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How To Fight Diabetes Fatigue

How To Curb Hunger At Night With Type 2 Diabetes

How To Curb Hunger At Night With Type 2 Diabetes

Whenever I meet with patients for the first time, I always ask them to “take me through a typical day” describing the foods they eat and meal patterns they follow. Often I will hear something like this: “Well I’m not of a breakfast person…” “So is the first time you eat, lunch?” “…well sometimes I don’t eat lunch either.” “If you do eat lunch, what will it be?” “Oh a sandwich or something quick…maybe some chips.” “Ok, so how about dinner?” “A meat, a vegetable and a potato…or sometimes something quick like a pizza.” “Ok, do you snack after dinner?” “Well, see that’s my problem…” Touche. It certainly is a problem, especially when they go on to describe what the evening snacking routine consists of. I’ll give you a hint: it’s not celery and carrot sticks. So what is the deal with eating at night? How can we avoid nighttime eating? Or more importantly, nighttime overeating? I've got plenty of tips for you to consider. 3 Reasons NOT To Munch Out At Night First things first. Whatever you've heard about not eating after a certain time (I’ve heard 5 pm, 6 pm, 8 pm) because everything turns into fat, is just not supported by research. While it IS the case that, generally speaking, the body is more efficient at burning calories when it needs them (ie during the day), compared to when we're sedentary, the rule about a specific time of day is not substantiated by research. That said, I strongly discourage eating much in the evening for the following reasons: 1. Most people make relatively poor food choices in the evening. This is likely due to poor inhibition – we are less likely to make smart choices as our bodies and minds fatigue at the end of the day. Or it's often due to making up for insufficient food intake thr Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Fatigue: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes And Fatigue: Everything You Need To Know

What exactly is fatigue? Is it just being tired after working a long week or not getting enough sleep? The answer is no. Fatigue is excessive tiredness that makes carrying out simple tasks difficult and interferes with one or more life functions. Sounds terrible, doesn’t it? Well imagine having a chronic illness along with the fatigue. Diabetes and fatigue have a strong relationship, and it can make a person’s life very difficult. The following article will discuss the relationship, along with ways to beat and reduce the risk of living with diabetes and fatigue. What is diabetes fatigue? As it was mentioned above, diabetes fatigue is an extreme tiredness that individuals with diabetes can experience. It is a tiredness that disrupts a person’s life and makes it difficult to function. It is very common, and studies have shown that 85% of those with diabetes experience fatigue. Some signs of fatigue include: Dizziness Irritability Headache Inability to concentrate Problems remembering things Blurry vision Slowed reflexes and muscle weakness Is feeling fatigue a sign/symptom of diabetes? Feeling fatigued is definitely a symptom of diabetes. However, fatigue can also be a sign or symptom of many other diseases, so it is important that you talk to your doctor about any problems that you are having. I advise reading the following: Reactive hypoglycemia, a term used to define the crash that a person gets after eating a lot of sugar and carbs, can be an early sign of diabetes. In order for the body to use the sugars and carbs that are consumed for fuel, each molecule must be paired with insulin to get into the cell. If there isn’t enough insulin available, then the sugar molecules stay in the bloodstream and cause high blood sugar. What happens is that over time, eating Continue reading >>

