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How To Heal Diabetes

What’s The Connection Between Diabetes And Wound Healing?

What’s The Connection Between Diabetes And Wound Healing?

Diabetes is a result of your body’s inability to produce or use insulin. Insulin is a hormone that allows your body to turn glucose, or sugar, into energy. If your body has difficulty metabolizing glucose, it can lead to high blood sugar levels. This can affect your body’s ability to heal wounds. In people with diabetes, wounds tend to heal more slowly and progress more quickly, so it’s important to know what to look out for. Although cuts, grazes, scratches, and blisters can occur anywhere on the body, the feet are one of the most common places of injury. A small wound on the foot can quickly develop into a foot ulcer. Foot ulcers can become serious if left untreated. Between 14 and 24 percent of people who have diabetes and develop an ulcer will end up having a lower limb amputation. For this reason, it’s crucial that you do regular self-checks and closely monitor any wounds closely. Catching wounds early is the only way to reduce your risk of complications. Keep reading to learn more about the healing process, ways to speed the healing process along, and how to improve your body’s healing powers long-term. When you have diabetes, a number of factors can affect your body’s ability to heal wounds. High blood sugar levels Your blood sugar level is the main factor in how quickly your wound will heal. When your blood sugar level is higher than normal, it: prevents nutrients and oxygen from energizing cells prevents your immune system from functioning efficiently increases inflammation in the body’s cells These effects slow down wound healing. Neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy can also result from having blood sugar levels that are consistently higher than normal. Over time, damage occurs to the nerves and vessels. This can cause the affected areas to lose sen Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Cure: 4 Ways To Reverse The Disease

Type 2 Diabetes Cure: 4 Ways To Reverse The Disease

Type 2 Diabetes Cure: 4 Ways to Reverse the Disease If you spot bleeding gums, it could be the first sign youre at risk of type 2 diabetes. Gum disease and insulin resistance share common origins, lets explore how to reverse type 2 diabetes One big mistake that healthcare has made is that it has considered the bodys systems as separate. Gums are treated by the dentist, hearts by the cardiologist, and type 2 diabetes by the endocrinologist. As a dentist, I see many patients with type 2 diabetes and advanced gum disease. Its long been know that the two conditions are linked. We must consider the body as a whole if we want to cure type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes affects over 30 million Americans and is the seventh leading cause of death . Whats more, 7.2 million of that 30 million are unaware they have type 2 diabetes. This disease is on the rise and expected to affect one in three Americans by 2050 . These are staggering numbers, impossible to ignore in my opinion. Gone are the days where the only piece of nutritional advice youll hear from a dentist is dont eat candy, itll rot your teeth. As a functional dentist I care about you and your health much more than that. Your diet and oral health are the gateway to your overall health a fact that until recently had been largely overlook. Up until this point, dentists have largely sat on the sidelines of the nutritional and systemic health conversation. Lets take a close look at how your teeth provide the secret to help cure type 2 diabetes. What is the main cause of type 2 diabetes? First, its important to understand what causes 2 diabetes in the first place, and that culprit is insulin resistance. What does it mean to be insulin resistant? It occurs when your body needs more and more insulin to bring your blood sugar levels Continue reading >>

Here's Exactly What I Ate To Cure My Type 2 Diabetes & High Cholesterol

Here's Exactly What I Ate To Cure My Type 2 Diabetes & High Cholesterol

Here's Exactly What I Ate To Cure My Type 2 Diabetes & High Cholesterol Mary Jenkins is 51 and lives in Kanab, Utah. Last December, before starting her new diet, she weighed 225 pounds. She has since lost 50 poundsand the weight is still coming off. This is her story. I was born in Charlotte, North Carolina, so I lived off a Southern-fried diet for most of my life. As a result, I had extremely high blood pressure for over 30 years. I tried every eating plan out there to get it under control: low-carb diets, high-protein dietsall that stuff. None of it worked for me. I was still obese, and my cholesterol levels didnt improve. (Discover the ONE simple, natural solution that can help you reverse chronic inflammation and heal more than 45 diseases. Try The Whole Body Cure today !) Then two years ago, my doctor ordered an A1C test. He had a hunch I may have type 2 diabetes as a result of my weight. My score was a seven, which meant his suspicions were correct. (A normal A1C level is below 5.7. ) It got worse: Because Ive had high blood pressure for so long, he said I could have long-term organ damage now that I also had diabetes. Youd think at that point, he would have sat me down and talked to me about how I could improve my diet, but he didnt. He just said something like, Watch your carbs and exercise. That was it. So I basically kept living as I had before. MORE: 15 Common Risk Factors Of Type 2 Diabetes Then my doctor moved away, and I found another doctor in a larger town nearby. My new physician told me that I needed to go on metformin (the generic name for a drug used to treat high blood sugar levels) immediately. He also told me that I should ramp up my exercise routine. So last year, I started hiking and rock climbing with my neighbor, who happens to be a yoga inst Continue reading >>

Is There A Diabetes Cure?

