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How To Help Someone Having A Diabetic Attack

First Aid For People With Diabetes

First Aid For People With Diabetes

The prevalence of diabetes increased 382% from 1988 to 2014. According to the National Diabetes Statistics Report, this growth correlates with the upsurge of visits to the emergency room from people in a life-threatening diabetic crisis. As the condition continues to rise so does the likelihood of providing first aid for someone with diabetes. Understanding Diabetes First-aid providers have important choices to make before providing care to a diabetic. The best way to effectively manage a diabetic emergency is through understanding the mechanisms behind the medical condition. Every cell in the body requires glucose as a foundation of energy. People with diabetes, though needing glucose, have an inability to process, or metabolize, it efficiently because the pancreas is either producing too little insulin or none at all—either way, glucose can accumulate to dangerously high levels. A healthy pancreas regulates the production of insulin proportionate to the amount of glucose in the blood. Classification of Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is primarily an autoimmune condition manifesting in children and young adults. These people do not produce insulin; they require routine injections of insulin to aid in glucose metabolism. Without insulin injections type 1 diabetics cannot use the sugar in their blood for energy. People with Type 2 diabetes produce small amounts of insulin, or they cannot properly use the insulin hormone, also known as insulin resistance. This condition usually develops later in life. Many people with type 2 diabetes use diet, exercise, and other non-insulin medications. Some Type 2 diabetics however, may require supplemental insulin. What is a Diabetic Emergency? With six million people using insulin in the United States, the incidence of too much or too litt Continue reading >>

Diabetic Reaction

Diabetic Reaction

A A A There are two main forms of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes: Absent or low insulin levels prevent cells from taking up and using sugar for energy, thus requiring insulin injections Type 2 diabetes: Cellular resistance to insulin reduces glucose uptake, often requiring medication to improve the sensitivity of cells to insulin Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is the most common form of diabetic reaction. A low blood sugar reaction is caused by increased exertion or increased demand for glucose. The body may "run out" of stored glucose more quickly, thus bringing on a hypoglycemic attack. Persistent intake of excessive alcohol may cause this reaction, because alcohol decreases glucose stores in the liver. High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) is a common problem for people with diabetes. High blood sugar can be brought on by infections or other significant stresses that cause the body to decrease cell uptake of glucose. A decrease in cell uptake of glucose leads to high blood sugar levels as well as the alternative use of fats by starving cells for energy. Fat breakdown increases the acidity of the blood and worsens symptoms of high blood sugar. Symptoms of diabetic reaction depends on the type of reaction. rapid onset of cool, pale, moist, and clammy skin; dizziness; headache; rapid pulse; and shallow breathing. If untreated, symptoms may progress to confusion, nonsensical behavior, coma, and death. Symptoms occur gradually over several days. The person with high blood sugar develops increasing thirst and urination due to large amounts of unused glucose being lost in the urine. Skin feels warm and dry; respirations may be shallow; pulse is rapid and weak, and breath may have a sweet odor (due to ketoacidosis from fat breakdown). The person with high blood sugar may become confus Continue reading >>

How To Treat Insulin Shock

How To Treat Insulin Shock

Edit Article Four Parts:Spotting the signs of insulin shockResponding quicklyGetting help from emergency servicesAvoiding future instances of insulin shockCommunity Q&A A person suffering from diabetes can experience low blood sugar, as diabetes prevents the body from regulating blood sugar levels. Early warning symptoms of insulin shock include the shakes, confusion or aggression, cold and sweaty skin, paleness and feeling tired, hungry or claiming to have a headache. All of this can happen rapidly when the blood sugar levels are low. And once a diabetic person goes into shock, he or she is liable to quickly become unconscious. Insulin shock is a medical emergency in need of immediate response. Note: This article is for a person without knowledge of diabetes care who needs to give first aid to a diabetic. If you are not familiar with invasive testing for blood sugar levels or giving injections, do not attempt either; as such, these are not covered in this article. 1 Recognize the symptoms of insulin shock. If a person begins to show any or all of the following symptoms, respond quickly to decrease the severity of the attack: The shakes Dizziness Weakness The sweats Headache Nervousness Moodiness (a key sign; may be irritability, confusion, anger, aggression, etc.) Increased heart rate Hunger Pale skin Disoriented behavior. 2 Expect the symptoms to begin and progress very quickly. Be aware that sometimes people mistake a diabetic person as someone who has drunk too much alcohol (aggression, slurring, sweating, odor, etc.). It may help to look for a medic bracelet but, provided you are safe, try to attend to helping the person regardless of the cause of the behavior. If the person is very aggressive, get help. It can be difficult sometimes to argue with a very determined Continue reading >>

