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How To Fight Diabetes Fatigue

The 14 Most Common Causes Of Fatigue

The 14 Most Common Causes Of Fatigue

Fatigue Cause No. 1: Not Enough Sleep Lack of sleep causes fatigue, and can have a negative impact on your overall health and well-being. Aim for seven to eight hours of sleep every night. Go to bed at the same time every night, and wake up at the same time each morning to keep yourself on schedule. Make sure your mattress is comfortable, the room is sufficiently dark and cool, and your cell phone and television is off. If you are still unable to sleep after making changes to your sleep environment, consult a doctor to rule out a sleep disorder. Fatigue Cause No. 2: Sleep Apnea Sleep apnea is a serious sleep disorder where sufferers briefly stop breathing for short periods during sleep. Most people are not aware this is happening, but it can cause loud snoring, and daytime fatigue. Being overweight, smoking, and drinking alcohol can all worsen the symptoms of sleep apnea. Lose weight if you are overweight, quit smoking, and avoid alcohol. Your doctor may also prescribe a CPAP device, which helps keep your airways open while sleeping. Fatigue Cause No. 3: Not Enough Fuel What you eat (or don't eat) can affect how much you do or don't sleep. Not eating enough, or eating foods that are not nutritious can cause fatigue. If you eat foods that cause spikes in your blood sugar, as soon as those sugars drop, you feel fatigued. Eat a balanced diet, complete with fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and protein. Avoid or limit junk foods high in sugar and fat. Fatigue Cause No. 4: Anemia Iron deficiency anemia is a common cause of fatigue in women. Red blood cells (pictured) carry oxygen throughout the body, and iron is a main component of these cells. Without enough iron, your body may not be getting the oxygen it needs for energy. Women who experience heavy menstrual periods, or a Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sleep Apnea: How Sleep Affects Blood Glucose And Diabetes

Diabetes And Sleep Apnea: How Sleep Affects Blood Glucose And Diabetes

Treat Apnea to Control Diabetes? Sleep apnea can affect diabetes control in many ways. Struggling for air may put your body into fight-or-flight mode, releasing stress hormones that can raise blood glucose levels. If you're tired, you won't want to take that walk around the block after lunch. While you're at work, you might keep snacking to stay awake. But can treating sleep apnea lead to better blood glucose control? Arvind Cavale, M.D., an endocrinologist in Feasterville, Pennsylvania, refers about 60 percent of his patients with type 2 diabetes for sleep studies. Cavale says treating sleep apnea reduces insulin resistance, improves alertness and motivation, and leads to more stable blood glucose levels. "We use correction of sleep apnea as a tool in controlling diabetes," he says. Does This Sound Like You? This is not a happy scenario: You're soooo tired. As soon as your head hits the pillow, you're asleep. But a little while later, someone nudges you awake. You go back to sleep. Just as you get into a deep sleep, you're nudged again. Sleep ... nudge ... sleep ... nudge. All night long. The next day, you might wake up with a headache, snap at your family over breakfast, have trouble concentrating at work. Irritability. Car accidents. Depression. High blood pressure. All because of those nightmarish nudges throughout the night. If you have obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA), you're getting those nudges. It's your body fighting for air. And sleep apnea may be one explanation for difficulty in controlling blood glucose and blood pressure levels. With OSA, something partly or completely blocks your airway when you're asleep. It could be your tongue. It could be the soft tissues in the back of your throat relaxing too much. Snoring is a sign that air is being forced p Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Insulin Resistance: Tired After Lunch?

Symptoms Of Insulin Resistance: Tired After Lunch?

