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How To Assess For Somogyi Phenomenon

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Somogyi Effect As The Most Common Cause Of Fasting Hyperglycemia In T1d Patients

Go to: Morning hyperglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) may be caused by the dawn phenomenon, the Somogyi effect or poor glycemic control, diagnoses that lead to different clinical management in each case. Previous reports considered the Somogyi effect as a rare entity in clinical practice. Go to: This study aimed to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of fasting hyperglycemia by continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) in patients with T1D. Go to: Materials and methods We analyzed the glycemic profile measured by 72h-CGMS in 85 patients with T1D (29 female), resulting in 255 overnight periods. We assessed the nocturnal glycemic profile and the accuracy of the CGMS sensor per night. Fasting hyperglycemia was categorized into dawn phenomenon when there was no nocturnal hypoglycemia followed by a minimum 10mg/dL rise plasma between 4: 00h-7: 00h; Somogyi effect when nocturnal hypoglycemia (< 70mg/dL) between 0: 00h-3: 00h was followed by morning hyperglycemia and poor glycemic control when there was sustained overnight hyperglycemia. Clinical data (age, diabetes duration, insulin regime, and HbA1c values) were obtained by chart review and compared to the differe Continue reading >>

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  1. hannahtan

    Somogyi effect VS. Dawn Phenomenon

    As there are a lot of people asking what Dawn Phenomenon and Somogyi effect is... I feel Dlife.com gives a good explanation on it...below is the article...
    -----
    Somogyi effect VS. Dawn Phenomenon
    By Theresa Garnero, APRN, BC-ADM, MSN, CDE
    Have you ever gone to bed with a relatively normal glucose reading, only to wake up with a much higher value? Do you wonder why glucose numbers can swing during sleep or pre-dawn hours? This month’s column will address readers’ questions about the difference between two possibilities: the Somogyi effect and dawn phenomenon.
    What is the Somogyi effect?
    Also known as “rebound hyperglycemia” and named after the physician who first described it, the Somogyi effect is a pattern of undetected hypoglycemia (low blood glucose values of less than 70) followed by hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels of more than 200). Typically, this happens in the middle of the night, but can also occur when too much insulin is circulating in the system. The cause of the Somogyi effect is said to be “man-made”—that is, a result of insulin or diabetes pills working too strongly at the wrong time.
    During periods of hypoglycemia, the body releases hormones which cause a chain reaction to release stored glucose. The end result is that the glucose level can swing too high in the other direction, causing hyperglycemia.
    How can you test for the Somogyi effect?
    This is the fun part. Set your alarm and wake up between 2 and 3 a.m. and test your blood glucose. Low blood glucose levels could signify the Somogyi effect is in action.
    Wouldn’t I know if I’m going too low?
    Not always. Sometimes the body has less of a reaction to low blood sugars, especially if you have had wildly fluctuating glucose values for years and can lead to a condition called autonomic neuropathy, which blocks the body’s ability to detect lows. This is more likely to occur during sleep hours—a frightening thought. One option is to ask your doctor or endocrinologist about a 3-day continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) exam. About the size of a pager, you would wear the device for 3 days. A little plastic tube taped gently beneath your skin allows the CGMS to read glucose readings several times a minute and can explain exactly when lows occur. Companies are competing to have “real-time” glucose values displayed in this device. Currently, the CGMS devices have to be downloaded at the physician or diabetes educator office for interpretation.
    What can I do to correct the Somogyi effect?
    The very best way is to prevent the low from happening in the first place. And that takes a little detective work to figure out what made the glucose plummet. You might try any of the following, with your physician or healthcare provider’s blessing:
    * Have a snack with protein before bedtime, like a piece of toast with peanut butter, or some cottage cheese, or yogurt, or some nuts and small piece of cheese.
    * Go to bed with a glucose level slightly higher than usual.
    * Wake up between 2 to 3 a.m. and test your blood glucose. Bring your logbook to your physician and ask if any medication adjustments are needed (like changing the type and/or amount of insulin, oral medication, or switching to an insulin pump). Do not skip or change your medications without your physician’s input!
    * Ask your doctor about having the CGMS test (see above description).
    What is the dawn phenomenon?
    Named after the time of day it occurs, not some high brow researcher, the dawn phenomenon is the body’s response to hormones released in the early morning hours. This occurs for everyone. When we sleep, hormones are released to help maintain and restore cells within our bodies. These counterregulatory hormones (growth hormone, cortisol and catecholamines) cause the glucose level to rise. For people with diabetes who do not have enough circulating insulin to keep this increase of glucose under control, the end result is a high glucose reading in the morning. For pregnant women, the dawn phenomenon is even more exaggerated due to additional hormones released in the night.
    How can I treat the high fasting glucose readings caused by the dawn phenomenon?
    Several options are worth considering:
    * Exercise later in the day, which may have more of a glucose-lowering effect in the night.
    * Talk with your doctor about a possible medication adjustment to control the higher fasting readings.
    * Limit bedtime carbohydrates and try more of a protein/fat type of snack (nuts, peanut butter, cheese, or meat).
    * Eat breakfast to limit the dawn phenomenon’s effect. By eating, your body will signal the counterregulatory hormones to turn off. This concept can be a little perplexing, as people often say, “But if I don’t eat, shouldn’t my sugar go down?” The opposite is true. By not eating, or skipping meals, it is fairly common to see higher glucose values as a result.
    No matter how we label high glucose values, whether caused by the Somogyi effect or dawn phenomenon, we must figure out their cause. Maybe we can start a dawn phenomenon chat room with everyone who will be setting their alarm clocks to awaken at 2 to 3 a.m. for blood sugar checks! One of the keys of diabetes management is identifying glucose patterns and trends over time. Monitoring is the best way to help solve these situations. Researchers are working diligently on newer systems to help unveil glucose patterns with relative ease. So in the meantime, Test! Don’t Guess – And let me know what you discover!

