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How To Get Blood Sugar Down After Surgery

Diabetes And Spine Surgery: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Spine Surgery: What You Need To Know

If you have diabetes and will undergo spine surgery, you need to make special accommodations to ensure a successful surgery and recovery. People with diabetes are at a higher risk for certain issues, such as infection and slower healing. Fortunately, you can take steps before and after spine surgery to reduce the potential for these complications. Diabetes and Spine Surgery: Why an Increased Risk of Complications? Neck or back surgery can cause physical and mental stress that leads to changes in your body’s hormone levels. These changes can cause increased insulin resistance, a condition in which the body produces insulin—a hormone that regulates the amount of sugar (glucose) in the blood—but does not use it effectively. Hormone fluctuations can also cause the body to produce less insulin and lead to other changes that increase the risk of hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar. High (or low) blood sugar levels increase the risk and severity of complications after surgery. If you have diabetes, the risk of complications after surgery is greater if you have had diabetes for a long time, frequently have high blood sugar levels, or if you have trouble controlling your levels. That’s why it’s important to work with your diabetes care team to develop strategies to manage your blood sugar before you undergo spine surgery. Medication Considerations for People with Diabetes Talk with your healthcare provider about what steps you should take to control your diabetes before spine surgery. In some cases, this will involve changes to your diabetes medication. Be sure that these steps are communicated to the surgeon. It may be helpful to see a certified diabetes educator (CDE). Medicare covers two hours of diabetes self-management education (DSME) per year, with your healthcar Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management: How Lifestyle, Daily Routine Affect Blood Sugar

Diabetes Management: How Lifestyle, Daily Routine Affect Blood Sugar

Diabetes management requires awareness. Know what makes your blood sugar level rise and fall — And how to control these day-to-day factors. Keeping your blood sugar levels within the range recommended by your doctor can be challenging. That's because many things make your blood sugar levels change, sometimes unexpectedly. Following are some factors that can affect your blood sugar levels. Food Healthy eating is a cornerstone of healthy living — with or without diabetes. But if you have diabetes, you need to know how foods affect your blood sugar levels. It's not only the type of food you eat but also how much you eat and the combinations of food types you eat. What to do: Learn about carbohydrate counting and portion sizes. A key to many diabetes management plans is learning how to count carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are the foods that often have the biggest impact on your blood sugar levels. And for people taking mealtime insulin, it's crucial to know the amount of carbohydrates in your food, so you get the proper insulin dose. Learn what portion size is appropriate for each type of food. Simplify your meal planning by writing down portions for the foods you eat often. Use measuring cups or a scale to ensure proper portion size and an accurate carbohydrate count. Make every meal well-balanced. As much as possible, plan for every meal to have a good mix of starches, fruits and vegetables, proteins and fats. It's especially important to pay attention to the types of carbohydrates you choose. Some carbohydrates, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains, are better for you than are others. These foods are low in carbohydrates and contain fiber that helps keep your blood sugar levels more stable. Talk to your doctor, nurse or dietitian about the best food choices and Continue reading >>

Fasting For Surgery: What If I Have A Low?

Fasting For Surgery: What If I Have A Low?

I have diabetes and will be getting an operation. I am not supposed to eat or drink after midnight, but after four hours, my blood glucose drops. What can I take to bring it up? Continue reading >>

Safe Surgery With Diabetes

Safe Surgery With Diabetes

If your doctor is honest he or she will have told you that people with diabetes have a very high risk of developing a serious infection or other complication after surgery. But having diabetes also makes it likely that a person will need surgery. So with that in mind let's look at what you can do if you are a person with diabetes to make sure that you emerge safely from any surgery you might have to undergo. 1. People with Diabetes and Normal Blood Sugar Fare as Well as Normal People. I can't point you to a study that proves this, because, sadly, there are no studies that involve people diagnosed with diabetes who maintain normal blood sugars. The only data we have is anecdotal--i.e. reports of people who have normalized their blood sugar despite a diabetes diagnosis. And the news from them is very good. This makes sense. There are two reasons that people with diabetes have such poor outcomes in a surgical setting. One is because uncontrolled high blood pressure destroy the tiny capillaries that should bring immune cells to healing tissues, which allow bacteria to grow unopposed. The other thing high blood sugars do is destroy nerves. Early in the process these high blood sugars kill the smaller nerve, then then later on, the larger nerves. This has a huge impact on the body's ability to fight infection because we now know thanks to Kevin Tracy's ground breaking research about the immune system published in Nature in 2002 that the nerves play a major role in sensing and then triggering the immune response to invasion. So when the nerves are damaged by high blood sugars, the immune system may not learn that an infection is taking place. This may be a major reason why neuropathy leads to the uncontrollable infections that lead to amputation. But if you keep your blood sug Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Levels After Surgery

