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How To Get Fasting Numbers Under 95 For Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes: The Numbers Game

Gestational Diabetes: The Numbers Game

Copyright 1998 [email protected] All rightsreserved. DISCLAIMER: The information on this website is notintended and should not be construed as medical advice. Consultyour health provider. This particular web section isdesigned to present more than one view of a controversialsubject, pro and con. It should be re-emphasizedthat nothing herein should be considered medical advice. One thing that is especially confusing in gd is the variousnumbers that are tossed around all the time. It is very common toget confused! For example, 140 mg/dl is a numberyou see a lot, but it means different things in differentcontexts. It is the cutoff for the one-hour glucose challengetest in pregnancy, it used to be the number for diagnosing 'true'diabetes outside of pregnancy, and it is the cutoff for desirableblood glucose levels one hour after a meal in many programs. Whenthe levels for diagnosing diabetes outside pregnancy wererecently revised to lower levels (126 mg/dl), it confused manypregnant women, who wondered if the cutoff for the one-hour testin pregnancy was also going to be lowered or if their target bGfor one hour after eating was going to be lowered too. The answeris that one has nothing to do with the others. They all refer to differentmeasurements; it is just coincidence that they use the samenumber as a cutoff. But even among those who have studied the basics of gd, thevarious reference numbers commonly used in gd discussions can bevery confusing. Kmom knows from experience that when gd comes upfor discussion on mailing lists, people often mix up theirreferences, compare numbers incorrectly, and generally make thediscussion even more confusing. This websection is an attempt toclarify this very confusing issue and discuss thevarious guidelines that gd women are often given. Continue reading >>

Is A Reading Of 3.9 Before Breakfast Bad?

Is A Reading Of 3.9 Before Breakfast Bad?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community is a reading of 3.9 before breakfast bad? Hello, Do you think thats a hypo? I'm newly diagnosed so a bit confused! I am a gestational diabetic mother to be as well. The amount of conflicting information out there is staggering to be honest. Also the differences between American and British approach is surprising as well. I was reading an American website regarding gestational diabetes and in there the normal levels are given as 0200-0300 am between 60-120 (between 4.4 and 6.7) I will post the address for this site again for you as soon as I find. However, my diabetic team gave me completely different limits. They did not bother with lower limits much but they said lower than 5.6 when fasting and lower than 7.8 1 hr after meals. When they talked to me about insulin they said if my blood glucose was measuring lower than 5.3 not to drive but to have something to eat before I drive. That's what they told me. Nobody mentioned about what was a hypo as such. 3.9 before breakfast is just only a tiny bit lower than what I get really. I get 4.2, 4.3 often in the mornings. As this is a UK site for Diabetes here is a link to the information about Gestational Diabetes from this sites Community pages with information about levels and much more. The usual advice is between 4 - 7 mmol/l so 3.9 is just a tad low. Not too far out though. You should in any case discuss the acceptable levels with your Diabetes Team as there may be reasons, medical or otherwise why you should adhere to a different set of standards. As the health of both baby and Mom are paramount do not do anything without first discussing it with the HCP's. Non diabetic women in the last trimester of a p Continue reading >>

How To Maintain Sugar Levels In Gestational Diabetes?

How To Maintain Sugar Levels In Gestational Diabetes?