Find Out If An Underlying Metabolic Disorder Is Causing Your Fatigue

Find Out If An Underlying Metabolic Disorder Is Causing Your Fatigue

Anyone who is overworked or not getting enough sleep at night can feel tired towards the end of the day. Add the daily stresses of family, kids, commuting, and work and it is not surprising that some days we just feel exhausted and ready for bed long before it is time. In mild cases of an afternoon slump, a good nights' sleep and eating healthier foods can usually resolve the symptoms, but not all afternoon slump symptoms are so easily addressed. For a growing percentage of those who suffer severe afternoon slump, extreme fatigue could be a warning sign of a serious metabolic disorder. Severe symptoms include a profound and intense desire to sleep, muscle fatigue, sweating, the shakes, headaches, changes in vision, or any combination of these symptoms. These symptoms are not signs of "normal" sluggishness but are often signs of pre-diabetes, type 2 diabetes, or insulin resistance. Sitting Disease As more employees have become sedentary, the number of desk workers who develop "Sitting Disease" is on the rise. Sitting disease is a disorder that puts workers at an increased risk of pre-diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and for cardiovascular problems. Experts reported that even people who sit for extended periods but regularly hit the gym are at risk. Exercise in itself, though obviously critical to our bodies overall, doesn't seem to counter the damaging effects of all this time spent seated. There are many reasons people develop a sluggish feeling in the afternoon (and for some, the "afternoon" slump occurs in mid-morning.) But when symptoms worsen or become severe enough that they decrease your ability to complete tasks, you may want to seek advice from a physician to rule out certain health problems. Pre-Diabetes and Insulin Resistance Pre-diabetes is a condition in which bod Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Multivitamin For Diabetics?

What Is The Best Multivitamin For Diabetics?

In the United States, about one in every 11 people has diabetes. This is a sobering statistic, especially considering that out of these 29.1 million people, a quarter don’t even know they have the disease. If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, or suspect that you may be diabetic, it’s far from the end of the world. Today, there are treatments that will benefit you greatly, lifestyle changes that ensure a normal life, and multivitamins that help restore your energy and vigor. Of these treatments you might ask, “What is the best multivitamin for diabetics?” Well, let’s discuss some of what you should look for in a diabetic multivitamin. Being overweight is the leading cause of type II diabetes in the U.S., and as a person that has struggled with their weight in the past, I know how easy it is to overeat. One of the primary treatments for managing diabetes is to strictly monitor your diet and calorie intake. Eating less is imperative for managing this condition, but that doesn’t mean that we can have to cut important diabetes-fighting vitamins from our lifestyles as well. The primary power of multivitamins for the treatment of diabetes is the fact that often times they can help supplement us from a dietary perspective when we are forced to eat less. Vitamins are needed to boost the effectiveness of your body’s enzymes by acting as coenzymes. Each vitamin provides a different boost to the way your body deals with weight loss, fatigue, or infection. B vitamins like folic acid reduce homocysteine levels and may reduce cardiovascular risk (source), so a supplement that has these types of vitamins are generally very helpful for managing the progressive nature of the disease. Vitamin C on the other hand, reduces the amounts of the damaging sugar that forms in t Continue reading >>

6 Signs Your Pet May Have Diabetes

6 Signs Your Pet May Have Diabetes

Diabetes is a glucose control problem that can affect both dogs and cats. A growing epidemic, raising awareness about diabetes is vital to identifying and treating the disorder early. Does My Pet Have Diabetes? Diabetes is a complex disease caused by either a lack of the hormone insulin or an inadequate response to insulin. Diabetes can develop gradually, over time, and the signs may not be apparent at first. There are a few signs to look for especially in older pets. 1. Extreme Thirst and Increased Urination The foremost clinical sign of diabetes is increased water consumption (“polydipsia”) and consequently increased urination (“polyuria”). Thirst is sometimes difficult to quantify. Is my dog drinking excessive amounts of water or just temporarily thirsty or hot? This must be evaluated over time and sometimes is vague in small dogs and cats. It’s easier to spot in large dogs, because their water bowl will empty quickly. The resulting urine will be diluted or clear, almost like water. 2. Increased Appetite and Weight Loss Dogs with diabetes will lose weight although may be still eating normally, or even appear hungrier than usual. That’s because the body can’t convert the food into energy – due to either a lack of insulin or insulin resistance. Since they are not getting energy from food, their body starts burning fat and muscle for energy, causing a reduction in overall body weight. 3. Chronic or Sudden Bouts of Fatigue Feeling fatigued or lethargic is also a sign of diabetes, and can be caused by blood sugar swings on both sides of the spectrum. When their blood sugar is high, it stops their body from getting the energy they need from food, so they are tired all the time. Blood sugar dips can cause sudden bouts of fatigue. 4. Depression and Vomiting A Continue reading >>

