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How To Get Diabetic Test Strips For Free

Get Diabetic Test Strips At Little Or No Cost*

Get Diabetic Test Strips At Little Or No Cost*

Keeping track of test strips can be a chore. Do I have enough? When do I need to get more? How many will my insurance allow me to get? What is the best way to get test strips? Which strips do I need for my meter? Through the Diabetic Connect pharmacy network we can take much of the guess work out of managing your test strips and other diabetic supplies. Just call our toll-free number or fill out the form to learn more about your eligibility to get test strips and additional diabetic supplies delivered to your home at little or no cost*. Feeling free to check blood sugar often is one of the keys to effective diabetes management. Since test strips are sensitive to heat and light exposure, it’s important to keep a fresh supply available to ensure you are getting the best results. We will work to ensure you have enough test strips and always have a fresh supply. Fill out the form or call our customer service team to learn more about how we can help you get test strips delivered right to your door. *Requires qualifying insurance and patient eligibility; deductibles and coinsurance amounts may apply Request More Information Continue reading >>

Ontario Monitoring For Health Program

Ontario Monitoring For Health Program

In Your Community > Local Programs & Events > Ontario Monitoring for Health Program This program is designed to help Ontarians with diabetes who use insulin or have gestational diabetes, and have no coverage for their diabetes testing supplies. The Monitoring for Health Program helps Ontario residents who use insulin or have gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) pay for the cost of their blood sugar testing supplies. The program is funded by the Ministry of Health and Long-term Care and administered by Diabetes Canada. be an Ontario resident with a valid Ontario health card; use insulin or have gestational diabetes; and have no other coverage for the supplies being claimed (e.g. group health plan, private insurance, Trillium Drug Program, ODSP, etc.) Note: Your first claim form to the program must be signed by a doctor or nurse practitioner to confirm insulin use or gestational diabetes. Lancets (used to prick your finger to draw blood) Talking blood glucose meters (letter from doctor required to confirm visual impairment) Senior 65 years of age or older, social assistance recipients and Trillium Drug Program clients can only submit to the program for reimbursement of lancets and blood glucose meters. Test strips for these client groups are covered through the Ontario Drug Benefit (ODB) Program. Please note: The program does not cover pen needles or syringes. Strips and lancets: 75% reimbursement up to a maximum of $920 per year. This means that you can submit up to $ 1227 in receipts for strips and lancets each year; the program will reimburse 75% ($920). Blood glucose meter: 75% reimbursement up to a maximum of $75, once every 5 years Talking blood glucose meter: 75% reimbursement up to a maximum of $300, once every 5 years; for visually-impaired clients o Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Update: A lot of our readers ask us where can they find the best deals for test strips. We personally recommend Amazon. You can check the list of selections they offer by clicking here. Blood glucose test strips play a crucial role in helping you to monitor your daily blood glucose level and giving your doctor the data to adjust your medication to control your diabetes symptoms. Without the help from these little disposable strips, life with diabetes can become even more chaotic than ever. But what exactly are these thin little plastic slip and why are they so expensive? Are there any alternative method I can use? Where can I get the best deal on these test strips? This article will answer many of your questions and concerns regarding these blood glucose test strips: Table of Contents History on Glucose Test Strips How Does the Test Strips Work Why Are the Strips So Expensive? And Why the Price Discrepancy? Why Must Diabetic Patients Use Glucometer and Test Strip? How Often Should You Administer A Blood Glucose Test? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? How Accurate Are the Test Strips? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? What is a Urine Glucose Test? Can’t I Use This Procedure Instead? Expiration of Test Strips Medicare Plan B Coverage for Glucose Test Strips Where to Get the Best Deal on Test Strips? Ways to Save of Test Strips How to Avoid Counterfeit Blood Glucose Test Strips Can You Reuse Test Strips? Can You Make Your Own Test Strip? 4 Most Affordable Meters How to Pick the Right Glucometer? How to Dispose Used Test Strips, Lancets, and Needles? What to Do with All These Test Strip Containers? Selling Your Glucose Test Strips A Good Idea? Odd Way to Earn Some Money Back Questions? History on Glucose Test Strips The first glucomet Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar (glucose) Test Strips

