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How To Fight Diabetes Fatigue

How To Beat Arthritis Fatigue

How To Beat Arthritis Fatigue

Fatigue is a mysterious and persistent foe when you have arthritis. Learn how to fight back. Once you recognize possible causes of your fatigue, write them down and discuss with your doctor. The two of you can come up with a comprehensive plan so you have the energy you need. The plan to regain your vigor may include medication and lifestyle changes. Medications to Treat Causes of Fatigue A 2017 one published in Current Rheumatology Reports, along with earlier ones, – show that medications used to treat your inflammatory arthritis have little effect on fatigue. But unchecked inflammation and pain caused by arthritis certainly contribute to fatigue. So, your first step in getting your energy back is to get disease activity under control. You will also need to treat any other underlying medical conditions you have that may cause or worsen your fatigue. Here are a few types of medicine your doctor may prescribe that are focused on treating fatigue. Anemia medicine. If you have anemia, you may need iron supplements or the hormone epoietin (Epogen, Procrit). Sleep aids. Sleeping pills may help promote restorative sleep. Newer medications, including eszopiclone (Lunesta), lorazepam (Ativan), zaleplon (Sonata), and zolpidem (Ambien), are less likely to trigger dependence than older sleep medications. Vitamins. If your nutrition is poor, your doctor may suggest you take a multivitamin or other supplements to fill your nutritional gaps and strengthen your overall health. Psychoactive medicines. You may benefit from “activating” medications that increase energy. These include some antidepressants, like bupropion (Wellbutrin), and psychostimulants, like modafinil (Provigil). Lifestyle Changes to Combat Fatigue Studies, such as several done by Patti Katz, PhD, of the Universi Continue reading >>

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

The American Diabetes Association cites the following symptoms as indicative of high blood sugar: High blood glucose [Editor’s note: Duh] High levels of sugar in the urine Frequent urination Increased thirst And if high blood sugar goes untreated? “Hyperglycemia can be a serious problem if you don’t treat it, so it’s important to treat as soon as you detect it. If you fail to treat hyperglycemia, a condition called ketoacidosis (diabetic coma) could occur. Ketoacidosis develops when your body doesn’t have enough insulin. Without insulin, your body can’t use glucose for fuel, so your body breaks down fats to use for energy. When your body breaks down fats, waste products called ketones are produced. Your body cannot tolerate large amounts of ketones and will try to get rid of them through the urine. Unfortunately, the body cannot release all the ketones and they build up in your blood, which can lead to ketoacidosis.” – ADA website But what does a high blood sugar feel like? Because when you see someone who is working through an elevated blood sugar, they may not look terribly out of sorts. But what is happening inside of them is real, and plays out in a myriad of ways for every person with diabetes. I’ve tried to write about it several times, but each high is different, and affects me in different ways: “It’s a thick feeling in the base of your brain, like someone’s cracked open your head and replaced your gray matter with sticky jam. I find myself zoning out and staring at things, and my eyeballs feel dry and like they’re tethered to my head by frayed ropes instead of optic nerves. Everything is slow and heavy and whipped with heavy cream.” – Oh, High! “There’s something about a high blood sugar that makes my body feel weighted down, l Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar And Adrenal Fatigue

