diabetestalk.net

How To Deal With Diabetes

10 Tips For Coping With Diabetes Distress

10 Tips For Coping With Diabetes Distress

10 Tips for Coping with Diabetes Distress To receive email updates about Diabetes Education enter your email address: Managing diabetes can be hard. Sometimes you may feel overwhelmed. Having diabetes means that you need to check your blood sugar levels often, make healthy food choices, be physically active, remember to take your medicine, and make other good decisions about your health several times a day. In addition, you may also worry about having low or high blood sugar levels, the costs of your medicines, and developing diabetes-related complications, such as heart disease or nerve damage. Having diabetes can be overwhelming at times. The good news is that there are things you can do to cope with diabetes and manage stress. When all of this feels like too much to deal with, you may have something called diabetes distress. This is when all the worry, frustration, anger, and burnout makes it hard for you to take care of yourself and keep up with the daily demands of diabetes. The good news is that there are things you can do to cope with diabetes and manage stress. Here are 10 tips that can help. Pay attention to your feelings. Almost everyone feels frustrated or stressed from time to time. Dealing with diabetes can add to these feelings and make you feel overwhelmed. Having these feelings for more than a week or two may signal that you need help coping with your diabetes so that you can feel better. Talk with your health care providers about your feelings. Let your doctor, nurse, diabetes educator, psychologist, or social worker know how youve been feeling. They can help you problem-solve your concerns about diabetes. They may also suggest that you speak with other health care providers to get help. Talk to your health care providers about negative reactions other Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Depression: How To Deal With It

Diabetes & Depression: How To Deal With It

When you have diabetes, you are already dealing with a lot. Now add depression into the mix- you now have a double-whammy. This is what happens when you have diabetes- you are at increased risk for developing depression. So when you develop depression in addition to your diabetes, then this makes your diabetes worse. And the diabetes makes the depression worse. So what you get is a negative spiral, with out of control blood sugars, and ever increasing mood symptoms. Therefore, it is imperative to take care of your depression, so that your diabetes treatment can be optimized, and not sabotaged by untreated depression. Depression and Diabetes When you have diabetes, then depression is sure to follow. For people with diabetes, the risk for depression is two to three times higher.1 The reason depression and diabetes go together is that they have similar causes. Both diabetes and depression are caused by poor diet, lack of exercise, poor sleep, and psychosocial stressors. These factors cause diabetes and depression via the body’s stress response. So when you are dealing with high pressured stuff (like losing a job, financial difficulties, or relationship problems) or not taking care of your body (not eating properly, not sleeping, not exercising), then your body mounts a stress response. This stress response releases stress hormones (such as cortisol and adrenaline) and activates the sympathetic nervous system, which decreases the ability of your own insulin to utilize blood sugars. In addition, the stress response dumps a lot of glucose into your bloodstream to fuel your stress response, as the body is preparing for fighting or fleeing (or freezing). With chronic activation of the stress response, high blood sugar and diabetes result. This same stress response with the re Continue reading >>

How To Deal With The Diagnosis Of Diabetes

How To Deal With The Diagnosis Of Diabetes

Common Emotional Reactions Ann Bloise was so ashamed to learn she had type 2 diabetes that she didn't tell her family for three weeks. "I thought I got diabetes because I'm so overweight," the Dallas resident says. "I really felt that it was my fault." On top of her shame, she was terrified about how diabetes would affect her vision, her feet, and her heart. She also became depressed. "I was staring mortality in the face," she says. "Here I was, 44 years old, and I hadn't done half of the things I wanted to do in life." Being diagnosed with diabetes is an emotional experience that can arouse difficult feelings. Some people deny their illness or feel outrage. Others become depressed, feel tremendous guilt and shame, or are stricken with fear about the future. "All of these are common emotional reactions," says John Zrebiec, M.S.W., CDE, associate director of mental health services at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston and a member of the Diabetic Living editorial advisory board. "Diabetes can often bring with it a normal grief reaction. But the stages and intensity will differ from person to person, depending on life experiences," he says. Healthy Ways to Deal with a New Diagnosis Zrebiec says it may take as long as a year to come to terms with diabetes. If you're in the doldrums, try not to let negative feelings interfere with taking care of your health. Here are some strategies to keep them in check: Educate Yourself: "The more you learn, the more empowered you'll feel," says Paula Wilkerson of Albany, New York, who was initially terrified by her diagnosis. "Now I know the diagnosis doesn't mean life is over. You can begin an even better life that includes taking better care of yourself and understanding your body," she says. Open Up to Family and Friends: Rather tha Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Dealing With Feelings