Is There A Diabetes Cure?

Everyone at Diabetes Daily is extremely excited for the day when diabetes is cured. We interview the greatest researchers in the world and are amazing by the continuous advances in understanding diabetes. In this section, we will look at our progress in curing type 1 and type 2 diabetes. You can also check out the many posts in our blog about the hunt for a diabetes cure. Is There a Type 2 Diabetes Cure? The short answer is: No. In reality, the answer is a little more complicated and depends upon how you define the word cure. There is currently no known treatment that will permanently eliminate type 2 diabetes. However, there are treatments that can cause diabetes to go into remission, often for very long periods of time. Those treatments include weight loss surgery and, in some circumstances, aggressive treatment with either diet, exercise and weight loss. At Diabetes Daily, we prefer using the word remission over cure because far too often the state of diabetes returns even with people’s best efforts. Regardless of the definition of a cure, finding a way to live with little to know highs or lows is a worthwhile endeavor. Long-term studies show that even a few years of great blood sugars significantly reduces your long-term risk of complications. A majority of people who undergo weight loss surgery experience diabetes remission. As the first major long-term studies are completed, we are discovering that many people do eventually relapse and the benefits are not permanent. In an interview with diaTribe, Dr. David Cummings shares the current state of research: A substantial proportion of people who experience type 2 diabetes remission after gastric bypass eventually have relapse of the disease down the road. I feel the best study of this was done by my co-author on CRO Continue reading >>

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Type 2 diabetes is a serious, long-term medical condition. It develops mostly in adults but is becoming more common in children as obesity rates rise across all age groups. Several factors contribute to type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor. Type 2 diabetes can be life-threatening. But if treated carefully, it can be managed or even reversed. Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin. When your blood sugar (glucose) levels rise, the pancreas releases insulin. This causes sugar to move from your blood to your cells, where it can be used as an energy source. As glucose levels in your blood go back down, your pancreas stops releasing insulin. Type 2 diabetes impacts how you metabolize sugar. Either your pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin or your body has become resistant to its effects. This causes glucose to build up in the blood. This is called hyperglycemia. There are several symptoms of untreated type 2 diabetes, including: excessive thirst and urination fatigue increased hunger weight loss, in spite of eating more infections that heal slowly blurry vision dark patches on the skin Treatment for type 2 diabetes includes monitoring your blood sugar levels and using medications or insulin when needed. Doctors also recommend losing weight through diet and exercise. Some diabetes medications have weight loss as a side effect, which can also help reverse diabetes. If you start eating healthier, get more exercise, and lose weight, you can reduce your symptoms. Research shows that these lifestyle changes, especially physical activity, can even reverse the course of the condition. Studies that show the reversal of type 2 diabetes include participants who have lived with the condition for only a few years. Weight loss is the primary fact Continue reading >>

This Is How I Cured My Diabetes

This Is How I Cured My Diabetes

Nicola Davidson was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2006. After a lifestyle overhaul, she reversed her diabetes in five months and plans to climb Mount Kilimanjaro in 2018. Nicola says diabetes felt like a disease that happened to other people.~ In 2006 Nicola Davidson weighed 135kg. When she went to her doctor for a check-up, she received an unexpected diagnosis: adult onset type 2 diabetes . Much has changed since then and Nicola plans to climb Mount Kilimanjaro in 2018 to help raise awareness and money for diabetes. She shares with us how she reversed her diabetes and how it changed her life. My doctor was worried about my health. I already had high blood pressure and high cholesterol, so she wanted to keep an eye on my blood sugar too, Nicola explains. I was going for regular check-ups on these markers, and the day inevitably came when I couldnt ignore the toll that hard, unhealthy living was taking on my body. The lab results came back I had adult onset type 2 diabetes. She was shocked at the diagnosis. I knew that Id been living very unhealthily eating too much, drinking too much and not exercising at all. But diabetes felt like a disease that happened to other people, not to me. It was a rude and scary awakening. Nicola was put onto chronic medication and her doctors orders were simple: You need to make some significant lifestyle changes, and right away. Her doctor recommended a healthy weight programme at the Sports Science Institute that Nicola signed up for right away. I did pretty well at it but then I got bored and irritated at not being able to do anything I liked that is, sitting around and eating and drinking a lot. When the programme ended, Nicola went back to her unhealthy habits. I took my medication and that was as far as lifestyle changes went. At Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