Blood Sugar And Adrenal Fatigue

Adrenal fatigue and diabetes often go hand in hand, impacting the body’s ability to handle stress and maintain healthy blood sugar levels, among their many other regulatory functions. If you already have diabetes or think you might be headed there, it’s important to become aware of these glands, their role, and how they (and you) can become exhausted from outside stress, poor diet/nutrition and especially caffeine. The adrenals are two small glands located above each kidney that produce hormones such as norepinephrine (adrenaline), DHEA and cortisol to help you handle physical, emotional and psychological stress. Adrenaline is released to help you in stressful situations in which a burst of energy is required to help sustain you. DHEA gets converted into estrogen, testosterone and other steroid hormones, slowing in production as we age. Cortisol contributes to a strong immune system, balances blood sugar and regulates blood pressure. Low levels of DHEA and high levels of cortisol, brought on my stress, can contribute to a number of health problems such as heart disease, inflammation, cardiovascular disease, premature aging and diabetes. Hormonal imbalances directly impact the body’s production and processing of insulin, ability to burn glucose and increase insulin resistance. They also contribute to weight gain and vulnerability to bacteria, viruses, fungi, etc. Although excessive stress is the ultimate cause of adrenal fatigue, a high sugar diet, caffeine and smoking can all contribute to their exhaustion. In relation to stimulants, the adrenal glands are forced to work harder to produce more adrenaline, putting the body into a "fight or flight" response, which over time can completely drain them and impair their ability to do their job. Some additional symptoms Continue reading >>

Is This Why You’re Tired All The Time?

Is This Why You’re Tired All The Time?

If you have diabetes and you’re tired all the time, don’t just chalk the fatigue up to your fluctuating blood sugar. Turns out that the emotional toll of dealing with diabetes can be what’s behind your fatigue, according to a new study published in The Diabetes Educator. And you don’t have to just take it. Researchers from the University of Illinois College of Nursing measured the blood sugar levels of 83 diabetic women over the age of 40, and also asked them general questions about their health. Instead of shifting blood sugar levels being linked with fatigue—as is often assumed by doctors—other factors, like depression and BMI, were shown to be greater indicators of whether women felt constantly tired. "People have always assumed blood sugar is the cause of fatigue," says lead study author Cynthia Fritschi, RN, PhD. "It really isn't. Stress, depression, sleep—all of these play a bigger factor in fatigue than blood sugar or blood glucose.” Here’s the problem: Being tired makes you less likely to do what you need to do to keep your diabetes in check, like exercising and eating healthy meals. And doctors don’t typically pick up on these lifestyle issues. "People want to know why they're lacking that get-up-and-go, but doctors don't ask how are you feeling? how are you sleeping? how is your daytime activity?” says Fritschi. Here’s how to make sure your fatigue is being addressed: Be specific. When discussing symptoms with your doctor, state the outcome as well, says Fritschi: Because I'm tired, I'm not able to do x, y and z. "It helps your doctor see that your fatigue is not just a symptom; it's keeping you from taking care of yourself." Take your own health inventory. "Think of the things you can control," says Fritschi. "What's your diet and leve Continue reading >>

Home Remedies For Diabetes

Home Remedies For Diabetes

Diabetes, also called diabetes mellitus, has become a very common heath problem. There are two main types of diabetes- type 1 diabetes in which the body does not produce insulin and type 2 diabetes in which the body does not produce enough insulin or the insulin that is produced does not work properly. Some of the common symptoms of diabetes include fatigue, weight loss (even though you are eating more), excessive thirst, increased urination, cut and bruises that are slow to heal and blurred vision. While there is no cure for diabetes, with your blood sugar level under control you can live a totally normal life. There are various natural remedies for diabetes that will help you control your blood sugar level. Here are the top 10 home remedies for diabetes. Needless to say, you also need to consult a doctor for proper diagnosis and treatment. (Out of the 10, we have covered 3 highly effective home remedies in this video as well.) 1. Bitter Gourd Bitter gourd, also known as bitter melon, can be helpful for controlling diabetes due to its blood glucose lowering effects. It tends to influence the glucose metabolism all over your body rather than a particular organ or tissue. It helps increase pancreatic insulin secretion and prevents insulin resistance. Thus, bitter gourd is beneficial for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. However, it cannot be used to entirely replace insulin treatment. Drink some bitter gourd juice on an empty stomach each morning. First remove the seeds of two to three bitter gourds and use a juicer to extract the juice. Add some water and then drink it. Follow this treatment daily in the morning for at least two months. Also, you can include one dish made of bitter gourd daily in your diet. 2. Cinnamon Powdered cinnamon has the ability to lower blood sug Continue reading >>

What The Yuck: Do Sugar Cravings Signal Diabetes?