  2. jwags

    Thanks for the explanation. The only thing I do find is that I need to eat some carbs late at night, not just protein. I think it is the lack of carbs early in the morning that signals DP to start.

  3. Lloyd

    Originally Posted by hannahtan
    How can I treat the high fasting glucose readings caused by the dawn phenomenon?
    Several options are worth considering:
    * Exercise later in the day, which may have more of a glucose-lowering effect in the night.
    * Talk with your doctor about a possible medication adjustment to control the higher fasting readings.
    * Limit bedtime carbohydrates and try more of a protein/fat type of snack (nuts, peanut butter, cheese, or meat).
    * Eat breakfast to limit the dawn phenomenon’s effect. By eating, your body will signal the counterregulatory hormones to turn off. This concept can be a little perplexing, as people often say, “But if I don’t eat, shouldn’t my sugar go down?” The opposite is true. By not eating, or skipping meals, it is fairly common to see higher glucose values as a result.
    No matter how we label high glucose values, whether caused by the Somogyi effect or dawn phenomenon, we must figure out their cause. Maybe we can start a dawn phenomenon chat room with everyone who will be setting their alarm clocks to awaken at 2 to 3 a.m. for blood sugar checks! One of the keys of diabetes management is identifying glucose patterns and trends over time. Monitoring is the best way to help solve these situations. Researchers are working diligently on newer systems to help unveil glucose patterns with relative ease. So in the meantime, Test! Don’t Guess – And let me know what you discover! The methods suggested for treatment of Somogy effect are often effective.
    The methods suggested for treatment of Dawn Phenomenon are almost never effective, unless you have a very mild case.
    An insulin pump can be 100% effective in stopping DP in its tracks, as long as it occurs with regularity, by raising your basal rate to whatever is needed at a given time.
    My fasting readings dropped 100+ points on the first night of using a pump.
    -Lloyd

  4. -> Continue reading
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The main cause of the rebound effect after a low blood sugar is over-correcting. Learn how I treat my lows to avoid rebounds. Video about lowering A1C: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkWyE... Dr. Bernstein's website: http://www.diabetes-book.com/

Somogyi Effect (rebound Hyperglycaemia)

