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How To Care For A Diabetic Patient

Diabetic Care In The Nursing Home

Diabetic Care In The Nursing Home

About 8.3 percent of Americans suffer from diabetes (1). This number is higher as a person gets older. About 20 percent of people between the ages of 65 and 75 years of age suffer from diabetes and its related complications. Diabetes affects about 80 percent of all people who live past the age of 80 years. The rate of diabetes is expected to increase as the life expectancy of the population increases. It is the responsibility of the nursing facility staff members to take part in the diabetic cares of the nursing facility residents. If the proper care and treatment is not received, an elderly person with diabetes can suffer from many different types of diabetic side effects. For this reason, it is imperative that the nursing facility staff learn about diabetes and how to care for the diabetic patient. Issues Related to the Elderly Diabetic Resident Diabetes is a complicated disease and there are many risks that go along with having diabetes in old age. The dangers of diabetes increase if the diabetes is not taken care of properly. Elderly people who have diabetes may have elevated rates of physical and mental disabilities related their diabetes, including the risk of dying prematurely of the disease. Older people who have diabetes have an increased likelihood of chronic diseases, such as a stroke, cardiovascular disease and high blood pressure. In addition, many of the typical health issues that affect the elderly person tend to be more pronounced and prevalent in elderly patients who are diabetic. Those elderly diabetic patients suffer from an increased risk for depression, reduced cognitive function, chronic and persistent pain, painful falls and problems with urinary incontinence. Elderly Diabetic Care in the Nursing Home It is vital for the older diabetic patient to Continue reading >>

Guidelines For The Management Of Diabetic Patients In The Health Centers Of Saudi Arabia

Guidelines For The Management Of Diabetic Patients In The Health Centers Of Saudi Arabia

GUIDELINES FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF DIABETIC PATIENTS IN THE HEALTH CENTERS OF SAUDI ARABIA Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Correspondence to: Dr. Eiad A. Al-Faris, P.O. Box 2925, Riyadh 11461, Saudi Arabia Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright : Journal of Family and Community Medicine This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. This paper presents general guidelines for the management of diabetic patients within the primary health care (PHC) system in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). It intends to enhance PHC physicians knowledge and improve clinical practice to ensure better management of people with diabetes mellitus. A stepwise (Algorithm) management approach for different categories of diabetic patients, including diet, exercise, and drugs, is suggested. The peculiarities of Family Medicine, e.g., adopting the biopsychosocial model, the holistic approach, and relations with the hospital are considered. Keywords: Guidelines, diabetes, family medicine, Saudi Arabia Developing guidelines for the management of diabetes mellitus (DM) is given priority, as it is a common, serious and costly health problem. Saudi Arabia is a high-prevalence country (12-16%) 1 , 2 according to the Ad Hoc Diabetes Reporting Group. 3 Although DM is associated with a high incidence of complications, 4 better control is associated with reduced morbidity and mortality. 5 Failure of consistency of care causes confusion Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Home Care | Interim Healthcare | Since 1966

Diabetes & Home Care | Interim Healthcare | Since 1966

Home > Services > Specialized Home Care > Diabetes Diabetes is a widespread disease that affects people of all ages, races and genders across the U.S. According to the American Diabetes Association, about 25.8 million Americans have diabetes, which makes up 8.3 percent of the country's population. Interim HealthCare can customize a program that helps you: Understand your disease and what causes it to have greater or lesser impact on your health and well-being. Know how to monitor the disease and what to do when levels aren't where they should be. Manage your medications - all of them, not just your insulin. See the impact of behaviors on your diabetes. Well cover nutrition topics as well as other lifestyle items. Learn to watch for signs that your diabetes might be having a negative impact on skin or nerve feelings. Help you communicate effectively with your physician. Diabetes is a chronic disease in which the levels of glucose, or sugar, in the blood are higher than they should be, and there is not enough insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas, to control it. The disease can be caused by too little insulin, a resistance to insulin or both. There are three major types of diabetes: Type 1 can occur at any age, but is most often diagnosed in children, teens or young adults whose bodies make small amounts of insulin or none at all. Type 2 Diabetes is the most frequently diagnosed, typically during adulthood. However, it is being increasingly diagnosed in teens and young adults because of high obesity rates. Gestational Diabetes refers to the development of high blood sugar in pregnant women who did not previously have the disease. In all cases of diabetes, patients may experience similar symptoms, such as blurry vision, excess thirst, fatigue, frequent urination, hu Continue reading >>

Standards Of Medical Care For Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