High Blood Sugar Levels After Surgery

How Diabetes and Blood Glucose Levels Can Affect Your Surgery Outcome Talk to Your Doctor About Your Diabetes.Hero Images/Getty Images If you're diabetic, you may be concerned about your blood sugar levels during surgery and later during your recovery. It's reasonable to be concerned, and it's appropriate to take steps to prepare to control glucose levels before, during, and after surgery. Even non-diabetics can experience issues with blood sugar levels after a procedure. The physical and emotional stress of a surgical procedure, along with what can be significant changes in lifestyle, diet, and exercise before and after surgery, can dramatically change an individual's glucose levels.Though all patients are at risk for high blood sugar levels after surgery due to stress, diabetics face even greater risks of complications after a procedure . Uncontrolled blood glucose can create complications for surgery patients, diabetic or not. Blood sugar that's even slightly elevated can lead to delayed healing and can increase your chances of getting a wound infection from less than 2 percent to over 10 percent. In general, the higher the blood sugar, the higher these risks. Make sure your doctor has your blood sugar checked before meals and at bedtime while you're in the hospital if you're diabetic. Learn which foods to enjoy and avoidand start feeling great! Checking your glucose during surgery is reasonable if the surgery is a lengthy one or if your glucose levels have been unpredictable. Even diabetics who are normally well controlled with diet and exercise can experience high levels of blood glucose during the hours and days following surgery. If your glucose is fluctuating widely between checks, you may even need to have it checked during the night if you're having symptoms Continue reading >>

Can Surgery Cause Increased Blood Sugar In Non-diabetics?

Can Surgery Cause Increased Blood Sugar In Non-diabetics?

Yes. As was noted in the prior answer, the stress that your body endures during surgery causes a stress response which increases blood sugar. In addition, (depending on what kind of surgery you needed), if you are getting steroids to reduce inflammation, your blood sugar would also increase. Steroids can increase circulating blood sugar and make it more difficult for your body to transport the glucose into cells, further increasing circulating glucose levels. Studies have shown that patients with normal blood sugars have better outcomes and fewer complications than those with high blood sugar. For that reason, we constantly check people’s blood sugar in the ICU that I work at, and often have to give insulin to patients who are not diabetic for this reason. Many patients are concerned that they will need to take insulin forever, but its generally only temporary. Yes, because of the stress it causes will induce higher levels of stress hormones mainly cortisol, which will raise you blood glucose levels. Know that many middle aged diabetics aren’t aware of the fact that they’ve diabetes at all, having a raised threshold for urinary loss of glucose it won’t cause peeing a lot = polyuria, which most lay people associate with having diabetes, in the US that would be one in every 4 persons having diabetes: Yes. Surgery can lead to high blood sugars even in non-diabetics. As part of evolution, a surgery is identified as a physical stress for the body. The body gears up for a speedy recovery and during this period, our body mobilizes energy i.e. glucose to overcome this stress. Certain hormones too are released to overcome this stress. Amongst many others like cortisol, these hormones include insulin and glucagon, both of which work in combination to maintain our blood su Continue reading >>