Blood Sugar (glucose) Test Strips

How often is it covered? Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) covers some diabetic test supplies, including blood sugar test strips as durable medical equipment (DME). Who's eligible? All people with Part B who have diabetes are covered. Your costs in Original Medicare If your supplier accepts assignment, you pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount, and the Part B deductible applies. Medicare pays for different kinds of DME in different ways. Depending on the type of equipment: You may need to rent the equipment. You may need to buy the equipment. You may be able to choose whether to rent or buy the equipment. Medicare will only cover your DME if your doctors and DME suppliers are enrolled in Medicare. Doctors and suppliers have to meet strict standards to enroll and stay enrolled in Medicare. If your doctors or suppliers aren’t enrolled, Medicare won’t pay the claims submitted by them. It’s also important to ask your suppliers if they participate in Medicare before you get DME. If suppliers are participating suppliers, they must accept assignment. If suppliers are enrolled in Medicare but aren’t “participating,” they may choose not to accept assignment. If suppliers don't accept assignment, there’s no limit on the amount they can charge you. Competitive Bidding Program If you live in or visit certain areas, you may be affected by Medicare's Competitive Bidding Program. In most cases, Medicare will only help pay for these equipment and supplies if they're provided by contract suppliers when both of these apply: Contract suppliers can't charge you more than the 20% coinsurance and any unmet yearly deductible for any equipment or supplies included in the Competitive Bidding Program. You may need to use specific suppliers for some types of diabetes testing sup Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

Are you urinating more often, feeling very thirsty, hungry, or tired? Maybe you’re losing weight. You may have type 2 diabetes. To find out, you can make an appointment with your doctor and have your blood tested for the condition. Or you can go to the drug store, buy a blood glucose meter, and give yourself a diabetes test. An estimated 40 percent of adults with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it, which means they aren’t getting treatment that could protect them from very serious health problems down the road, such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, and kidney failure. The best option is to go to a doctor if you’re having symptoms of diabetes. But if you’re reluctant to do that, for whatever reason, the next best thing is to buy an over-the-counter diabetes test kit. "If you have a family history of diabetes, are obese, or have high blood pressure, you should test yourself for diabetes, if your doctor hasn’t already done so," says Marvin M. Lipman, M.D., Consumer Reports' chief medical adviser. "By being a proactive person, you might save yourself a lot of grief in the future.” Blood glucose meters can be purchased without a prescription. Models in our Ratings of more than two dozen devices cost $10 to $75. They usually come with 10 lancets, but you might have to buy a pack of test strips separately, which can cost $18 and up; check the package to see what it includes. If the meter doesn’t come with strips, make sure you buy a pack made for that model or you’ll get inaccurate results. Most models come with batteries. Here’s what you need to do next: Fast overnight. Don’t have anything to eat or drink (except water) for at least 8 hours, then test yourself first thing in the morning, before breakfast. Follow directions. Read the manual to ma Continue reading >>

How To Get Free Test Strips: Blood Glucose Test Strips For Free

How To Get Free Test Strips: Blood Glucose Test Strips For Free

Diabetic test strips and non-prescription diabetic test supplies offered free through group helping Type 1 diabetics without insurance or who can’t afford them. This resource will soon be added to our growing list of Where to Get Free Diabetes Test Supplies and Diabetic Testing, but we wanted to first announce it to our regular readers via Twitter and our Free Diabetes Test Supplies mailing list. Believe it or not, we actually spend every single day searching for new sources of free and discounted diabetic test supplies for our readers. A new resource has just appeared on the radar that is quite promising for those in need of help, but who don’t qualify for free help from government health care plans or pharmaceutical companies. ACT1 Diabetes Group: Adults Coping With Type 1 Diabetes, is a volunteer group that has been helping to provide Type 1 diabetics with non-prescription diabetes test supplies such as blood glucose meters, test strips and lancets since August of 2009. The program is free and requests are each handled on an individual basis by volunteers via e-mail. The group accepts donations of non-prescription diabetic testing supplies from the public and in turn makes them available to those in need. The program especially targets those who can not afford health insurance, have been denied health insurance due to their diabetes being declared a “pre-existing condition” and/or going through hard economic times. It is not a long-term solution for obtaining free diabetes test supplies, but rather a short-term assistance program for those in more immediate need. In addition to their Supply Exchange Program for Type 1 diabetics, the group also runs a website that features regularly-updated blogs and announcements. For those of you who use Twitter, they have a Continue reading >>