Standards Of Medical Care For Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes is a chronic illness that requires continuing medical care and patient self-management education to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk of long-term complications. Diabetes care is complex and requires that many issues, beyond glycemic control, be addressed. A large body of evidence exists that supports a range of interventions to improve diabetes outcomes. These standards of care are intended to provide clinicians, patients, researchers, payors, and other interested persons with the components of diabetes care, treatment goals, and tools to evaluate the quality of care. While individual preferences, comorbidities, and other patient factors may require modification of goals, targets that are desirable for most patients with diabetes are provided. These standards are not intended to preclude more extensive evaluation and management of the patient by other specialists as needed. For more detailed information, refer to Skyler (Ed.): Medical Management of Type 1 Diabetes (1) and Zimmerman (Ed.): Medical Management of Type 2 Diabetes (2). The recommendations included are diagnostic and therapeutic actions that are known or believed to favorably affect health outcomes of patients with diabetes. A grading system (Table 1), developed by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and modeled after existing methods, was utilized to clarify and codify the evidence that forms the basis for the recommendations. The level of evidence that supports each recommendation is listed after each recommendation using the letters A, B, C, or E. CLASSIFICATION, DIAGNOSIS, AND SCREENING Classification In 1997, the ADA issued new diagnostic and classification criteria (3). The classification of diabetes mellitus includes four clinical classes: Type 1 diabetes (results from β Continue reading >>

4 Steps To Manage Your Diabetes For Life

4 Steps To Manage Your Diabetes For Life

This publication has been reviewed by NDEP for plain language principles. Learn more about our review process. Actions you can take The marks in this booklet show actions you can take to manage your diabetes. Help your health care team make a diabetes care plan that will work for you. Learn to make wise choices for your diabetes care each day. Step 1: Learn about diabetes. What is diabetes? There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes – Your body does not make insulin. This is a problem because you need insulin to take the sugar (glucose) from the foods you eat and turn it into energy for your body. You need to take insulin every day to live. Type 2 diabetes – Your body does not make or use insulin well. You may need to take pills or insulin to help control your diabetes. Type 2 is the most common type of diabetes. Gestational (jest-TAY-shun-al) diabetes – Some women get this kind of diabetes when they are pregnant. Most of the time, it goes away after the baby is born. But even if it goes away, these women and their children have a greater chance of getting diabetes later in life. You are the most important member of your health care team. You are the one who manages your diabetes day by day. Talk to your doctor about how you can best care for your diabetes to stay healthy. Some others who can help are: dentist diabetes doctor diabetes educator dietitian eye doctor foot doctor friends and family mental health counselor nurse nurse practitioner pharmacist social worker How to learn more about diabetes. Take classes to learn more about living with diabetes. To find a class, check with your health care team, hospital, or area health clinic. You can also search online. Join a support group — in-person or online — to get peer support with managing your Continue reading >>

Care Of Diabetic Patients In Hospital Clinics And General Practice Clinics: A Study In Dudley.

Care Of Diabetic Patients In Hospital Clinics And General Practice Clinics: A Study In Dudley.

Care of diabetic patients in hospital clinics and general practice clinics: a study in Dudley. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. A five year retrospective casenote review was undertaken of 452 patients attending 11 different general practice diabetic clinics, and 506 patients attending a diabetic clinic at hospital A and 210 patients attending a diabetic clinic at hospital B. The populations attending the clinics, the degree of glycaemic control achieved and the monitoring for the development of diabetic complications were investigated. Insulin dependent patients comprised 57.9% of patients attending the diabetic clinic at hospital A, 35.7% at hospital B and 25.0% of patients attending the diabetic clinics at general practices. Of these 55.6%, 37.3% and 30.1% respectively received multiple daily insulin injections. Hospital A had a higher proportion of patients under 40 years old than hospital B or the general practice clinics. The ages of diabetic patients attending the general practice diabetic clinics were broadly similar to those attending hospital B. Significantly more general practice patients, both insulin and non-insulin dependent, had a mean blood glucose level of less than 11 mmol l-1 compared with patients attending clinics at hospitals A and B (P < 0.001). Glycosylated haemoglobin levels did not differ between patients attending hospital A and the general practice clinics. More non-insulin dependent and insulin dependent diabetic patients attending the general practice clinics and hospital A had been monitored satisfactorily for diabetic retinopathy (general practice clinic 68.8% and 39.7% respectively, hospital A 61.7% and 43.5%) than at hospital B (43.0% and 19.4%). Referral rates among all groups for ophthalmological assessment were s Continue reading >>