What The Yuck: Do Sugar Cravings Signal Diabetes?

Too embarrassed to ask your doctor about sex, body quirks, or the latest celeb health fad? In a regular feature and a new book, "What the Yuck?!," Health magazine medical editor Dr. Roshini Raj tackles your most personal and provocative questions. Send 'em to Dr. Raj at [email protected] Q: I've been craving sweets lately - could that mean I have diabetes? A: Nope. Craving sugar is not one of the symptoms of diabetes, or hyperglycemia (too much blood glucose). Symptoms to look for are frequent urination, excessive thirst, fatigue, weight loss, and blurry vision. If you skip meals often you may be experiencing hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. When your blood sugar starts to dip, you naturally long for a sugary snack to get it back up. But the body processes sugar fast, so the energy surge quickly wears off and you're left craving another cookie. Another common culprit? Low levels of serotonin, the brain chemical responsible for making us feel happy. If you have chronically low levels, your sugar yen could be your body's attempt to fix the problem - studies suggest that sugar increases the absorption of the amino acid tryptophan, which the body uses to make serotonin. The good news: You can break the cravings cycle. First, stick to three or more healthy meals a day - no skipping! Blowing off a meal can cause your blood sugar to drop and your body to seek a solution - like a hit of chocolate or pint of coffee ice cream. Instead, choose good-news fare that keeps you satisfied. Take a test to see how well you're managing your diabetes And when you've just gotta have a little something sweet, just go right ahead. If you are at a healthy weight and not under a doctor's instructions to limit your sugar intake, there's really no reason you can't indulge - in moderation, o Continue reading >>

Tiredness And Diabetes

Tiredness And Diabetes

Tweet Many people with diabetes will describe themselves as feeling tired, lethargic or fatigued at times. It could be a result of stress, hard work or a lack of a decent night’s sleep but it could also be related to having too high or too low blood glucose levels. Tiredness as a symptom of diabetes Regular tiredness, particularly tiredness following meals, is a common symptom of diabetes. Read more on the symptoms of diabetes What causes people with diabetes to be tired? Two common reasons for tiredness or lethargy are having too high or too low blood sugar levels. In both cases, the tiredness is the result of having an imbalance between one’s level of blood glucose and the amount or effectiveness of circulating insulin. If you feel tired during the day, despite having slept well, it could be a result of either high or low sugar levels. It is best to test your blood glucose levels to see whether the tiredness is indeed a result of having high or low sugar levels. This is particularly important for people on insulin. Read about the recommended blood glucose levels ranges Tiredness and high blood sugar levels Blood glucose levels go high when there is either insufficient insulin (typically in the case of type 1 diabetes) or the insulin is not working effectively enough (typically in type 2 diabetes). To provide us with energy, insulin is needed to transport glucose from blood into our cells to be used for energy. When there is not enough insulin, or the insulin isn’t working effectively, it means the sugar in our blood cannot get into our cells and therefore our cells do not receive the energy they need. As a result, we feel tired. Managing tiredness and high blood sugar after meals If tiredness is accompanied by high blood glucose levels after meals, it can indica Continue reading >>