Diabetes: Dealing With Feelings

en espaolLa diabetes: cmo afrontar los sentimientos When their child is diagnosed with diabetes, parents might spend a lot of time thinking about the disease's physical effects. But emotional issues also come with a diabetes diagnosis. So it's important for parents to recognize the feelings that kids with diabetes might have and learn ways to help them. Kids often have these emotions after learning they have diabetes: Isolation. Diabetes can make kids feel different from friends, classmates, and family members. Kids who don't know other people with diabetes or are the only student who needs to visit the school nurse for injections or blood tests might feel isolated or alone. Denial. Because kids want to blend in or be like other kids, they may sometimes pretend that they don't have diabetes, which can be dangerous if they avoid blood sugar testing and taking their medicine. Depression. Feelings of depression , sadness, and hopelessness are common among kids with diabetes. A child may cry a lot, feel tired, have changes in eating or sleeping habits, or have a hard time sticking to the diabetes management plan. Guilt. Some kids may feel like diabetes is their fault or that they're causing problems for parents, siblings, and teachers because of their diabetes. Anger, frustration, and resentment. Your child might be angry at you because you oversee testing and treatment, and frustrated by the diagnosis. Many kids resent the restrictions that diabetes can put on their everyday activities. Fear and anxiety. Blood sugar control problems, needles , and the potential for long-term health problems can be scary for kids. Embarrassment. Kids might be embarrassed about the extra attention they get, like when they're testing blood sugar and injecting insulin at school, at friends' h Continue reading >>

Coping With A Diabetes Diagnosis

Coping With A Diabetes Diagnosis

Awareness that you can cope with your diabetes by taking an active part in your treatment Being diagnosed with diabetes is often a shock that turns your life upside down. It takes constant work to accept and psychologically adjust to the diagnosis. If you reject your diabetes, you can compromise your health by undermining your treatment and motivation to adopt a healthy lifestyle. As with other chronic diseases, a diabetes diagnosis means that your health is impaired, and your future health is threatened by the medium- and long-term complications associated with the disease. This sword of Damocles hanging over your head can be very stressful. Stress can impact your diabetes control due to the effect of stress hormones on blood glucose (sugar) levels or even to poor stress-management strategies or behaviours. Furthermore, you are directly responsible for the complicated, demanding and chronic treatment of your diabetes, which can require major changes to your daily habits. On one hand, you have the power to change the course of your disease; on the other, you are burdened with this enormous responsibility. Diabetes can also weaken your self-esteem, which can be compounded by the discrimination you might face at work, when you apply for insurance or a drivers license. The process of adjusting to the stress of diabetes happens in 5 stages, similar to the stages of mourning. The better you understands your diabetes and its treatment, the less fearful and accepting you will be, and the more involved in your treatment and diabetes control. Denial, refusing to even acknowledge the existence of the diabetes, its chronic nature or the necessity of treatment. No, not me! There must be some mistake. This is just a temporary rise in my blood sugar; I will get better. Awareness of Continue reading >>

4 Steps To Manage Your Diabetes For Life

4 Steps To Manage Your Diabetes For Life

This publication has been reviewed by NDEP for plain language principles. Learn more about our review process. Actions you can take The marks in this booklet show actions you can take to manage your diabetes. Help your health care team make a diabetes care plan that will work for you. Learn to make wise choices for your diabetes care each day. Step 1: Learn about diabetes. What is diabetes? There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes – Your body does not make insulin. This is a problem because you need insulin to take the sugar (glucose) from the foods you eat and turn it into energy for your body. You need to take insulin every day to live. Type 2 diabetes – Your body does not make or use insulin well. You may need to take pills or insulin to help control your diabetes. Type 2 is the most common type of diabetes. Gestational (jest-TAY-shun-al) diabetes – Some women get this kind of diabetes when they are pregnant. Most of the time, it goes away after the baby is born. But even if it goes away, these women and their children have a greater chance of getting diabetes later in life. You are the most important member of your health care team. You are the one who manages your diabetes day by day. Talk to your doctor about how you can best care for your diabetes to stay healthy. Some others who can help are: dentist diabetes doctor diabetes educator dietitian eye doctor foot doctor friends and family mental health counselor nurse nurse practitioner pharmacist social worker How to learn more about diabetes. Take classes to learn more about living with diabetes. To find a class, check with your health care team, hospital, or area health clinic. You can also search online. Join a support group — in-person or online — to get peer support with managing your Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Deal With A Diabetes Complication