Q: My wife was diagnosed with gestational diabetes in her 30th week of pregnancy. She is strictly on diabetic diet, she goes for a one hour walk everyday and takes insulin twice (14, 14) daily. Doctor has told her to maintain post meal 1 hour sugar levels up to 140. Her readings generally comes in 135-145 range. I read somewhere that post meal 1 hour sugar levels for pregnant women should be less than 120/130. What level should she maintain? A:During a healthy pregnancy, mean fasting blood sugar levels decline progressively to a remarkably low value of 74 ± 2.7 (standard deviation) mg/dL. On the other hand, peak postprandial blood sugar values rarely exceed 120 mg/dL. Meticulous replication of the normal glycaemic profile during pregnancy has been demonstrated to reduce the rate of macrosomia (large babies). Specifically, when 2-hour postprandial glucose levels are maintained at less than 120 mg/dL, approximately 20% of fetuses demonstrate macrosomia. Conversely, if postprandial levels range up to 160 mg/dL, macrosomia rates rise to 35%. The current recommendations are: Fasting whole blood glucose level less than 95 mg/dL (5.3 mmol/L) Two-hour postprandial whole blood glucose level less than 120 mg/dL (6.7 mmol/L) Dietary therapy Metabolic management of a patient is focused on dietary control, regular home glucose monitoring, and judicious use of insulin therapy. Most patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) diagnosed in the third trimester can maintain 1-hour postprandial blood glucose levels less than 130 mg/dL via diet manipulation alone (i.e., multiple, small, nonglycaemic meals and increased exercise). Glucose monitoring A home glucose monitor is essential to assist the patient in choosing the types and timing of food ingestion. For the first 1-2 weeks, t Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Numbers In Gestational Diabetes - Medhelp

Blood Sugar Numbers In Gestational Diabetes - Medhelp

Blood sugar numbers in gestational diabetes Common Questions and Answers about Blood sugar numbers in gestational diabetes Hi, 223 is too high (is that blood sugar or blood pressure)? In either case it's too high.Most likley you have gestational diabetes with these numbers. Low carb eating and careful portion control will help with your blood sugar management. Worst case you will need to take medications / insulin. Please don't eat sugars now. Work with your doctor. Good blood sugar control is important for healthy pregnancy. Has anyone had gestational diabetes ? I was diagnosed with it and everyone says I'm gonna have a big baby. Is this always true? I've only gained in my belly. I'm all belly pretty much. I think my size is normal for 35 weeks. I'm close to what I was with my first and I was all belly with him. Thanks in advance. Your fasting blood sugar when pregnant is suppose to be 20 pts lower then when your not pregnant. My fasting sugar was the same way between 90 - 96 I now take a low dose of meds and my fasting blood sugar is between 70-80. It's not a big deal to take the meds and it's in your baby's best interest. If you were having tests to detect gestational diabetes since you were pregnant, and at 30 weeks you are having raised blood sugars, you needn't worry and have a plan set out with your doctor, usually requiring a regular monitoring of blood glucose at morning before breakfast and after meals, treatment would be generally by insulin injection, also keep a watch on the high and low numbers of blood glucose in a journal along with blood pressure values. They ha e me testing my blood sugar 4 times a day. First thing in the am, then 2 hours after eating breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Insurance should cover the equipment. 2 times a day isn't really going Continue reading >>

Glyburide Decreases Blood Sugar In Gestational Diabetes But Not Birth Weight

Glyburide Decreases Blood Sugar In Gestational Diabetes But Not Birth Weight

All pregnant women undergo screening for gestational diabetes during the 24-28th week of pregnancy. For the 5-6% of women who are diagnosed with gestational diabetes by high blood sugars, physicians traditionally recommended diet modification or insulin to control blood sugar levels below the goal of 95 when fasting and 120 two hours after a meal. Mild gestational diabetes can often be controlled with diet modification, and in 2009, a large study demonstrated diet modification can improve maternal and neonatal outcomes for women with mild gestational diabetes. A new study from the University of Texas in Dallas examines the role of glyburide, an oral medicine to treat high blood sugar, in helping women with mild gestational diabetes. 395 women with mild gestational diabetes and otherwise uncomplicated pregnancies enrolled in the study. They all received standard nutritional counseling. Half of the women received glyburide 2.5mg daily and half the women received a placebo (a fake pill) that was designed to look like glyburide. The women's doctors increased the dose to try to control blood sugar. If blood sugar was still too high on a max dose of 20mg, the physician would start insulin. This tactic is consistent with the standard of care in obstetrics. The study authors estimated that the infants who received glyburide would weigh on average 200g less than the babies who did not receive the medication. Because diabetes can lead to infants who are "large for gestational age" (LGA) and prone to complications like the shoulder getting stuck during delivery and low blood sugar at birth, a 200g decrease in weight would be a benefit to these infants. The authors used this 200g estimation to decide how many women needed to enroll in the study- about 400- to make the study powerfu Continue reading >>

