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How To Lower A1c

A1c Level: What It Is And How To Lower It

A1c Level: What It Is And How To Lower It

If you are a diabetic, you are probably familiar with the concept of A1C tests. These are blood tests that are designed to check a person’s level of glucose (or blood sugar). This test has a purpose of checking to see if the patient has type 1 or 2 diabetes or prediabetes. Having high blood sugar is also called hyperglycemia, which may be caused by undiagnosed diabetes. It is important to continually get tested so that the syndrome can be caught and treated in its early stages. If it is addressed and treated quickly after being discovered, you may have a chance of reversing the disease. A patient’s diagnosis depends on what level of blood glucose is found in the blood. You are considered to be diabetes-free if the test shows levels that are below 5.7%. If you have blood glucose levels that are between 5.7 to 6.4%, it is likely that you have prediabetes. If the test comes back with levels greater than 6.5%, this indicates diabetes. In any case, a second test will be taken to confirm the diagnosis. Effects of High A1C levels If your A1C test has shown high levels of glucose in the blood, you are at risk for developing more serious complications. Some of these complications include heart attacks, strokes, kidney problems and circulation problems. If the issue goes untreated, it is also possible that you will start to suffer from damage to the eyes, cardiovascular disease, nerve damage, infections to the skin and gums, as well as problems with the joints. Symptoms of High A1C Prediabetes is difficult to spot, as it has no noticeable symptoms. People with type 1 diabetes may show many symptoms. You should get your blood glucose checked if you display signs of: extreme thirst, increased appetite, fatigue, weight loss and urination, blurry vision and/or fruity-smelling bre Continue reading >>

Amazingly Easy Ways To Lower Your A1c

Amazingly Easy Ways To Lower Your A1c

What if there were a magical “lower your A1c” wand? You just pull it out, swoop it over your head (or your pancreas) and… voila! A1c lowered. If only it were that simple. Focusing on eeking down that ever shifting number can be one of the most frustrating things a person living with diabetes has to do. But here is some good news: while there may not be a magic wand, there are some pretty simple, pretty cool fixes to help you on your way to lower your A1c. Kick it old school: Remember those bulky paper logbooks we all used to lug around? Yeah, well there’s something about them that just works. Going back to actually logging blood sugars, meals and doses can really help a person lower an A1c. Why? Because while it’s great to have tools that automatically upload to our medical team (and our computers), writing things down forces us to face them more, study them more and yes, not ignore them. (A cool side trick: use one of those pens with four colors of ink in it. Write all of your in range numbers in green, your high numbers in blue and your low numbers in red. Use the black for notes. With this, you can look at a logbook page and the patterns will jump out at you.) Ramp it up new school: Never used a CGM? Or haven’t used it in a while? CGM’s are a great way to help you lower your A1c, says Regina Shirley, RD, LDN and person with diabetes. “I make a commitment with my CGM. I will wear it religiously until I can get my A1c back to where I like it. It is not as easy as it may seem to remember to check blood sugars, and inserting yet one more device in your body adds on time to your diabetes care regimen that you would rather spend doing something else. However, when you know you need to get in better control, either to help with such things as pregnancy prepa Continue reading >>

How To Lower A1c ?

How To Lower A1c ?