You And Hypoglycemia: What Others Should Know

You And Hypoglycemia: What Others Should Know

When hypoglycemia strikes, it’s hard to communicate what you need. Here’s what friends, family, and co-workers should know. Sometimes, it can take a day of disaster to help people with diabetes to realize they need to be more communicative with those around them about the possibility of hypoglycemia. That was the case for “Dr. P”, a diabetes blogger and English professor who runs the website Diagnosednotdefeated.com. Dr. P, who prefers to go by a pseudonym because she hasn’t told her co-workers about her condition, had a hypoglycemic event that ruined a day of sightseeing in Normandy, France. She hadn’t wanted to tell her traveling companions she was feeling off in Normandy, and events spiraled out of control. “I was so focused on my friend and husband having a good time,” she says. “My friend is a history buff and I knew he might not get a chance to see this American cemetery he wanted to see, so when I told them I was hungry and needed to eat, they didn’t really get it.” While the other two toured the site, Dr. P stayed in the car, feeling increasingly weak, tired, and irritable. When they were done, she made them rush to find food. And though she was o.k. in the end, she now realizes the episode could easily have ended in disaster. Ask any diabetes educator and you’ll no doubt hear a scary story about hypoglycemia. Dr. Amber Taylor of the Diabetes Center at Mercy Hospital in Baltimore says some of her patients have been stopped by police for driving intoxicated, when in reality they were suffering from low blood sugar. John Zrebiec of Behavioral Health Services at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston says he’s heard it all, from those whose marriages have gone by the wayside to those who have gotten abnormally combative and aggressive because of Continue reading >>

First Aid For Someone Who Is Having A Diabetic Emergency

First Aid For Someone Who Is Having A Diabetic Emergency

First aid for someone who is having a diabetic emergency Learn first aid for someone who is having a diabetic emergency 1. Give them something sweet to eat or a non-diet drink. If someone has a diabetic emergency, their blood sugar levels can become too low. This can make them collapse.Giving them something sugary will help raise their blood sugar levels and improve their bodily function. Avoid giving them a diet drink, as it wont have any sugar in it and will not help them. 2. Reassure the person. Most people will gradually improve, but if in doubt, call 999. If you cant call 999, get someone else to do it. Watch how to help someone who is having a diabetic emergency (1 minute 47 seconds) Diabetes is a medical condition that affects blood sugar levels. Normally, peoples bodies maintain the ideal blood sugar levels automatically. When a person has diabetes, their body fails to maintain the blood sugar balance, so they need to manage it through diet, tablets or insulin injections. Sometimes, a person who has diabetes can suffer diabetic emergencies, which require first aid. What are the signs and symptoms of a diabetic emergency? Signs and symptoms vary, but common ones include: In most cases, the persons blood sugar levels become too low. This is called hypoglycaemia. It can happen when the person has missed a meal or exercised too much. If left untreated, a diabetic emergency can become very serious. You can give them sugary drinks such as cola, lemonade, fruit juice and isotonic sports drinks, and sweet foods such as jelly beans, chocolate and sugar cubes. The person may also be carrying glucose gel or tablets. Avoid giving them a diet drink, as it wont have any sugar in it and will not help them. But some people have high blood sugar levels, so wont giving them suga Continue reading >>