How To Cure Diabetes Without Medication | Men's Health

How To Cure Diabetes Without Medication | Men's Health

If you Google type 2 diabetes, reliable sourceslike the National Institutes of Health websitewill tell you that its a chronic condition. But Newcastle University researcher Roy Taylor, M.D., begs to differ. His research finds that some people are able to reverse their diabetes by going on an ultra low-calorie diet. For Dr. Taylors new study, 30 diabetic people ate just 700 calories daily for two months. They lost 31 pounds on average. Related: THE 21-DAY METASHREDOne Guy Lost 25 Pounds In Just 6 Weeks! Twelve of those subjects blood sugar levels fell below the threshold for diabetes, 126 milligrams per deciliter, as a result. Some of their levels were completely within the normal range, Dr. Taylor says, but the average fell within pre-diabetic parameters. Afterward, the researchers gave the study participants guidance on portion size to help them return to a normal diet while maintaining their new, lower weight. Six months later, all of those people were still diabetes-free. That means that as long as they keep their weight down, they no longer need to take insulin or constantly monitor their blood sugar. Theyre no longer at risk for premature heart attacks and strokes, or diabetes complications that can damage their eyes, kidneys, and feet, says Dr. Taylor. Plus, they just feel betterpoor blood sugar regulation can zap your energy. How does a diet cure type 2 diabetes? It comes down to weight loss, he says. Diabetes is caused by a buildup of fat in your pancreas, Dr. Taylor says. The extra fat screws with your organs ability to make insulin, the hormone that controls your blood sugar. Related: Does Sugar Really Cause Diabetes? But when you lose fat, the first bit to go is the fat in your organs, says Dr. Taylor. In the first 10 to 14 kilograms [22 to 31 pounds] of wei Continue reading >>

This Man Says A 'rare Gene' Cured His Type 1 Diabetes. Experts Are Skeptical.

This Man Says A 'rare Gene' Cured His Type 1 Diabetes. Experts Are Skeptical.

Type 1 diabetes, or diabetes mellitus, is an incurable disease that requires lifelong treatment. That is, unless you're Daniel Darkes. About eight years ago, Darkes said, doctors diagnosed him with type 1 diabetes : a potentially life-threatening condition in which the immune system kills off the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, the hormone necessary for transporting glucose, or sugar, into cells so they can produce energy. But early last year, routine finger-prick tests showed his blood-sugar levels were normal, so doctors advised him to stop his insulin injections, Darkes said. Now, his doctors have told him they're 80 percent sure he's cured, the Northampton Chronicle and Echo reported. If true, this would mean Darkes could be the first person ever to naturally experience complete remission of type 1 diabetes. [ 27 Oddest Medical Cases ] Darkes has become a celebrity within the diabetes community, particularly in the United Kingdom, and he was happy to talk with Live Science about his experience. Daniel Darkes is a 30-year-old army veteran and type 1 diabetic who said he no longer needs insulin. But does Darkes' story really mean type 1 diabetes can be cured? Darkes declined to provide his medical records, and the experts Live Science spoke to said there were several missing or confusing pieces of information in his story. Usually, incredible medical stories like this one are reported as case reports in the medical literature, the experts said. And even if the details of his story can ultimately be confirmed, the experts emphasized that it's extremely unlikely that Darkes' case would lead to a widespread cure for type 1 diabetes, as reports in the media have wrongly suggested . Darkes, who is 30 years old and an army veteran, lives in Northamptonshire, En Continue reading >>

Is There A Diabetes Cure?

Is There A Diabetes Cure?

