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How The Digestive System And Urinary System Play A Role In Type 2 Diabetes

How Does The Digestive And Urinary Systems Play A Role In Type 2 Diabeties?

How Does The Digestive And Urinary Systems Play A Role In Type 2 Diabeties?

Answered Apr 30, 2018 Author has 25.6k answers and 51.3m answer views Digestive system: taking up your nutrients from the food you ate, if eating too much making you grow obese, thus inducing insulin resistance, that either inducing or worsening ones type 2 diabetes, for which to become clinical apparent one needs to first develop insulin resistance, followed by the pancreas getting overworked and unable to deliver the great amounts of insulin needed to keep blood glucose levels within normal limits. Kidneys: if blood glucose levels rise above the threshold of 180 mg/dL, one wont be able to reuptake all the glucose ultrafiltered into the primary urine, so lose glucose in the urine, and since we cant pee out sugar crystals carries (sometimes a lot of) water with it, causing polyuria (much and frequent peeing), one of the symptoms of diabetes. Long time badly controlled diabetes, especially when combined with untreated hypertension, will cause diabetic kidney disease, the number one cause for ESRD = end stage kidney disease worldwide, nescessitating kidney replacement treatment (dialysis or kidney transplant) 257 Views View Upvoters Answer requested by Continue reading >>

Urinary System

Urinary System

Tweet The urinary system, also known as the excretory system, allows the body to remove waste or unneeded products from the body through the urine. The urinary system can also help the body to remove excess glucose from the blood. As a result, though, high blood sugar levels can present problems for the urinary system in the short term as well as in the longer term. Role of the excretory system The role of the excretory system is to remove waste products such as urea, uric acid, and creatinine from the blood to be passed out of the body as urine. The urinary system also helps us to regulate the amount of glucose, salts and water in the blood. Components of the urinary system The following organs and vessels make up the excretory system: The kidneys are the filters which remove waste products and water from the blood. The resulting urine passes out of the kidneys through muscular tubes called the ureters which drain into the bladder. The bladder gradually collects and stores urine until it can be conveniently emptied. Upon emptying, the bladder's sphincter opens and urine travel down a tube called the urethra which empties out of the body via the genitals. The urinary system and blood sugar levels If the blood has an excess of glucose, the kidneys will remove glucose from the blood to be excreted in the urine. A number of diabetes drugs, known as SGLT2 inhibitors, have been developed which reduces the amount of glucose that is reabsorbed by the kidneys, therefore more glucose is passed out of the urine. How diabetes can affect the urinary system Diabetes can have short term and long term effects on the urinary system. In the short term, high blood glucose levels can promote bacterial growth which can raise the risk of urinary tract infections or thrush developing. Long t Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect The Digestive System?

How Does Diabetes Affect The Digestive System?

If you’ve recently been diagnosed with diabetes or have been living with the disease for a while, you’re more than likely familiar with possible complications, like kidney disease, vision loss, and even amputations. But it’s important to note that poorly controlled type 2 diabetes can also affect other parts of your body, including your digestive system, and that the longer you’ve lived with diabetes, the more likely it may be that you could experience these types of problems. In fact, some research suggests 75 percent of people visiting diabetes clinics report having significant gastrointestinal symptoms. How Diabetic Neuropathy Can Lead to Heartburn and Other Issues So how might diabetes affect the digestive system? “Advanced diabetes, whether it’s from type 1 or type 2 diabetes, can affect any organ in the body — including those organs in the digestive tract,” says James C. Reynolds, MD, a gastroenterology specialist and clinical medicine professor at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Dr. Reynolds notes digestive problems may be caused by the very factors that led to diabetes in the first place, such as obesity, but it’s also possible that digestive problems are the result of diabetes-related complications, such as hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar. One of the most serious diabetes complications that can result from consistent high blood sugar is diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage. Neuropathy may lead to weakness, pain, and numbness, affecting feeling in your feet, legs, and hands, but the condition can also affect digestive functions like swallowing and constipation, Reynolds explains. If you have diabetes, this potential complication is just another reason it’s crucial to pay attention to your A1C, the average level of glucose o Continue reading >>