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

In the next two articles we’re going to discuss the concept of “normal” blood sugar. I say concept and put normal in quotation marks because what passes for normal in mainstream medicine turns out to be anything but normal if optimal health and function are what you’re interested in. Here’s the thing. We’ve confused normal with common. Just because something is common, doesn’t mean it’s normal. It’s now becoming common for kids to be overweight and diabetic because they eat nothing but refined flour, high-fructose corn syrup and industrial seed oils. Yet I don’t think anyone (even the ADA) would argue that being fat and metabolically deranged is even remotely close to normal for kids. Or adults, for that matter. In the same way, the guidelines the so-called authorities like the ADA have set for normal blood sugar may be common, but they’re certainly not normal. Unless you think it’s normal for people to develop diabetic complications like neuropathy, retinopathy and cardiovascular disease as they age, and spend the last several years of their lives in hospitals or assisted living facilities. Common, but not normal. In this article I’m going to introduce the three markers we use to measure blood sugar, and tell you what the conventional model thinks is normal for those markers. In the next article, I’m going to show you what the research says is normal for healthy people. And I’m also going to show you that so-called normal blood sugar, as dictated by the ADA, can double your risk of heart disease and lead to all kinds of complications down the road. The 3 ways blood sugar is measured Fasting blood glucose This is still the most common marker used in clinical settings, and is often the only one that gets tested. The fasting blood glucose Continue reading >>

Myth-busting Insulin For Gestational Diabetes

Myth-busting Insulin For Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is a roller coaster ride from start to finish. There is a lot of information to navigate and often at a session with your diabetes educator you don’t know what questions to ask. So we pulled together an extensive list of questions about insulin for gestational diabetes. We wanted to highlight the positives and to bust the myths. We hope that after reading this you’ll feel more informed and less anxious about insulin treatment. Written by Natasha Leader, Accredited Practising Dietitian & Credentialled Diabetes Educator Do many women with GDM have to take insulin? It tends to depend on your treatment centre and which timing and targets your health practitioners are using. For example you may be advised to check your blood glucose level at 1 hour or 2 hours after the meal. There may also be some variation in the target level of glucose that your doctor/diabetes educator uses i.e may be < 7.4 or 8.0 1hr or <6.7 or 7.0 for 2hr time point. The percentage of women who need insulin is usually between 20 and 60%. Have I failed if I end up having to take insulin? Absolutely not. The need for insulin is related to how much insulin your body is able to make and whether this is enough to process the amount of carbohydrate food you and baby need to stay well. In most cases it is not a reflection of the effort you are making with your diet. Is the insulin going to harm my baby in any way? Insulin will not harm your baby but high glucose levels may. Insulin is used because it only crosses the placenta in very small amounts (compared with oral agents) and therefore is considered the safest way to control your blood glucose levels if diet and exercise alone are not enough. Are there any long-term effects from taking insulin? No. Taking injected insulin is just in Continue reading >>