Availability Of Blood Glucose Test Strips

Availability Of Blood Glucose Test Strips

Tweet Availability of blood glucose testing strips is a particular issue for people with type 2 diabetes, but can also be an issue for people with other types of diabetes as well. Self monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) can be very beneficial for people with all types of diabetes and can help to reduce the risk of developing diabetic complications. Research into cost effectiveness A number of research studies have been conducted to assess whether self-monitoring for blood glucose is cost effective for the NHS. The studies have found self-monitoring has not been effective at improving blood glucose control in cases where patients have either not known how to interpret their results or have not been themselves committed to self testing. However, many people with type 2 diabetes see self monitoring of their blood glucose as an essential part of their diabetes management and their self-testing has lead to a vast improvement in their blood glucose control. NICE recommendations The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) recommends that self-monitoring should be available for people on diabetes medication to help provide information to avoid hypoglycaemia, to assess fluctuations in blood glucose, to cope with periods of illness and to ensure against accidents during dangerous activities such as driving or operating certain machinery. In line with this, those who are prescribed self-monitoring equipment should be assessed at least as often as annually on the appropriate frequency of their testing and whether self-monitoring is benefitting the patient. Can PCTs declare blanket bans on prescribing test strips? Each PCT should consider each case for self testing individually. The government has responded to issues by underlining that PCTs should not impose bl Continue reading >>

Going Undercover To Investigate Selling Test Strips For Cash

Going Undercover To Investigate Selling Test Strips For Cash

Maybe you've seen the "Diabetic Strips" signs on the side of the road in your state and also wondered what actually happens when you call one of the numbers listed... We wrote about organizations dealing in test strips cheap-for-cash in our post "Test Strip Charities" last year, but without the extra bonus of having an undercover "secret shopper" to check the service out. Now our talented cartoonist, D-Advocate and correspondent Mike Lawson offered to make that happen by following up on one of these surprising road-side signs. Read on to discover what Mike found out! Special to the 'Mine by Mr. Mike Lawson I felt like Woodward. No...I felt like Bernstein. Wait. Which one did Robert Redford play in All The President's Men? That's the one I felt like. I was sitting in a McDonald's parking lot in Scottsdale, Arizona, waiting for a man named Marcus to meet me so I could sell a box of 50 test strips. I arranged this meeting by calling a phone number that I saw on a road-side sign in Phoenix that said "Ca$h Paid For Diabetic Strips." It is not illegal for companies to buy and sell test strips like this — although the companies are required to register with the FDA and many fail to do so — yet this transaction still felt a little shady. When I called the number, for example, I wasn't greeted with a company name but just by a woman who identified herself as "Stephanie." Stephanie told me that there was no physical building for me to drop off the strips, but rather a courier would be sent to me. Stephanie also told me that the price paid for strips varied based on the brand and the expiration date. So I could sell this box of One Touch strips that I purchased for $10 on my private insurance to this unnamed company for $20. And this same box of strips will sell for $40 or mor Continue reading >>

Changes To Access To Blood Glucose Test Strips

Changes To Access To Blood Glucose Test Strips

Information relating to the changes to access to blood glucose test strips The Australian Government has introduced changes to the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) to ensure people living with diabetes can continue to access the products they need as well as ensuring the ongoing sustainability of the NDSS. This includes changes to access to subsidised blood glucose test strips. If a doctor, credentialed diabetes educator, or nurse practitioner wants their patient to use blood glucose test strips in managing their diabetes, they will be able to access them from the NDSS. Access to Blood Glucose Test Strips Through the NDSS People with type 2 diabetes not using insulin will receive an initial six month supply of subsidised blood glucose test strips under the NDSS. This means registrants will be able to access blood glucose test strips, as required, over a six month period, starting any time on or after 1 July 2016. After six months, registrants will be able to continue to access subsidised test strips if their doctor, nurse practitioner or credentialed diabetes educator considers that there is a clinical need for them to continue to monitor their blood glucose levels. The initial six month access period applies to both new and existing NDSS registrants. Where a registrant has been accessing test strips for several years, their six month initial access period will commence from their first order of test strips on or after 1 July 2016. These changes to do not affect individuals who use insulin, women with gestational diabetes and those registered through the NDSS as having ‘other diabetes’. Individuals with type 2 diabetes, who are not using insulin, but who have an inter-current illness or are taking medicines which adversely impact blood glucose control, will Continue reading >>