Find Out If An Underlying Metabolic Disorder Is Causing Your Fatigue

Find Out If An Underlying Metabolic Disorder Is Causing Your Fatigue

Anyone who is overworked or not getting enough sleep at night can feel tired towards the end of the day. Add the daily stresses of family, kids, commuting, and work and it is not surprising that some days we just feel exhausted and ready for bed long before it is time. In mild cases of an afternoon slump, a good nights' sleep and eating healthier foods can usually resolve the symptoms, but not all afternoon slump symptoms are so easily addressed. For a growing percentage of those who suffer severe afternoon slump, extreme fatigue could be a warning sign of a serious metabolic disorder. Severe symptoms include a profound and intense desire to sleep, muscle fatigue, sweating, the shakes, headaches, changes in vision, or any combination of these symptoms. These symptoms are not signs of "normal" sluggishness but are often signs of pre-diabetes, type 2 diabetes, or insulin resistance. Sitting Disease As more employees have become sedentary, the number of desk workers who develop "Sitting Disease" is on the rise. Sitting disease is a disorder that puts workers at an increased risk of pre-diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and for cardiovascular problems. Experts reported that even people who sit for extended periods but regularly hit the gym are at risk. Exercise in itself, though obviously critical to our bodies overall, doesn't seem to counter the damaging effects of all this time spent seated. There are many reasons people develop a sluggish feeling in the afternoon (and for some, the "afternoon" slump occurs in mid-morning.) But when symptoms worsen or become severe enough that they decrease your ability to complete tasks, you may want to seek advice from a physician to rule out certain health problems. Pre-Diabetes and Insulin Resistance Pre-diabetes is a condition in which bod Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a “pre-diagnosis” of diabetes—you can think of it as a warning sign. It’s when your blood glucose level (blood sugar level) is higher than normal, but it’s not high enough to be considered diabetes. Prediabetes is an indication that you could develop type 2 diabetes if you don’t make some lifestyle changes. But here's the good news: . Eating healthy food, losing weight and staying at a healthy weight, and being physically active can help you bring your blood glucose level back into the normal range. Diabetes develops very gradually, so when you’re in the prediabetes stage—when your blood glucose level is higher than it should be—you may not have any symptoms at all. You may, however, notice that: you’re hungrier than normal you’re losing weight, despite eating more you’re thirstier than normal you have to go to the bathroom more frequently you’re more tired than usual All of those are typical symptoms associated with diabetes, so if you’re in the early stages of diabetes, you may notice them. Prediabetes develops when your body begins to have trouble using the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells via the bloodstream. In pre-diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or it doesn’t use it well (that’s called insulin resistance). If you don’t have enough insulin or if you’re insulin resistant, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps prediabetes. Researchers aren’t sure what exactly causes the insulin process to go awry in some people. There are several risk factors, though, that make it more likely that you’ll develop pre-diabetes. These are Continue reading >>

Fatigue After Eating? Reasons Why You Feel Tired After You Eat

Fatigue After Eating? Reasons Why You Feel Tired After You Eat

Many people experience fatigue after eating, especially when they’ve enjoyed a large lunch or dinner, but why do you feel tired after you eat? Keep reading to learn what causes fatigue after eating, and how you can prevent the excessive sleepiness from hitting you after a meal. Fatigue after eating causes You’ve just polished off a great lunch and are now feeling your energy wane and your eyes getting heavy. It happens to many of us, though few people actually know why they experience fatigue after eating. Find out a few possible causes for this sudden tiredness below. Reactive hypoglycemia: After a meal full of carbohydrates, you may experience reactive hypoglycemia, which leaves you feeling extremely fatigued after eating and may also lead to headaches, irritability, and light-headedness. This occurs because the excess of carbohydrates cause your insulin production to spike and raise your blood glucose. When you are finished digesting, your blood glucose levels drop dramatically, resulting in a sugar crash. Tryptophan: Tryptophan increases the production of serotonin, the neurotransmitter responsible for mood, sleep, and regulating bowel movements. Consuming foods high in tryptophan causes a rise in insulin leaving you feeling drowsy after your meal. Alkaline tide: Alkaline tide occurs during the first two hours of digestion and raises the blood’s pH level. The digestion process produces an alkaline that is released into the blood plasma of the stomach and makes the blood from the stomach more alkaline than the blood travelling to it during digestion. Allocation of resources: The theory that blood and oxygen are allocated to the digestive system in the same way they are to the muscles when working out has not been scientifically backed, but could explain the fat Continue reading >>