5 Ways To Deal With A Diabetes Complication

5 Ways to Deal With a Diabetes Complication Moving forward when you have a diabetes-related problem You do your best to manage your diabetes. But sometimes thats not enough to prevent diabetes-related complications. You may be facing damage to your heart , eyes , nerves , or kidneys . Being diagnosed with diabetes can feel like a world-rockercomplications can seem like the end of your world, although they can be treated. Here are some steps you can take to move forward emotionally after receiving the news that you have a complication. 1. Identify your feelings, and feel them. When someone gets a serious diagnosis, they may pass through the stages of griefshock, denial, anger, and sadnessbefore theyre able to accept it, says Judith Margerum, PhD, a licensed clinical psychologist in Southfield, Mich. That [diagnosis] really creates a sense that the world is not the safe place you thought it was, she says. Itll take some time before you can really accept what the next steps are in caring for your complication. Thats OK. Just try to recognize how you feel at the time, feel it, and then let it go. Sometimes when a doctor gives you bad news, it envelops you in a fog, and you might not be listening or thinking clearly about what comes next. Thats common, says Shelley Diamond, PhD, a licensed clinical psychologist in San Francisco. Youve just gotten a big shock. Youre going to need time to figure out what does this mean as a big change in your life, she says. So once youre a little removed from that initial diagnosis, feel free to ask as many questions as you have. You may want to write down your questions so you dont forget to ask them at your next visit. People need to be aware of what helps them when theyre overwhelmed, Diamond says. That might mean taking some time off wor Continue reading >>

How You Can Cope With Type 1 Diabetes

How You Can Cope With Type 1 Diabetes

Intro Living with type 1 diabetes can be emotionally draining. It’s normal for people with type 1 diabetes to feel scared, angry, frustrated, or discouraged from time to time. But there are some simple steps that you can take to reduce stress levels and anxiety. These seven suggestions can also help you to live better with type 1 diabetes. 1. Manage your stress It can be difficult to adjust to life with diabetes. Making changes to diet and lifestyle, monitoring blood sugar, counting carbs, and remembering to take insulin and other medications are often sources of stress. As time goes on, these tasks will get easier. But everyone has days when they feel overwhelmed. Doctors call the stress, anxiety, and negative emotions related to diabetes “diabetes distress.” People who have had type 1 diabetes for a long time may develop “diabetes burnout.” This can happen when you start to feel burdened by your diabetes. Along with diabetes stress, you likely also have other sources of stress in your life, such as school or work. Getting a handle on stress can go a long way towards coping better with diabetes. Find an activity that you enjoy to manage daily stress. Some options include exercising, going for a walk, taking a long bath, or even doing the dishes. Breathing exercises can also be helpful for reducing anxiety. 2. Work with your diabetes care team Your diabetes care team often includes your diabetes doctor and nurse, general practitioner, dietician, ophthalmologist, and diabetes educator. Depending on your needs, your team may also include other specialists, such as a foot doctor, mental health professional, or heart doctor. These are the best people to ask if you have any questions about your condition. They can also give you some tips on coping with type 1 diabe Continue reading >>