11 Tips To Protect Your Feet And Legs If You Have Diabetes

11 Tips To Protect Your Feet And Legs If You Have Diabetes

1 / 12 How Does Diabetes Affect Your Feet and Legs? If you're managing diabetes, you may encounter problems with your feet and legs, two common complications of the disease. Diabetes puts you at higher risk for calluses, corns, bunions, blisters, and ulcers — and high blood sugar means these minor injuries and alterations may become gateways to potentially disabling infections. But you can take several steps to help keep your feet in good shape, including wearing specialized footwear, having regular foot exams, and performing low-impact exercise. Why does this complication occur in the first place? First, know that high blood sugar levels damage nerves. Researchers aren’t exactly sure how this damage happens, but they think that blood sugar may have a negative effect on the nervous system’s cells and enzymes, according to the Joslin Diabetes Center. These damaged nerves may lead to diabetic neuropathy, a condition in which you lose feeling in your feet or your hands. According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, neuropathy occurs in about 70 percent of people with diabetes, and its symptoms can result in harmful infections. After all, if you can't feel your feet, you won't be able to notice cuts, sores, or pain. And if you can’t feel these irritations and wounds, they may lead to infection, and untreated infections can lead to gangrene, which in turn can require amputation. Neuropathy is the cause of the dry skin experienced by many of those with diabetes: The disabled nerves in your feet can’t receive the brain’s message to sweat. Dry feet crack, which makes it possible for germs to enter the body. Nerve damage can also cause changes to the shape of your feet, which can make previously comfortable shoes hard to walk in. Continue reading >>

Taking Care Of Your Diabetes Every Day

Taking Care Of Your Diabetes Every Day

There are four things you need to do every day to lower high blood sugar: Eat healthy food Get regular exercise Take your diabetes medicine Test your blood sugar If you have diabetes, you should try to keep your blood sugar level as close as possible to that of someone who doesn’t have diabetes. This may not be possible or right for everyone. Check with your doctor about what the right range of blood sugar is for you. You will get plenty of help in learning how to do this from your health care team, which is made up of your doctor, nurses, and dietitian. Bring a family member or friend with you when you see your doctor. Ask lots of questions. Before you leave, be sure you understand everything you need to know about taking care of your diabetes. Eat Healthy Food The foods on your diabetes eating plan are the same ones that are good for everyone. Try to stick to things that are low in fat, salt, and sugar and high in fiber, like beans, fruits, vegetables, and grains. Eating right will help you: Reach and stay at a weight that is good for you Keep your blood sugar in a good range Prevent heart and blood vessel disease Ask your doctor for the name of a dietitian who can work with you on an eating plan for you and your family. Your dietitian can help you plan meals with foods that you and your family like and that are good for you. If You Use Insulin Give yourself an insulin shot. Eat about the same amount of food each day at about the same time. Don't skip meals, especially if you’ve already given yourself an insulin shot. Your blood sugar may go too low. If You Don't Use Insulin Follow your meal plan. Don't skip meals, especially if you take diabetes pills. Your blood sugar may go too low. Skipping a meal can make you eat too much at the next meal. It may be better to Continue reading >>

Daily Diabetes Care: Sleep, Weight, Checking Blood Sugar, And More

Daily Diabetes Care: Sleep, Weight, Checking Blood Sugar, And More

Lighten the stress on your hips, knees, ankles, and feet Give you more energy and let you breathe easier Check with your doctor before you start a weight loss plan. Then, talk with a diabetes educator or nutritionist to figure out some healthy changes that you can stick with for a lifetime. A better diet and exercise routine can be a big help. But if those habits havent worked for you, ask your doctor if weight loss medications or surgery might be a good option. Not getting enough rest is a struggle for anyone, but it might be an even bigger issue for someone with diabetes: Poor ZZZs may mean worse blood-sugar control, some research shows. And its not just about the amount of sleep you get -- the quality of it can make a difference when it comes to improving blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. If you have a hard time falling or staying asleep, ask your doctor about some ways to get better rest. She can help you figure out why youre losing sleep. If a medical problem is keeping you awake, she can recommend some treatments that can help, like medications for neuropathy or a breathing machine for sleep apnea. Practice relaxation techniques or breathing exercises right before bed. Get regular exercise, but try to finish your workout at least 3 hours before you hit the sack. Dont smoke or drink caffeine or alcohol in the evening. Get up and do something else outside your bedroom when you cant sleep. Dont go back to bed until youre drowsy. Think About Supplements and Natural Treatments Do your homework before you try a supplement. Some might help control your blood sugar, but others can be harmful for people with the condition. Remember that the FDA doesnt regulate them the same way it does medications. Be wary when you consider the claims listed on bottles and label Continue reading >>