Ads by Google Know your limits, but never stop trying to exceed them. High A1C means there are more chances of developing diabetes complications of heart, kidneys, eyes, and nerves. A low-carbohydrate diet supplemented with regular exercise can lower you HbA1c. Laying off the simple carbohydrates help a lot. What should be your A1C number? The clinical study, as well as Dr. Richard K. Bernstein experience, confirmed an A1C target of 4 to 4.6%. This goal helps to avoid diabetes complications and provide longest life expectancy. Right A1C for you is based on: Your age, Ability to identify hypoglycemia, Frequency of hypoglycemia, Other health conditions you have, and Expected life expectancy. Optimal A1C is better if you can achieve it without any hypoglycemia risk. If you cannot able to identify your early symptoms of hypo, then you should aim for higher-end A1C. Discuss with your health profession to help set a perfect A1C goal for you. My A1C is high! How can I lower my A1C? First, do not get to discourage over your numbers. Trends are more concern than a single test. Everyone agrees elevated blood sugar leads to diabetic complications. You know the blood sugar goals advised by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) & Australian Diabetes Association (ADS) is very high. When solving problems, dig at the roots instead of just hacking at the leaves. For healthy non-diabetics fasting blood sugar stay within 70 to 100 mg/dL (3.8 to 5.5 mmol/l). After meals (post meal) it can rise to 120 mg/dL or 6.7 mmol/l and drops below 100 mg/dL or 5.5 mmol/l within two hours. However, do not fix any target that is hard to achieve. It may make you disappoint and lose heart to achieve it again. Instead, aim for an easy target, once you achieved it; you Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

For some, home blood sugar testing can be an important and useful tool for managing your blood sugar on a day-to-day basis. Still, it only provides a snapshot of what’s happening in the moment, not long-term information, says Gregory Dodell, MD, assistant clinical professor of medicine, endocrinology, diabetes, and bone disease at Mount Sinai Health System in New York City. For this reason, your doctor may occasionally administer a blood test that measures your average blood sugar level over the past two to three months. Called the A1C test, or the hemoglobin A1C test, this provides a more accurate picture of how well your type 2 diabetes management plan is working. Taking the A1C Test If your diabetes is well controlled and your blood sugar levels have remained stable, the American Diabetes Association recommends that you have the A1C test two times each year. This simple blood draw can be done in your doctor's office. Some doctors can use a point-of-care A1C test, where a finger stick can be done in the office, with results available in about 10 minutes. The A1C test results provide insight into how your treatment plan is working, and how it might be modified to better control the condition. Your doctor may want to run the test as often as every three months if your A1C is not within your target range. What the A1C Results Mean The A1C test measures the glucose (blood sugar) in your blood by assessing the amount of what’s called glycated hemoglobin. “Hemoglobin is a protein within red blood cells. As glucose enters the bloodstream, it binds to hemoglobin, or glycates. The more glucose that enters the bloodstream, the higher the amount of glycated hemoglobin,” Dr. Dodell says. An A1C level below 5.7 percent is considered normal. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 perce Continue reading >>

How To Lower A1c Levels

How To Lower A1c Levels

Reader Approved A1C is a form of glucose in the body that is regularly measured in people who suffer from type 1 and type 2 diabetes. A1C is generally used to determine a diabetic’s average blood sugar levels from previous months, and can aid healthcare providers in prescribing and recommending treatments to those with diabetes. A1C levels can generally be lowered by practicing healthy living, including adhering to proper nutrition, exercising regularly, and managing stress. 1 Add a higher number of fruits and vegetables to your diet. Fruits and vegetables contain a number of antioxidants that promote better health in general, and are also high in fiber, which studies have shown can contribute to better blood sugar management.[1] 2 Eat more beans and legumes. According to Harvard University Health Services, one-half cup (118 ml) of beans will provide you with one-third of your daily fiber requirement. Beans will also slow down the digestion process, and help stabilize blood sugar levels following meals.[2] 3 Consume more fat-free milk and yogurt. Fat-free milk and yogurt are rich in calcium and vitamin D, which have been shown to contribute to better blood sugar management and weight loss, the latter of which can help improve most cases of type 2 diabetes. 4 Increase your intake of nuts and fish. Most nuts and fatty fish including tuna, mackerel, and salmon contain omega-3 fatty acids that will help lower insulin resistance, regulate blood sugar levels, and contribute to better heart health. Nuts can also benefit type 2 diabetics who are trying to lower their cholesterol levels. 5 Spice your food with cinnamon. Although cinnamon is generally associated with sweets and desserts, research has shown that consuming one-half tsp. (2 ml) cinnamon per day can improve insulin Continue reading >>