With all the research on diabetes and advances in diabetes treatments, it's tempting to think someone has surely found a diabetes cure by now. But the reality is that there is no cure for diabetes -- neither type 1 diabetes nor type 2 diabetes. (Although lifestyle changes can achieve remission in type 2 diabetes in some cases.) However, there are treatments, including simple things you can do daily, that make a big difference. No. Natural therapies such as deep abdominal breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, guided imagery, and biofeedback can help relieve stress. And emotional stress affects your blood sugar levels. So learning to relax is important in managing your diabetes. Supplements don't cure diabetes, either. Some natural supplements may interact dangerously with your diabetes medication. Others have been shown to help improve your diabetes, but always check with your doctor before taking any supplement. Be skeptical about claims of a diabetes cure. A genuine cure will have been tested repeatedly in clinical trials with clear success. Even though there's no diabetes cure, diabetes can be treated and controlled, and some people may go into remission. To manage diabetes effectively, you need to do the following: Manage your blood sugar levels. Know what to do to help keep them as near to normal as possible every day: Check your glucose levels frequently. Take your diabetes medicine regularly. And balance your food intake with medication, exercise, stress management, and good sleep habits. Plan what you eat at each meal. Stick to your diabetes eating plan as often as possible. Bring healthy snacks with you. You’ll be less likely to snack on empty calories. Exercise regularly. Exercise helps you keep you fit, burns calories, and helps normalize your blood gluc Continue reading >>

The Future Of Diabetes Treatment: Is A Cure Possible?

The Future Of Diabetes Treatment: Is A Cure Possible?

The Future of Diabetes Treatment: Is a Cure Possible? Diabetes has become an epidemic, with over 422 million people affected worldwide sentenced to lifelong medication. Science is striving to find a cure to this chronic disease, but how close are we? Diabetes is the major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attack and stroke. The number of people affected by all types of diabetic disorders is now over four times higher than just 40 years ago. This has led the World Health Organization (WHO) to consider diabetes an epidemic , predicting it will soon be the seventh biggest cause of death worldwide. Despite its huge impact, there is still no cure for diabetes. Most treatments help patients manage the symptoms to a certain extent, but diabetics still face multiple long-term health complications. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect the regulation of insulin, a hormone required for glucose uptake in cells, resulting in high levels of blood glucose. Over time, high sugar levels deteriorate the body, especially the eyes, kidneys, heart and blood vessels. While type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that destroys the insulin-producing beta-pancreatic cells, in patients with type 2 diabetes these cells still function but the body develops insulin resistance as a consequence of genetics, obesity, highly caloric diets and lack of exercise. The biotech industry has seen this opportunity and is striving to develop new diabetes treatments and chasing for the holy grail: a cure. Lets have a look at whats brewing in the field and how it will change the way diabetes is treated. Although still in the very early stages of development, cell therapy is one of the biggest hopes towards developing a cure for diabetes, especially for type 1 diabetes. Replacing the missing insulin-pr Continue reading >>

Could There Be A Cure For Type 2 (adult Onset) Diabetes?

Could There Be A Cure For Type 2 (adult Onset) Diabetes?

With all the research on diabetes and advances in diabetes treatments, it's tempting to think someone has surely found a diabetes cure by now. But the reality is that there is no cure for diabetes -- neither type 1 diabetes nor type 2 diabetes . (Although lifestyle changes can achieve remission in type 2 diabetes in some cases.) However, there are treatments, including simple things you can do daily, that make a big difference. Is there a natural therapy that can cure diabetes? No. Natural therapies such as deep abdominal breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, guided imagery, and biofeedback can help relieve stress. And emotional stress affects your blood sugar levels . So learning to relax is important in managing your diabetes. Supplements don't cure diabetes, either. Some natural supplements may interact dangerously with your diabetes medication . Others have been shown to help improve your diabetes, but always check with your doctor before taking any supplement. Be skeptical about claims of a diabetes cure. A genuine cure will have been tested repeatedly in clinical trials with clear success. What lifestyle changes can help me manage my diabetes? Even though there's no diabetes cure, diabetes can be treated and controlled, and some people may go into remission. To manage diabetes effectively, you need to do the following: Manage your blood sugar levels . Know what to do to help keep them as near to normal as possible every day: Check your glucose levels frequently. Take your diabetes medicine regularly. And balance your food intake with medication, exercise , stress management , and good sleep habits. Plan what you eat at each meal. Stick to your diabetes eating plan as often as possible. Bring healthy snacks with you. Youll be less likely to snack on empty calo Continue reading >>