Sex, Urinary, And Bladder Problems Of Diabetes

Sex, Urinary, And Bladder Problems Of Diabetes

What sexual problems can occur in men with diabetes? Erectile Dysfunction Erectile dysfunction is a consistent inability to have an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. The condition includes the total inability to have an erection and the inability to sustain an erection. Estimates of the prevalence of erectile dysfunction in men with diabetes vary widely, ranging from 20 to 75 percent. Men who have diabetes are two to three times more likely to have erectile dysfunction than men who do not have diabetes. Among men with erectile dysfunction, those with diabetes may experience the problem as much as 10 to 15 years earlier than men without diabetes. Research suggests that erectile dysfunction may be an early marker of diabetes, particularly in men ages 45 and younger. In addition to diabetes, other major causes of erectile dysfunction include high blood pressure, kidney disease, alcohol abuse, and blood vessel disease. Erectile dysfunction may also occur because of the side effects of medications, psychological factors, smoking, and hormonal deficiencies. Men who experience erectile dysfunction should consider talking with a health care provider. The health care provider may ask about the patient's medical history, the type and frequency of sexual problems, medications, smoking and drinking habits, and other health conditions. A physical exam and laboratory tests may help pinpoint causes of sexual problems. The health care provider will check blood glucose control and hormone levels and may ask the patient to do a test at home that checks for erections that occur during sleep. The health care provider may also ask whether the patient is depressed or has recently experienced upsetting changes in his life. Treatments for erectile dysfunction caused by nerve damage, Continue reading >>

Role Of Multiple Organs And Tissues In Type 2 Diabetes

Role Of Multiple Organs And Tissues In Type 2 Diabetes

SHARE RATE★★★★★ Type 2 diabetes is increasingly seen as a disease in which multiple organs and tissues in the body play a role in causing high blood glucose. In fact, nowadays when researchers consider type 2 diabetes, they think of the “ominous octet” or organs and tissues that work together to contribute to elevated blood glucose. This octet includes1: Muscle Fat cells Liver Beta cells in the pancreas Alpha cells in the pancreas Intestine Kidney Brain Muscle tissue. Muscle tissue throughout the body contribute to elevated blood glucose by becoming resistant to insulin and unable to take up glucose for cellular energy needs. Fat cells. Fat cells in people with type 2 diabetes exhibit increased breakdown of fats and other lipids that contributes insulin resistance and increases fat deposits throughout the body. Liver. In type 2 diabetes, the liver—a major site of glucose storage—attempts to compensate for the decreased ability of the body to use glucose and increases glucose production. Pancreas (beta and alpha cells). Both alpha cells and beta cells in the pancreas play a central role in type 2 diabetes. Beta cells lose the ability to produce insulin, while alpha cells increase production of glucagon, the hormone that plays a role in transforming glycogen stored in the liver and muscles back into glucose. Additionally, beta cells also produce the hormone amylin, which controls how quickly glucose is released into the blood stream after eating. Intestine. Gastrointestinal tissues in the intestine become deficient in producing the hormones called incretins and resistant to its effects. Incretins stimulate the body to produce insulin after eating and also slow emptying of the stomach, which promotes the feeling of fullness and delays the release of gluco Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Diabetes On Your Body