Secrets To Lowering Your A1c — A Diabetic Health Coach Gives Us The Scoop

Secrets To Lowering Your A1c — A Diabetic Health Coach Gives Us The Scoop

As a Diabetic Health coach, the majority of my clients come to me looking for help to lower their A1C. Being a Type 1 diabetic for fifteen years, I understand that a lower A1C is more than just a number. It’s about getting control of your life. When I was diagnosed at seven years old, I was extremely fortunate to have parents that took really great care of me. I remember growing up with my dad telling me, “Out of all the report cards you will ever bring home, your A1C report is the most important one!” The majority of my childhood I had a decent A1C that averaged in the mid 7’s. It was never terrible, but it was always a goal of mine to get it as low as possible to reduce future complications. When I went off to college and became more independent, things changed. While most kids were partying and eating fast food at 2 a.m., I was playing Division 1 soccer, and knew that if I wanted to perform my best, I needed to feel my best. Through self-education and attending the Institute for Integrative Nutrition after college, I started implementing tools for both my mind and body which helped me become healthier and more in control of my diabetes. Today, I want to share with you how I lowered my A1C from a 7.5 to a 5.7, and became the healthiest and happiest I have ever been. If you want tighter control of your blood sugar numbers, start by looking at your level of satisfaction in these 5 areas: 1 – Organization I find that organization makes life with diabetes less overwhelming. Every Sunday night I plan out my week. I write down days, times, and details for food shopping, morning meditation, workouts, pump set changes, appointments, and meal prepping. When I’m organized from day to day, I have more energy to focus on my diabetes control. This also empowers me both Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your A1c Level With These Simple Steps?

How To Lower Your A1c Level With These Simple Steps?

Diabetes management is very important owing to the complications that the disease brings along. Monitoring and maintaining healthy levels of blood glucose is a very important step for diabetes self- management. Hence, there are several tests conducted for ensuring that the levels of blood sugar in the body are within the limits. A diabetes patient also needs to adopt a host of measures in order to keep the blood level sugar under check. This article deals with the simple easy ways in which the level of A1C can be maintained by the patient. So, come and join in for the article “How to Lower Your A1C Level with These Simple Steps?” Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com What is anA1c Level Test? The A1C test is the test that is conducted which helps in determining the level of blood glucose in your body over a period of past two to three months. The test tells you the average level of blood glucose present in the red blood cells which have an average life of around four months. Let us now look into some of the easy steps that can be taken to lower and stabilize the levels of A1C in your body 1. Test Your Blood Sugar The first and foremost thing which you should do is to keep on regularly monitoring your blood glucose levels. You have to understand where you stand so that you can take adequate measures to keep the sugar level under control 2. Understand the Patterns You need to read the patterns about the level of blood glucose in your body. You should check for the level of blood glucose in the morning and evening, while also looking for the fluctuations of the same before and after every meal and exercise. 3. Manage Your Diet One of the most effective and sou Continue reading >>

How To Lower Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

How To Lower Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

I may receive a commission if you purchase something mentioned in this post. Full disclosure here. If you are an American age 40 to 70, the odds are about 40 percent that you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes or prediabetes. (source) That means nearly HALF of us aged 40-70 have blood sugar regulation issues, likely from consuming too much sugar and too many refined carbs. Has your doctor told you to monitor your blood sugar levels? Is your fasting glucose above 95 mg/dL? Most of us are aware that uncontrolled high blood sugar leads to type 2 diabetes, but it also contributes to weight gain, metabolic syndrome, heart disease, increased oxidation (read: accelerated aging), inflammation, and high blood pressure. ALL of these conditions are preventable via diet and lifestyle changes. Even if you have a family history of diabetes, you are not a slave to your genes. You can lower your blood sugar naturally to prevent disease and look and feel better. What is High Blood Sugar? Also called hyperglycemia or high blood glucose, high blood sugar means there is too much glucose circulating in your bloodstream because your cells have shut the door and will not receive any more glucose. Frequent or ongoing high blood sugar levels damage your nerves, blood vessels, and organs. Fasting high blood sugar is considered higher than 130 mg/dL after 8 hours of fasting, and postprandial (after a meal) high blood sugar is higher than 180 mg/dL two hours after you eat. Your blood glucose shouldn’t rise over 140 mg/dL after meals. Normal fasting blood glucose is between 75-95 mg/dL. Although 100 is often considered the cutoff for normal, studies have shown that fasting blood sugar levels in the mid-90s were predictive of future diabetes a decade later. Ideal fasting blood glucose is 85 mg/dL. Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your A1c

