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How To Gain Weight With Diabetes Type 2

Diabetes Is Making Me Fat

Diabetes Is Making Me Fat

It’s popular knowledge now in America that the obesity epidemic has given rise to an epidemic of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. In other words, (with the right genetic predisposition) being fat can make you a diabetic. What is less appreciated is that being a diabetic can make you fat. If I were to characterize my diabetes care, I would say I aggressively treat to range. If I see my blood glucose (BG) start to rise, I bolus early, rather than waiting until I am actually high and correcting. I admit it– I prefer to run a little low rather than a little high. The benefit of this aggressive treatment is that I can prevent some degree of hyperglycemia. The downside? I frequently have to correct on the other end– eating to bring my BG back up because I too aggressively treated a high. I correct usually with 5 – 10 grams of carbohydrates, in the form of dry crackers, or straight sugar if I’m below 60 mg/dL. (I don’t like glucose tabs much, and I try not to correct with foods I actually like because, as a diabetic, my relationship with food is screwed up enough as it is.) I am fairly insulin and exercise sensitive at this point in my life, so I end up needing to correct frequently. On average, I end up eating about 40 grams of corrective carbohydrates per day. That’s 160 extra calories (ignoring for simplicity any extra non-carb calories the crackers contain) a day. One hundred and forty extra, totally non-nutritive calories. And not enjoyed, either– it’s medicine, not food. Ugh. To gain one pound, on average, a person needs to eat an extra 3,500 calories. At 160 extra calories per day, I will gain a pound about every three weeks. Over the course of a year, I will gain 17 pounds. The way I treat my diabetes is making me fat. So what are my options? T Continue reading >>

Women Who Gain Weight Between Babies At Higher Risk For Diabetes

Women Who Gain Weight Between Babies At Higher Risk For Diabetes

TUESDAY, Aug. 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Women who gain weight after having a baby may be more likely to develop diabetes during their next pregnancy, a new study suggests. Women's weight before conception and how much they gain during pregnancy are known risk factors for gestational diabetes, the study authors explained. Gestational diabetes is a form of high blood sugar diagnosed during pregnancy. It can cause complications for both mother and baby. Led by Linn Sorbye of the University of Bergen in Norway, researchers investigated the diabetes risk among women who had been pregnant once or twice before. The study involved about 24,200 women who gave birth between 2006 and 2014. The researchers considered the women's previous history of gestational diabetes and body mass index (BMI) when they got pregnant again. BMI is an estimate of body fat based on weight and height. A BMI of 30 is considered obese. About 36 percent of the women gained more than 1 BMI unit of weight between the start of their first pregnancy and their second, the study found. These women were more likely than women whose weight was stable to develop diabetes during a second pregnancy. Women who gained twice as much weight had double the risk for gestational diabetes. And the risk rose fivefold for women who had the greatest weight gain, the researchers found. These risks were most striking among women whose weights were normal before their first pregnancy. The study showed, however, that overweight women who lost weight after delivery reduced their risk of diabetes during another pregnancy. The study was published Aug. 1 in the journal PLOS Medicine. -- Mary Elizabeth Dallas Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms Reversed: This Could Lower Blood Sugar And Help Weight Loss

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms Reversed: This Could Lower Blood Sugar And Help Weight Loss

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body can’t use insulin effectively or when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin. This means glucose - or sugar - stays in the blood and isn’t used as fuel. If glucose builds up in the blood it can lead to hyperglycaemia which is toxic to organs. Now experts believe the condition could be treated by implanting sponges into fat tissue. A study has shown that in obese mice with type 2 diabetes symptoms, the implant reduced weight gain and blood sugar levels. The research was presented at the National Meeting of the American Chemical Society. Experts said the sponges, which are made of poly(lactide-co-glycolide), or PLG, help to reduce fat and lower blood sugar levels. “We’re approaching diabetes as tissue engineers,” said Professor Michael Gower, fro the University of South Carolina. “When people eat poorly, don’t exercise and are under a lot of stress, they gain weight. “When fat stores get too large, communication with other parts of the body breaks down and can lead to diabetes. What we’re trying to do is restart that conversation.” Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. The experts set out to see what impact the sponges had on fat - in a bid to stimulate communication from fat to other organs and tissues. The sponges deliver pancreatic islets - or cells which stimulate hormones - into the fat. Michael Hendley, a doctoral student in Gower's USC lab, implanted PLG sponges in large abdominal fat pads in obese mice that had developed symptoms resembling those of Type 2 diabetes. In one week, the mice's fat cells, immune cells and blood vessels filled the Continue reading >>

I Am Underweight, How Do I Gain Weight When I Have Diabetes?