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

Explanation of gestational diabetes & personal reflection of what to expect if you are diagnosed during your pregnancy. Not to worry, it’s can be managed! When you’re pregnant many people love to say “Now you can eat for two!” or “Your pregnant, this is the time you can eat what you want!” Unfortunately, these words of wisdom are not entirely accurate. Every mom-to-be dreads the glucose tolerance test, which involves ingesting a high concentration of glucose (a form of sugar) mixed with water to see if you have gestational diabetes. It’s a grueling test because you have to sit in a doctor’s office or clinic for a few hours while they take blood samples before and 2-3 times after you drink the solution. Before the test, you have to fast for 8 hours and this alone makes mamas pretty aggravated but then with the drink solution you have to deal with a sugar high! Waiting for the results, you cross your fingers and hope that the last 24-28 weeks you’ve had a balanced, healthy diet. I knew that I had increased my carbohydrate and sweet intake more than before I was pregnant, but I was hoping the test would still be negative. Unfortunately, when I got the call from my doctor who then said I had gestational diabetes, my first reaction was guilt. How could I have done this to my baby? Gestational Diabetes 101 I want to make sure I disclose this up front, I am not a doctor, I’m just sharing my experience with gestational diabetes. My daily pregnancy routine consisted of exercising five times a week and eating healthy on most days. However, I knew I could have eaten healthier in the last trimester, but I didn’t (those darn cravings and ravishing bouts of hunger!). As I learned more about gestational diabetes, I realized that our bodies change so much during p Continue reading >>

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

This is the most comprehensive page on some of the most frequently asked questions about GD. Let us know if we missed something and we will add it in our list of questions. Note: GD means Gestational Diabetes. What is GD? What are the signs and symptoms? What kind of weight gain should I expect? Gestational vs type 2 diabetes. How does apple cider vinegar effect? What are the cut off values for GD? What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? What are the screening tests available? What should the fasting blood glucose be when pregnant? What is the correlation between GD and jaundice with the newborn? What foods should I avoid? What is the correlation with gestational hypertension and GD? When do you get tested for this issue? What causes it? Who is at risk? What is the risk of getting diabetes after being diagnosed with GD? What is the risk of my child getting diabetes after I am diagnosed? What are some healthy breakfast ideas for someone with this issue? Is there a risk if taking Zantac? Does Zofran cause it? Are Zone bars okay to eat while pregnant? Is the Zone diet okay to do while pregnant? What is the prevalence of GD in New Zealand? Is yogurt okay to eat? Is it normal to have yeast infections? Is it okay to take Xylitol during pregnancy? Is it okay to have a vbac? Does vitamin D help? What are the considerations for vegetarians? What are the risks if you don’t treat? Am I at greater risk of GD since I am carrying twins? What are the risks for the baby when mom has GD? What should I do about this issue after I deliver the baby? Is there any way to prevent it? What is the pathophysiology? PCOS and GD. What is the prevalence? Does oatmeal help? When is the usual onset? Does obesity increase the chance of getting it? When do I have to take Metformin Continue reading >>

Ot: Human Gestational Fasting Glucose At 34-35 Weeks

Ot: Human Gestational Fasting Glucose At 34-35 Weeks

OT: human gestational fasting glucose at 34-35 weeks Thought someone here might just happen to be able to give me the answer to a question that my midwife, obstetrician, and gestational diabetes counselor could not answer for me: Is there a normal increase in fasting blood sugar rates between the weeks of 34-36 in human pregnancy? According to the baby books and other sources, this is the time that the baby's brain and body fat reserves need extra nutrition for development. I have asked all three of these professionals for information on non-GD gestational glucose levels, and they just refer to the chart and point at what the chart says is safe for "gestational diabetics" without regard to phase of pregnancy. I have also spent hours (days) searching for this answer on pregnancy boards and in many books. I know that a few folks use glucometers with their IR horses: has anyone ever happened to take a fasting reading on themselves (or a friend) while 34-35 weeks pregnant? I would really like to know if normal blood sugars also rise at all during this phase. I have also read that GD numbers tend to naturally decline after week 36. fwiw or tmi ;-), I am 41 years old with a healthy baby in the 40th weight percentile (according to wk 32 sonogram) and was diagnosed GD about six weeks ago. Until the last three days (beginning week 34), my fasting numbers have been consistently under 95 (most often 85). They have jumped up to the "alarming" number of 104. (Apparently human pregnancy naturally reduces glucose levels by about 10 points.) There is no way I will consent to taking insulin (which has been shown to increase complications) at this point for what is essentially a normal blood sugar reading, but I have been so stressed over this and over being scheduled twice weekly for f Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes - My Story And Recipes