Preparing For Surgery When You Have Diabetes

Preparing For Surgery When You Have Diabetes

Work with your health care provider to come up with the safest surgery plan for you. Focus more on controlling your diabetes during the days to weeks before surgery. Your provider will do a medical exam and talk to you about your health. Tell your provider about all the medicines you are taking. If you take metformin, talk to your provider about stopping it. Sometimes, it can be stopped 48 hours before and 48 hours after surgery to decrease the risk of a problem called lactic acidosis. If you take other types of diabetes drugs, follow your provider's instructions if you need to stop the drug before surgery. If you take insulin, ask your provider what dose you should take the night before or the day of your surgery. Your provider may have you meet with a dietitian, or give you a specific meal and activity plan to try to make sure your blood sugar is well-controlled for the week prior to your surgery. Some surgeons will cancel or delay surgery if your blood sugar is high when you arrive at the hospital for your surgery. Surgery is riskier if you have diabetes complications. So talk to your provider about your diabetes control and any complications you have from diabetes. Tell your provider about any problems you have with your heart, kidneys, or eyes, or if you have loss of feeling in your feet. The provider may run some tests to check the status of those problems. You may do better with surgery and get better faster if your blood sugar is controlled during surgery. So, before surgery, talk to your provider about your blood sugar target level during the days before your operation. During surgery, insulin is given by the anesthesiologist. You will meet with this doctor before surgery to discuss the plan to control your blood sugar during the operation. You or your nurses s Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Can Increase Post-surgery Wound Complications

High Blood Sugar Can Increase Post-surgery Wound Complications

High blood glucose levels can lead to wound infection. Diabetes is a disease that can not only lead to serious issues like amputation, but can also affect the way your body handles the wound healing process. Researchers have recently analyzed how maintaining a high blood sugar level could eventually lead to an increase in wound complications after undergoing a surgical procedure. Members of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons analyzed the rates of 79 patients who had endured wound-related complications after receiving surgery to close up chronic wounds. The doctors measured the blood glucose levels of the patients five days leading up to the medical procedure as well as five days after, and extensively tested the subjects for measurements of hemoglobin A1c, which is a primary indicator of long-term diabetes control in the body. High levels of blood glucose as well as diabetes control are the main risk factors that can influence an occurrence of wound infection, additional surgery and wound dehiscence, which is when a wound is re-opened after already receiving surgery to close it. Blood glucose levels that are considered higher than average are measured at 200 milligrams per deciliter or greater. The researchers found that 44 percent of the patients who exhibited high blood glucose levels either before or after surgery underwent experiences of wound dehiscence, while only 19 percent of diabetic patients who had normal blood glucose levels received any type of wound complication. The records of those who had high hemoglobin A1c levels, which are primary indicators of poor diabetes control, also showed significant spikes in the rates of wound infection or re-opening occurring. Dr. Christopher Attinger, a professor at Georgetown University as well as one of the lead st Continue reading >>

What Causes A Blood Sugar Rise After Surgery?

What Causes A Blood Sugar Rise After Surgery?

The Risks of High Blood Sugar After Surgery written by: Dr. Kristie Leong edited by: Diana Cooper updated: 11/17/2010 The period of time after surgery can be challenging for diabetics trying to control their blood sugar levels. Learn more about how stress affects blood sugar levels and what you can do to control this problem. Surgery can be a stressful experience, especially for diabetics. Its quite common to have a blood sugar rise after surgery in people who have diabetes and sometimes in normal people too. What causes this blood sugar rise after surgery? Any type of stress makes blood sugars more difficult to control, including the stress of surgery. When diabetics are stressed for any reason, their body pumps out hormones that alter blood sugar levels causing blood sugars to go up or down. Sometimes medications doctors give during or after surgery, particularly steroids, cause blood sugar levels to rise. Although high blood sugar levels are more common after surgery, hypoglycemia or low blood sugars can also occur in some cases. Its critical to control blood sugars after surgery since diabetics with high blood sugars are at a higher risk of complications including post-surgical infection and poor wound healing. Diabetics have up to a five times greater risk of developing a wound infection than non-diabetics and poorly controlled blood sugars elevates the risk even more. Poorly controlled blood sugars are especially common after heart surgery, and very high blood sugar levels increases mortality after such a procedure. Obviously, its important for doctors to treat these blood sugar rises to increase the chances of a good outcome. How Are Rises in Blood Sugar After Surgery Controlled? After surgery, doctors and nurses monitor glucose levels more frequently and adjust Continue reading >>