An insulin dose that is too high may bring about the Somogyi effect or rebound hyperglycaemia. This can also be produced if blood glucose concentrations fall too rapidly. The body attempts to counteract the decline in the blood glucose concentration through a chain of reactions: The blood glucose concentration falls rapidly or approaches hypoglycaemia (blood glucose concentrations of less than 5 mmol/l (90 mg/dl)) following the injection of insulin. The animal becomes hungry and either restless or lethargic. In response to a declining blood glucose concentration in the CNS, adrenaline and subsequently cortisol, glucagon and growth hormone are released. These hormones bring about an increase in the blood glucose concentration (through gluconeogenesis, release of glucose from hepatic glycogen and increased peripheral resistance to insulin). The resultant hyperglycaemia produces polyuria and polydipsia. This can easily be misinterpreted as a result of an inadequate insulin dose. If the morning polyuria is thought to be the result of an insufficient insulin dose and a higher dose is given, the problem will be aggravated. An even more pronounced Somogyi effect will follow. Eventually th Continue reading >>

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  1. hannahtan

    Somogyi effect VS. Dawn Phenomenon

    As there are a lot of people asking what Dawn Phenomenon and Somogyi effect is... I feel Dlife.com gives a good explanation on it...below is the article...
    -----
    Somogyi effect VS. Dawn Phenomenon
    By Theresa Garnero, APRN, BC-ADM, MSN, CDE
    Have you ever gone to bed with a relatively normal glucose reading, only to wake up with a much higher value? Do you wonder why glucose numbers can swing during sleep or pre-dawn hours? This month’s column will address readers’ questions about the difference between two possibilities: the Somogyi effect and dawn phenomenon.
    What is the Somogyi effect?
    Also known as “rebound hyperglycemia” and named after the physician who first described it, the Somogyi effect is a pattern of undetected hypoglycemia (low blood glucose values of less than 70) followed by hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels of more than 200). Typically, this happens in the middle of the night, but can also occur when too much insulin is circulating in the system. The cause of the Somogyi effect is said to be “man-made”—that is, a result of insulin or diabetes pills working too strongly at the wrong time.
    During periods of hypoglycemia, the body releases hormones which cause a chain reaction to release stored glucose. The end result is that the glucose level can swing too high in the other direction, causing hyperglycemia.
    How can you test for the Somogyi effect?
    This is the fun part. Set your alarm and wake up between 2 and 3 a.m. and test your blood glucose. Low blood glucose levels could signify the Somogyi effect is in action.
    Wouldn’t I know if I’m going too low?
    Not always. Sometimes the body has less of a reaction to low blood sugars, especially if you have had wildly fluctuating glucose values for years and can lead to a condition called autonomic neuropathy, which blocks the body’s ability to detect lows. This is more likely to occur during sleep hours—a frightening thought. One option is to ask your doctor or endocrinologist about a 3-day continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) exam. About the size of a pager, you would wear the device for 3 days. A little plastic tube taped gently beneath your skin allows the CGMS to read glucose readings several times a minute and can explain exactly when lows occur. Companies are competing to have “real-time” glucose values displayed in this device. Currently, the CGMS devices have to be downloaded at the physician or diabetes educator office for interpretation.
    What can I do to correct the Somogyi effect?
    The very best way is to prevent the low from happening in the first place. And that takes a little detective work to figure out what made the glucose plummet. You might try any of the following, with your physician or healthcare provider’s blessing:
    * Have a snack with protein before bedtime, like a piece of toast with peanut butter, or some cottage cheese, or yogurt, or some nuts and small piece of cheese.
    * Go to bed with a glucose level slightly higher than usual.
    * Wake up between 2 to 3 a.m. and test your blood glucose. Bring your logbook to your physician and ask if any medication adjustments are needed (like changing the type and/or amount of insulin, oral medication, or switching to an insulin pump). Do not skip or change your medications without your physician’s input!
    * Ask your doctor about having the CGMS test (see above description).
    What is the dawn phenomenon?
    Named after the time of day it occurs, not some high brow researcher, the dawn phenomenon is the body’s response to hormones released in the early morning hours. This occurs for everyone. When we sleep, hormones are released to help maintain and restore cells within our bodies. These counterregulatory hormones (growth hormone, cortisol and catecholamines) cause the glucose level to rise. For people with diabetes who do not have enough circulating insulin to keep this increase of glucose under control, the end result is a high glucose reading in the morning. For pregnant women, the dawn phenomenon is even more exaggerated due to additional hormones released in the night.
    How can I treat the high fasting glucose readings caused by the dawn phenomenon?
    Several options are worth considering:
    * Exercise later in the day, which may have more of a glucose-lowering effect in the night.
    * Talk with your doctor about a possible medication adjustment to control the higher fasting readings.
    * Limit bedtime carbohydrates and try more of a protein/fat type of snack (nuts, peanut butter, cheese, or meat).
    * Eat breakfast to limit the dawn phenomenon’s effect. By eating, your body will signal the counterregulatory hormones to turn off. This concept can be a little perplexing, as people often say, “But if I don’t eat, shouldn’t my sugar go down?” The opposite is true. By not eating, or skipping meals, it is fairly common to see higher glucose values as a result.
    No matter how we label high glucose values, whether caused by the Somogyi effect or dawn phenomenon, we must figure out their cause. Maybe we can start a dawn phenomenon chat room with everyone who will be setting their alarm clocks to awaken at 2 to 3 a.m. for blood sugar checks! One of the keys of diabetes management is identifying glucose patterns and trends over time. Monitoring is the best way to help solve these situations. Researchers are working diligently on newer systems to help unveil glucose patterns with relative ease. So in the meantime, Test! Don’t Guess – And let me know what you discover!