Taking Care Of Your Diabetes Means Taking Care Of Your Heart

Taking Care Of Your Diabetes Means Taking Care Of Your Heart

Taking Care of Your Diabetes Means Taking Care of Your Heart Taking Care of Your Diabetes Means Taking Care of Your Heart Taking Care of Your Diabetes Means Taking Care of Your Heart For people with diabetes, heart disease can be a serious health problem. Many people dont know that having diabetesmeans that you have a greater chance of having heart problems such as a heart attack or stroke. Taking care of your diabetescan also help you take care of your heart. Use the tools in this tip sheet to help. They are: A list of things you can do such as eating healthy foods and getting more active. A form to write down and track your A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol numbers. This publication has been reviewed by NDEP for plain language principles. Learn more about our review process . Ask your health care team these questions: What can I do to lower my chances of getting heart disease? What should my goals be for A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol? Should I take medicine that can protect my heart such as aspirin or a statin? Eat foods that are high in fiber such as whole grain breads and cereals, brown rice, lentils, beans, fruits, and vegetables. Eat foods with heart-healthy fats such as fish, nuts, seeds, and avocado. Eat foods low in saturated and transfats such as lean meat, chicken without the skin, fish, and non-fat or low-fat milk, yogurt, and cheese. Use oils when cooking food instead of butter, cream, shortening, lard, or stick margarine. Limit desserts such as cookies and ice cream to only 1 or 2 times a week. Eat smaller amounts of foods that are high in fat, sugar, or salt. For example, if you want french fries, order the kid-sized portion. Bake, broil, or grill food instead of frying. Ask for help or call 1-800-784-8669 (1-800-QUIT-NOW). Be active for 30 min Continue reading >>

Diabetes Care: 10 Ways To Avoid Diabetes Complications

Diabetes Care: 10 Ways To Avoid Diabetes Complications

Diabetes care is a lifelong responsibility. Consider 10 strategies to prevent diabetes complications. Diabetes is a serious disease. Following your diabetes treatment plan takes round-the-clock commitment. But your efforts are worthwhile. Careful diabetes care can reduce your risk of serious — even life-threatening — complications. Here are 10 ways to take an active role in diabetes care and enjoy a healthier future. 1. Make a commitment to managing your diabetes Members of your diabetes care team — doctor or primary care provider, diabetes nurse educator, and dietitian, for example — can help you learn the basics of diabetes care and offer support along the way. But it's up to you to manage your condition. Learn all you can about diabetes. Make healthy eating and physical activity part of your daily routine. Maintain a healthy weight. Monitor your blood sugar level, and follow your doctor's instructions for managing your blood sugar level. Ask your diabetes treatment team for help when you need it. 2. Don't smoke Smoking increases your risk of various diabetes complications, including: Reduced blood flow in the legs and feet, which can lead to infections, ulcers and possible removal of a body part by surgery (amputation) Heart disease Stroke Eye disease, which can lead to blindness Nerve damage Kidney disease Talk to your doctor about ways to help you stop smoking or using other types of tobacco. 3. Keep your blood pressure and cholesterol under control Like diabetes, high blood pressure can damage your blood vessels. High cholesterol is a concern, too, since the damage is often worse and more rapid when you have diabetes. When these conditions team up, they can lead to a heart attack, stroke or other life-threatening conditions. Eating a healthy, reduced-fat d Continue reading >>

What Does Self-care Mean For Diabetic Patients?

What Does Self-care Mean For Diabetic Patients?

What Does Self-Care Mean for Diabetic Patients? When patients cant or wont see a health care provider, theyre left to their own devices, which often leads to self-care, a practice that many people take for granted. Self-care usually refers to indulgent relaxation: taking a hot bath, pouring a glass of wine or cutting an extra-large slice of cake. Diabetics have to be careful when partaking in those practices because they can cause more stress than they relieve. For diabetics, medical self-care means a long-term commitment to avoiding health complications in the absence of a medical provider. This type of self-care can be overwhelming for diabetics, and its unsurprising that a study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine found that most patients struggle with motivation and support for self-care. The link below leads to a worksheet that helps diabetics and their caregivers to keep track of self-care strategies and to stay accountable to their health goals. Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition characterized by hyperglycemia also known as high blood sugar levels. Diabetes is caused by the bodys inability to create or absorb the proper amount of insulin, a hormone that regulates the amount of sugar in the blood, which is called glucose. There are three common forms of diabetes: Type 1: Most often occurring children, whose bodies create little to no insulin, Type 1 diabetes forces people to rely on insulin injections that move the bodys sugar, or glucose, from the bloodstream to the cells. Only 5 percent of diabetes patients have Type 1. Type 2: The most common form of diabetes has historically occurred in adults though in recent years an increase in pediatric diagnoses has alarmed health care providers. People with Type 2 diabetes have developed an insul Continue reading >>

