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How To Gain Weight With Prediabetes

Pre-diabetes And Weight Gain

Pre-diabetes And Weight Gain

Obesity is a root cause of Insulin Resistance, which, in turn, is a key factor in the development of reversible Pre-Diabetes. If neglected, this latter condition severely increases the risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes, which, in the vast majority of cases, can only be managed for the rest of the Diabetic's life and may require daily injections of insulin. Reversing Insulin Resistance can be a crucial factor in the prevention of Pre- and Type 2 Diabetes and its attendant risk of Cardiovascular Disease. Insulin is the hormone responsible for allowing glucose, or blood sugar, to be absorbed by the cells of the body, where it is converted to energy. If you are Insulin Resistant, your cells react sluggishly to insulin. When you eat a meal, whether it's steak, fish or vegetables, the body breaks it down into a usable energy form, namely glucose. In a simplified explanation, the food you consume becomes sugar that will be transported to the tissues, muscles and organs of the body via the blood stream to be converted into energy. Following a meal, particularly one that is high in carbohydrates, you will have elevated levels of glucose in the blood stream, which signal the pancreas to release even more insulin until the excess glucose is absorbed by the cells. When you are Insulin Resistant, excessive amounts of free-floating unconverted glucose remain in the blood stream until they are sent to the liver and converted to excess body fat. In addition, hyperinsulinemia (elevated insulin in the blood) encourages your liver to produce even more triglycerides which are directly related to a greater risk of heart disease. Insulin Resistance and Serious Health Conditions Insulin Resistance promotes fat storage because glucose cannot properly enter the cells to be used as energy. Elev Continue reading >>

Losing Weight With Diabetes: What Prevents It And Causes Weight Gain

Losing Weight With Diabetes: What Prevents It And Causes Weight Gain

I recently was included in a discussion on a Facebook group for athletes with diabetes about how hard it can be to lose weight through exercise. While I would never claim to have all the answers on this topic, here are some ideas about what can make you gain weight or keep you from losing weight with diabetes, based on my decades of professional and personal experience with diabetes and weight management, and what you can do about it. Insulin My former graduate student with type 1 diabetes went on an insulin pump and promptly gained about 10 pounds, even though his blood glucose control improved only marginally. Why did this happen to him (and why does it happen to so many other insulin users)? As a naturally occurring anabolic hormone, insulin promotes the uptake and storage of glucose, amino acids, and fat into insulin-sensitive cells around your body (mainly muscle and fat cells). It doesn’t matter whether it’s released naturally, injected, or pumped—all insulin and insulin analogues have these same effects. Going on intensive insulin therapy is associated with fat weight gain (1), for people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Some of the weight gain comes from that if you’re using insulin to keep your blood glucose in control, you’ll be keeping and storing all of the calories that you’re eating instead of losing some glucose through urine (during hyperglycemia). Unfortunately, this realization has led some people to try skipping or limiting their insulin use to help them lose weight (2), but that is a dangerous practice that can lead to loss of excess muscle mass and life-threatening conditions like DKA. The best way to balance your insulin use and your body weight, in my opinion, is to be physically active to keep your overall insulin levels lower. I Continue reading >>

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

A prediabetes diagnosis can be alarming. This condition is marked by abnormally high blood sugar (glucose) most often due to insulin resistance. This is a condition in which the body doesn’t use insulin properly. It’s often a precursor to type 2 diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, people with prediabetes are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years. With prediabetes, you may also be at risk of developing cardiovascular disease. However, a prediabetes diagnosis doesn’t mean you will definitely get type 2 diabetes. The key is early intervention; to get your blood sugar out of the prediabetes range. Your diet is important, and you need to know the right kind of foods to eat. How diet relates to prediabetes There are many factors that increase your risk for prediabetes. Genetics can play a role, especially if diabetes runs in your family. Excess body fat and a sedentary lifestyle are other potential risk factors. In prediabetes, sugar from food begins to build up in your bloodstream because insulin can’t easily move it into your cells. Eating carbohydrates doesn’t cause prediabetes. But a diet filled with carbohydrates that digest quickly can lead to blood sugar spikes. For most people with prediabetes, your body has a difficult time lowering blood sugar levels after meals. Avoiding blood sugar spikes can help. When you eat more calories than your body needs, they get stored as fat. This can cause you to gain weight. Body fat, especially around the belly, is linked to insulin resistance. This explains why many people with prediabetes are also overweight. You can’t control all risk factors for prediabetes, but some can be mitigated. Lifestyle changes can help you maintain balanced blood sugar levels as well as a healthy weight. Watch carbs with Continue reading >>