When the clock strikes 2:00 in the afternoon, does fatigue drop on you like a heavy load? The time frame over the couple hours after lunch can send the best of us down for the count. If you notice that you are so exhausted you want to curl up and take nap after your midday meal, you may be experiencing your blood sugar levels shifting. For many people, eating a higher carbohydrate meal, like a sub sandwich or a pasta dish, or even sushi can really knock the wind out of their sails, because their blood sugar will spike and then drop after the body releases insulin. If you find that you are tired almost every day around the same time after lunch, then you may be experiencing a symptom of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is a condition where your body doesn't process carbohydrates and sugars like it is supposed to. Insulin is a fat-storing hormone, and insulin resistance simply means your cells don't respond like they should to this hormone. Insulin is the key that unlocks the cell door to let glucose inside. With insulin resistance, the insulin key isn't fitting properly and so your body will store the glucose that cannot get inside cells as fat. This condition of insulin resistance can make it extremely difficult to lose weight, and insulin causes your body to become very eager to store fat. People can have varying degrees of insulin resistance, some more severe than others. When you have insulin resistance for a long time, it almost always leads to type 2 diabetes. The good news is, insulin resistance is easily reversible with the right type of meal plan and nutrition. At Cederquist Medical Wellness Center, we can determine the level of your insulin resistance, and formulate a customized program to first help reverse your insulin resistance, and second, to help yo Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a “pre-diagnosis” of diabetes—you can think of it as a warning sign. It’s when your blood glucose level (blood sugar level) is higher than normal, but it’s not high enough to be considered diabetes. Prediabetes is an indication that you could develop type 2 diabetes if you don’t make some lifestyle changes. But here's the good news: . Eating healthy food, losing weight and staying at a healthy weight, and being physically active can help you bring your blood glucose level back into the normal range. Diabetes develops very gradually, so when you’re in the prediabetes stage—when your blood glucose level is higher than it should be—you may not have any symptoms at all. You may, however, notice that: you’re hungrier than normal you’re losing weight, despite eating more you’re thirstier than normal you have to go to the bathroom more frequently you’re more tired than usual All of those are typical symptoms associated with diabetes, so if you’re in the early stages of diabetes, you may notice them. Prediabetes develops when your body begins to have trouble using the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells via the bloodstream. In pre-diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or it doesn’t use it well (that’s called insulin resistance). If you don’t have enough insulin or if you’re insulin resistant, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps prediabetes. Researchers aren’t sure what exactly causes the insulin process to go awry in some people. There are several risk factors, though, that make it more likely that you’ll develop pre-diabetes. These are Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Multivitamin For Diabetics?

What Is The Best Multivitamin For Diabetics?

In the United States, about one in every 11 people has diabetes. This is a sobering statistic, especially considering that out of these 29.1 million people, a quarter don’t even know they have the disease. If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, or suspect that you may be diabetic, it’s far from the end of the world. Today, there are treatments that will benefit you greatly, lifestyle changes that ensure a normal life, and multivitamins that help restore your energy and vigor. Of these treatments you might ask, “What is the best multivitamin for diabetics?” Well, let’s discuss some of what you should look for in a diabetic multivitamin. Being overweight is the leading cause of type II diabetes in the U.S., and as a person that has struggled with their weight in the past, I know how easy it is to overeat. One of the primary treatments for managing diabetes is to strictly monitor your diet and calorie intake. Eating less is imperative for managing this condition, but that doesn’t mean that we can have to cut important diabetes-fighting vitamins from our lifestyles as well. The primary power of multivitamins for the treatment of diabetes is the fact that often times they can help supplement us from a dietary perspective when we are forced to eat less. Vitamins are needed to boost the effectiveness of your body’s enzymes by acting as coenzymes. Each vitamin provides a different boost to the way your body deals with weight loss, fatigue, or infection. B vitamins like folic acid reduce homocysteine levels and may reduce cardiovascular risk (source), so a supplement that has these types of vitamins are generally very helpful for managing the progressive nature of the disease. Vitamin C on the other hand, reduces the amounts of the damaging sugar that forms in t Continue reading >>