How To Get Free Diabetes Supplies

How To Get Free Diabetes Supplies

1 Obtain insurance. If you do not have insurance already, you should enroll in an insurance program. Insurance can provide free or discounted diabetes supplies under basic coverage. You can enroll in an insurance program through healthcare.gov, a public database provided under the Affordable Care Act. Under AFA, you cannot be turned down for preexisting conditions and you may be eligible for a discounted premium depending on your current income. There is a toll-free number to call if you have any questions.[1] You can try to pursue a private insurance program on your own. You will have to undergo a health insurance physical, which will serve to determine your pay rate. This choice may be costly, especially if you already have diabetes. This may increase your monthly premium. If you are currently employed, see if your employer provides health care options and what you need to do to get on their plan. 2 Call your existing insurance company. If you're already insured, call your insurance company to talk about diabetes coverage. You can ask them what supplies will be covered under their program, what the copay is, and whether local pharmacies will offer you free or discounted supplies. If you're unhappy with your current coverage, consider pursuing an alternative insurance plan. 3 Consider Medicare. Medicare is a government assistantship program that provides discounted health care to those 65 and over. If you're in this age group and need help paying for diabetes supplies, look into Medicare. Medicare Part B is basic medical insurance provided by Medicare. Part B will cover blood sugar self-testing equipment and supplies, insulin pumps, and therapeutic shots or shoe inserts.[2] If you have or are at risk for diabetes, you'll be encouraged to enroll in Medicare Part D, whic Continue reading >>

Why Do Test Strips Cost So Much?

Why Do Test Strips Cost So Much?

Have you looked at test strip prices and thought, “These should be made of gold?” Well, they are made of gold, along with other costly chemicals. But some cost 16 cents apiece; others cost $1 to $2. Why this range? What price is right? Spurred by some comments from DSM reader John C, I decided to research test strips, and they’re amazing. In fact, I will need two columns to explore them and the issues involved in their best use. To understand how test strips work, you would need to know quantum mechanics and electrochemistry (whatever that is), and I don’t. Here’s the part I could understand: Modern strips work by measuring the electrical energy in glucose in the blood. According to an article by Erika Gebel, PhD, in Diabetes Forecast, “Electrochemical test strips, the world standard today, employ enzymes…that convert glucose into an electrical current. That electricity…is read out by the meter as a glucose concentration.” It’s much faster than the old way, which was based on reading a color change, and requires much less blood. Apparently, working with enzymes is hard. “You want hydration around the enzyme to keep it active, but not too much because that will lead to degradation,” says Selly Saini, the worldwide director of strip products for Johnson & Johnson. “That’s a fine balance.” Because they use enzymes, strips are delicate. According to Dr. Gebel, exposure to humidity or temperature extremes can damage the enzymes, reducing accuracy. But “strip makers have partly tamed enzymes and increased their life span by incorporating chemicals that stabilize them.” So the colored patch at the end of the strip includes absorbents to soak up blood and enzymes to turn it into electricity and stabilizers to protect the enzymes. Then the elect Continue reading >>

When Do You Need A Prescription For Diabetic Test Strips?

When Do You Need A Prescription For Diabetic Test Strips?

When Do You Need A Prescription for Diabetic Test Strips? Whether or not you need a prescription to purchase diabetic test strips depends on one thing. Read this article to find out how it all works. If you’re one of the 29 million Americans living with diabetes, you likely have a lot of questions about how to get the medication you need. We’re sure you also have questions about how you can keep the costs of supplies, test strips, lancets, and hospital visits down. Even if you’re working out and taking care of yourself, you may feel like you can’t do much to fight back against the rising costs of life with diabetes. In this post, we’ll talk about whether or not you need a prescription to get diabetic test strips. We’ll also talk about how the cost of diabetes is different for the insured and the uninsured diabetes patient. No matter what your coverage is like, it’s always a smart idea to look for bargains, ways to save, and ways to make back some of the money you’ve spent on diabetic test strips. Read this post to learn how to save better. The Costs Of Diabetes: Insured vs. Uninsured There’s no getting around it: life with diabetes is costly. In fact, recent figures show that the average yearly cost for one person living with diabetes is about $13,700. Unfortunately, that same study showed that those without health insurance who are living with a diabetes diagnosis get 68% fewer prescriptions, and 79% fewer doctor visits, than those that are insured. Though most states have made sure insurance companies are required to cover medical costs and supplies, you still have to do a good amount of work to get certain things covered by your plan. You may even have to write them letters just to make back a small portion of what you spend on supplies like diabeti Continue reading >>