Regaining Your Energy With Type 2 Diabetes: Tips To Prevent Fatigue

Regaining Your Energy With Type 2 Diabetes: Tips To Prevent Fatigue

No, it's not your imagination: Taking care of yourself when you have type 2 diabetes can be exhausting. Diabetes-related fatigue is common, and you may be feeling it from a variety of sources — your type 2 diabetes symptoms themselves, exhaustion from the responsibilities of managing diabetes daily, ineffective diabetes management, or even from other underlying conditions. Understanding Diabetes-Related Fatigue There are strong associations between diabetes and testosterone levels, kidney disease, and other health complications, all of which can cause you to become very tired, says Ronald Tamler, MD, medical director of the Mount Sinai Clinical Diabetes Institute at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. There’s also a link between diabetes and depression, he adds, and depression is a common cause of extreme fatigue. According to a study published in June 2014 in the journal Current Diabetes Report, depressive symptoms affect up to one-third of people with diabetes. The research also found that depression not only impairs quality of life but also adds to the difficulties experienced in diabetes self-management. "The research highlights a wide range of potential explanations for the association between diabetes and depression, which include having a sedentary lifestyle, eating a diet high in refined sugars, sleeping poorly, and experiencing brain dysfunction due to low and high blood sugars, as well as chronic inflammation that is associated with diabetes," says David Lam, MD, associate director of the Mount Sinai Diabetes Center at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Other causes of fatigue from diabetes include cells being deprived of sugar, high blood sugar, dehydration from increased urination, loss of calories, and sleep apnea. Graham McMahon, bachelor of med Continue reading >>

The Weight: Caregiver Fatigue And Diabetes

The Weight: Caregiver Fatigue And Diabetes

8.8K When your kid's life is on the line, caregiving is a 24 hour job. What do you do when that job wears you down? Happy Holidays! Folks is taking a break until January 2nd. In the meantime, enjoy this story from our archives. Originally published on November 16, it is one of our favorite pieces from 2017. It’s 2:14 in the morning and a high-pitched beeping is coming out of an iPhone next to my bed. I groggily stand up, trudge upstairs, and save my son’s life again. My son Henry has type 1 diabetes. It’s an incurable autoimmune condition that, if managed well, won’t have a significant impact on his quality of life. But managing it well presents its own challenges for my wife and I. The thing with diabetes is that there are two dangers. If his blood sugar goes high, it’s not an immediate threat. Too much of that will cause his eyes to fail and his organs to shut down, but we catch that kind of thing pretty quickly and he’s very responsive to insulin. But if it goes low– and keeps falling–it can result in him falling into a coma and dying. When he goes low, he typically loses 50% of his brain functionality, meaning that he’s not always capable of treating it himself. It happens all the time. And his sugar can drop really fast. We’ve been out swimming or hiking and he’s plummeted from the mid-80s to the mid-40s in ten minutes. Once he was at school and he dropped so precipitously that he wasn’t coherent enough to take sugar by mouth. The staff had to give him the Glucagon, an injection of sugar that will rapidly spike his blood glucose back up to safe levels. That’s a big needle, a scary needle, and it goes right into the muscle. So we have a device called a continuous glucose monitor, a little needle implanted in his arm, attached to a Bluetooth Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Make You Tired And Sleepy?

Does Diabetes Make You Tired And Sleepy?