6 Ways To Control Type 2 Diabetes

6 Ways To Control Type 2 Diabetes

Last year during a physical, Lauren Crim of Richwood, TX, got a diagnosis she wasn’t expecting: type 2 diabetes. She had no symptoms, so the news threw her for a loop. “I was devastated,” she says. “My grandmother had diabetes, and I saw her go through major health struggles because of it.” After seeking support from loved ones -- and shedding a few tears -- Crim got to work. With help from her health care team, she changed the way she ate and started exercising. Now, a year later, she’s 22 pounds lighter, and her blood sugar is normal. “My advice to anyone else facing type 2 diabetes is to stick to a plan, stay positive, and put your health first,” she says. A diabetes diagnosis might feel overwhelming, but living well with the condition doesn’t have to be. If you’re ready to take control of your blood sugar levels and get on the path to better health, here’s how to start. “It takes a village to manage diabetes,” says Linda Siminerio, RN, PhD, chair of the National Diabetes Education Program. Along with your doctor or nurse practitioner, you can get help from: Diabetes educators Dietitians or nutritionists Pharmacists Endocrinologists Podiatrists Dentists Psychologists or Therapists Their services are often covered by insurance. Having a health care team is key, but you're the most important member of it. “We want you to be informed and empowered,” Siminerio says. Take an active role in your care. Ask questions. Learn what your medications do and how to take them properly. Practice any other healthy habits your doctor recommends. And know what your A1c levels are and what they mean. “Being overweight is one of the major drivers of the epidemic of diabetes,” says Vivian Fonseca, MD, a professor of medicine and pharmacology at Tulane Uni Continue reading >>

10 Tips For Coping With Diabetes

10 Tips For Coping With Diabetes

Sometimes you will have those days where you’re discouraged and feel completely overwhelmed with your diabetes. It’s important when you’re feeling this way to take a step back and challenge your perspective so you can find a way to stay motivated to keep moving forward. Managing diabetes is an ongoing process, and there are so many daily tasks involved with your management, which can become challenging at times. We wanted to share some encouragement with you, so we asked the DOC to share the best advice someone has ever given them in life that they can apply to coping with diabetes. Here are 12 tips from the community we hope will make coping with diabetes easier for you. 1. Choose How to Deal “We don’t always get to choose what happens to us, but we do get to choose how we deal with it! It’s ok to be angry and frustrated with this. But use that anger and frustration to motivate you to take care of yourself. Because the more you take care of yourself the less this disease defines you!” – Kristin Sasha Bear McConnell 2. Listen to your Body “Everyone dealing with this is different. What they do to cope may not be good for you. Listen to your body and it will help you. And remember one thing, you are not alone.” – Cecelia Montague 3. Take Care of Yourself First “Take care of yourself first, so you can take care of others and do anything you want.” – Rose Schonberger 4. Find the Diabetes Technology That Works for You “After being type I for more than 45 years, and being on the pump for 8, I can tell you that a pump is a MUST for great control as well enjoyable convenience.” – Mickey Cohen 5. Make the Most of Everyday “Check your BG regularly, eat responsibly, exercise when you can, and know your limits. There are so many variables related Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Cope With Diabetes Burnout

7 Ways To Cope With Diabetes Burnout

I’ve been feeling burnt out about work, and so I recently forced myself to spend a weekend untethered from my phone, not checking email, and not responding to calls. The two days felt longer than normal, I didn’t miss anything important, and I emerged on Monday morning refreshed – so much so that I’m thinking of making it part of my regular routine. The experience made me wish that it were possible to do something similar with diabetes – to just take a break. But, as I complained to my husband, that’s just not possible; as we all know, there’s simply no way (without the risk of high or low blood sugar) to just take a weekend “off.” You can’t hire a babysitter for your diabetes and have a romantic dinner out. You can’t take a vacation to a tropical island and leave diabetes at home (and if you’re anything like me, diabetes and tropical drinks are a recipe for disaster to begin with). So what can you do? I’ve been doing a lot of thinking about this, especially since I am way too much of a control freak to come anywhere close to ignoring my blood sugar or rebelling against diabetes by eating a box of donuts. And, I came up with what for me might be a partial solution. It occurred to me that perhaps instead of trying to give myself space by ignoring diabetes – which would be self-destructive – I might be able to tackle my diabetes burnout from a side angle: perhaps if I could clear out some of the junk in other areas of my life, I’d have the mental space to take care of my diabetes without feeling quite so overwhelmed. Following this logic, I’m trying to find ways to be nicer to myself – to sleep late when I need to, to work in the garden instead of answering emails – in hopes that in so doing, I’ll clear out some emotional space for Continue reading >>

