glucose stashed away at the back of the pantry, this blog is for you! Read on to discover new recipes to make using glucose and why its such a handy baking ingredient. Glucose syrup is typically used in foods to enhance flavour, soften, add volume and prevent crystallisation. There is a tonne of incredible ways to use up that jar of goodness, so weve rounded up 10 amazing ideas to use up that jar of Queen Glucose Syrup , that hopefully become new favourites in your baking repertoire. Home > Blog > Inspiration Alert > 10 ways to use up your jar of Queen Glucose Syrup Marshmallows, what can we say? Pillowy soft, fluffy and irresistible. You may end up using your jar making batch after batch of these Vanilla and Maple Marshmallows. If youve never made your own marshmallows, youre in for a treat. Glucose is the ultimate texture enhancer, not only does it stop crystallisation, it creates a creamier marshmallow and helps keep them soft and squishy for days. If they last that long Glucose is the perfect substitute for corn syrup. Traditionally, Pecan Pie is made with half corn syrup, half sugar to create a smooth textured pie without being overly sweet. This means that delicious pecan flavour shines through without too much caramelisation. Glucose is one of the best binders for Chewy Granola Bars. Its perfect for holding all your ingredients together without the sweetness that honey, sugar or other syrups give. Because Glucose is only 74% sweetness of sugar its perfect for those who prefer their granola bars on the lower end of the sweetness scale. To put it simply, the molecules in glucose stop the other sugars from crystallising, which creates that gritty, icy texture you sometimes find in y Continue reading >>

Classic Rolled Fondant

Classic Rolled Fondant

Mixture of both powdered sugar and cornstarch Sift the powdered sugar into a very large bowl. Make a well in the center of the sugar. Set aside. Place water in a small saucepan. Sprinkle the gelatin over the water (dont dump the gelatin in as this may create lumps.) Let the gelatin sit in the water for 5 minutes, without stirring, to soften. Turn the stovetop heat on low to medium-low, heat and stir the gelatin until dissolved, do not let the mixture boil. Add the glucose or corn syrup, glycerin, and shortening; heat and stir until melted. Remove from the heat and stir in flavoring. Pour the gelatin mixture into the well of powdered sugar. Mix together with a wooden spoon to incorporate as much of the powdered sugar as possible. Turn the fondant mixture out onto a pastry mat or pastry board, or clean counter-top greased with vegetable shortening. Lightly grease your hands with vegetable shortening and knead the fondant until it is smooth and pliable, 5 to 8 minutes. You may need to add additional shortening to the work surface and your hands if they start getting sticky. Tip: If the fondant feels sticky, knead in additional powdered sugar using about 1 tablespoon at a time. If the fondant feels too dry knead in a bit of shortening. Kneading fondant is like kneading bread dough; however fondant is much stiffer and heavier than dough. Shape the fondant into a thick disk and rub a thin coating of shortening over the entire surface to keep the fondant from drying out. Wrap the fondant disc tightly in at least two layers of plastic wrap and then place in a resealable plastic bag or airtight container and store at room temperature to rest and cure for at least 8 to 12 hours or overnight. Tip: The fondant can be used immediately but it is easier to use if left to cure for at Continue reading >>

Fondant Icing Recipe - Best Recipes

Fondant Icing Recipe - Best Recipes

STEP 1 Sift the icing sugar into a large non-metal bowl and then make a well in the centre. STEP 2 In a small saucepan, add water and gelatine. Over a low heat, dissolve the gelatine. Do not let it boil. STEP 3 Remove saucepan from the heat and add the glycerine and glucose syrup. Stir until combined well, then add vanilla essence. STEP 4 Pour the gelatine mixture into the well in the icing sugar. STEP 5 Mix until all of the icing sugar is combined with the mixture. Knead the icing until it is well combined and smooth. Add extra sifted icing sugar in small amounts if the mixture becomes sticky while kneading. Wrap in 2-3 layers of glad wrap for 6-8 hours before using for best results. Chocoholics unite! Satisfy sweet tooth cravings with these devilishly delicious... Chocoholics unite! Satisfy sweet tooth cravings with... Chocoholics unite! Satisfy sweet tooth cravings with these devilishly delicious recipes. Best Recipes can be viewed on multiple devices We collect information about the content (including ads) you use across this site and use it to make both advertising and content more relevant to you on our network and other sites. This is also known as Online Behavioural Advertising. You can find out more about our policy and your choices, including how to opt-out here . 2018 NewsLifeMedia, all rights reserved Continue reading >>