Gestational Diabetes - My Story And Recipes

This is a little bit of a departure from my normal blog posts. However, I thought sharing my experience with gestational diabetes would be good to raise awareness and let other pregnant gals hear a first hand account. I hope you keep reading and that you learn something. The recipes, ideas and meal suggestions are healthy for anyone diabetic or not. Heading into my third trimester gestational diabetes was not on my radar. It blindsided me. I didn't expect to be diagnosed. I've been very proactive about my health. I've focused on eating well, maintaining a good weight and getting exercise. I only had two of the risk factors: I'm over 25 and I do have history of type II diabetes from both my maternal grandfather and paternal grandmother. Although they both were diagnosed late in life and already had other health problems so it just didn't seem relevant. When I failed the first 1-hour non-fasting glucose test I figured it was a fluke and I would pass the longer 3-hour fasting glucose test. I didn't. For the 1-hour glucose test, anything over 130mg/dL (or 140mg/dL depending on your doctor) is high enough to warrant the three-hour test. If your blood sugar is over 200mg/dL they don't even bother with the 3-hour test and confirm a diagnosis of gestational diabetes. Usually pregnant women are tested between 24 and 28 weeks. At week 28 my blood sugar tested at 138 mg/dL. What is considered elevated blood glucose levels vary by doctor and practice. From what I've read, I go to a fairly conservative practice. Below you can see the American Diabetes Association scores to diagnose gestational diabetes verses the practice I go to and then what my scores were. The 3-hour fasting glucose test involves not eating for 12 hours, then having blood drawn. That's the first fasting score. Th Continue reading >>

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

JUMP TO: Intro | Blood sugar vs blood glucose | Diagnostic levels | Blood sugar goals for people with type 2 diabetes | Visual chart | Commonly asked questions about blood sugar Before Getting Started I was talking to one of my clients recently about the importance of getting blood sugar levels under control. So before sharing the diabetes blood sugar levels chart, I want to OVER EMPHASIZE the importance of you gaining the best control of your blood sugar levels as you possibly can. Just taking medication and doing nothing else is really not enough. You see, I just don’t think many people are fully informed about why it is so crucial to do, because if you already have a diabetes diagnosis then you are already at high risk for heart disease and other vascular problems. Maybe you've been better informed by your doctor but many people I come across haven't. So if that's you, it's important to know that during your pre-diabetic period, there is a lot of damage that is already done to the vascular system. This occurs due to the higher-than-normal blood sugar, that's what causes the damage. So now that you have type 2 diabetes, you want to prevent any of the nasty complications by gaining good control over your levels. Truly, ask anyone having to live with diabetes complications and they’ll tell you it’s the pits! You DO NOT want it to happen to you if you can avoid it. While medications may be needed, just taking medication alone and doing nothing is really not enough! Why is it not enough even if your blood sugars seem reasonably under control? Well, one common research observation in people with diabetes, is there is a slow and declining progression of blood sugar control and symptoms. Meaning, over time your ability to regulate sugars and keep healthy gets harder. I Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Chart

Blood Sugar Level Chart

A blood sugar level chart can help you understand the levels of healthy blood sugar. Some of the tests listed below must be prescribed and administered by a doctor or medical clinic, but you can also use these charts along with a glucometer (a tool to test blood sugar at home) to decide which foods cause blood sugar spikes, and which to avoid to maintain low levels of blood sugar and hence, good health. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com Fasting Blood Sugar Test Fasting blood sugar is a measurement of your blood sugar after not eating for 8-12 hours. This test is normally included with a CBC (complete blood chemistry) blood test. A CBC is a test often ordered by doctors when doing a complete health evaluation. Fasting blood sugars are evaluated as follows: Fasting blood sugars after 8-12 without food: Normal blood sugar range: between 60- 100 mg/dL Pre -Diabetic range: between 101- 126 mg /dL Diabetic range: more than 126 mg/dL on two different blood test occasions Oral Glucose Tolerance Test An oral glucose tolerance test is used to test the body’s ability to metabolize a specific amount of glucose, clear it from the blood stream and return blood sugar levels to normal. The patient is asked to eat normally for several days before the test. No food should be taken for 8-10 hours before the test, and there is no eating during the test. To begin the test, a fasting blood sugar is taken. Then the patient drinks a sweet liquid which contains approximately 75 grams of sugar in the form of glucose. The drink must be finished in 5 minutes. After sitting quietly for one to two hours, the patient’s blood sugar is re-tested and evaluated as follows on this blood s Continue reading >>