I Am Underweight, How Do I Gain Weight When I Have Diabetes?

You may have lost weight because your blood sugar has been running high. This can cause much of the carbohydrate food that you eat to pass into your urine and not be absorbed into your body. Alternately, you may have been slim to begin with, and then as you got older your pancreas may not be making as much insulin, so you got diabetes. Regardless of the cause, once you have diabetes and are underweight, eating can be a challenge. Restricting carbohydrate foods that increase your blood sugar, also restricts calories, so you need to rely more on proteins and fats to get your needed calories. I have a 6-page section in The Complete Diabetes Guide devoted to this topic. The first thing to do is to see your doctor, to find out if you need more diabetes medications, or a change in medications. The right diabetes medication can help you gain weight by improving absorption of sugar. Next step, look at what you are eating. It is best to spread your intake out into three small meals and three small snacks. This spreads out your carbohydrates and also means you will not feel so full at each meal. Here are a few simple ideas to boost calories: spread peanut butter on an apple or banana, to add protein slice up avocado and have it in sandwiches or salads add ¼ cup of skim milk powder to each cup of milk to double the protein add extra oil such as olive, canola, corn or soya oil, margarine, mayonnaise and salad dressings to recipes and foods such as mashed potatoes, rice or pasta, oatmeal, scrambled eggs or casseroles add chopped nuts or roasted sunflower seeds on top of yogurt or cereal add sliced or shredded cheese to soups and casseroles. In addition to boosting calories, it is important to rebuild lost muscles. To build muscle strength, a walk is good, and so is doing some weigh Continue reading >>

About Diabetes

About Diabetes

You have probably heard quite a few things about "Diabetes," mostly as a general umbrella term thrown around by the mass media, from news articles, to well-intentioned television hosts. Based on what these folks say, you probably have a very basic, limited understanding of the disease, and it's probably in alarmist terms: Something along the lines of... "335 million people, worldwide, have it, with around 2% of Americans walking around, undiagnosed, not knowing they have high blood "sugar" (with little explanation of what blood "sugar" is)... and oh, my god, the obesity epidemic is skyrocketting, and seriously, you people need to lose weight, and yadda, yadda, yadda, yadda... Stop eating sugary food, and McDonald's... because in the 'near future', estimated figures "predict" as much as 75% of people will be developing "Diabetes"." What's worse is that these alarmist outlets leave you with the impression that a.) There's only one type of Diabetes, b.) all Diabetes is the same, c.) Diabetes is very straightforward and easy to understand, d.) all people gave themselves this disease (or gave their kids this disease) because they're slackers, or poor parents, e.) if they weren't such slackers, they could cure themselves with diet and exercise, gastric bypass, or some miracle supplement or special raw diet being promoted online, and f.) if people aren't diagnosed, it's their own fault for not paying enough attention. There are SO MANY things that are wrong with this scenario! 1. Diabetes is NOT straightforward. Diabetes is a very complex spectrum of diseases, with many etiologies, and a variety of treatments... It is attended to by many EXTREMELY uneducated medical 'professionals'! (This is why so many people run undiagnosed, by the way... It should bother you. A LOT. It is N Continue reading >>

How To Gain Weight Fast And Naturally (the Ultimate Guide)

How To Gain Weight Fast And Naturally (the Ultimate Guide)

Most of the people these days struggle with weight issues. A big number of people are either obese or overweight. Yet, not so small number of people have the opposite problem – the problem of being too skinny or underweight. For overweight people, this issue might not seem like a real one, but for people struggling with this condition, it is a very vivid problem. It often depends on the person’s metabolism, body structure, and genetics. Sometimes little tips and tricks can help you gain weight. But whether you are clinically underweight or you are just a “hard gainer”, principles of obtaining more kilograms are basically the same. What Does it Mean to be Underweight It means that your body doesn’t inquire the minimum amount of body mass needed to obtain optimal health. Even though obesity is number one health problem in the world today, being underweight can also be bad for your body. One study showed that there is a big chance of an early death because of this condition. Being underweight is also bad for your immune system. Your body does not receive the needed amount of vitamins, minerals, and other healthy substances. They are required for performing regular bodily functions. You are more vulnerable to immune diseases, for example, viruses, osteoporosis, and infections if you lack a sustainable amount of kilograms. There are several reasons why somebody has lost weight or struggles with gaining weight. Most common conditions are eating disorders. One of the most serious eating disorders is anorexia nervosa, a serious mental disorder. Other reasons may include different medical conditions, such as diabetes, thyroid problems, infections or even cancer. If you are experiencing some symptoms that pinpoint to some of these diseases, contact your doctor immediate Continue reading >>