How To Lower Your A1c

According to the American Diabetes Association, it is recommended that you have the A1C test administered twice a year, so long as your diabetes is well managed and your blood sugar levels have been consistent. This test can provide valuable insight into how well your diabetes treatment has been working—and how you can adjust it to work better in the future. For individuals who haven’t been able to control their diabetes and sugar levels as well, a doctor may request that you have the test run every few months until your A1C falls into your target range. Steps to Help Achieve a Lower A1C Diabetes is a complex condition, requiring detailed management and understanding. This can be like a second job for many patients. While it does take significant effort to manage diabetes properly, it can lead to a much more rewarding quality of life for patients. These simple changes can help you secure that lower A1C you’ve been striving for: 1. Get More Active You don’t need to run a marathon or break a weight lifting record—just start by getting around 30 minutes of exercise around 5 days a week. This doesn’t even need to be “formal” exercising, like going to the gym or running laps. Instead, this can be something like going for a walk with your dog, playing tennis, riding a bike, or other alternatives. Even yoga and stretching can be extremely beneficial. So long as you are moving, your body will be grateful! 2. Balance Your Diet Eating smart with diabetes can be difficult. Try to keep an eye on the amount of fruits, proteins, fats and complex carbs you are eating. You don’t have to cut these out of your diet completely, but you should be monitoring your portion sizes and ensuring you aren’t over doing it. Fill up on green vegetables, salads, and other non-starc Continue reading >>

5 Things That Helped Me Improve My A1c

5 Things That Helped Me Improve My A1c

This article is intended for people with diabetes who take insulin and monitor their blood sugars frequently with blood glucose tests and/or with continuous glucose monitors. (NOTE: If you’re struggling mentally with the pressure of improving your A1C results, read this article from a physician who realized just how emotional A1C measurements can be for her patients: Ending the A1C Blame Game.) Your A1c is a simple blood test will tell you an approximation of your blood sugar control for the past 3 months based on the amount of Advanced Glycogenated End-Products (AGEs) that have accumulated in your blood. You can read more about A1Cs here. When I was a college student through to my early 20s, my A1C hovered between 6.8 to 7.3, but as I’ve gotten older and become and more and more engrossed in health, nutrition, planning for optimal pregnancy, and overall commitment to my diabetes, I’ve set my sights on reducing my A1C to a level near 6.0 percent. You can read what these percentages translate to in blood glucose levels with this chart to the right. —> My most recent A1Cs were 6.8, then 6.4, and most recently 5.9. At last, I’ve reached my goal! But this was no accident. In addition to regularly fine-tuning my insulin doses and wearing a CGM, here are 5 things that helped me lower my A1C…that might help you: Change what I view in my head as an “okay” blood sugar. For me, I feel this has the biggest part of my progress. It’s easy (and understandable) in type 1 diabetes to see a blood sugar of 145 or 150 mg/dL as a decent blood level to “hang out” at throughout the day. In reality, if this is often your average blood sugar, then your A1C will inevitably be around 7.0 percent. Which is considered healthy for long-term health in diabetes management, certa Continue reading >>