Diabetes Attacks

Diabetes Attacks

Known as a common “lifestyle disease”, Diabetes is associated with high blood pressure, an excess of sugar and the inability to heal properly. A person experiencing a Diabetes Attack might become incoherent, becoming anxious, fatigue and weak, and also lead to shock. Symptoms Confusion Change in senses, experiencing blurred vision, headaches, and double vision. Sweating, tingling, numbness, and foot pain may also be present. Sudden hunger, unusual thirst Convulsion that may lead to coma Blood sugar levels read higher as the body’s kidneys suffer damage Chest pain, irregular heart rate that could signal a potential heart attack (see Heart Attack) First Aid for a Diabetic attack 1. Monitor Lifeline – follow DRABC If a known diabetic loses consciousness, attempt to resuscitate and seek help. Tell the caller to inform the medical team that the patient is diabetic. 2. Determine high or low blood sugar levels Talk to the patient and try to establish if their blood sugar levels are low or high. Signs and Symptoms of LOW blood sugar include: The patient is hungry The patient is sweating The patient appears pale The patient seems confused, weak or disoriented The patient seems aggressive or irritable If the patient is suffering from low blood sugar levels, give them something sweet to drink or eat. Do not give diet, sugar free or diabetic safe food or drink. Seek medical help and continue to give them sweet food or drink every 15 minute until medical help arrives. Signs and Symptoms of HIGH Blood sugar levels include: The patient’s skin is hot and/or dry The patient feels thirsty The patient needs to urinate Help the patient administer insulin. Do not administer it for them, but assist them if necessary. Seek medical help and give them sugar-free fluids to drink. Water Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergencies: Warning Signs And What To Do

Diabetic Emergencies: Warning Signs And What To Do

Diabetes symptoms can quickly turn into emergencies. The disease of diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States in 2010, claiming nearly 70,000 lives. Responding promptly to symptoms of a diabetic emergency can be lifesaving. Causes and types Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes inhibit the body's ability to manage blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetes does so by destroying the cells that produce insulin. Type 2 diabetes reduces how responsive the body is to insulin, while not enough insulin is produced to counter the sugar in the body. Hence, most diabetic emergencies are related to disruptions in a person's blood sugar levels. Occasionally, even too much of a drug being used to treat diabetes can trigger a diabetic emergency. The most common diabetic emergencies include the following: Severe hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is when blood sugar levels are abnormally low. When blood sugar dips very low, it becomes a medical emergency. Hypoglycemia normally only occurs in people with diabetes who take medication that lowers blood sugar. Blood sugar levels may drop dangerously low when a person is: consuming too much alcohol exercising, especially without adjusting food intake or insulin dosage missing or delaying meals overdosing on diabetic medication Diabetic ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body does not have enough insulin to break down glucose properly, and hormones that normally work opposite insulin are high. Over time, the body releases hormones that break down fat to provide fuel. This produces acids called ketones. As ketones build up in the body, ketoacidosis can occur. Common causes of ketoacidosis include: uncontrolled or untreated diabetes an illness or infection that changes hormone production an illness or infection that chang Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shock And Insulin Reactions