Learn How To Make Your Cake Shimmer With Shiny Fondant

Learn How To Make Your Cake Shimmer With Shiny Fondant

Treating a cake with a blast of steam serves a dual purpose. Its a great way to remove traces of corn starch or powdered sugar left on fondant after rolling it out especially useful for dark-colored cakes but it also gives the cake a glossy finish. Small items, like cupcake toppers, or setting the dusted color on gum paste flowers, can be held over the steam from a boiling kettle or pan of water. Just be very careful, as the steam can burn! For whole cakes, an electric steamer is needed. The disadvantages of this method are that too much steam can cause water droplets and drips to appear on the surface of the fondant. In addition, the glossy finish does eventually dry out and the cake will need to be re-steamed to maintain the shine. Rubbing a vegetable shortening (such as Crisco or Trex) over the surface of the fondant will produce a very convincing sheen. Jessica Harris , instructor of Craftsys Clean & Simple Cake Design class, gave this perfect watering can cake a high shine with an application of shortening. Jessica says, I rubbed Crisco all over the outside of the cake and then used a dry paper towel and started lightly buffing that Crisco into the fondant. It gave it a shiny satin-like finish. Similar to the steaming method, the shortening is eventually absorbed into the fondant and may need to be reapplied before the cake is presented. The subtle sheen on these pale yellow hypericum berries was achieved by dipping them in egg whites. The egg white coating dries after a few hours to a sheen perfect for natural-looking berries or succulents. Further coats can be applied for a glossier finish. Use pasteurized egg whites from a carton to ensure you meet food safety standards for fondant decorations that may be eaten. The disadvantages of this method are that the egg Continue reading >>

Homemade Clear White Syrup

Homemade Clear White Syrup

A selection of recipes. - Max M Rasmussen Video recipe - You often need a syrup as a base ingredient in other recipes. The is a short presentation about how to make your own syrup. I present one basic recipe and show 4 variations that you can use as an ingredient in other recipes. usage: often used as basic syrup in sorbet ice and syrup in canned fruit fruit. usage: often used as syrup in canned fruit. usage: Italian meringue, cream puffs, marzipan. cup (100 grams) grape sugar or glucose. cup (100 grams) grape sugar or glucose. Bring water and sugar to a boil. Let it cook until there are no visible sugar crystals left. But be aware that the longer you cook it, the more water will evaporate. So you may risk that a 1:3 syrup becomes a 1:4 instead. 1:1 (1 part sugar to 1 part water) and 1:2 syrup can usually be stored for long periods at room temperature without any problems. When you make 1:3 and 1:4 syrup then it will crystallizes if you just let it stand. You can reheat it and melt the sugar, but that is a hassle. In order to avoid crystallization you mix two different kinds of sugar together in your syrup. Sugar molecules are a bit like Lego bricks. If they are all the same they will easily glue together and form crystals. If they are different they will not. So mixing different types of bricks / molecules prevents that they grow together and crystalize. There must be added more than 20% "foreign" sugar for it to work. You can use both glucose, dextrose or most other sugars. Whatever you can most easily get a hold of. It does not make much difference in the amounts if you are using a syrup or a powder as the foreign sugar. You can add flavor to your syrup as you like. The seeds from a vanilla pod is a good and classical flavour. Citrus zest. A stick of cinnamon. A sta Continue reading >>