Obesity And Type 2 Diabetes

Obesity And Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a medical condition that prevents the body from properly processing blood sugar. Type 2 diabetes is highly associated with excess weight and afflicts many obese people, putting them at risk of disabling symptoms and complications. Because type 2 diabetes and its precursors are closely tied to obesity, weight loss is often all that is needed to improve or resolve them. Even a moderate amount of weight loss can help many people reduce diabetes medications and even put the disease into remission. When we eat foods that contain carbohydrates, our bodies break them down into a sugar called glucose. Glucose travels through the bloodstream and supplies energy to all of our cells. However, before our cells can use glucose as energy, they need a hormone called insulin. The pancreas detects the presence of glucose in our blood after we eat and releases insulin to balance our blood sugar levels. “Insulin takes the blood sugar that’s floating around in our bloodstream and puts it into the places we need it,” says Dr. Craig Primack, a medical obesity specialist. According to Dr. Primack, insulin is “like the key in the lock,” opening the door for our muscles, organs and fat to take in glucose and put it to use. When insulin is no longer able to fulfill this crucial role, we can gradually develop type 2 diabetes as our cells become unable to process high levels of glucose in the blood. Though it is not entirely clear why insulin stops functioning properly, it is generally agreed that obesity and physical inactivity are contributors to type 2 diabetes. Obesity. When our bodies have more fatty tissue, especially in the abdomen, our cells become more resistant to insulin and more is required to reduce blood sugar levels. Inactivity. Because physical activity uses u Continue reading >>

Impact Of Restricted Maternal Weight Gain On Fetal Growth And Perinatal Morbidity In Obese Women With Type 2 Diabetes

Impact Of Restricted Maternal Weight Gain On Fetal Growth And Perinatal Morbidity In Obese Women With Type 2 Diabetes

OBJECTIVE Since January 2008, obese women with type 2 diabetes were advised to gain 0–5 kg during pregnancy. The aim with this study was to evaluate fetal growth and perinatal morbidity in relation to gestational weight gain in these women. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A retrospective cohort comprised the records of 58 singleton pregnancies in obese women (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) with type 2 diabetes giving birth between 2008 and 2011. Birth weight was evaluated by SD z score to adjust for gestational age and sex. RESULTS Seventeen women (29%) gained ≤5 kg, and the remaining 41 gained >5 kg. The median (range) gestational weight gains were 3.7 kg (−4.7 to 5 kg) and 12.1 kg (5.5–25.5 kg), respectively. Prepregnancy BMI was 33.5 kg/m2 (30–53 kg/m2) vs. 36.8 kg/m2 (30–48 kg/m2), P = 0.037, and median HbA1c was 6.7% at first visit in both groups and decreased to 5.7 and 6.0%, P = 0.620, in late pregnancy, respectively. Gestational weight gain ≤5 kg was associated with lower birth weight z score (P = 0.008), lower rates of large-for-gestational-age (LGA) infants (12 vs. 39%, P = 0.041), delivery closer to term (268 vs. 262 days, P = 0.039), and less perinatal morbidity (35 vs. 71%, P = 0.024) compared with pregnancies with maternal weight gain >5 kg. CONCLUSIONS In this pilot study in obese women with type 2 diabetes, maternal gestational weight gain ≤5 kg was associated with a more proportionate birth weight and less perinatal morbidity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Since January 2008, all obese pregnant women with type 2 diabetes attending our clinic have been advised to gain 0–5 kg body weight during pregnancy. All 117 pregnant women with type 2 diabetes giving birth at our center during January 2008 to October 2011 were included in this retrospective cohort stud Continue reading >>

I Am A Diabetic And Would Like To Know How I Can Put On Some Weight

I Am A Diabetic And Would Like To Know How I Can Put On Some Weight

I have had diabetes for nearly three years and have always been able to control it. I have an enormous amount of energy and run the house with six children (four of them are young foster children). You can imagine the amount of work I get through daily. The worry I have is that I am losing weight and am down from 9.5 to 8.5 stone. Even if I am given the chance to, I find I can't sit and relax and am always on the go. I maintain a proper diet. Can you tell me how I could put on some weight? Could a change of insulin help? There are several possible explanations for your weight loss. It may be that you need a change of insulin treatment as you say – it depends a bit on what your blood glucose levels are running at. On the other hand it could be that your thyroid gland has gone overactive. Or, it could be stress related, what with all the demands on you. First steps should be to get a couple of simple blood tests done – one to check the sugar control and one to check the thyroid gland. Yours sincerely The NetDoctor Medical Team Other Qs & As Last updated 03.04.2011 Continue reading >>