The Cure For Type 2 Diabetes Is Known, But Few Are Aware

The Cure For Type 2 Diabetes Is Known, But Few Are Aware

The cure for type 2 diabetes is known, but few are aware I recently posted to Facebook about a cure for diabetes and suggested someone try it. Just six days later, I received the following message from a friend: I just wanted to drop you a line and thank you for that post… My lab results at the beginning of the month were 230. After just this last week it’s down to 155. I think I’ll be in normal range within a month. Really miraculous… It’s really been a game changer for me already and I wanted you to know how much I appreciated the info and how much of a difference I think it will make in my life. Four months later, the friend posted this to Facebook: I started on this regiment when Nathan posted about it [four months ago]. My blood glucose level at that time, while taking two daily glucose meds, was 235. Two weeks ago, my [fasting] glucose level, WITHOUT the meds, was 68. If you google “diabetes cure” you are directed to websites like WebMD and the Mayo Clinic where you find information on diet, exercise, medication, and insulin therapy, but nothing about the cure. This lack of information may have to do with the fact that Americans spend $322 billion a year to treat diabetes, $60 billion a year on weight-loss programs, and $124 billion a year on snack foods. This is about 3% of the US economy! Because so many peoples’ livelihoods are supported by diabetes and its main cause, obesity, the viral effect of people getting cured and telling others is greatly diminished. Because of this understandable stifling of the message, if you are like my Facebook friend and have already experienced the type 2 diabetes cure for yourself — there are thousands of you out there — it is important for you to share your success stories as far and wide as possible. You c Continue reading >>

Six Dos And Donts For Diabetes Wound Care

Six Dos And Donts For Diabetes Wound Care

Six Dos and Donts for Diabetes Wound Care Bumps, blisters, scratches, and cuts are a fact of life. For the most part, slapping on a Band-Aid or dabbing some antibiotic ointment does the trick. But if you have diabetes, even the simplest scratch or cut can quickly snowball into an extremely serious situation if youre not extra careful. Ignoring a cut or not treating it the right way, for example, can slow healing, lead to infection, and, in the worst case, possibly result in amputation. The good news? There are steps that you can take to nip possible problems in the bud. Read on to learn how to properly take care of a wound. Look for cuts, blisters, red spots, or swelling. This is especially important to do if you have any loss of sensation in your feet or legs due to diabetic neuropathy . More than 80 percent of amputations start with a foot ulcer . For this reason, make foot checks part of your daily routine say, before you go to bed every night. If you notice a cut that doesnt seem to be healing, or redness that is spreading, call your doctor as soon as you can. If you have trouble seeing or reaching your feet, ask someone to check your feet for you. Or, use a mirror to help you see the bottom of your feet. Dont: Perform any type of bathroom surgery Leave that to the experts. There are different types of wounds, and some wounds require a process called debridement, which is the removal of dead tissue. Debridement helps with wound drainage and healing, and allows for closer inspection. As tempting as it may be to pick or cut off dead skin yourself, avoid doing this at all cost. You can easily end up damaging a blood vessel and worsening the problem. Never cut corns or calluses or use an acid-based wart remover. Gently use a pumice stone, or, better yet, visit a podiat Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Wound Healing

Diabetes And Wound Healing

Diabetes can cause wounds to heal more slowly. This raises the risk that someone with diabetes will develop infections and other complications. A person who manages their diabetes well can improve wound healing and reduce the chances of developing a serious infection. Those with diabetes may find that different types of wounds are slow to heal. Minor wounds, cuts, and burns are a part of life, but for people with diabetes, they can cause serious health issues. Many people with diabetes develop wounds that are slow to heal or never heal. Wounds that do not heal well can become infected. An infection can spread locally, to surrounding tissue and bone, or to further away areas of the body. In some cases, they may even be fatal. Diabetic foot ulcers affect 15 percent of people with diabetes . These are painful sores that can ultimately lead to foot amputation. Even when a wound does not become infected, it can affect a person's health and quality of life. Cuts or injuries on the feet or legs can make it difficult to walk or exercise without pain. Keeping diabetes under control can reduce the risk of slow-healing wounds and complications, including foot ulcers. A 2013 study found a clear correlation between blood glucose and wound healing. People undergoing surgery for chronic diabetes wounds were more likely to fully heal if their blood glucose was well-controlled at the time of surgery. Diabetes makes it more difficult for the body to manage blood glucose levels. When blood glucose remains chronically high, it impairs the function of white blood cells, resulting in an inability to fight bacteria. Diabetes, particularly if uncontrolled, is also associated with poor circulation. As circulation slows, red blood cells move more slowly. This makes it more difficult for the bod Continue reading >>

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