Liquid Glucose Substitutes

Liquid Glucose Substitutes

Corn syrup is a type of liquid glucose.Photo Credit: Jupiterimages/PHOTOS.com>>/Getty Images Liquid glucose, sometimes called glucose syrup, is a liquid sweetener used to keep icings and baked goods moist and soft. A number of other liquid sweeteners can be used in a 1-to-1 replacement if you don't have liquid glucose, although the end product may taste somewhat different depending on which sweetener you use. Corn syrup is probably one of the best replacements for glucose syrup. It's actually a form of glucose syrup, which can be made from any number of starchy foods, including corn, potatoes or wheat. In the United States, corn syrup is one of the most readily available types of glucose syrup. Light corn syrup is a better replacement than dark corn syrup because the flavor isn't as strong. It has 62 calories and about 17 grams of sugar per tablespoon. Golden syrup is a liquid sweetener more commonly used in the United Kingdom and the Caribbean than in the United States. It's a little thicker and darker in color than glucose or corn syrup and has a stronger flavor, but still makes a good substitute. It's also called cane syrup, cane juice and light treacle. Each tablespoon has 56 calories and about 15 grams of sugar. If you don't have glucose syrup or corn syrup available, you can make a substitute at home. One option is cane sugar syrup, made by mixing granulated cane sugar with water and a small amount of cream of tartar and salt. Cane syrup has about 56 calories and 15 grams of sugar per tablespoon. Another option is to make simple syrup, which is a mix of two parts sugar and one part water heated until the sugar is totally dissolved in the water. Other liquid sweeteners can also be used with varying results. Honey is sweeter than corn syrup and glucose syrup, and m Continue reading >>

Baking - How Do I Make Liquid Glucose From Powdered Glucose - Seasoned Advice

Baking - How Do I Make Liquid Glucose From Powdered Glucose - Seasoned Advice

How do I make liquid glucose from powdered glucose I recently decided to make something that required liquid glucose, 140g of it. No problem in general, but for some reason none of my usual suppliers had stock (even tried pharmacies). The closest I found was glucose powder. Unfortunately, having no clue how to "re-hydrate" the powder to a liquid form, I experimented. :-) I can safely say that 100g glucose powder was way to much as a substitute for 140g of liquid glucose (which I expected). However, I was wondering if any of you had a convenient method of turning powdered glucose into the wonderfully thick and sticky liquid glucose, in case I ever find myself in that position. Chemically speaking, saying "liquid glucose" is inaccurate. To explain, at normal temperatures, glucose is a solid; depending on the isomer/chiral form , melts at ~150C, and is a liquid above that temperature when not under pressure. ...What you want is a solution (syrup) with water. Glucose also dissolves in nonpolar solvents for other 'liquid' solutions. zanlok Nov 30 '12 at 18:50 Well, the answer is "it depends." This is pretty much the same as asking, "I have sugar, and I want sugar syrup. How much water do I add?" It depends on the concentration you're looking for. If you're looking for a 24% solution, it's 24 grams of glucose in 76 grams of water. A 30% solution is 30 grams of glucose in 70 grams of water, etc, etc. Unless you have some chemical reason to avoid dextrin, you can just substitute corn syrup. The only reason they use glucose in Europe is because they don't have our superabundance of corn. I live in South Africa, and unfortunately corn syrup is not generally available. We base most of our syrups and sugars off sugar cane. brianb Aug 25 '11 at 17:11 Sorry, forgot to ask. What is c Continue reading >>