Diabetic Shock And Insulin Reactions

Severe hypoglycemia, or diabetic shock, is a serious health risk for anyone with diabetes. Also called insulin reaction, as a consequence of too much insulin, it can occur anytime there is an imbalance between the insulin in your system, the amount of food you eat, or your level of physical activity. It can even happen while you are doing all you think you can do to manage your diabetes. The symptoms of diabetic shock may seem mild at first. But they should not be ignored. If it isn't treated quickly, hypoglycemia can become a very serious condition that causes you to faint, requiring immediate medical attention. Diabetic shock can also lead to a coma and death. It's important that not only you, but your family and others around you, learn to recognize the signs of hypoglycemia and know what to do about them. It could save your life. Hypoglycemia is a low level of blood sugar. The cells in your body use sugar from carbohydrates for energy. Insulin, which normally is made in the pancreas, is necessary for sugar to enter the cells. It helps keep the levels of sugar in the blood from getting too high. It's important to maintain the proper level of sugar in your blood. Levels that are too high can cause severe dehydration, which can be life threatening. Over time, excess sugar in the body does serious damage to organs such as your heart, eyes, and nervous system. Ordinarily, the production of insulin is regulated inside your body so that you naturally have the amount of insulin you need to help control the level of sugar. But if your body doesn't make its own insulin or if it can't effectively use the insulin it does produce, you need to inject insulin as a medicine or take another medication that will increase the amount of insulin your body does make. So if you need to me Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergency

Diabetic Emergency

Diabetes is a lifelong medical condition where the body cannot produce enough insulin. Insulin is a chemical made by the pancreas (a gland behind the stomach), which regulates the blood sugar (glucose) level in the body. Normally our bodies automatically keep the right blood sugar levels, but for someone with diabetes their body can't. Instead, they have to control the blood sugar level themselves by monitoring what they eat, and taking insulin injections or pills. There are two types of diabetes: Type1, or insulin-dependent diabetes, and Type 2, also known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Sometimes people who have diabetes may have a diabetic emergency, where their blood sugar becomes either too high or too low. Both conditions are potentially serious and may need treatment in hospital. Watch our video - diabetic emergency Hyperglycaemia Too little insulin can cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia). If it’s not treated and gets worse, the person can gradually become unresponsive (going into a diabetic coma). So it's important to get them to see a doctor in case they need emergency treatment. Hypoglycaemia Too much insulin can cause low blood sugar or hypoglycaemia (hypo). This often happens when someone with diabetes misses a meal or does too much exercise. It can also happen after someone has had an epileptic seizure or has been binge drinking. If someone knows they are diabetic, they may recognise the start of a hypo attack, but without help they may quickly become weak and unresponsive. What to look for - Diabetic emergency If you think someone is having a diabetic emergency, you need to check against the symptoms listed below to decide if their blood sugar is too high or too low. High blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) • Warm, dry skin • Rapid pulse and breathin Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Low Blood Sugar - Self-care

Diabetes - Low Blood Sugar - Self-care

Low blood sugar is called hypoglycemia. A blood sugar level below 70 mg/dL (3.9 mmol/L) is low and can harm you. A blood sugar level below 54 mg/dL (3.0 mmol/L) is cause for immediate action. You are at risk for low blood sugar if you have diabetes and are taking any of the following diabetes medicines: Insulin Glyburide (Micronase), glipizide (Glucotrol), glimepiride (Amaryl), repaglinide (Prandin), or nateglinide (Starlix) Chlorpropamide (Diabinese), tolazamide (Tolinase), acetohexamide (Dymelor), or tolbutamide (Orinase) Know how to tell when your blood sugar is getting low. Symptoms include: Weakness or feeling tired Shaking Sweating Headache Hunger Feeling uneasy, nervous, or anxious Feeling cranky Trouble thinking clearly Double or blurry vision Fast or pounding heartbeat Sometimes your blood sugar may be too low even if you do not have symptoms. If it gets too low, you may: Faint Have a seizure Go into a coma Talk with your health care provider about when you should check your blood sugar every day. People who have low blood sugar need to check their blood sugar more often. The most common causes of low blood sugar are: Taking your insulin or diabetes medicine at the wrong time Taking too much insulin or diabetes medicine Not eating enough during meals or snacks after you have taken insulin or diabetes medicine Skipping meals Waiting too long after taking your medicine to eat your meals Exercising a lot or at a time that is unusual for you Not checking your blood sugar or not adjusting your insulin dose before exercising Drinking alcohol Preventing low blood sugar is better than having to treat it. Always have a source of fast-acting sugar with you. When you exercise, check your blood sugar levels. Make sure you have snacks with you. Talk to your provider about r Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Recovery From Diabetic Coma