Meals To Help Diabetics Gain Weight

Meals To Help Diabetics Gain Weight

Gaining weight while controlling your blood sugar can be very difficult for those with diabetes. The key to a healthy weight gain is to recognize which foods affect your blood sugar and which do not. For weight gain that also allows consistent blood sugar control, add more healthy fats to your diet. Video of the Day The first step to a healthy diabetic diet is consistent carbohydrate intake at each meal. The American Diabetes Association generally recommends about 45 to 60 grams of total carbohydrates per meal, but this may vary for each individual. Foods that contain carbohydrates include, but are not limited to, grains, starchy vegetables, fruits, milk products, snack foods and sweets. Portion control of these foods is very important because too many high-carbohydrate foods will spike your blood sugar. Nonstarchy vegetables such as leafy greens, broccoli, eggplant, peppers and cabbage have fewer carbohydrates per serving and will not spike your blood sugar as much as starchy ones. The American Diabetes Association recommends at least three to five servings of nonstarchy vegetables per day. Fats and Weight Gain Fats can be categorized as "unhealthy" or "healthy." According to the American Heart Association, unhealthy fats include saturated and trans fats, which can contribute to increased cholesterol and should be avoided. These include high-fat cuts of meat and high-fat dairy products. Trans fats are not naturally occurring and are added to foods by the manufacturer. Fats contain 9 calories per gram, whereas protein and carbohydrates only contain 4 calories per gram.To gain weight, consume more calories than you are expending. Healthy Fats: Monounsaturated and Omega-3 Healthy fats can assist you in gaining weight, while controlling your blood sugar and cholesterol lev Continue reading >>

How To Gain Weight And Maintain Blood Glucose

How To Gain Weight And Maintain Blood Glucose

By Lara Rondinelli-Hamilton, RD, LDN, CDE Yes, you read the title correctly—there are people with diabetes that are actually trying to gain weight. These people are underweight and need to put on a few pounds without creating extremely high blood sugar levels. Note: If you have diabetes and are losing weight or having difficulty gaining weight, your first step is making sure the issue isn’t due to high blood glucose levels. Uncontrolled hyperglycemia, which is typical with undiagnosed type 1 diabetes (or misdiagnosed type 2), can lead to weight loss and is a dangerous state for your body. If your weight loss or inability to gain weight is unexpected, make sure to discuss it right away with your doctor. It may be that your medication needs to be adjusted for better glycemic control. If, on the other hand, your blood glucose levels are controlled, here are few tips to help you gain weight without spiking your sugar. 1. Eat three meals a day. Don’t skip meals. If you are trying to gain weight, you need to increase your daily caloric intake. If you skip breakfast (or any meal), you could be missing out on an extra 400 to 500 calories per day, which if done consistently could lead to a one-pound weight loss per week. So, even if you are not a breakfast person, find some foods that you can eat for breakfast, such as a fruit-vegetable smoothie (you can add flax seed and coconut oil to increase calories, fiber, and satiety). A quick smoothie could be a few handfuls of spinach, 1 cup frozen berries, ½ banana, 1-2 tablespoons coconut oil, 1 tablespoon ground flax seed and ½-1 cup coconut milk. Serve the smoothie with a side of egg and chicken sausage. You might also try an egg, cheese, and avocado sandwich on a low-carb wrap or tortilla. 2. Eat snacks. Snacks and small me Continue reading >>

How Do I Gain Weight Safely With Prediabetes?

How Do I Gain Weight Safely With Prediabetes?

Eat as much as you want, what will bring you from pre diabetes into diabetes is excessive sugar or quick releasing carbohydrate consumption. Limiting this is really the key although exercise and adequate protein and fibre will help too. So the question is, how would you know how a meal Is affecting your blood glucose levels? Well if you are brave, you can buy a glucometer and record your own individual response to different combination of foods. All you have to do is stay within the recommended safe ranges for fasting and post meal and you will be fine. Its a real education, you don't need to be diabetic to use a glucometer but carbs do help with weight gain so a glucometer helps you find the safe zone. You should also ask yourself, what kind of weight do I want to gain. Many years ago I struggled to gain weight but after much persistence gained 7pds...7pds of which were on my stomach and increased my waist line by 3 inches. Keeping a trim waist line and gaining weight is ultimately a health goal most should aim for. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes: 7 Steps To Take Now