How To Make A Basic Fondant For Cake Decorating | Tiphero

How To Make A Basic Fondant For Cake Decorating | Tiphero

Find the full recipe at Gemmas Bigger Bolder Baking So its actually pretty easy, right? Instead of the butter, milk and sugar that makes up the best buttercream , fondant involves gelatin (or agar-agar for vegans and vegetarians), a tiny bit of butter, and a lot more sugar. The key really seems to be the step where you work in the sugar by kneading the fondant in a way similar to how you would work with bread dough. Not only does this kneading help you work the ingredients together, the hands-on approach gives you a sense of how flexible and pliable the fondant will be before you start to really decorate with it, allowing you to adjust before you jump to creating your design. Even better? You can store fondant for up to two months! All you need to do is roll it into a ball, coat it in vegetable oil, wrap it in plastic wrap and store in an airtight container. You dont even need to refrigerate it. So you can make as much fondant as you want, and always have it on hand for when a creative cake craving strikes. Gemma has even more tips and tricks for working with fondant, tinting it, and making gorgeous fondant cakes, so be sure to head over there to check them out. Have you ever made your own fondant before? Do you like working with it, or are you more a fan of buttercream? Continue reading >>

The Best Homemade Fondant Recipe From Scratch

The Best Homemade Fondant Recipe From Scratch

The Best Homemade Fondant Recipe How to make Fondant at home? If you looking for a fondant recipe? Homemade fondant recipe? This is the best homemade fondant recipe! Soft, elastic, works great in humid conditions and unlike store bought this actually taste delicious. This simple, easy and effortless recipe will have you making fondant, yes homemade fondant for all your fondant cake recipe. The Best Homemade Fondant Recipe from scratch This is my homemade fondant recipe aka Best fondant recipe ever! (Save/Pin) If I may in all modesty say -I honestly love it and that its been very highly appreciated by my customers. In fact some say they hated fondant before but now are not so opposed to it. The secret to this is in the ingredients. The other good thing about this fondant is that it has good elasticity you can roll it out really thin using a nice thin layer of fondant on your cake. I personally dont like a thick layer of fondant on my cakes so its a big plus for me. And when you place it on your cake it doesnt break easily but stretches instead. When I started cake decorating I use to use this almost exclusively on all my cakes. But over time as my business has grown I often use store bought fondant. Kneading fondant can be very tiring if you have to continuously make many double batches in a week. So I find I am unable to make high quantities of homemade fondant recipe often. I still do sometimes make these for special customers and for family cakes. I do hope you enjoy this recipe. How to make Homemade Fondant from Scratch When you live in a place where the weather in summer is really hot and humid, the luxury of coating the outside of your cake with lots of butter cream is almost impossible. (especially because I use an all butter butter cream). As such, I had to find Continue reading >>

Substitute For Light Corn Syrup In Fondant - Kolej Universiti

Substitute For Light Corn Syrup In Fondant - Kolej Universiti

How to Make Homemade Corn Syrup Substitute This video will teach you how to make corn syrup in a less processed way. This syrup has a good consistency similar to the original corn syrup. This syrup can be used to make various desserts... If you enjoyed the video PLEASE give me a thumbs up, it helps me out A TON!!! Hi everyone! Today I am showing you how to make a corn syrup recipe, just in case you don't have any on... What Is A Substitute For Glycerin In Fondant? - Subscribe For more Videos ! For more Health Tips | Like | Comment | Share & Subscribe: Thank you for watching Our videos: CONNECT with us!! YOUTUBE - -Corn Syrup without tartar Corn syrup is a food syrup which is made from the starch of corn and contains varying amounts of maltose and higher oligosaccharides, depending on the grade,today we will make a substitute... Watch more Candy Recipes videos: If the wonders of rock candy have lost their charm, this guide will turn that sweet candy confection... How to make edible gems without isomalt This video is about How to make edible gems. It is a demo on how I made my light blue edible gems from sugar and light corn syrup Ingredients: 1/2 cup sugar and 1/4 light corn syrup Directions:... Get the recipe @ This rolled buttercream fondant tastes just like yummy buttercream frosting. This is a great fondant recipe... Modelling chocolate recipe ,best fondant replacement #THE SWEET TOOTH# Hello bakers today I will show you how to make modeling chocolate. Modeling chocolate solves the purpose of a fondant on a cake. It can be made with different types and flavors of chocolate... All i ask is that you please give this video a thumbs up and leave a comment if you wish :) With regards to the temps, please reverse what i said as i mixed up the fahrenheit and celsius.... Ho Continue reading >>