The Weight: Caregiver Fatigue And Diabetes

The Weight: Caregiver Fatigue And Diabetes

8.8K When your kid's life is on the line, caregiving is a 24 hour job. What do you do when that job wears you down? Happy Holidays! Folks is taking a break until January 2nd. In the meantime, enjoy this story from our archives. Originally published on November 16, it is one of our favorite pieces from 2017. It’s 2:14 in the morning and a high-pitched beeping is coming out of an iPhone next to my bed. I groggily stand up, trudge upstairs, and save my son’s life again. My son Henry has type 1 diabetes. It’s an incurable autoimmune condition that, if managed well, won’t have a significant impact on his quality of life. But managing it well presents its own challenges for my wife and I. The thing with diabetes is that there are two dangers. If his blood sugar goes high, it’s not an immediate threat. Too much of that will cause his eyes to fail and his organs to shut down, but we catch that kind of thing pretty quickly and he’s very responsive to insulin. But if it goes low– and keeps falling–it can result in him falling into a coma and dying. When he goes low, he typically loses 50% of his brain functionality, meaning that he’s not always capable of treating it himself. It happens all the time. And his sugar can drop really fast. We’ve been out swimming or hiking and he’s plummeted from the mid-80s to the mid-40s in ten minutes. Once he was at school and he dropped so precipitously that he wasn’t coherent enough to take sugar by mouth. The staff had to give him the Glucagon, an injection of sugar that will rapidly spike his blood glucose back up to safe levels. That’s a big needle, a scary needle, and it goes right into the muscle. So we have a device called a continuous glucose monitor, a little needle implanted in his arm, attached to a Bluetooth Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Make You Tired And Sleepy?

Does Diabetes Make You Tired And Sleepy?

Diabetes is known to cause a lot of complications in your body. Tiredness and sleepiness in diabetes is the result of all such complications. In this article, we shall try to analyze the reasons why diabetes leads to diabetes fatigue. So, come and join us in the article as we try to explore the answer to the question “Does Diabetes Make You Tired and Sleepy?” Meaning of Diabetes Fatigue? When you are a diabetic patient, you tend to have a feeling of extreme tiredness so much so that it negatively affects your day to day life. A few symptoms of diabetic tiredness include the following: A headache and irritation Blurred vision Poor concentration and poor memory Dizziness What Causes Tiredness in Diabetes? When you are a patient of diabetes, there are several changes that are experienced by your blood. Your blood flow tends to become very slow as the blood gets thicker, like a maple syrup. Due to this, the blood does not reach to the inner cells in an appropriate manner to give enough oxygen and energy to different body parts and organs in the body. This results in tiredness and you tend to feel sleepy at all times. Another reason for tiredness caused in the diabetic patients is that the condition leads to inflammation. This acts as a sign to the brain that it needs to take some rest and this process causes the fatigue amongst all the people who suffer from diabetes. Finally, diabetes is known to give rise to a host of complications in its patients. People often experience the lack of red blood cells in their body. This again leads to tiredness. Other complications such as kidney failure, heart-related conditions, as well as damage to various body nerves cause tiredness in the people who have diabetes. Fatigue is also caused due to very high or very low blood glucose l Continue reading >>