How To Deal With Diabetes

How To Deal With Diabetes

Cut down on junk food like pizzas and donuts. Photo: iStockphoto Diabetes has become a lifestyle epidemic. Globally, the number of adults suffering from this disease has risen from 4.7% of the total population in 1980 to 8.5% in 2014, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). India ranks among the top 3 countries with a large diabetic population, according to a 2016 Lancet study. The number of cases rose from 11.9 million in 1980 to 64.5 million in India in 2014, up 50% among men and a whopping 80% among women, according to the Lancet data. Diabetes is caused by the inefficient functioning of the hormone insulin, which helps the bodys cells convert glucose, derived from the food we eat, to energy. Insulin also helps the cells of muscles, and the liver among other organs, to absorb glucose from the bloodstream for daily metabolic activity. The two common kinds of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. In type 1 diabetes, a chronic autoimmune condition that usually affects children and young adults, the bodys immune system destroys the beta cells of the pancreas that produce insulin. Type 2 diabetes, which accounts for almost 90-95% of all diagnosed diabetes cases, occurs due to insulin resistance and, according to the American Diabetes Association 2017 guidelines, progressive insulin secretory defect. Insulin resistance is a condition in which the bodys cells fail to respond normally to insulin signalling and/or an inadequate amount of insulin is produced by the pancreas. While type 1 diabetes is caused by the malfunctioning of the bodys immune system, a genetic predisposition and factors like obesity and lack of exercise can lead to type 2 diabetes. Type 3 diabetes, a brain-specific diabetes which has been linked to Alzheimers disease, is increasingly under review. A Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Handle The News

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Handle The News

"You have type 2 diabetes.” It’s a tough diagnosis to hear. Once you're told, what should you do? First, take a breath. You may be surprised or even shocked, especially if your body feels the same as it always has. Some people feel scared, sad, or overwhelmed. “When I was diagnosed, it hit me like a blow to my stomach. I couldn’t believe it,” says 65-year-old Luxmi Popat, from Orlando, FL. But after you have time to think, remember this: You can live a long, healthy life with diabetes. You may need to make changes to your daily routine, but it doesn’t have to stop you from doing the things you want and need to do. “Diabetes can be controlled,” says Gregory Dodell, MD, of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Health System in New York. “In addition to finding ways to live a healthier life, we have amazing tools that can help avoid complications.” Get to the right mind-set with these first steps: A shift in your thinking may help you feel better and move forward. “Think of managing diabetes and improving your overall health as a tremendous challenge with a huge upside,” Dodell says. Maybe you haven’t been eating well or getting enough exercise. Maybe you need more of a work-life balance. Your diagnosis can be a wake-up call -- in a good way. “We often take our health for granted,” Dodell says. “But in the long run, it’s difficult to accomplish all we do on a daily basis if we’re not healthy.” A change in mind-set worked for Quinn Nystrom, a diabetes advocate in Baxter, MN, who has been living with the condition for 18 years. “When I learned that I was the only one that could determine the quality of my life, it changed how I looked at the world,” Nystrom says. “Diabetes didn't have to define me, I could use it to refine me Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

Coping With Diabetes Over Time

Coping With Diabetes Over Time

If a problem has no solution, it may not be a problem, but a fact – not to be solved, but to be coped with over time. –Shimon Peres When you are diagnosed with a chronic illness such as diabetes, you must face the fact that there is no cure. Despite the millions of dollars spent in research to better understand diabetes and the ongoing advances in treatment options for it, a person with diabetes has to realize that it will accompany him for the rest of his life. Among chronic diseases, diabetes is unique in the amount of time and attention it requires of the person who has it to remain healthy. It is therefore no surprise that taking care of yourself may feel difficult or challenging at times. That’s why dealing with diabetes over the long term requires developing a range of coping skills and techniques, from learning to carry out the daily tasks of diabetes control, to finding ways to deal with the emotions that having diabetes and having to care for it are bound to bring up at times. Daily care Much of what you do to keep your blood glucose, blood pressure, and blood cholesterol levels in the near-normal range is aimed at preventing long-term complications. But it’s also about feeling good today. Keeping your blood glucose level in your target range, in particular, can help you feel more energetic and alert, enabling you to participate in and enjoy the other parts of your life. So how do you carry out the tasks of eating right, getting physical activity, monitoring your blood glucose level, and taking any prescribed medicines every day for the rest of your life without getting overwhelmed? Here are some tips: Knowledge is power. All aspects of diabetes care require a certain amount of knowledge: Meal planning requires some knowledge of nutrition; being physica Continue reading >>

More in diabetes