Managing Gestational Diabetes

Managing Gestational Diabetes

3 Staying in Balance Three-quarters of women with gestational diabetes can manage it through diet alone.Toxemia or preeclampsia is the medical term for high blood pressure that is caused by pregnancy. Symptoms of this type of high blood pressure include swelling of the feet and lower legs. High blood pressure is not good for you or for your baby. It can be life threatening. If you develop toxemia, your activity may need to be limited, you may be hospitalized, or have a cesarean birth. Like gestational diabetes, the high blood pressure usually goes away once the baby is born. Urinary tract infections are more common for women with gestational diabetes. Besides the discomfort of burning with urination and frequent urination, urinary tract infections may lead to premature birth. A program of meal planning, exercise, and possibly insulin therapy will help you keep your blood-sugar level within the normal range and your body healthy. Earlier in this book, we told you that gestational diabetes is like Type 2 diabetes, except that it’s temporary and that it’s activated by your pregnancy. Certain hormones from your placenta block the insulin made by your pancreas from doing its job, which is to help your cells absorb the sugar in your blood. The result is not enough sugar in your cells to give you strength and energy and too much in your blood, which can be dangerous and even fatal if not treated. To correct this situation, you have to reduce the amount of sugar/glucose coming into your body (but not too much!) by changing your diet. About three-quarters of the women who get gestational diabetes are able to control their blood sugar levels through changes in their diets. You can also reduce the amount of sugar/glucose in your bloodstream by exercising. If both of these solu Continue reading >>

Losing Weight With Diabetes

Losing Weight With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, know that you are not alone. According to recent statistics, the occurrence of diabetes in the United States has reached 9.4% of children and adults - or about 30.3 million Americans. Before we go into the tips for weight loss and diabetes, it's important to understand the different types and what causes diabetes. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a condition where the body has too much glucose, or blood sugar, in the bloodstream. Usually, the body produces insulin in response to glucose. Insulin is a hormone that moves glucose from the bloodstream into the cells, but with type 1 diabetes, the body no longer produces insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body either may or may not be making enough insulin, however, the cells don't use the insulin properly. In either situation and without proper management, glucose can build up in the bloodstream. This excess buildup of glucose flows through the blood vessels throughout your body and then eventually can cause damage to your heart, eyes, kidneys and feet. Although both types have to do with high blood sugar, type 1 and type 2 diabetes differ in a number of ways. Type 1 diabetes, is most often diagnosed in childhood, while type 2 diabetes is more frequently diagnosed in adulthood. However, increasingly, type 2 is being seen earlier on, even being diagnosed in young children. Type 1 diabetes, unlike type 2, is an autoimmune disease where the body's immune system mistakenly attacks cells in the pancreas responsible for producing insulin. The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown, but genetics do play a role, along with environmental factors such as viruses. There is no cure for type 1 diabetes, but a person can manage their condition by taking insulin injections daily. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, is Continue reading >>

Meal Plan For A Diabetic Bodybuilder

Meal Plan For A Diabetic Bodybuilder

Diabetes, or as it's fully called Diabetes Mellitus, is in fact two completely different diseases type 1 and type 2. From a nutritional point of view each should be treated differently, and meal plans for each can be viewed though the relevant links here where you can also read more about the conditions. The plan below is aimed at a type 1 diabetic, i.e. who replies on injections of insulin to control their blood sugar levels, and who is looking to increase their muscle size and strength. The individual will more likely be on an insulin regimen which allows for some flexibility by having one injection of long acting insulin per day and an appropriate dose of super-fast acting insulin prior to a meal. Regular meals and snacks are encouraged, especially in respect of slow-released low glycaemic carbohydrate foods as the basis of each meal and snack. If you do not control your own insulin regimen, then speak to your doctor or diabetes specialist nurse. See our Glycaemic Index Tables for GI values of foods. Many diabetics feel they cannot make notable muscle and strength gains due to their condition, but there is no reason at all why a diabetic cannot make just as good gains as a non diabetic. There is nothing revolutionary and special about a diet for type 1 diabetics; it's simply based on the healthy eating guidelines which everyone should be following, so simply incorporate concepts applicable to muscle growth, and the results will be fruitful. So called 'diabetic products' such as special chocolates, cakes, biscuits, etc are not recommended. Eating a range of low fat, low sugar, high fibre 'ordinary' foods is far better. Many of these 'diabetic products' are no lower in fat or calories and are normally more expensive. Some contain the sweetener sorbitol which can cause Continue reading >>