Cause Of Fatigue For Days After Exercise In Diabetics

Cause Of Fatigue For Days After Exercise In Diabetics

So when a person with diabetes is still suffering from fatigue even days after exercise, there’s a particular situation going on. “The main cause of fatigue after exercise that lasts is being low on muscle glycogen stores,” explains Sheri Colberg, PhD, Professor Emerita, Exercise Science, Old Dominion University, founder of Diabetes Motion, and one of the world’s leading experts on diabetes and exercise. “Depending on how much of these carbohydrate stores that you use up during an exercise session, it can take 24 to 48 hours to fully replenish them — assuming you’re eating a diet with enough carbohydrates in it. “If you are on a low-carb diet [as many diabetics are], it can take much longer for glycogen to be repleted, and that can make people feel tired when they try to do any type of activity. “If you’re eating enough carbs (usually at least 40 percent of total calories coming from carbs when you’re training regularly is required for optimal recovery), you also have to keep your blood glucose in good control for glycogen restoration to occur in a timely manner.” Causes of Longer Lasting Fatigue in Diabetics After Exercise “Thus, longer lasting fatigue can be related to: 1) not enough carbohydrate intake after workouts so glycogen levels remain lower; 2) poorly managed blood glucose levels (which also can impact glycogen restoration); or possibly 3) low iron levels (anemia).” It’s important to check your blood sugar at various points in the days following your exercise sessions to see if there’s a predictable depletion. A diabetic who works out should have a convenient source of carbohydrate with them so that it can be taken right after the exercise or soon after. For hardcore weight workouts, a healthy carb source may need to be taken e Continue reading >>

Tiredness & Fatigue

Tiredness & Fatigue

Fatigue is the feeling of being tired all the time, even after you have rested. Most of the time fatigue is your bodies way of saying "slow down". Tiredness and fatigue can be a sign that some part of your life is out of balance. It is unusual for tiredness on its own to be a sign that there is anything medically wrong. However, if you are getting enough sleep and generally have a healthy, low-stress lifestyle and are still experiencing fatigue. talk to your doctor. It could be a symptom of an underlying medical problem such as iron deficiency or thyroid problems. Key points One in 5 people feel tired most of the time and 1 in 10 people experience ongoing tiredness. Women tend to feel more tired than men. See your doctor if your tiredness is combined with any of the following: heavy periods, weight loss, a change in bowel habits, hair loss or extreme thirst. Blood and urine tests can rule out medical reasons such as anaemia, diabetes or underactive thyroid gland. Once a medical reason has been ruled out, try to identify stressors or events in your life that may have triggered or be contributing to your tiredness. Fatigue is the feeling of being tired all the time. It is different from the feeling of sleepiness you get at bedtime or tiredness you have after a late night. Fatigue is the sense of having such low energy that you have little or no motivation to do your regular daily activities. Fatigue may be physical (in your body) or psychological (in your mind). People at greatest risk of fatigue include: women people with low income people with physical or mental illness. Most of the time fatigue is not due to just one thing, but rather to a combination of factors. Fatigue is an important body response to life stressors such as: emotional distress poor diet physical exer Continue reading >>

Reactive Hypoglycemia

Reactive Hypoglycemia

Reactive hypoglycemia, postprandial hypoglycemia, or sugar crash is a term describing recurrent episodes of symptomatic hypoglycemia occurring within 4 hours[1] after a high carbohydrate meal in people who do not have diabetes.[2] The condition is related to homeostatic systems utilised by the body to control blood sugar levels. It is variously described as a sense of tiredness, lethargy, irritation, or hangover, although the effects can be less if one has undertaken a lot of physical activity within the next few hours after consumption. The alleged mechanism for the feeling of a crash is correlated with an abnormally rapid rise in blood glucose after eating. This normally leads to insulin secretion (known as an insulin spike), which in turn initiates rapid glucose uptake by tissues either accumulating it as glycogen or utilizing it for energy production. The consequent fall in blood glucose is indicated as the reason for the "sugar crash".[3]. A deeper cause might be hysteresis effect of insulin action, i.e., the effect of insulin is still prominent even if both plasma glucose and insulin levels were already low, causing a plasma glucose level eventually much lower than the baseline level[4]. Sugar crashes are not to be confused with the after-effects of consuming large amounts of protein, which produces fatigue akin to a sugar crash, but are instead the result of the body prioritising the digestion of ingested food.[5] The prevalence of this condition is difficult to ascertain because a number of stricter or looser definitions have been used. It is recommended that the term reactive hypoglycemia be reserved for the pattern of postprandial hypoglycemia which meets the Whipple criteria (symptoms correspond to measurably low glucose and are relieved by raising the glucos Continue reading >>