How To Get Fasting Numbers Under 95 For Gestational Diabetes And High Fasting Levels?

How To Get Fasting Numbers Under 95 For Gestational Diabetes And High Fasting Levels?

Home / Gestational Diabetes / How To Get Fasting Numbers Under 95 For Gestational Diabetes How To Get Fasting Numbers Under 95 For Gestational Diabetes How To Get Fasting Numbers Under 95 For Gestational Diabetes and High fasting levels? How To Get Fasting Numbers Under 95 For Gestational Diabetes? Some ladies find it helps to take a big glass of water to bed with them so that. They can also drink when waking to go to the bathroom in the nighttime. How To Get Fasting Numbers Under 95 For Gestational Diabetes? A high-fat meal such as takeaway food can also cause higher blood sugar levels. And so eat a well paired evening meal is important. How To Get Fasting Numbers Under 95 For Gestational Diabetes The key to stabilizing blood sugar levels is to eat small amounts, often. We obviously cannot do this throughout the night, but if you eat your evening meal early and do not eat again until breakfast the following day, it can be an extremely long time to go without eating. How To Get Fasting Numbers Under 95 For Gestational Diabetes? Likewise, if you eat a large meal just before going to bed, this too can have a detrimental effect on your fasting levels. Dehydration will cause higher blood sugar levels. Water helps to flush excess sugar from the body, and so it is important to stay well hydrated. Some ladies find it helps to take a big glass of water to bed with them, So that they can also drink when waking to go to the bathroom in the nighttime. Possible ways to try to lower fasting levels Go for a walk after your evening meal exercise has an insulin type effect on the bodys cells which can impact may hours after and so may help lower fasting levels Eat fewer carbohydrates in your evening meal remember that it is important to eat sufficient carbohydrates still to avoid keto Continue reading >>

Pregnancy Life With Gestational Diabetes

Pregnancy Life With Gestational Diabetes

I’ve had a fantastic pregnancy. I have loved every moment of this (my first) pregnancy. Everything was awesome until Week 30 when I was tested for gestational diabetes. My world of eating whatever I wanted (within reason) died the day I received the call with results. What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes occurs when your pancreas works hard to create insulin but the placenta produces pregnancy hormones that block it from countering your blood sugar. The insulin can’t pass through the placenta to the baby. This may cause the baby’s pancreas to work hard to produce her/his own insulin, and gestational diabetes can cause a bigger baby, early labor, and other complications. My Blood Glucose Scores I took two tests: the 1-hour and the 3-hour glucose tests. I massively failed the first test. There goes that stereotype about Asians doing really well on tests! Test 1: This is the one-hour test where you gulp down your glucose drink and have your blood sugar tested an hour later. I was supposed to score less than 140; I scored 214. Test 2: Since I failed the first test, I had to come back the next week and do a three-hour test, drinking double the amount of that glucose drink and having my blood drawn four times. Fasting: Normal is less than 95 – I scored a 95. 1 hour: Normal is less than 180 – I scored 220. 2 hour: Normal is less than 155 – I scored 230. 3 hour: Normal is less than 140 – I scored 163. My insurance allowed me to participate in a gestational diabetes program at my hospital. I was enrolled and given my new fancy poking pen (lancing device) and blood glucose monitor. The CDE (certified diabetes educator) went through my plan including meal ideas, writing in a food diary, and learning how to use the monitor. There was a long list of what Continue reading >>

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