Diabetes Control: Lower Your A1c In 90 Days

Diabetes Control: Lower Your A1c In 90 Days

Receiving a type 2 diabetes diagnosis was overwhelming. I have always considered myself a healthy person. I eat right and workout. So, how could this be happening to me? If this sounds familiar, take deep breath and know you’re not alone. With the support of my loving husband, guidance of my physicians, diabetes self-management clinics hosted by UC San Diego Health Systems, and SmartDraw, I was able to successfully bring my A1C levels from 10.5 to 6.3 in just 90 days. My ability to take control of my diabetes in such a short amount of time impressed not only my physicians but the medical team at UC San Diego Health Systems. As a result, I was invited as a guest lecturer to teach a class at the University of California San Diego on patient self-management and the use of technology. If you’re interested in reading more about my guest lecture read 5 Steps to Make Your Next Presentation or Sales Pitch Perfect. It’s been a little over a year and based on my most recent A1C test results, I have been able to maintain normal levels. In this week’s post I’ll share with you the 5 tips to help you or your loved one take control of their diabetes. An easy way to remember the 5 tips is S.P.A.R.K. To be honest, finding out that I have type 2 diabetes was the spark that I needed to live an even healthier life. Stay Active Plan Your Meals Avoid Risk Factors Recognize the Signs Keep Track Tip #1: Stay Active Being active doesn’t necessarily mean that you need to run the next marathon. It’s about having an active lifestyle. There are a number of benefits to being physically active. You’ll increase your energy levels as well as longevity. At the same time you’ll decrease your glucose levels, blood pressure, cholesterol and stress levels. They recommend 3 types of physica Continue reading >>

4 Steps To Naturally Lower Your A1c

4 Steps To Naturally Lower Your A1c

If you’re diabetic, you know. If you aren’t, you probably aren’t as concerned. Think of the A1C test as an early warning system for complications that happen down the road when we don’t control our blood sugar. If the test shows that our blood glucose level is high, it means that we have a greater risk of developing diabetes. The A1C test measures how much glucose has been sticking to our red blood cells for the previous two or three months. Our bodies replace each red blood cell with a new one every four months. The A1C test tells us the average of how high our glucose levels have been during the life of the cells. There are many things you can do to lower your A1C level. Diet and exercise do wonders. There are countless medical articles about how a low carbohydrate diet combined with regular exercise naturally lowers your HbA1c. Here are my top 4 steps to get your A1c down naturally. 1: Remove the culprits The only fruits I recommend for now are blueberries, strawberries and raspberries, but only in small amounts. 2: Get Active Daily physical activity is one of the most important ways to keep your blood sugar low. Lifting weights or resistance band training can improve muscle mass and strength. For diabetics, the added muscle is very beneficial because muscles are “major clearance sites” for circulating blood sugar. 3: Eat a Balanced Healthy Diet Too much protein can cause a condition which can raise blood sugar levels, but it has to be consumed in fairly large amounts in order for that to happen. 4: Natural Supplements Cinnamon is not only incredibly delicious, but research has shown that it can stabilize blood sugar. Apply: try adding 2 tsp of Ceylon Cinnamon in your coffee or protein shake. You can also sprinkle on vegetables at meals. This plant extrac Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Lower Your A1c Levels

7 Ways To Lower Your A1c Levels

If you have diabetes, you’re probably used to checking your own blood sugar with a glucose meter. These blood sugar measurements are important for controlling levels on a daily basis but are less useful for understanding your long-term blood sugar levels. Your doctor has a way to determine if your blood sugar has been in the recommended range by checking your hemoglobin A1C levels through a blood test. Your A1C shows how well you have been controlling your blood sugar levels over time and can help your health care team determine your average level over the past three months. What does my A1C mean An A1C level below 5.7% is normal whereas an A1C level between 5.7 and 6.4 signals prediabetes. For most, the goal is to lower A1C levels. Here’s what the A1C means in reference to average daily blood sugar. 6% A1C = 126 average blood sugar 7% A1C = 154 average blood sugar 8% A1C = 183 average blood sugar 9% A1C = 212 average blood sugar 10% A1C = 240 average blood sugar 11% A1C = 269 average blood sugar 12% A1C = 298 average blood sugar How often should I check my A1C? Your doctor or health care team will determine how often you should get your blood work, and A1C tested. Usually, you will be directed to get your A1C levels checked every three months. However, if your diabetes is well-controlled, your doctor may only require you to get your blood work done every six months. Is there a way to check my A1C besides going to the doctor? Yes. You can now purchase over-the-counter A1C test kids right from your local pharmacy. However, using an at-home testing kit for your A1C is not a substitute for regular blood glucose measurements or regular visits with your healthcare provider. What should my A1C goal be? Your doctor will help you determine what your personal A1C goal should Continue reading >>