How To Fight Fatigue

How To Fight Fatigue

Exhausted; bone-weary; shattered - it sometimes seems there are nearly as many terms for tiredness as there are people suffering from it. It can be hard to know when it's down to the stresses and strains of modern life and when you need to seek help. Read on to find out what might be causing your symptoms, and how you can fight it. Good news or bad? On the up side, 70-80% of people who see their doctor about tiredness don't have a physical illness to account for it. On the downside, the tiredness is still real and you'll need to work on overcoming it with these top tips. Physical causes of tiredness Lots of illnesses can cause tiredness. Fortunately, many of them are easily treated. Along with tiredness, other symptoms might point you and your doctor in the direction of a treatable cause. The cause: anaemia Symptoms: often heavy periods; light-headedness/feeling faint Treatment: replacement of iron/vitamin B12 (depending on levels in your body); finding and treating the cause of blood loss or your body not making enough red blood cells The cause: underactive thyroid Symptoms: weight gain without eating more; constipation; dry hair and skin; feeling the cold. Treatment: tablets taken for life, with annual blood tests to check your thyroid levels (more often until your doctor has found the right dose for you). The cause: heart failure (your heart isn't pumping blood efficiently round your system). Symptoms: shortness of breath on exercising and lying flat; swollen ankles. The cause: type 2 diabetes Symptoms: feeling thirsty; needing to pass water often; weight loss; minor infections (type 1 diabetes can also cause all these symptoms, but they're likely to come on more quickly and be much more severe). Treatment: diet and lifestyle changes; managing your weight; medication Continue reading >>

Pcos And Fatigue: Causes & Tips For Relief

Pcos And Fatigue: Causes & Tips For Relief

Tired of always being tired? You’re not alone. We live in a fast-paced world where many of us embrace fatigue as a part of life. But when you are a woman with PCOS, fatigue can take a whole new meaning. For many women living with PCOS, fatigue sets in even before the day can begin. You’re too tired to get out of bed….you’re too tired for your morning jog…you’re too tired to even make a healthy breakfast. And you tiredness only worsens as the day progresses. So what’s going on? Let’s find out the connection between PCOS and fatigue, and can you do something about it? PCOS And Fatigue: What’s Going On? Hormonal imbalance lies at the very heart of PCOS. It also makes you more vulnerable to physical, mental and environmental stressors like a poor diet, lack of exercise, sleep deprivation and building up stress. If you suffer from PCOS, neglecting your own needs can manifest itself in the form of fatigue. That’s when your afternoon slump is more than just feeling sluggish. The hormonal imbalances going on in your body, coupled with stress, cause rapid changes in blood sugar and insulin levels. PCOS and fatigue may make you feel: Too tired to get out of bed in the mornings Extremely sleepy and tired by afternoon Suffer from shakes and sweating Have headaches, migraines, and weakness Experience vision changes Or a combination of all of the above Studies have found that approximately 50-70% of all women with PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) may have some degree of insulin resistance. With insulin dysfunction comes hyperinsulinemia wherein the body pumps out more and more insulin in an effort to normalize blood glucose levels. It’s this hyperinsulinemia and fluctuations in blood sugar that is the primary reason behind periods of profound fatigue in women Continue reading >>