Prediabetes: 7 Steps To Take Now

Getting diagnosed with prediabetes is a serious wake-up call, but it doesn't have to mean you will definitely get diabetes. There is still time to turn things around. “It’s an opportunity to initiate lifestyle changes or treatments, and potentially retard progression to diabetes or even prevent diabetes,” says Gregg Gerety, MD, chief of endocrinology at St. Peter’s Hospital in Albany, N.Y. Making these seven changes in your daily habits is a good way to start. Becoming more active is one of the best things you can do to make diabetes less likely. If it's been a while since you exercised, start by building more activity into your routine by taking the stairs or doing some stretching during TV commercials, says Patti Geil, MS, RD, author of What Do I Eat Now? “Physical activity is an essential part of the treatment plan for prediabetes, because it lowers blood glucose levels and decreases body fat,” Geil says. Ideally, you should exercise at least 30 minutes a day, five days a week. Let your doctor know about your exercise plans and ask if you have any limitations. If you're overweight, you might not have to lose as much as you think to make a difference. In one study, people who had prediabetes and lost 5% to 7% of their body weight (just 10-14 pounds in someone who weights 200 pounds) cut their chances of getting diabetes by 58%. See your doctor every three to six months, Gerety says. If you're doing well, you can get positive reinforcement from your doctor. If it's not going so well, your doctor can help you get back on track. "Patients like some tangible evidence of success or failure," Gerety says. Continue reading >>

11 Ways To Gain Weight If You Have Diabetes

11 Ways To Gain Weight If You Have Diabetes

Although diabetes is often associated with being overweight, especially type 2 diabetes, it’s a myth that everyone with diabetes has a high body mass index (BMI). Some people have trouble gaining weight. In fact, unexplained or unintentional weight loss can be a symptom of undiagnosed diabetes. Issues with weight management center around insulin, a hormone produced by your pancreas. People with diabetes are unable to use or produce enough insulin to transport excess sugar out of their blood and into their cells, where it can be used as energy. This can cause your body to burn its existing fat stores and muscle tissue in order to supply your cells with energy. If your sugar levels are constantly in flux, your body will continue to chip away at its fat stores, resulting in weight loss. Diabetes food plans are often geared toward helping people lose, rather than gain, weight. This can make it harder to figure out how to gain weight in a healthy way. Before trying the tips below, talk with your doctor or dietician. They can help you set the right diet and exercise goals for you, as well as answer any questions you may have. There are many apps available to help you manage your condition and make the right food choices. Look for apps that help you track blood sugar and BMI. Some options include: GlucOracle: This glucose forecasting app uses crowdsourcing to analyze the estimated amount of carbohydrates, protein, fat, calories, and fiber in each meal. It also predicts what your glucose level will be after eating. SuperTracker: This app helps you gain weight by providing comprehensive nutritional information on over 8,000 food items. It also tracks your nutritional targets, diet, and activity levels against your goals. If these don’t appeal to you, we’ve also rounded up Continue reading >>

The Prediabetes Diet Everyone Should Follow

The Prediabetes Diet Everyone Should Follow

Skip the sugary sodas and processed food, and opt for whole foods like fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, low-fat dairy, and healthy fats like olive oil and avocado, Experts believe the number of people living with diabetes will rise dramatically over the next 40 years. If current trends continue, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as many as one in three adults could have the disease by 2050. And about 79 million American adults now have prediabetes, a condition marked by above-normal blood sugar levels that aren't high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. If there's a silver lining to these alarming statistics, it's that there's plenty you can do to prevent the disease or slow the progression, including eating a balanced diet. Everyone can benefit from a healthy eating plan aimed at containing prediabetes, regardless of whether you're at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes, says Barbara Borcik, RD, a certified diabetes eductor at the Diabetes & Nutrition Center at Northwest Hospital in Randallstown, Md. 7 Golden Rules of Healthy Eating Here are seven sound diet principles that can keep your blood sugars from creeping upward, among other health benefits. Skip the sugary drinks. No sweet tea. No juice. No soda. No sweetened lemonade. No mocha latte coffee creations. "My number one recommendation to people is: Don't drink your sugar," Borcik says. Sugary drinks provide nothing more than empty calories, and they won't help you feel full. "All the sugary drinks out there are a real risk factor for obesity," she stresses. Pull back on portions. You still can eat many of the foods you like, just have smaller amounts of them, Borcik says, adding that this is especially true for starchy foods like white rice, white potat Continue reading >>