Post Surgery Hyperglycemia Associated To Operative Procedures

Post Surgery Hyperglycemia Associated To Operative Procedures

Infections at point of surgery account for 14-17% of all hospital infections in patients and ranks third in causes for all post surgical infection. According to a report in the September issue of Archives of Surgery, a JAMA journal, increased blood sugar levels after surgery are linked to procedures in the operating room. Ashar Ata, M.B.B.S., M.P.H., and colleagues at Albany Medical College, Albany state: Studies have shown that these infections prolong the hospital length of stay after surgery, increase rehospitalization rates and dramatically increase the use of emergency services and health care costs. Post surgery glucose levels were reviewed in 1,561 patients. Of these, vascular surgery took place in 559 (36%) persons, 226 (14%) had colon related surgery and 776 (50%) were a part of general surgery procedure. Almost seven and a half percent of the patients developed surgical site infections. Vascular patients at 10%, colorectal at 14% and 4% of the total having general surgeries. Making adjustments for age, emergency status, physical status as classified by the American Society of Anesthesiologists, time in surgery, diabetes , it was concluded that almost all of these factors were not significant predictors of infections. A further analysis of colorectal surgery patients found that a postoperative serum glucose level higher than 140 milligrams per deciliter was a sign of surgical site infection, and in vascular patients, time of operation and existing diabetic conditions influenced signs of surgical site infection, although not associated with hyperglycemia. Why are these infections dangerous? Hyperglycemia may impair the immune system, and insulin may have anti-inflammatory and other anti-infective activities. Much further investigation is necessary, as is the cas Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medications: Blood Glucose Management Before Surgery

Diabetes Medications: Blood Glucose Management Before Surgery

F A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E S When you have diabetes, managing your blood glucose is always important. But before you have surgery, it’s vital. This sheet tells you why— and explains what you can do to prepare. Why is my blood glucose so important right now? Studies show that people with well controlled blood glucose have fewer problems during and after surgery. But unfortunately, staying in control might not be so easy. Surgery can cause big problems in blood glucose levels — even if you normally have things under control. Here’s why: • Surgery is stressful. Stress usually increases before, during, and after surgery. Beforehand, you’re probably a bit nervous. During and after surgery, your body is stressed, trying to heal itself. And unfortunately, stress makes your body release hormones that make it even more difficult than usual to regulate blood glucose. • You may go off your normal meal plan. Often your doctor will give you special instructions about eating and drinking in the hours before surgery. And for a few days after, you might not eat normally either. Going off your meal plan can cause changes in blood glucose levels. • Depending on what type you take, you may be told to stop taking your diabetes medications before surgery. Or you may need to switch to a different medication, or adjust your dose. The stress and changes that surgery brings can push your blood glucose too high — or too low. Very high or low blood glucose can be dangerous at any time. But they’re especially risky when they happen during or after surgery. They can cause dangerous complications and slow your recovery. So to avoid problems, feel better, and get well faster — control your blood Continue reading >>

3 Weeks After Surgery High Blood Sugar

3 Weeks After Surgery High Blood Sugar

I am new here and have been trying to do a lot of research, but I recently had a septoplasty turbinate reduction the last week of November to correct my deviated septum. While I was prescribed antibiotics, I noticed my blood sugar has been in the 200's I have seen some dips as low as 129 but most of the reading have been 220-250 daily. I do take metformin 500 er twice a day and have retaken glipizide 5mg to help, but it seems like it doesn't do anything. I don't eat bad and exercise as much as I can. For instance I went for a 30 minute bike ride one day and a mile walk the next day it seemed it had not effect. My biggest question is if anyone has experienced this post surgery and how long it takes for blood glucose to normalize out. I generally as a fyi drink nothing but water all day with an occasional Gatorade and my morning coffee with just creamer only. I am not sure what is going on. Moderator T2 dx'd 2009, low carb diet, Metformin, Januvia. Hello and welcome to DD. Have you brought this to your doctor's attention? Many times pain, inflammation and/or other meds might increase blood glucose (bg) but if you're concerned then I'd suggest contacting your doctor. What is your diet like? Do you test your bg to see how various foods affect it? I had to tweak my diet in order to get my bg lower. Again, welcome. Perhaps members with a similar experience will chime in soon. My diet usually consists of 2-3 eggs in the morning preferably scrambled with whole wheat toast or I mix it up and have oatmeal. For lunch through my crossfit gym, I get a meal plan which is varied but generally very well balanced with veggies and a protein of meat. Dinner wise all kind of depends but again usually healthy nothing crazy. I also tend to do 3 days of crossfit. I have since the surgery sin Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia In The Hospital