What You Should Know About Recovery From Diabetic Coma

A diabetic coma occurs when a person with diabetes loses consciousness. It can occur in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. A diabetic coma occurs when blood sugar levels become either too low or too high. The cells in your body require glucose to function. High blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, can make you feel lightheaded and lose consciousness. Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, can cause dehydration to the point where you may lose consciousness. Usually, you can prevent hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia from progressing to a diabetic coma. If a diabetic coma occurs, it’s likely that your doctor can balance your blood glucose levels and restore your consciousness and health quickly if they can respond to your condition in a timely manner. You can also slip into a diabetic coma if you develop diabetic ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a buildup of chemicals called ketones in your blood. Hypoglycemia The symptoms of hypoglycemia may include: headache fatigue dizziness confusion heart palpitations shakiness Hyperglycemia If you have hyperglycemia, you may experience noticeably increased thirst and you may urinate more frequently. A blood test would also reveal higher levels of glucose in your blood stream. A urine test can also show that your glucose levels are too high. DKA causes high levels of blood glucose. The symptoms also include increased thirst and a frequent need to urinate. Other symptoms of elevated ketone levels include: feeling tired having an upset stomach having flushed or dry skin If you have more severe diabetic coma symptoms, call 911. Severe symptoms may include: vomiting difficulty breathing confusion weakness dizziness A diabetic coma is a medical emergency. It can lead to brain damage or death if you don’t get treatment. Treating hyperg Continue reading >>

How To Act Quickly In A Diabetic Emergency

How To Act Quickly In A Diabetic Emergency

Over 29 million people have diabetes in the U.S., nearly 10% of the total population. With numbers that staggering, it makes diabetes one of the most common diseases, and chances are that you know someone who’s been affected by diabetes. During this National Diabetes Awareness Month, we want our community to be ready for any emergency they may encounter. The best way to prepare for a diabetic emergency, also called diabetic shock, is to research the symptoms of these attacks and learn how to react quickly and effectively. Keep reading to learn more. What is a diabetic emergency? A diabetic emergency, or diabetic shock, can occur when there is either too much sugar in the blood (hyperglycemia) or too little sugar in the blood (hypoglycemia). Often, diabetic individuals will feel dizzy and their skin may appear grey or pale during an attack. The key to stopping a diabetic emergency before it progresses is to recognize the symptoms. Look for these signs. Dry skin that may be warm to the touch Drowsiness Dazed or glossed-over look Dizziness and headaches Rapid pulse and labored breathing Sickly sweet breath Excessive thirst If the person isn’t taken immediately to an emergency room, they may faint, have a seizure or even fall into a coma. Knowing that someone has diabetes certainly makes it easier to recognize these symptoms and act quickly. If you see someone in public, like at a restaurant or gym, exhibiting some of these signs, check their person for any medical identifying tags. These are often worn as bracelets or necklaces and will provide contact information in the case of a diabetic emergency. This is the quickest way to ensure they’re treated properly. Act quickly Once you’ve identified the symptoms, the next step is to determine if their blood sugar is too Continue reading >>

What Is To Be Done If Someone Has A Diabetic Attack Due To High Blood Sugar?

What Is To Be Done If Someone Has A Diabetic Attack Due To High Blood Sugar?