The 4 Common Mistakes All Prediabetics Must Avoid To Prevent Diabetes

The 4 Common Mistakes All Prediabetics Must Avoid To Prevent Diabetes

Just a “little touch of sugar?” iStock/stocksnapper If you’re among the 79 million Americans with prediabetes—higher-than-normal levels of blood sugar, which boost your risk for full-blown diabetes and related health problems—don’t shrug it off. New research published in the journal The Lancet found that prediabetic patients who had at least one normal blood sugar reading, even for a short period of time, were 56 percent more likely to avoid progressing to diabetes during nearly six years of follow-up after the study. In other words, “This is your chance to take control,” says Matt Longjohn, MD, MPH, senior director of chronic disease prevention for the YMCA-USA. “Research proves that some simple, daily lifestyle changes can dramatically cut the risk for developing diabetes over the next couple of years by 58 percent, which is better than what is seen with frequently prescribed medications like metformin.” The key? Avoid these four roadblocks between you and a healthier future. iStock/martinedoucet The landmark Diabetes Prevention Program study, which followed 3,234 people with prediabetes for three years, revealed that everyday changes—switching up their eating habits and adding more physical activity—helped participants lose a little weight. Trimming just 5 percent to 7 percent of their body weight (that’s 12.5 pounds for a 180 pound person) and exercising slashed the odds for developing full-blown diabetes by a whopping 58 percent. This helps trim abdominal fat—the deep belly fat that settles in your torso, wraps itself around your internal organs, and even invades your liver. It messes with your liver’s ability to regulate blood sugar by pumping out inflammation-boosting compounds that make your body stop obeying insulin. Smart Move: St Continue reading >>

Top 5 Signs You May Have Prediabetes

Top 5 Signs You May Have Prediabetes

Prediabetes is a diagnosis of risk for diabetes, which is a metabolism disorder in which the body cannot regulate insulin. This results in unhealthy levels of glucose in the blood. If a person has prediabetes, their blood glucose levels are high, but not considered high enough to merit a diabetes diagnosis. A prediabetes diagnosis should be taken seriously, as it is advanced warning of a preventable serious disease. Unless diet and lifestyle changes are made, prediabetes can develop into type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association reports that some people may not show any signs of prediabetes other than a higher than normal blood glucose level. However, these five signs have been associated with a prediabetes diagnoses and may merit the advice of a physician: Urgent: Discover Your Risk for Heart Disease, Take the Test Now! 1. Increased thirst and urination: When insulin levels are not being regulated, the kidneys have to work overtime to remove glucose from the bloodstream. This causes increased urination, which then causes dehydration and excessive thirst. 2. Weight gain: A common sign of prediabetes is unexplained weight gain even when eating habits have remained the same. In addition, increased exercise may have no effect on weight loss. Insulin is the hormone that is released by the pancreas to regulate blood sugar, which is converted into energy. If the body has become insulin resistant, blood sugar cannot be used as energy and is converted to fat by the liver instead. 3. Unexplained fatigue: Fatigue that is not due to a lack of sleep, poor nutrition, excessive stress, or other illnesses may be a sign of prediabetes. According to Natural Health Advisory, "The experience of fatigue and other low blood sugar symptoms 2-4 hours after a high-carb meal may be a w Continue reading >>

How To Put On Weight When You Have Diabetes

How To Put On Weight When You Have Diabetes

Not everybody with diabetes needs to lose weight. Some people have the opposite problem; the pounds just won’t stay on. Although certainly a great source of calories, filling up on hot fudge sundaes isn’t the best way to fill out your frame if you have diabetes. Before we talk about some healthful strategies for weight gain, it is important to make sure your efforts to add a few pounds are not sabotaged by out of control blood glucose numbers. If your glucose level is very high, all the extra calories in the world won’t have the desired effect. When the body perceives it is starving –that is essentially what occurs when it can’t use all the glucose building up in the blood stream– glucose (energy or calories) spills into the urine. So instead of keeping those precious calories to add muscle and some fat you will end up losing weight. If you are losing weight and your glucose levels are in good control then a visit to your health care provider is in order to look for other causes of weight loss. The old adage says; to gain a pound a week, add 500 calories a day to your current calorie level. Now new research tells us that this isn’t entirely accurate, but it is still a good place to start. You can find out about how many calories you are eating now by using any one of a hundreds of nutrition management websites on the internet: Caloriecount.com, Myfitnesspal.com and Fitday.com are three options. One of the first things to look at when you are trying to gain weight is low calorie foods to eliminate. Plain beverages such as black coffee or tea, broth soups, low calorie salads all fill you up without providing much in the way of calories. All of your food chooses should be as calorie dense as possible. If you like salads for example, keep the lettuce to a mini Continue reading >>

Why Does Insulin Resistance Cause Weight Gain?