32 Home Remedies For Diabetes

32 Home Remedies For Diabetes

Each day in the United States, some 18 million people with diabetes walk a tightrope between too little sugar in the bloodstream and too much. Too little, which may come from a complication of medication, and they may quickly be overcome by dizziness, fatigue, headache, sweating, trembling, and, in severe cases, loss of consciousness and coma. Too much, which can happen after eating too much, especially if the person is older and overweight, and the person may experience weakness, fatigue, excessive thirst, labored breathing, and loss of consciousness. If diabetes is poorly controlled or left untreated, it may lead to blindness, kidney disease, blood vessel damage, infection, heart disease, nerve damage, high blood pressure, stroke, limb amputation, and coma. Because the initial symptoms (fatigue, weakness, frequent urination) are usually mild, about 30 percent of all people with diabetes do not realize that they have the disease. And that can have tragic consequences, because with early diagnosis and treatment, the chances of living a long and productive life are higher than if the disease creeps along until irreversible damage occurs. If you'd like some proof that diabetes is a disease you can live well with, consider the accomplishments of these prolific people with diabetes: jazz musician Dizzy Gillespie, singer Ella Fitzgerald, actress Mary Tyler Moore, and baseball Hall-of-Famer Jim "Catfish" Hunter. Even before treatment was as sophisticated as it is today, author Ernest Hemingway and inventor Thomas Edison, both of whom had diabetes, managed to leave their marks on the world. If you are one of the lucky ones whose diabetes has been diagnosed by a doctor, you probably have some idea of what has gone awry in your body. Basically, the disorder stems from a malfunct Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Make You Tired And Sleepy?

Does Diabetes Make You Tired And Sleepy?

Diabetes is known to cause a lot of complications in your body. Tiredness and sleepiness in diabetes is the result of all such complications. In this article, we shall try to analyze the reasons why diabetes leads to diabetes fatigue. So, come and join us in the article as we try to explore the answer to the question “Does Diabetes Make You Tired and Sleepy?” Meaning of Diabetes Fatigue? When you are a diabetic patient, you tend to have a feeling of extreme tiredness so much so that it negatively affects your day to day life. A few symptoms of diabetic tiredness include the following: A headache and irritation Blurred vision Poor concentration and poor memory Dizziness What Causes Tiredness in Diabetes? When you are a patient of diabetes, there are several changes that are experienced by your blood. Your blood flow tends to become very slow as the blood gets thicker, like a maple syrup. Due to this, the blood does not reach to the inner cells in an appropriate manner to give enough oxygen and energy to different body parts and organs in the body. This results in tiredness and you tend to feel sleepy at all times. Another reason for tiredness caused in the diabetic patients is that the condition leads to inflammation. This acts as a sign to the brain that it needs to take some rest and this process causes the fatigue amongst all the people who suffer from diabetes. Finally, diabetes is known to give rise to a host of complications in its patients. People often experience the lack of red blood cells in their body. This again leads to tiredness. Other complications such as kidney failure, heart-related conditions, as well as damage to various body nerves cause tiredness in the people who have diabetes. Fatigue is also caused due to very high or very low blood glucose l Continue reading >>