Diabetes is known to cause a lot of complications in your body. Tiredness and sleepiness in diabetes is the result of all such complications. In this article, we shall try to analyze the reasons why diabetes leads to diabetes fatigue. So, come and join us in the article as we try to explore the answer to the question “Does Diabetes Make You Tired and Sleepy?” Meaning of Diabetes Fatigue? When you are a diabetic patient, you tend to have a feeling of extreme tiredness so much so that it negatively affects your day to day life. A few symptoms of diabetic tiredness include the following: A headache and irritation Blurred vision Poor concentration and poor memory Dizziness What Causes Tiredness in Diabetes? When you are a patient of diabetes, there are several changes that are experienced by your blood. Your blood flow tends to become very slow as the blood gets thicker, like a maple syrup. Due to this, the blood does not reach to the inner cells in an appropriate manner to give enough oxygen and energy to different body parts and organs in the body. This results in tiredness and you tend to feel sleepy at all times. Another reason for tiredness caused in the diabetic patients is that the condition leads to inflammation. This acts as a sign to the brain that it needs to take some rest and this process causes the fatigue amongst all the people who suffer from diabetes. Finally, diabetes is known to give rise to a host of complications in its patients. People often experience the lack of red blood cells in their body. This again leads to tiredness. Other complications such as kidney failure, heart-related conditions, as well as damage to various body nerves cause tiredness in the people who have diabetes. Fatigue is also caused due to very high or very low blood glucose l Continue reading >>

How To Curb Hunger At Night With Type 2 Diabetes

How To Curb Hunger At Night With Type 2 Diabetes

Whenever I meet with patients for the first time, I always ask them to “take me through a typical day” describing the foods they eat and meal patterns they follow. Often I will hear something like this: “Well I’m not of a breakfast person…” “So is the first time you eat, lunch?” “…well sometimes I don’t eat lunch either.” “If you do eat lunch, what will it be?” “Oh a sandwich or something quick…maybe some chips.” “Ok, so how about dinner?” “A meat, a vegetable and a potato…or sometimes something quick like a pizza.” “Ok, do you snack after dinner?” “Well, see that’s my problem…” Touche. It certainly is a problem, especially when they go on to describe what the evening snacking routine consists of. I’ll give you a hint: it’s not celery and carrot sticks. So what is the deal with eating at night? How can we avoid nighttime eating? Or more importantly, nighttime overeating? I've got plenty of tips for you to consider. 3 Reasons NOT To Munch Out At Night First things first. Whatever you've heard about not eating after a certain time (I’ve heard 5 pm, 6 pm, 8 pm) because everything turns into fat, is just not supported by research. While it IS the case that, generally speaking, the body is more efficient at burning calories when it needs them (ie during the day), compared to when we're sedentary, the rule about a specific time of day is not substantiated by research. That said, I strongly discourage eating much in the evening for the following reasons: 1. Most people make relatively poor food choices in the evening. This is likely due to poor inhibition – we are less likely to make smart choices as our bodies and minds fatigue at the end of the day. Or it's often due to making up for insufficient food intake thr Continue reading >>

Fatigue

Fatigue

Fatigue affects an estimated 80% of all sarcoidosis patients, even when other symptoms are well controlled. For some, this symptom can be persistent and disabling, affecting their quality of life and ability to complete daily functions. If you suffer from fatigue, you are not alone. Some sarcoidosis patients are so debilitated by it that they are unable to work. Others are underemployed or feel unable to do activities they used to enjoy because of their symptoms. To make things worse, many patients are not taken seriously by family, friends, and healthcare providers because they appear to be healthy. FSR recognizes this to be a huge barrier to wellness that needs to be recognized and treated with the same compassion given to those who are battling visible illnesses. Luckily, this is an area of sarcoidosis which has been studied more thoroughly in recent years and there are steps you and your doctors can take to investigate and treat the symptoms. There are a couple considerations your doctor will take into account when assessing your fatigue: Is your disease currently under control? Patients who have active inflammation and associated organ dysfunction are likely to experience fatigue. This may result both from their disease and as a side effect to common treatments. Corticosteroids, for example, are a first line therapy for sarcoidosis whose side effects include weight gain, diabetes, and sleep apnea that can worsen fatigue. If your disease is not under control, it is important to first work with your doctor(s) to determine the best course of treatment to address the inflammation in your body. If you have just been diagnosed with sarcoidosis, you may benefit from finding a physician with familiarity with sarcoidosis in our searchable provider directory. We also suggest Continue reading >>

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