Foods To Lower A1c – How To Lower A1c

Foods To Lower A1c – How To Lower A1c

Foods To Lower A1C – How To Lower A1C How to lower a1c? The questios arises in everyone’s mind. Foods to lower a1c levels naturally is a list which would help you immensely. If you suffer from diabetes, with high A1c levels consider what you eat is one of the most important things that will help keep you healthy. Foods to lower a1c are very effective foods. The main thing is that you want to avoid blood sugar spikes. Sweets and sugary sodas, They can be dangerous as the body absorbs these sugars instantly.However, the good news is that there are many foods out there that can actually help in a natural way to lower A1c levels. Natural way to lower A1c – List of Foods To Lower A1C Broccoli Broccoli contains a compound called sulforaphane. This naturally occurring substance, when eaten, will allow an anti-inflammatory process to begin which helps to lower A1c levels naturally. This substance also helps protect blood vessels from heart disease which is a leading cause of death in people with diabetes. This substance also helps protect blood vessels from heart disease which is a leading cause of death in people with diabetes. Chocolate Chocolate is good for me!!! Yes in moderation but stick to Dark Chocolate. It is full of flavonoids which have shown to reduce insulin resistance, lower a1c levels fast and keep cravings at bay. Tests have shown that people who consume dark chocolate consume less fat and carbohydrates. Tests have shown that people who consume dark chocolate consume less fat and carbohydrates. Blueberries Blueberries contain both insoluble fiber (helps to get rid of fat in your system) but also soluble fiber which helps to lower A1c levels naturally by slowing down the emptying of the stomach. There is also a natural hormone in the berries which helps reg Continue reading >>

5 Tips For Lowering Your A1c

5 Tips For Lowering Your A1c

If you have diabetes, the idea of lowering your A1C to a number less than 7.0 may seem impossible without acquiring some sort of diabetes management obsession. Diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (and Celiac disease) when I was a teenager, I'm here to tell you, it doesn't. While I certainly don’t want to give the impression that it’s a simple or easy goal to obtain, I've been able to maintain an A1C of 6.0 for most of my adult life mostly by following a proven path of tried and true strategies. By far the most helpful thing for me has been to structure my nutrition so I'm eating fairly low-carb throughout the day and "save" my carb servings for dinner or dessert. This way, managing my blood sugars in a tighter range requires significantly less effort than when I do eat my carbs in the evening. Here, a few other rules I live by: 1. Care about the quality of food you eat. This simple principle is terribly important. Consuming a diet that is made mostly of real food—whole food—that you chopped and prepared and cooked yourself will have the greatest impact on your blood sugars and your sensitivity to insulin, whether you’re type 1, type 2 or have prediabetes. You don’t have to be a brilliant chef to cook delicious food in reasonable amounts of time on a reasonable budget—but you do have to be willing! Dive in, learn, take your time—enjoy it! Your blood sugars will thank you for the effort. Start by taking a closer look at how much of your current food choices are highly processed! 2. Find an activity you enjoy and become more active in it. You don’t have to be an athlete or a hardcore Cross-fitter to benefit from exercise. Just walking 30 minutes a day will have a powerful effect on your overall sensitivity to insulin and your blood sugar levels. I used to be a Continue reading >>

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