Fatigue

Fatigue

Fatigue affects an estimated 80% of all sarcoidosis patients, even when other symptoms are well controlled. For some, this symptom can be persistent and disabling, affecting their quality of life and ability to complete daily functions. If you suffer from fatigue, you are not alone. Some sarcoidosis patients are so debilitated by it that they are unable to work. Others are underemployed or feel unable to do activities they used to enjoy because of their symptoms. To make things worse, many patients are not taken seriously by family, friends, and healthcare providers because they appear to be healthy. FSR recognizes this to be a huge barrier to wellness that needs to be recognized and treated with the same compassion given to those who are battling visible illnesses. Luckily, this is an area of sarcoidosis which has been studied more thoroughly in recent years and there are steps you and your doctors can take to investigate and treat the symptoms. There are a couple considerations your doctor will take into account when assessing your fatigue: Is your disease currently under control? Patients who have active inflammation and associated organ dysfunction are likely to experience fatigue. This may result both from their disease and as a side effect to common treatments. Corticosteroids, for example, are a first line therapy for sarcoidosis whose side effects include weight gain, diabetes, and sleep apnea that can worsen fatigue. If your disease is not under control, it is important to first work with your doctor(s) to determine the best course of treatment to address the inflammation in your body. If you have just been diagnosed with sarcoidosis, you may benefit from finding a physician with familiarity with sarcoidosis in our searchable provider directory. We also suggest Continue reading >>

How To Beat Arthritis Fatigue

How To Beat Arthritis Fatigue

Fatigue is a mysterious and persistent foe when you have arthritis. Learn how to fight back. Once you recognize possible causes of your fatigue, write them down and discuss with your doctor. The two of you can come up with a comprehensive plan so you have the energy you need. The plan to regain your vigor may include medication and lifestyle changes. Medications to Treat Causes of Fatigue A 2017 one published in Current Rheumatology Reports, along with earlier ones, – show that medications used to treat your inflammatory arthritis have little effect on fatigue. But unchecked inflammation and pain caused by arthritis certainly contribute to fatigue. So, your first step in getting your energy back is to get disease activity under control. You will also need to treat any other underlying medical conditions you have that may cause or worsen your fatigue. Here are a few types of medicine your doctor may prescribe that are focused on treating fatigue. Anemia medicine. If you have anemia, you may need iron supplements or the hormone epoietin (Epogen, Procrit). Sleep aids. Sleeping pills may help promote restorative sleep. Newer medications, including eszopiclone (Lunesta), lorazepam (Ativan), zaleplon (Sonata), and zolpidem (Ambien), are less likely to trigger dependence than older sleep medications. Vitamins. If your nutrition is poor, your doctor may suggest you take a multivitamin or other supplements to fill your nutritional gaps and strengthen your overall health. Psychoactive medicines. You may benefit from “activating” medications that increase energy. These include some antidepressants, like bupropion (Wellbutrin), and psychostimulants, like modafinil (Provigil). Lifestyle Changes to Combat Fatigue Studies, such as several done by Patti Katz, PhD, of the Universi Continue reading >>

How To Banish Afternoon Fatigue

How To Banish Afternoon Fatigue

Afternoon fatigue is a common complaint. One of the most common causes is post-lunch hypoglycemia, which is related to your inability to effectively burn fat By switching your body over from primarily burning carbs to primarily burning fats for fuel or becoming “fat adapted,” you virtually eliminate such drops in energy levels Besides replacing carbs with healthful fats, intermittent fasting is one of the most effective ways to encourage your body to change from burning carbs to burning fat, thereby boosting your mental and physical stamina Working out in the middle of the day can give you an energy boost lasting three to four hours. If you prefer exercising in the evenings, it's best to avoid working out two to three hours before bedtime to avoid sleep disruption If you’re not sleeping well, it will be next to impossible to avoid lagging energy levels. According to recent research, maintaining a regular exercise program can help improve your sleep over time By Dr. Mercola Many people experience a slump in energy levels by the time the afternoon rolls around. A number of factors may contribute to this phenomenon. The most common cause is post-lunch hypoglycemia, which is related to your inability to burn fat. Hence, addressing your diet is key if afternoon fatigue is something you contend with on a regular basis. Besides alterations in your diet, intermittent fasting is one of the most effective ways to switch your body from burning carbs to burning fat, thereby boosting your mental and physical stamina. Other factors are related to when and how much you exercise. Poor sleep also plays a role, of course, and recent research highlights the interconnectedness between sleep and exercise. Diet Is Key for Maintaining Your Energy Levels There are two fuels your body can Continue reading >>