The Effects Of Diabetes On Your Body

When you hear the word “diabetes,” your first thought is likely about high blood sugar. Blood sugar is an often-underestimated component of your health. When it’s out of whack over a long period of time, it could develop into diabetes. Diabetes affects your body’s ability to produce or use insulin, a hormone that allows your body to turn glucose (sugar) into energy. Here’s what symptoms may occur to your body when diabetes takes effect. Diabetes can be effectively managed when caught early. However, when left untreated, it can lead to potential complications that include heart disease, stroke, kidney damage, and nerve damage. Normally after you eat or drink, your body will break down sugars from your food and use them for energy in your cells. To accomplish this, your pancreas needs to produce a hormone called insulin. Insulin is what facilitates the process of pulling sugar from the blood and putting it in the cells for use, or energy. If you have diabetes, your pancreas either produces too little insulin or none at all. The insulin can’t be used effectively. This allows blood glucose levels to rise while the rest of your cells are deprived of much-needed energy. This can lead to a wide variety of problems affecting nearly every major body system. The effects of diabetes on your body also depends on the type you have. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1, also called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is an immune system disorder. Your own immune system attacks the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, destroying your body’s ability to make insulin. With type 1 diabetes, you must take insulin to live. Most people are diagnosed as a child or young adult. Type 2 is related to insulin resistance. It used to occur i Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects The Digestive System

How Diabetes Affects The Digestive System

With an increase of glucose in the blood, our digestive systems can experience problems with absorbing necessary nutrients. Diabetes is currently one of the most common health conditions. This illness arises when the body is not capable of producing insulin, something that usually helps regulate the amount of sugar in the blood. Diabetes varies in type and severity, but regardless of these details they all pose health risks. While it continues to be incurable, it is treatable. For this reason, we are about to explain in detail how diabetes affects the digestive system. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com The functions of the digestive system One of the most important systems in a human being is the digestive system. It is a network of organs including the mouth, the pharynx, and the stomach, which must transform food into something that can be absorbed by parts of the body, mainly cells, so that it can function. The complete digestive cycle is comprised of transportation, secretion, absorption, and excretion in order for the body to function properly. It supplies all of the nutrients our bodies need through this process. It also allows us to clean or dispose of those elements that our bodies no longer need. How diabetes affects the digestive system As we already know, digestion is an automatic process. This means that our body does not require a conscious stimulus to work and digest food. The opposite is actually true, the digestive system operates on its own thanks to the nervous system. Diabetes creates issues with this system that prevent proper functioning of the digestive system. When the blood has an increased amount of glucose, our digestive system can Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Digestion

Diabetes And Your Digestion

Diabetes can cause problems associated with digestion in your stomach as the result of a condition called gastroparesis. Literally, gastroparesis means "paralysis of the stomach," but it is much more than that. First, let's understand how the stomach works. In the stomach, the stimulation of the vagus nerve causes contractions that help to crush food into small particles and mix it up with the acids and enzymes that break down food. The contractions of the stomach then propel the food out of the stomach a little at a time through a valve (pyloric sphincter) that opens into the small intestine. It may take up to 4 hours to empty food from the stomach into the intestine. A meal containing a high amount of fat slows down the process. In people with diabetes, gastroparesis may be caused by damage of the vagus nerve when blood sugar has been high for a period of years. As a result of the damage, the food that enters the stomach is not pulverized and sits in the stomach for a longer period of time. Gastroparesis symptoms can include bloating, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, a feeling of fullness soon after starting a meal, weight loss, and heartburn. Secretions of enzymes and acids from the stomach lining still occur, but they contribute to nausea and vomiting when the food hasn't been crushed into small particles. If vomiting does occur, the food may come up in much the same condition as it went down. Gastroparesis can create a vicious cycle in the control of blood sugar. Food that is not digested properly can make blood sugar difficult to control. In return, poor blood sugar control worsens gastroparesis by promoting slow stomach emptying. Therefore, blood sugar control plays an important role in preventing and managing gastroparesis. The symptoms of gastroparesis can be Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect Endocrine, Excretory, And Digestive Systems?

How Does Diabetes Affect Endocrine, Excretory, And Digestive Systems?