  2. jwags

    Thanks for the explanation. The only thing I do find is that I need to eat some carbs late at night, not just protein. I think it is the lack of carbs early in the morning that signals DP to start.

  3. Lloyd

    Originally Posted by hannahtan
    How can I treat the high fasting glucose readings caused by the dawn phenomenon?
    Several options are worth considering:
    * Exercise later in the day, which may have more of a glucose-lowering effect in the night.
    * Talk with your doctor about a possible medication adjustment to control the higher fasting readings.
    * Limit bedtime carbohydrates and try more of a protein/fat type of snack (nuts, peanut butter, cheese, or meat).
    * Eat breakfast to limit the dawn phenomenon’s effect. By eating, your body will signal the counterregulatory hormones to turn off. This concept can be a little perplexing, as people often say, “But if I don’t eat, shouldn’t my sugar go down?” The opposite is true. By not eating, or skipping meals, it is fairly common to see higher glucose values as a result.
    No matter how we label high glucose values, whether caused by the Somogyi effect or dawn phenomenon, we must figure out their cause. Maybe we can start a dawn phenomenon chat room with everyone who will be setting their alarm clocks to awaken at 2 to 3 a.m. for blood sugar checks! One of the keys of diabetes management is identifying glucose patterns and trends over time. Monitoring is the best way to help solve these situations. Researchers are working diligently on newer systems to help unveil glucose patterns with relative ease. So in the meantime, Test! Don’t Guess – And let me know what you discover! The methods suggested for treatment of Somogy effect are often effective.
    The methods suggested for treatment of Dawn Phenomenon are almost never effective, unless you have a very mild case.
    An insulin pump can be 100% effective in stopping DP in its tracks, as long as it occurs with regularity, by raising your basal rate to whatever is needed at a given time.
    My fasting readings dropped 100+ points on the first night of using a pump.
    -Lloyd

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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Somogyi effect, also called rebound hyperglycemia (suh moh jee) when the blood glucose level swings high following hypoglycemia. The somogyi phenomenon revisited using continuous glucose. What is the somogyi effect? Healthline. Blood sugar that is low at 3. And at your normal wake up time for several nights 28 shanik et al, example, suggested that the hyperglycemia attributed to somogyi phenomenon actually is caused by an insulin induced it's relatively easy tell difference between effect dawn. The dawn phenomenon and the somogyi effect two phenomena of morning hyperglycaemia. Feline diabetes mellitus the somogyi effect vetsulin. Somogyi effect diabetes self managementthe somogyi rebound hyperglycemia verywella short review semantic scholarclinician reviews mdedgethe difference between the and dawn phenomenondawn phenomenon daily. Michael somogyi, which is how the distinction between somogyi phenomenon and dawn dyslipidemia assessment treatment of cardiovascular risk applying 24 related to too much insulin causing rebound hyper, while caused by not enough circulating 12 effect (first discovered my dr. A healthcare provider recommend testing blood glucose levels in the royal infirma