The Weight: Caregiver Fatigue And Diabetes

The Weight: Caregiver Fatigue And Diabetes

8.8K When your kid's life is on the line, caregiving is a 24 hour job. What do you do when that job wears you down? Happy Holidays! Folks is taking a break until January 2nd. In the meantime, enjoy this story from our archives. Originally published on November 16, it is one of our favorite pieces from 2017. It’s 2:14 in the morning and a high-pitched beeping is coming out of an iPhone next to my bed. I groggily stand up, trudge upstairs, and save my son’s life again. My son Henry has type 1 diabetes. It’s an incurable autoimmune condition that, if managed well, won’t have a significant impact on his quality of life. But managing it well presents its own challenges for my wife and I. The thing with diabetes is that there are two dangers. If his blood sugar goes high, it’s not an immediate threat. Too much of that will cause his eyes to fail and his organs to shut down, but we catch that kind of thing pretty quickly and he’s very responsive to insulin. But if it goes low– and keeps falling–it can result in him falling into a coma and dying. When he goes low, he typically loses 50% of his brain functionality, meaning that he’s not always capable of treating it himself. It happens all the time. And his sugar can drop really fast. We’ve been out swimming or hiking and he’s plummeted from the mid-80s to the mid-40s in ten minutes. Once he was at school and he dropped so precipitously that he wasn’t coherent enough to take sugar by mouth. The staff had to give him the Glucagon, an injection of sugar that will rapidly spike his blood glucose back up to safe levels. That’s a big needle, a scary needle, and it goes right into the muscle. So we have a device called a continuous glucose monitor, a little needle implanted in his arm, attached to a Bluetooth Continue reading >>

Tiredness And Fatigue: Why It Happens And How To Beat It

Tiredness And Fatigue: Why It Happens And How To Beat It

'Tired all the time' is a popular complaint; tiredness and fatigue are common problems. Often, it is not a medical issue but one that can be reversed by a change of lifestyle. Tiredness can negatively impact performance at work, family life, and social relationships. Fatigue has a reputation as a vague and difficult problem for doctors to investigate, and many people with fatigue do not report it to their doctor. Doctors who are conscious of this take the problem seriously and attempt to determine an underlying cause. There are many reasons people become tired, and, consequently, there are many ways to rectify the situation. Contents of this article: Fatigue is also known as tiredness, reduced energy, physical or mental exhaustion, or lack of motivation. Causes of fatigue can be psychological, physiological, and physical. To diagnose the reasons for fatigue, a doctor will ask questions and take a sleep history, and may perform a physical examination and blood and urine tests. Treatment is focused on the underlying cause of tiredness. What is the definition of fatigue? Simply put, fatigue is the feeling of being tired. It is generally different from the sleepy feeling of drowsiness, or the psychological feeling of apathy, although these might both accompany fatigue. Other terms to describe fatigue include: reduced or no energy physical or mental exhaustion lack of motivation Reasons for tiredness and fatigue Fatigue is a common experience - all humans become tired. However, this is not usually due to disease. There are numerous medical and non-medical causes of fatigue, including personal dietary and lifestyle habits. The following factors can contribute to fatigue, either alone or in combination: Physiological - pregnancy, breast-feeding, inadequate sleep, and excessive Continue reading >>

How Does Having Diabetes Affect My Cancer Treatment?

How Does Having Diabetes Affect My Cancer Treatment?