Recipe For Modeling Chocolate

Recipe For Modeling Chocolate

(Follow this link to the Wicked Goodies tutorial, All About Chocolate for advice on buying chocolate) The Classifications of Chocolate andHow They Pertain to Modeling Chocolate BittersweetorExtra Dark Chocolatehas the lowest percentage of sugarand therefore, the edgiest flavor. It is often denoted by the percentage of cocoa materialspresent, which can range anywhere from 35100 percent. The higher the percentageof cocoa, the lower the percentage of sugar and the more bitter the taste. Bittersweetchocolate, rich in both color and taste, makes an excellent, not-too-sweet modelingchocolate. Semisweet ChocolateorDark Chocolateis typically intended for baking purposes andcommonly found in chip form. It is essentially dark chocolate that has been sweetenedat 1:2 ratio of sugar to cocoa. It works well for modeling chocolate. Sweet Chocolateis a term used only by U.S. standards to represent a lower qualitysweetened chocolate containing no more than 15 percent real chocolate liquor. Itworks fine for modeling chocolate but has a diminished quality of taste. Milk Chocolateis dark chocolate with a milk product added. Although it canbe used for modeling chocolate, its softness is not optimal for ease of handing orstability. Compound Chocolateis the technical term for imitation chocolate that is madewith some or all hydrogenated fats in place of real cocoa butter. Compound chocolatecan be used for modeling chocolate, but it may be less stable and less tasty. The formularequires 1020 percent less sugar syrup. White Chocolate, a confection composed of sugar, milk and fat(s), is the basis ofall colors of modeling chocolate except brown and black. True white chocolate containscocoa butter, which lends an ivory tint to the hue. Imitation brands like Nestls(U.S.) Premium White Morsels and Continue reading >>

Make Your Own Rolled Fondant

Make Your Own Rolled Fondant

Disclosure: Please note some of the links in this post may be affiliate links, I will earn a commission if you decide to make a purchase.This doesnt cost you anything additional and I truly appreciate this support, thank you! Rolled fondant is a sugar paste that, as the name implies, can be rolled. It is used to cover cakes to give it a nice, smooth finish. It is also used to make decorations from the most simple to the most ethereal designs. Using rolled fondant is fun but it can be temperamental at times. If it becomes too stiff to handle, try nuking it in the microwave just for a few seconds to make it soft. You can also knead in a bit of shortening. Dust the work surface with a bit of cornstarch so that the fondant won't stick. Some people prefer to use oil or shortening to grease the work surface. And always cover it in plastic wrap or zipper bag so it won't dry out. There's a couple of ways (that I know) to make rolled fondant of which I' m going to provide recipes for both. There is the classic way of making fondant which includes a lot of icing sugar, glucose and gelatin as ingredients. And the other way of making it still includes a lot of powdered sugar and marshmallows. For both recipes, it is always best to let the sugar dough rest for a few hours or even overnight before using it. To color the fondant, you can either knead the color in or add the color with the liquid. The latter method is best if you are using large quantities of the same color. It is also easier to get a dark color such as black with this method. This was the very first rolled fondant recipe that I ever and still use. This recipe is from one of my favorite cake books, The Cake Bible by Rose Levy Beranbaum. You can find glucose and glycerine sold in cake decorating stores and in pharmacie Continue reading >>