Somogyi Phenomenon - Rebound Hyperglycemia

Tweet The Somogyi phenomenon (also known as post-hypoglycemic hyperglycemia, chronic Somogyi rebound) describes a rebound high blood glucose level in response to low blood glucose. Amongst those people with diabetes who manage their blood glucose using insulin injections, this may take the form of high blood sugar in the morning due to an excess amount of insulin during the night. The Somogyi effect is controversial despite being widely reported. Why is rebound hyperglycemia called The Somogyi effect? The Somogyi phenomenon was named after a Hungarian-born professor called Dr. Michael Somogyi. He prepared the first insulin treatment given to a child with diabetes in the USA, and also showed that too much insulin would make diabetes management unstable and more difficult. Is Somogyi Phenomenon the same as Dawn Phenomenon? No, although they are often confused by healthcare professionals. The Dawn Effect (or Dawn Phenomenon) is a morning rise in blood sugar which occurs as a response to waning levels of insulin and a surge in growth hormones. How does Somogyi Phenomenon occur? Somogyi theorised that prolonged levels of untreated hypoglycemia could lead to stress (due to low blood suga Continue reading >>

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  1. hannahtan

    Somogyi effect VS. Dawn Phenomenon

    As there are a lot of people asking what Dawn Phenomenon and Somogyi effect is... I feel Dlife.com gives a good explanation on it...below is the article...
    -----
    Somogyi effect VS. Dawn Phenomenon
    By Theresa Garnero, APRN, BC-ADM, MSN, CDE
    Have you ever gone to bed with a relatively normal glucose reading, only to wake up with a much higher value? Do you wonder why glucose numbers can swing during sleep or pre-dawn hours? This month’s column will address readers’ questions about the difference between two possibilities: the Somogyi effect and dawn phenomenon.
    What is the Somogyi effect?
    Also known as “rebound hyperglycemia” and named after the physician who first described it, the Somogyi effect is a pattern of undetected hypoglycemia (low blood glucose values of less than 70) followed by hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels of more than 200). Typically, this happens in the middle of the night, but can also occur when too much insulin is circulating in the system. The cause of the Somogyi effect is said to be “man-made”—that is, a result of insulin or diabetes pills working too strongly at the wrong time.
    During periods of hypoglycemia, the body releases hormones which cause a chain reaction to release stored glucose. The end result is that the glucose level can swing too high in the other direction, causing hyperglycemia.
    How can you test for the Somogyi effect?
    This is the fun part. Set your alarm and wake up between 2 and 3 a.m. and test your blood glucose. Low blood glucose levels could signify the Somogyi effect is in action.
    Wouldn’t I know if I’m going too low?
    Not always. Sometimes the body has less of a reaction to low blood sugars, especially if you have had wildly fluctuating glucose values for years and can lead to a condition called autonomic neuropathy, which blocks the body’s ability to detect lows. This is more likely to occur during sleep hours—a frightening thought. One option is to ask your doctor or endocrinologist about a 3-day continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) exam. About the size of a pager, you would wear the device for 3 days. A little plastic tube taped gently beneath your skin allows the CGMS to read glucose readings several times a minute and can explain exactly when lows occur. Companies are competing to have “real-time” glucose values displayed in this device. Currently, the CGMS devices have to be downloaded at the physician or diabetes educator office for interpretation.
    What can I do to correct the Somogyi effect?
    The very best way is to prevent the low from happening in the first place. And that takes a little detective work to figure out what made the glucose plummet. You might try any of the following, with your physician or healthcare provider’s blessing:
    * Have a snack with protein before bedtime, like a piece of toast with peanut butter, or some cottage cheese, or yogurt, or some nuts and small piece of cheese.
    * Go to bed with a glucose level slightly higher than usual.
    * Wake up between 2 to 3 a.m. and test your blood glucose. Bring your logbook to your physician and ask if any medication adjustments are needed (like changing the type and/or amount of insulin, oral medication, or switching to an insulin pump). Do not skip or change your medications without your physician’s input!
    * Ask your doctor about having the CGMS test (see above description).
    What is the dawn phenomenon?
    Named after the time of day it occurs, not some high brow researcher, the dawn phenomenon is the body’s response to hormones released in the early morning hours. This occurs for everyone. When we sleep, hormones are released to help maintain and restore cells within our bodies. These counterregulatory hormones (growth hormone, cortisol and catecholamines) cause the glucose level to rise. For people with diabetes who do not have enough circulating insulin to keep this increase of glucose under control, the end result is a high glucose reading in the morning. For pregnant women, the dawn phenomenon is even more exaggerated due to additional hormones released in the night.
    How can I treat the high fasting glucose readings caused by the dawn phenomenon?
    Several options are worth considering:
    * Exercise later in the day, which may have more of a glucose-lowering effect in the night.
    * Talk with your doctor about a possible medication adjustment to control the higher fasting readings.
    * Limit bedtime carbohydrates and try more of a protein/fat type of snack (nuts, peanut butter, cheese, or meat).
    * Eat breakfast to limit the dawn phenomenon’s effect. By eating, your body will signal the counterregulatory hormones to turn off. This concept can be a little perplexing, as people often say, “But if I don’t eat, shouldn’t my sugar go down?” The opposite is true. By not eating, or skipping meals, it is fairly common to see higher glucose values as a result.
    No matter how we label high glucose values, whether caused by the Somogyi effect or dawn phenomenon, we must figure out their cause. Maybe we can start a dawn phenomenon chat room with everyone who will be setting their alarm clocks to awaken at 2 to 3 a.m. for blood sugar checks! One of the keys of diabetes management is identifying glucose patterns and trends over time. Monitoring is the best way to help solve these situations. Researchers are working diligently on newer systems to help unveil glucose patterns with relative ease. So in the meantime, Test! Don’t Guess – And let me know what you discover!