Hyperglycemia In The Hospital

Hyperglycemia is the medical term for blood glucose (sugar) that is too high. High blood glucose (HBG) is a common problem for people with diabetes. Blood glucose can also rise too high for patients in the hospital, even if they do not have diabetes. This patient guide explains why some patients develop HBG when they are hospitalized and how their HBG is treated. Until about 10 years ago, doctors thought that HBG in hospital patients was not harmful as long as their blood sugar stayed at or below 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Recent research studies show that HBG above 180 increases the risk of complications in hospital patients. Keeping blood sugar below this level with insulin treatment lowers the risk for these problems. Most doctors agree that controlling blood sugar so it stays below 180 mg/dl is best for very ill patients in intensive care units ( ICU). Less clear is what the best target blood sugar should be for inpatients who are admitted for general surgery or non-critical medical conditions. In some patients, insulin treatment can cause low blood sugar, called hypoglycemia. Just like blood sugar levels that are too high, blood sugars that are too low are not safe and should be avoided. This patient guide for glucose control in the hospital is based on The Endocrine Society’s practice guideline for health care providers on preventing and treating HBG. This guide applies just to patients on a regular hospital floor, not those who are in an ICU. What causes HBG in the hospital? Many conditions can cause or worsen HBG in hospital patients. These include: Physical stress of illness, trauma, or surgery Inability to move around Steroids like prednisone and some other medicines Skipping diabetes medicines Liquid food given through a feeding tube or nutrition Continue reading >>

I Was Given Steroids For Surgery Recently, And Now Have Not Been Able To Lower My Blood Sugar Below 300. Could There Be A Connection?

I Was Given Steroids For Surgery Recently, And Now Have Not Been Able To Lower My Blood Sugar Below 300. Could There Be A Connection?

Q: I had surgery about two weeks ago and they gave me some small steroids to help with any kind of infections. I have not been able to get my blood sugar down below 300 without completely stopping eating and giving myself a short acting insulin. Does it take time to rid my body of steroids? I'm sorry to hear that your blood sugar levels have been so high following your steroid injection. Although prednisone and other steroids are often necessary post-surgery to protect against infection and inflammation, they can make blood sugar control very difficult. After steroids have been discontinued, blood sugar levels should normalize within a few days to several weeks, depending on the individual. Even though your blood sugar is elevated, you should still be eating regular meals. The key is to choose foods that have a minimal effect on blood sugar, such as protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese), nonstarchy vegetables (most types other than corn, peas, lima beans, and carrots), and healthy fats (olive oil, coconut oil, butter). Answered By dLife Expert: Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Certified diabetes educator and registered dietitian living in Southern California. The content of this website, such as text, graphics, images, and other material on the site (collectively, “Content”) are for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for, and dLife does not provide, professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 im Continue reading >>

Post Surgery Blood Sugar: High But Not Worried

Post Surgery Blood Sugar: High But Not Worried

“If you have all that inflammation, your blood sugar will be high. And if you still have pain then you probably still have inflammation,” Jessica told me after I told her that my morning blood sugar was 225. This morning wasn’t exceptional in any way. My blood sugar has been out of control since my surgery last Wednesday. Most mornings begin somewhere between 200-250 and the rest of the day is spent chasing my blood sugar down, but it seems as if the glucose meter is broken and won’t go south of 150. I expected this to happen, but thought I would be able to control it better and that it wouldn’t last this long. I’ve tried different things. On Thursday afternoon I gave in and took Tylenol for the pain. The Tylenol did make me feel better, but still, my blood sugar remained high despite the fact that I was feeling less pain. Friday morning I decided to set my basal rate to 150%, but that, too, had little effect on my blood sugar levels. It may have allowed me to bolus less, but my blood sugar levels stayed high. Since my surgery I have cut down even more on the carbs while using way more insulin than I usually do. Normally, I use 17-18 units of insulin a day and now have been using around 25 units. The first few days the high numbers drove me nuts. I actually told Jessica one day that I would love to have a low. You know you’ve been a diabetic for a long time when you catch yourself saying, “Something in the 40’s would be nice.” On Monday, feeling a little better physically, I went out on my first walk outdoors since my surgery (a quarter of a mile). While walking, slowly, carefully and a little hunched over I thought about my blood sugar. I wasn’t thinking about my health in that moment, but I was actually worried that these numbers would ruin my ne Continue reading >>

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