Likewise on the digestive system, diabetes also has some consequences on the endocrine system. But before we delve into its effects, let us have a quick glance into the understanding of what endocrine system is and what role does it play. Endocrine system is basically a complex network of glands that produce some chemicals known as hormones. These hormones are responsible for controlling various functions of the body by sending signals to the brain. The body falls under an endocrine disease either when the glands stop producing respective hormones or when the brain doesn’t respond to the hormonal signals. Some of the major glands that form up the endocrine system are: Adrenal glands Pancreas Pituitary gland Reproductive glands Hypothalamus Thyroid Pineal body Parathyroid Relation between Diabetes and Endocrine System Diabetes is a form of endocrine disease caused by high blood sugar levels in the body. It is perhaps the most common disease affecting the endocrine system. Diabetes arises when the group of hormones governing the glucose levels in the blood stops functioning, resulting in shooting up of the blood glucose. In addition to insulin and glucagon, various other hormones of endocrine system are responsible for influencing blood glucose levels. For instance, cortisol raises the levels of blood glucose to boost up the energy. Likewise, incretins hormones begin the insulin secretion from the pancreas, so that the glucose levels don’t increase much, after having meals. How diabetes affects the stomach? According to doctors, the other term for gastroparesis is ‘diabetic stomach’. Autonomic neuropathy that is the damaging of the vagus nerve, makes the movement of the food slow, thus retaining it for an extended period. This accumulation of solid mass in the sto Continue reading >>

Effects Of Diabetes On The Body And Organs

Effects Of Diabetes On The Body And Organs

Over time, the raised blood sugar levels that result from diabetes can cause a wide range of serious health issues. But what do these health issues involve, and how are the organs of the body affected? Can these effects be minimized? When people have diabetes, the body either does not make enough insulin or cannot use what it has effectively. As a result, the amount of sugar in the blood becomes higher than it should be. Glucose, or blood sugar, is the main power source for the human body. It comes from the food people eat. The hormone insulin helps the cells of the body convert glucose into fuel. Fortunately, taking a proactive approach to this chronic disease through medical care, lifestyle changes, and medication can help limit its effects. Effect on systems and organs The effects of diabetes can be seen on systems throughout the body, including: The circulatory system Diabetes can damage large blood vessels, causing macrovascular disease. It can also damage small blood vessels, causing what is called microvascular disease. Complications from macrovascular disease include heart attack and stroke. However, macrovascular disease can be prevented by: Microvascular disease can cause eye, kidney, and nerve problems, but good control of diabetes can help prevent these complications. The cardiovascular system Excess blood sugar decreases the elasticity of blood vessels and causes them to narrow, impeding blood flow. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute say diabetes is as big a risk factor for heart disease as smoking or high cholesterol. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the risk of stroke or dying of heart disease increases by 200-400 percent for adults with diabetes. The nervous system When people have diabetes, they can develop n Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections – Things You Need To Know

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections – Things You Need To Know

In this article we will cover everything you need to know about diabetes and your risk for Urinary Tract Infections. Do you have an increased risk of Urinary Tract Infections now that you have diabetes? We will cover what a Urinary Tract Infection is, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment guidelines, as well as why they are more common in people with diabetes. More importantly, we will discuss steps you can take to prevent them! What Is a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)? A urinary tract infection or UTI is an infection anywhere in your bladder, kidneys or in the urinary system. An infection of the upper urinary tract or the bladder is called a bladder infection or cystitis. An infection in the urethra is called urethritis. Women tend to be more at risk of these types of infections due to their anatomy; they have a much shorter area between the urethra and the opening to the urethra to the bladder. Urinary tract infections are rare in men under 50 due to their anatomy. A more serious infection of the lower urinary tract is an infection of the kidney and the ureters and is called pyelonephritis. This is a complication and occurs when the bladder infection progresses to the kidneys. I highly advise reading the following articles: According to the Stanford Medicine’s Michael Hsieh Lab, half of women and men will have experienced a urinary tract infection (UTI) during our lifetime at least once. They are the most common infection, and can lead to death in patients who are experiencing it severely. Antibiotics are the most effective therapy.The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases account 8.1 million visits to the clinic, hospitals for UTI purposes. For women, the risk of getting a UTI is 50 percent greater than a man. What Are The Symptoms of a UTI? L Continue reading >>