More than 25 million people in the United States have been diagnosed with diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Among people 65 and older, nearly 27 percent have diabetes. The vast majority of diabetes cases are type 2 diabetes, which is associated largely with older age and being overweight as well as family history. Older age and obesity also are risk factors for developing cancer, which means that people with type 2 diabetes are diagnosed with cancer more often than those in the general population. Having diabetes can complicate cancer treatment due to a number of factors. At the same time, some treatments for cancer, including certain newer targeted therapy drugs, can spur the development of diabetes, especially in patients who already had a propensity toward developing the disease, although this effect is usually reversible. Azeez Farooki is a Memorial Sloan Kettering endocrinologist who specializes in treating cancer patients who also have diabetes. We spoke with Dr. Farooki about what special considerations are taken into account when treating this group of patients. A Disease of Blood Sugar “Diabetes is a disease in which a person has increased levels of glucose, or sugar, in the blood,” Dr. Farooki explains. “It can occur because the pancreas does not produce enough insulin — the hormone that allows glucose to be absorbed — or because cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. Cells should normally take in sugar from the blood; if they don’t, then high blood sugar or ‘hyperglycemia’ results.” The majority of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, which often causes the body to become resistant to the effects of insulin. Type 2 disease may be treated with insulin injections, other hormonal inject Continue reading >>

How Juicing These 20 Foods Can Prevent Or Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

How Juicing These 20 Foods Can Prevent Or Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes type 2 is caused by years of faulty eating. Begin to include plenty fresh plant foods in your dietary and bring it under control, maybe even reverse it. Understanding Diabetes Mellitus Doctors often use the full term “Diabetes Mellitus” rather than “diabetes” alone, to distinguish this disorder from “Diabetes Insipidus” which is another rare disease that does not affect blood sugar levels. There are two types of diabetes mellitus: Type I: Known as juvenile diabetes, occurs when the pancreas fails to produce adequate insulin. Insulin is the hormone used by the body to make blood sugar (glucose) available to cells. Recent evidence reported by John Hopkins University suggests that consumption of dairy products by sensitive children causes the immune cells to respond with excessive aggressiveness to antigens in cow’s milk. These antigens may attach themselves to cells in the pancreas. Once attached, the antigens are attacked by immune cells that, in the process, destroy both the antigens and the pancreatic cells that produce insulin. Most people who have type I diabetes develop this disorder before age 30. Type II: The most common form of diabetes, usually occurs in adulthood in people older than forty; but these days, the age number is getting smaller and smaller. For most adult-onset diabetics, the pancreas actually produces more insulin than is necessary, at least in the early stages of the illness. Dietary fat and cholesterol infiltrate the blood and block insulin from making glucose available to cells. As the disorder continues, the pancreas weakens, and production of insulin diminishes until insulin injections may be prescribed. Constantly overeating the wrong kinds of foods over the years is the main risk factor for developing type II diabetes. Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Insulin Resistance: Tired After Lunch?

Symptoms Of Insulin Resistance: Tired After Lunch?

When the clock strikes 2:00 in the afternoon, does fatigue drop on you like a heavy load? The time frame over the couple hours after lunch can send the best of us down for the count. If you notice that you are so exhausted you want to curl up and take nap after your midday meal, you may be experiencing your blood sugar levels shifting. For many people, eating a higher carbohydrate meal, like a sub sandwich or a pasta dish, or even sushi can really knock the wind out of their sails, because their blood sugar will spike and then drop after the body releases insulin. If you find that you are tired almost every day around the same time after lunch, then you may be experiencing a symptom of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is a condition where your body doesn't process carbohydrates and sugars like it is supposed to. Insulin is a fat-storing hormone, and insulin resistance simply means your cells don't respond like they should to this hormone. Insulin is the key that unlocks the cell door to let glucose inside. With insulin resistance, the insulin key isn't fitting properly and so your body will store the glucose that cannot get inside cells as fat. This condition of insulin resistance can make it extremely difficult to lose weight, and insulin causes your body to become very eager to store fat. People can have varying degrees of insulin resistance, some more severe than others. When you have insulin resistance for a long time, it almost always leads to type 2 diabetes. The good news is, insulin resistance is easily reversible with the right type of meal plan and nutrition. At Cederquist Medical Wellness Center, we can determine the level of your insulin resistance, and formulate a customized program to first help reverse your insulin resistance, and second, to help yo Continue reading >>

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