Tips For Managing Type 1 And 2 Diabetes At Home

Tips For Managing Type 1 And 2 Diabetes At Home

Diabetes home care management facts Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition associated with abnormally high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. The main types of diabetes mellitus are type 1 (insulin deficiency; formerly called juvenile diabetes) and type 2 (insulin resistance). Type 1 diabetes requires insulin therapy as well as controlled nutrition and exercise. Type 2 diabetes is best treated with weight reduction, the proper diabetic diet, and exercise. When these measures do not control the blood sugar, oral medications and/or injectable therapies (including insulin) are prescribed. The main goal of diabetes care is to control blood glucose levels in order to prevent the serious complications of diabetes. Glucose levels should be lowered into the normal range, while avoiding low blood sugar whenever possible. It is essential to monitor the effects of treatment on blood glucose levels to avoid overtreatment or undertreatment. Two kinds of home blood glucose monitoring exist. The first type uses a reagent strip. The second type uses a reagent strip and glucose meter. Use of the glucose meter has become more common due to higher reliability than strips alone. Glucose can also be measured in the urine but no longer has a significant role in home testing. Ketoacidosis is a serious but preventable complication from inadequate treatment of diabetes. This dangerous condition is identified by testing for the urine for ketones. People with diabetes should discuss monitoring in detail with their health-care professional, and have clearly defined goals for blood sugar control. Choices for blood glucose meters should be discussed with your physician and any caregivers. The optimal meter accounts for characteristics of the patient which impact usability, such as visual impa Continue reading >>

How To Take Care Of A Diabetic Patient

How To Take Care Of A Diabetic Patient

Diabetes is a chronic condition, which is caused by a lack of insulin production and resistance to insulin in the body. Insulin is a hormone that collects sugar (in the form of glucose) out of the blood and puts it into the liver, fat cells and muscle cells, where it can be used purposefully. Diabetic patients suffer from high levels of sugar in their blood that may lead to complications, such as nerve damage and poor circulation. [Read: Tips to Take Care of Diabetic Foot ] A diabetic patient needs proper health care and for that one needs to have at least some knowledge about the disease. There are many hospitals that conduct workshops on diabetes for educating family members and those caring for diabetic patients in easy language. To avoid serious complications, diabetic patients need to follow a special dietary and exercise regime. The medications for diabetics whether in the form of pills or injections, should be given after consulting a doctor. In case you are taking care of a diabetic patient, you should be trained in giving injections, such as insulin. Do these below mentioned things every day to take care of a diabetic patient. 1. At first, you need to make yourself familiar with the doctor-recommended menu plan prepared for the diabetic patient. You need to ensure to avoid those food items that contain sugars and starches in particular as these can cause unnecessary blood glucose imbalances for diabetic patients. You must add foods with more fiber, such as whole grain cereals, breads, crackers, rice, or pasta. Choose foods that are lower in calories, saturated fat, sugar, and salt. 2. Check the blood glucose level of the diabetic patient daily. Learn to read and understand the blood glucose meter readings of your patient. Ensure that test strips are never outd Continue reading >>

How To Take Care Of A Diabetic Patient

How To Take Care Of A Diabetic Patient

Two Parts: Making Lifestyle Changes Together Helping Your Loved One Manage Diabetes Community Q&A Diabetes is a condition that occurs when the pancreas either makes not enough insulin or not enough insulin at all. This makes it difficult for the body to regulate the person's blood sugar. If you are caring for someone with diabetes you can help them by offering support, making lifestyle changes together, and helping them manage their medications. [1] Provide emotional support. If a loved one has just received a diagnosis of diabetes, they are probably feeling upset and overwhelmed. You can provide emotional support and help them learn to manage their diabetes by: [2] Listening. Your loved one may be worried about how the diagnosis may change their life. If your loved one is ready to talk about concerns and fears, listen and when they are ready, help make a plan for how to deal with the issues. Provide reassurance that diabetes is fully manageable and will not prevent them from living a long and full life. Educating yourself about the condition. This may involve reading books and pamphlets about the disorder. You can also find information online at the American Diabetes Association. Your doctor may even be able to suggest a diabetes education course for you and your loved one. The more educated you are, the better you will be able to anticipate what help might be needed. Offering help when you see something that you can do. Even small things like providing a ride to a doctors appointment may mean a lot. Make dietary changes together. Your loved one may be told eat a healthier diet. You can both change your eating habits together. This will reduce the amount of unhealthy food you have in the house and lessen feelings of isolation. Eating healthier will also benefit you. S Continue reading >>

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