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

The American Diabetes Association cites the following symptoms as indicative of high blood sugar: High blood glucose [Editor’s note: Duh] High levels of sugar in the urine Frequent urination Increased thirst And if high blood sugar goes untreated? “Hyperglycemia can be a serious problem if you don’t treat it, so it’s important to treat as soon as you detect it. If you fail to treat hyperglycemia, a condition called ketoacidosis (diabetic coma) could occur. Ketoacidosis develops when your body doesn’t have enough insulin. Without insulin, your body can’t use glucose for fuel, so your body breaks down fats to use for energy. When your body breaks down fats, waste products called ketones are produced. Your body cannot tolerate large amounts of ketones and will try to get rid of them through the urine. Unfortunately, the body cannot release all the ketones and they build up in your blood, which can lead to ketoacidosis.” – ADA website But what does a high blood sugar feel like? Because when you see someone who is working through an elevated blood sugar, they may not look terribly out of sorts. But what is happening inside of them is real, and plays out in a myriad of ways for every person with diabetes. I’ve tried to write about it several times, but each high is different, and affects me in different ways: “It’s a thick feeling in the base of your brain, like someone’s cracked open your head and replaced your gray matter with sticky jam. I find myself zoning out and staring at things, and my eyeballs feel dry and like they’re tethered to my head by frayed ropes instead of optic nerves. Everything is slow and heavy and whipped with heavy cream.” – Oh, High! “There’s something about a high blood sugar that makes my body feel weighted down, l Continue reading >>

Fatigue After Eating? Reasons Why You Feel Tired After You Eat

Fatigue After Eating? Reasons Why You Feel Tired After You Eat

Many people experience fatigue after eating, especially when they’ve enjoyed a large lunch or dinner, but why do you feel tired after you eat? Keep reading to learn what causes fatigue after eating, and how you can prevent the excessive sleepiness from hitting you after a meal. Fatigue after eating causes You’ve just polished off a great lunch and are now feeling your energy wane and your eyes getting heavy. It happens to many of us, though few people actually know why they experience fatigue after eating. Find out a few possible causes for this sudden tiredness below. Reactive hypoglycemia: After a meal full of carbohydrates, you may experience reactive hypoglycemia, which leaves you feeling extremely fatigued after eating and may also lead to headaches, irritability, and light-headedness. This occurs because the excess of carbohydrates cause your insulin production to spike and raise your blood glucose. When you are finished digesting, your blood glucose levels drop dramatically, resulting in a sugar crash. Tryptophan: Tryptophan increases the production of serotonin, the neurotransmitter responsible for mood, sleep, and regulating bowel movements. Consuming foods high in tryptophan causes a rise in insulin leaving you feeling drowsy after your meal. Alkaline tide: Alkaline tide occurs during the first two hours of digestion and raises the blood’s pH level. The digestion process produces an alkaline that is released into the blood plasma of the stomach and makes the blood from the stomach more alkaline than the blood travelling to it during digestion. Allocation of resources: The theory that blood and oxygen are allocated to the digestive system in the same way they are to the muscles when working out has not been scientifically backed, but could explain the fat Continue reading >>

Beat Fatigue: Home Remedies To Feel More Energized

Beat Fatigue: Home Remedies To Feel More Energized

Feeling bone-tired, as so many people do, is disheartening, demoralizing, and frustrating. You want to race like a thoroughbred, but you feel stuck in the mud. Half the time youre struggling just to stay awake. Life is passing by, and you cant keep up with it. Willpower doesnt work, so what does? Sometimes your best bet is a total energy makeover changes in the way you eat, drink, and exercise. Certain supplements can also help. Or maybe your solution is simple: sleep, beautiful sleep. Of course, it wouldnt hurt to have your doctor test your blood for hypothyroidism, anemia , vitamin B12 deficiency, and other conditions that can cause fatigue. Often fatigue is accompanied by lack of motivation and low sex drive. A long list of medical conditions and lifestyle issues can contribute to fatigue, including lack of sleep, inadequate nutrition, flu, obesity, allergies , infections, anemia, alcohol abuse, hypothyroidism, heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and AIDS. For a quick pick-me-up, put two drops of peppermint oil on a tissue or handkerchief, hold it to your nose, and breathe deeply. If you have more time, try adding two drops of the oil to bathwater along with four drops of rosemary oil for an invigorating soak. Lie on your back and use pillows to prop your feet at a level higher than your head or, better yet, lie on an adjustable exercise bench or other surface that slants. In India, yogis fight fatigue through such practices by encouraging blood flow to the brain, which is thought to boost alertness. Continue reading >>

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