Diabetes Programs And Supplies

Diabetes Programs And Supplies

For diabetic patients who need financial assistance with supplies and related health care items and services, the following programs may be of help. Please note that applications must be submitted to the programs and not to PPA® . Categories Insulin Access Programs Blink Health is working with Eli Lilly and Company to offer a 40 percent discount on Lilly insulins. The Blink Health Insulin Patient Access Program delivers the 40 percent discount directly to patients and will be honored at over 67,000 local pharmacies nationwide. Anyone can participate in the Blink Health Insulin Patient Access Program via the Blink Health mobile app (available for iOS & Android) or website, www.blinkhealth.com, which has no membership fees or monthly premiums. Patients enter the form, dosage and quantity of the Lilly insulin that matches their prescription. The discount will be automatically applied. Payments are made online and the prescriptions can be picked up at virtually any U.S. pharmacy, including: Walgreens, CVS/pharmacy, Target, RiteAid, Safeway and Kroger. People using federal government programs are not eligible. Purchases are fully refundable. Assistance: Insulin Free Glucose Meters Abbott Diabetes Care provides free blood glucose monitoring system kits to those with diabetes. Abbott Diabetes Care, Inc. 1360 South Loop Road Alameda, CA 94502 USA Tel: 888-522-5226 Fax: 202-337-8314 Email: [email protected] Assistance: Free Glucose Meters Test Strips Roche Diagnostics, the maker of ACCU-CHEK® Products provides a limited supply of ACCU-CHEK Aviva test strips to a network of community clinics and health centers throughout the U.S. to distribute to their low-income and uninsured patients with diabetes. Roache Diagnostics Corporation 9115 Hague Road Indianapolis, IN 46250 Phone: 800 Continue reading >>

Nhs Risking People's Health By Rationing Test Strips, Diabetes Uk Says

Nhs Risking People's Health By Rationing Test Strips, Diabetes Uk Says

The NHS is putting diabetic patients at risk of serious illness by rationing test strips that monitor blood glucose levels in an attempt to save money, a charity claims. A survey carried out by Diabetes UK found that one in four complained of restrictions placed on the number of test strips they were prescribed by GP practices. People with diabetes need to test their blood glucose regularly to monitor the condition. If not managed properly, diabetes can lead to health complications such as heart disease, strokes, blindness and amputations. More than half of those professing problems had type 1 diabetes. Government guidance says this group should test themselves at least four times a day. Older people and those on low incomes were also affected, the charity found. Many said they felt they needed to buy test stripsonline, where quality cannot always be guaranteed. People with diabetes were given a variety of reasons for the reduced number of strips prescribed, according to the charity. Some respondents to the survey said they had been told they should test less often. Some were told there were “budget constraints”, while others were told it was because they were testing too frequently. “They said I had my allowance for the month,” said one respondent. Another said: “I was told they were expensive and we should test less. Only need to test four times a day. We use a pump, so need to test every two hours.” Some said they were having to ask for repeat prescriptions more often. “I now need to order and collect a prescription monthly, or sooner, depending on any issues that crop up,” wrote one. Often when people complained to the practice, their normal prescription was reinstated. But Diabetes UK said they were concerned that people had to challenge the GP prac Continue reading >>

Get A Free Accu-chek® Guide Or Accu-chek Aviva Meter!

Get A Free Accu-chek® Guide Or Accu-chek Aviva Meter!

When you have diabetes, accuracy matters. Choose a meter you can trust. In an average week, our quality control process tests a combined total of over 60,000 Accu-Chek test strips for consistent accuracy.1 With that type of commitment, why not use an Accu-Chek test strip? If you're not currently using Accu-Chek products, get a free meter and ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider to help you switch today. The Roche difference Roche goes above and beyond to deliver safe, accurate and dependable products. Ensuring quality and accuracy has always been our top priority. In fact, the manufacturing processes we employ for Accu-Chek Guide and Accu-Chek Aviva Plus test strips ensure that Accu-Chek products meet our uncompromising standards of quality. Here are a few examples: For every lot of Accu-Chek test strips, containing millions of strips, at least 1 out of every 128 vials is tested for consistency of performance Vials representative of the entire lot are tested a second time, with blood at a variety of glucose levels, to reflect a real-world environment To ensure all strips we release to the market meet our high quality standards, investigation and additional testing are performed should a test strip show a reading outside specific ranges Can any other manufacturer say this? Continue reading >>

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