Glucose | Baking Ingredients | Bakerpedia

Glucose | Baking Ingredients | Bakerpedia

Granulated sugar is not the sole form of sugar used in baking applications. Liquid glucose, or sugar syrup, is used to impart extra moisture and softness to products such as cakes, and also used for ease of handling in icings or frostings. In cakes, sugar syrup is usually added during the creaming stage with sugar and butter. When sugar syrup is utilized in royal icing or frosting, the syrup serves the purpose of preventing hardening and improving viscosity of the frosting. More specifically, sugar gives cookies their crisp texture and assists in spread. In breads or rolls, sugar not only gives flavor but aids in crumb color, grain texture, and volume. Furthermore, all products able to form a crust utilize sugar in a chemical reaction called a Maillard reaction, where proteins and sugars react to enhance crust color and flavor. If too much glucose is consumed at one time, the excess glucose is stored in the liver in the form of glycogen. At times when the level of glucose in the blood stream drops significantly, glycogen is utilized to compensate for the low levels. The major hormone utilized in blood sugar regulation is insulin, released by the pancreas. Improper regulation of glucose leads to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Individuals with hypoglycemia yield an extremely low volume of glucose in the blood stream caused by overproduction of insulin and is remedied by additional consumption of glucose to compensate. High glucose levels in the blood results in hyperglycemia and must be regulated by the addition of insulin to promote storage or promote metabolism of the excess blood sugar. For healthier options, date sugar, honey, maple sugar, and agave nectar can serve as replacements to sugar. Continue reading >>

Homemade Corn Syrup - Homegrown In The Valley

Homemade Corn Syrup - Homegrown In The Valley

Ever find yourself in the middle of your holiday baking, sure that you have enough corn syrup and find out that low and behold you are either out or do not have quite enough for your recipe? Me Too!This is a perfect substitution for store-bought corn syrup! Let me try to answer a few questions you may have about corn syrup: Q: Can anything be substituted for the store bought corn syrup? A: Yes! depending on what you are using it for and if it calls for dark or light corn syrup you have a few options. Honey is an option that should work in most recipes and you can make your own corn syrup to get you through. Q: Is the homemade corn syrup the exact same as the store bought? A: Not the exact same. We are only trying to create a substitute version. Store bought corn syrup is stabilized to avoid the sugar crystallizing. Homemade corn syrup can get some of the sugar to crystalize after it cools down. It will work in most recipes but if you are a serious candy maker you may want to stick with store bought for those hard candies or specialty recipes. But your average person can use the homemade in most of your baking/cooking. Q: What do I do if my corn syrup does crystallize? A: Usually gently reheating it and adding just a little bit of hot water to it will be enough to liquify those sugar crystals I have TWO recipes for you today. I use them both. The first is my in a pinch, middle of a recipe rescue, and the second one is my make my own large batch plan ahead recipe. Continue reading >>

Rolled Fondant Recipe - Allrecipes.com

Rolled Fondant Recipe - Allrecipes.com

The reviewer that stated the powdered sugar wasn't sufficient was because they substituted EQUAL amounts of corn syrup for glucose which is incorrect. Corn syrup contains a higher % of water th... I think i did well on this recipe as a first timer. But I really got tired of kneading it manually, i transfered it to a bread kneader...a stand mixer using the dough hook attachment and it came... I used this recipe to make a stacked 3 tier wedding cake. It was easy to make and was tastier than other rolled fondants I have tasted - especially the boxed stuff. I substitued the glucose fo... I have been making 3D cakes for a couple of years now and have wanted to use a "wrap" frosting, but have been deterred by fears of ease of prep and taste ("Chalk" is the term I heard most). Thi... My first time using fondant and it didn't turn out too bad. I used corn syrup in place of glucose and it turned out fine, first batch I ended up using more powdered sugar. Second batch I used a ... Loved it! Taste great. The only thing is it HAD to be a 100+ degree day here so I had a heck of a time with it. I added a ton of extra sugar and it was still sticky (thanks to the humidity). ... Easy to make but needed much more powdered sugar. It was beautiful on the cake too. I used corn syrup instead of the glucose which is a nice substitution. Any flavoring can be added too. What a... I really, really like this recipe. My children helped and simple didn't won't to stop working with it. My daughter said, "This is clay I would like to play with and eat." We flavored it with ... I'm not an expert, but this was a Fiasco!!! I followed the instructions step by step. The texture was good, so was the taste, but when I tried to roll it, it was imposible. It kept sticking to... Continue reading >>

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