If you think someone is having a diabetic emergency, you need to check against the symptoms listed below to decide if their blood sugar is too high or too low. High blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) • Warm, dry skin • Rapid pulse and breathing • Fruity sweet breath • Really thirsty • Drowsiness, leading to unresponsiveness if not treated Low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia) • Weakness, faintness or hunger • Confusion and irrational behaviour • Sweating with cold, clammy skin • Rapid pulse • Trembling • Deteriorating level of response • Medical warning bracelet or necklace and glucose gel or sweets • Medication such as an insulin pen or tablets and a glucose testing kit What you need to do ‒ for high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) Call an ambulance straight away for medical help and say that you suspect hyperglycaemia. While you wait for help to arrive, keep checking their breathing, pulse and level of response. If they lose responsiveness at any point, open their airway, check their breathing and prepare to treat someone who’s become unresponsive. What you need to do ‒ for low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia) Help them sit down. If they have their own glucose gel, help them take it. If not, you need to give them something sugary like fruit juice, a fizzy drink, three teaspoons of sugar, or sugary sweets. If they improve quickly, give them more sugary food or drink and let them rest. If they have their glucose testing kit with them, help them use it to check their glucose level. Stay with them until they feel completely better. If they do not improve quickly, look for any other causes and then call an ambulance for medical help. While waiting, keep checking their responsiveness, breathing and pulse. What you need to do ‒ if you’re unsure whether their Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergencies: Warning Signs And Steps To Save Someone’s Life

Diabetic Emergencies: Warning Signs And Steps To Save Someone’s Life

A diabetic can develop hyperglycemia (raised blood sugar) or hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Giving sugar will be lifesaving if blood sugar is low, and is unlikely to do harm if sugar levels are raised. Diabetics usually know how to control their condition, but even people who’ve had diabetes for years or decades may be susceptible to an attack. Low Blood Sugar (Hypoglycemia) Symptoms: This can occur if the blood sugar-insulin balance is incorrect. A person with diabetes often recognizes the warning signs: Feels shaky and weak Skin is pale and feels cold and clammy Confused, irritable, and behaving irrationally Rapid, but full and pounding pulse; patient may tell you that his heart is pounding Patient will quickly lose consciousness if he is not given some sugar If you know a patient has diabetes and he fails to respond to sugar or his condition begins to worsen, call for medical help immediately. A person recently diagnosed with diabetes is more susceptible to a “hypo” attack, especially while he is becoming used to balancing his sugar-insulin levels. What to Do for Hypoglycemia 1. Sit patient down. Reassure him and help him to sit down on a chair or on the floor if he is feeling faint. 2. Give sugar. If the patient is fully conscious and alert, give him a sugary drink, such as fruit juice, or some glucose tablets. People with diabetes often carry a dose of glucose concentrate or have some sugary food on hand as a precaution. 3. Check response. If the patient improves quickly after eating or drinking something, follow this with some slower-release carbohydrate food, such as a cereal bar, a sandwich, a piece of fruit, biscuits and milk, or the next meal if the timing is right. 4. Find medication. Help the patient find his glucose testing kit and medication and let Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High

Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High

Hyperglycemia means high (hyper) glucose (gly) in the blood (emia). Your body needs glucose to properly function. Your cells rely on glucose for energy. Hyperglycemia is a defining characteristic of diabetes—when the blood glucose level is too high because the body isn't properly using or doesn't make the hormone insulin. You get glucose from the foods you eat. Carbohydrates, such as fruit, milk, potatoes, bread, and rice, are the biggest source of glucose in a typical diet. Your body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose, and then transports the glucose to the cells via the bloodstream. Body Needs Insulin However, in order to use the glucose, your body needs insulin. This is a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin helps transport glucose into the cells, particularly the muscle cells. People with type 1 diabetes no longer make insulin to help their bodies use glucose, so they have to take insulin, which is injected under the skin. People with type 2 diabetes may have enough insulin, but their body doesn't use it well; they're insulin resistant. Some people with type 2 diabetes may not produce enough insulin. People with diabetes may become hyperglycemic if they don't keep their blood glucose level under control (by using insulin, medications, and appropriate meal planning). For example, if someone with type 1 diabetes doesn't take enough insulin before eating, the glucose their body makes from that food can build up in their blood and lead to hyperglycemia. Your endocrinologist will tell you what your target blood glucose levels are. Your levels may be different from what is usually considered as normal because of age, pregnancy, and/or other factors. Fasting hyperglycemia is defined as when you don't eat for at least eight hours. Recommended range without diabet Continue reading >>

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