Why Does Insulin Resistance Cause Weight Gain?

Why does insulin resistance cause weight gain? People with insulin resistance often make too much insulin in response to eating. They may also produce too much insulin in order to maintain normal blood sugar (blood glucose) levels. The body cannot excrete excess insulin made by the pancreas; excess insulin is stored as fat in the body. This is just one of the reasons why people with insulin resistance gain weight more easily than those who are not insulin resistant. A simpler explanation is this: Insulin is a fat storing hormone – it triggers the body to store more fat; Insulin itself can be stored as body fat; and People with insulin resistance often make too much insulin. Many People With Insulin Resistance Can Eat Normal Amounts of Food and Still Gain Weight Insulin is a Fat Storing Hormone – It Signals the Body to Store Energy as Fat The body requires more insulin to metabolize (use as energy) carbohydrates than it does fat and protein. A low-calorie diet that is high in carbohydrates and unhealthy fats can trigger the pancreas to make too much insulin. People with insulin resistance can consume a normal amount of calories, but if calories are from foods that trigger too much insulin production, they can still gain weight from the excess insulin which is stored as fat. Excess insulin can also make you feel hungrier and signal the body to store more calories as fat. One way to lose weight is to reduce the number of carbohydrates you eat and to only eat low-glycemic carbohydrates. Avoiding “fast acting” carbohydrate foods (foods that are high in refined flour and sugar) also can reduce the amount of insulin your body needs to manufacture. Fast acting foods include candy, juice, soda, and foods that contain sugar, corn syrup, and highly-processed starches usual Continue reading >>

Why Do I Find It So Hard To Lose Weight?

Why Do I Find It So Hard To Lose Weight?

There are lots of myths about weight gain, weight loss and dieting, but the most damaging is that it’s all about willpower. “If only I had a stronger willpower”, people say to themselves, “I would eat more healthily and become slim again”. If you believe that then you will also believe that if you are fat then it is all your own fault. So, you go on a diet and when it fails (which many do) then naturally you blame yourself. You get depressed, gorge on carbs and give up. The fact is that experts who work in weight loss management are well aware that weight loss is about far more than simply trying to eat fewer calories. Most overweight people have a metabolic problem, one that makes them hungry all the time. The normal feedback mechanisms that tell you that you are full no longer work. Willpower fails because you are up against one of the most basic drives we have, hunger. This metabolic problem will not only stop you losing weight, it will also lead to serious health problems such as high blood pressure, heart disease and diabetes. Unless you do something about it this is a problem that will get worse over time. Once you solve the metabolic problem (and the good news is that it can be solved) your appetite will shrink and you will find it not only easier to lose weight but to keep it off. It starts with developing Insulin resistance At the heart of weight gain is the hormone, insulin. One of the main reasons why so many people struggle to lose weight is not because they are idle or greedy but because their muscles have become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced by your pancreas. It controls your blood sugar levels, but it does far more than that. It also controls fat storage. When you eat a meal, particularly one that is rich in sugary carbs, y Continue reading >>

Tips To Gain Weight

Tips To Gain Weight

Save for later If you have diabetes and you’re underweight or struggling with your appetite, it’s important to eat the foods you like rather than being too restrictive with your diet. This may mean eating foods that are higher in fat and calories. Speak with your diabetes team to review your medications and talk to a dietitian to help you make any changes. Do you want to put on weight? These are some of the things your dietitian may suggest to help you gain/maintain your weight. Eat smaller meals, more often. You’ll find this easier than eating three large meals and it will also help increase your appetite. Use full-fat dairy products like milk, cream, cheese and yogurt. Add unsaturated fats to your food where you can in foods such as avocados, nuts and seeds, and spreads and oils, including olive, rapeseed, sunflower and peanut. Unsaturated fats are still high in calories, but better for your heart than saturated fats. Serve vegetables with melted butter, spread or grated cheese. Add cream or full-fat milk to foods like mashed potato or soups. Have nourishing drinks like smoothies and milky drinks. Add powdered milk to cereals. Nutritional supplements, in the form of food or drink, can be useful for some people who are finding it hard to gain weight or who have a poor appetite. They are available on prescription. Continue reading >>

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