How To Lose Weight When You Live With Diabetes

How To Lose Weight When You Live With Diabetes

Losing weight can be difficult for anyone, and living with diabetes definitely doesn’t make it easier. However, there ARE people who set out to lose weight and end up so extraordinarily successful that you wonder if they have some inside information you don’t. That information EXISTS. I’m here to give you the rundown on how to successfully lose weight when you live with diabetes. In this post, I will go through: How to set realistic goals How many calories to eat How much protein, carbs, and fat to eat How much to exercise How blood glucose control affects your weight Without further ado…lets GET TO IT! Temper expectations at the start People these days have this intensive need for instant gratification. They want that 15 lbs gone by yesterday! While I’m all for efficiency, I’m going to be short and sweet and show reality with a pop quiz: True or false: it took more than a week to gain the weight you are trying to lose. The answer is undeniably “True”. So if it took you X number of months to gain weight, why would it take you a week or two to lose it? It doesn’t. It takes time and some concerted effort. Don’t expect to lose all of the weight immediately, but know that with proper habit formation and consistency, you WILL see the results you are after. The general rule for healthy weight loss is to aim for A MAX of 1-2 lbs. per week. It’s also quite common for people living with diabetes to take as long as 2-3 weeks before seeing any weight loss at all on a new diet. “Why?” you ask. Changing caloric intake and workout routines may require a reduction of insulin (or other diabetes medication) as well as diet manipulation, which takes a little trial and error to adjust. BE PATIENT. Once the ball is rolling, a slow and controlled weight loss makes Continue reading >>

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

By some estimates, diabetes cases have increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years. One in four Americans now have either diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose) Type 2 diabetes is completely preventable and virtually 100 percent reversible, simply by implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle changes, one of the most important of which is eliminating sugar (especially fructose) and grains from your diet Diabetes is NOT a disease of blood sugar, but rather a disorder of insulin and leptin signaling. Elevated insulin levels are not only symptoms of diabetes, but also heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and obesity Diabetes drugs are not the answer – most type 2 diabetes medications either raise insulin or lower blood sugar (failing to address the root cause) and many can cause serious side effects Sun exposure shows promise in treating and preventing diabetes, with studies revealing a significant link between high vitamin D levels and a lowered risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome By Dr. Mercola There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes — and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes aren’t aware of their circumstances, either. Diabetes: Symptoms of an Epidemic The latest diabetes statistics1 echo an increase in diabetes ca Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Cured Through Weight Loss, Newcastle University Finds

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Cured Through Weight Loss, Newcastle University Finds

Millions of people suffering from Type 2 diabetes could be cured of the disease if they just lost weight, a new study suggests. Scientists at Newcastle University have shown the disease is caused by fat accumulating in the pancreas and losing less than one gram from the organ can reverse the life-limiting illness and restore insulin production. Type 2 diabetes affects 3.3 million people in England and Wales and, until now, was thought to be chronic. It can lead to blindness, stroke, kidney failure and limb amputation. “For people with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight allows them to drain excess fat out of the pancreas and allows function to return to normal” Professor Roy Taylor, Newcastle University But now researchers at Newcastle have shown that the disease can be reversed, even in obese people who have had the condition for a long time. 18 obese people with Type 2 diabetes who were given gastric band surgery and put on a restricted diet for eight weeks were cured of their condition. During the trial the patients, aged between 25 and 65, lost an average of 2.2 stone, which was around 13 per cent of their body weight. Crucially they also lost 0.6 grams of fat from their pancreas, allowing the organ to secrete normal levels of insulin. The team is now planning a larger two year study involving 200 people with Glasgow University to check that the findings can be replicated and weight loss can be sustained for two years. “For people with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight allows them to drain excess fat out of the pancreas and allows function to return to normal,” said Professor Roy Taylor, of Newcastle University who also works within the Newcastle Hospitals. “So if you ask how much weight you need to lose to make your diabetes go away, the answer is one gram. But t Continue reading >>

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