  2. jwags

    Thanks for the explanation. The only thing I do find is that I need to eat some carbs late at night, not just protein. I think it is the lack of carbs early in the morning that signals DP to start.

  3. Lloyd

    Originally Posted by hannahtan
    How can I treat the high fasting glucose readings caused by the dawn phenomenon?
    Several options are worth considering:
    * Exercise later in the day, which may have more of a glucose-lowering effect in the night.
    * Talk with your doctor about a possible medication adjustment to control the higher fasting readings.
    * Limit bedtime carbohydrates and try more of a protein/fat type of snack (nuts, peanut butter, cheese, or meat).
    * Eat breakfast to limit the dawn phenomenon’s effect. By eating, your body will signal the counterregulatory hormones to turn off. This concept can be a little perplexing, as people often say, “But if I don’t eat, shouldn’t my sugar go down?” The opposite is true. By not eating, or skipping meals, it is fairly common to see higher glucose values as a result.
    No matter how we label high glucose values, whether caused by the Somogyi effect or dawn phenomenon, we must figure out their cause. Maybe we can start a dawn phenomenon chat room with everyone who will be setting their alarm clocks to awaken at 2 to 3 a.m. for blood sugar checks! One of the keys of diabetes management is identifying glucose patterns and trends over time. Monitoring is the best way to help solve these situations. Researchers are working diligently on newer systems to help unveil glucose patterns with relative ease. So in the meantime, Test! Don’t Guess – And let me know what you discover! The methods suggested for treatment of Somogy effect are often effective.
    The methods suggested for treatment of Dawn Phenomenon are almost never effective, unless you have a very mild case.
    An insulin pump can be 100% effective in stopping DP in its tracks, as long as it occurs with regularity, by raising your basal rate to whatever is needed at a given time.
    My fasting readings dropped 100+ points on the first night of using a pump.
    -Lloyd

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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