Gut Warning: Type 2 Diabetes Is Driven By The Digestive System

Gut Warning: Type 2 Diabetes Is Driven By The Digestive System

The gut - or gastrointestinal tract - is an organ system which takes in food, digests it and absorbs energy and nutrients, expelling any waste as urine or faeces. It contains gut flora, a complex community of microorganisms that live in the digestive tract. A new study, however, has found the gut plays an integral role in the development of type 2 diabetes. Research published in Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders has revealed how it contributes to an imbalance in insulin-regulating hormone levels. Type 2 diabetes is known to be triggered by genetics and lifestyle, but the gut may play a key role too. Type 2 diabetes is known to be triggered by genetics and lifestyle. They cause insulin resistance - when your body doesn't use insulin as it should to maintain a normal blood glucose level. This means blood sugar can rise too high. The study found that the gut adds to this by contributing to the hypersecretion of glucagon in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. Hypersecretion is excessive production of a bodily secretion - in this case a hormone. That hormone is glucagon, and it tells your liver and muscles to convert glycogen into glucose and release it into your blood so your cells can use it for energy. In healthy people, glucagon works in sync with insulin. Roughly four to six hours after you eat, your pancreas is triggered to produce glucagon, which causes glucose to be realeased into your bloodstream for energy. Insulin is then meant to counterbalance this by telling the body's cells to take in glucose. The balance is thrown off when insulin doesn't work properly Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes (type-2) Affect The Digestive System?

How Does Diabetes (type-2) Affect The Digestive System?

How Does Diabetes (Type-2) Affect the Digestive System? In the early stages of type-2 diabetes, the disease may be easy to ignore especially if you are still feeling fine. But in fact, it can affect the major organs of the body if left uncontrolled, including the digestive system. Other organs that are often linked with the diabetes complications are kidneys, heart & blood vessels, eyes, and nerves. All types of diabetes (type-1, type-2, and gestational diabetes (typically it only occurs during pregnancy)) affect the mechanism of the body in using glucose /sugar. This simple substance of carbohydrate is needed by the body to produce energy or fuel. If glucose in the bloodstream cannot be effectively converted into energy, the blood sugar level will increase. If this occurs frequently /too often or left untreated (not well-controlled), a cascade of other health problems can occur! Having frequent high blood sugar in long term can trigger diabetes complications. Thats why, to prevent or lower the risk of the complications from the disease, its very crucial for diabetics in managing and controlling their blood sugar level as well. In other words, regular blood sugar tests are required for patients. This can help you to get to know the level of your blood sugar regularly so thus you will know exactly what you need to do! There are several choices to help monitoring your blood sugar, such as: CGM (Continuous Glucose Monitoring System)is one of practical choices to keep self-monitoring your blood sugar. It uses a very small sensor that located under the skin particularly in the tissue fluid under the skin. With this idea, a transmitter of the sensor can transfer the information of the blood sugar level continuously. CGM also can help monitor certain subtle changes that may b Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

What is type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects your body’s use of glucose (a type of sugar you make from the carbohydrates you eat). Glucose is the fuel your cells need to do their work. You need glucose for energy. You also need insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps glucose enter your cells so that it can be converted to energy. Here’s the problem: People with type 2 diabetes (also known as diabetes mellitus) can’t properly use or store glucose, either because their cells resist it or, in some cases, they don’t make enough. Over time, glucose builds up in the bloodstream, which can lead to serious health complications unless people take steps to manage their blood sugar. Type 2 diabetes affects more than 29 million Americans, including nearly eight million who don’t even know they have it. You may be at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes if it runs in your family, if you are of a certain age or ethnicity, or if you are inactive or overweight. Type 2 diabetes vs. type 1 diabetes What’s the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the body does not produce insulin. The immune system destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children, teens, and young adults. People with type 1 diabetes need life-long insulin therapy. Type 2 diabetes is much more common. In type 2 diabetes, the body doesn’t use insulin properly or, in some cases, doesn’t make enough. It’s usually diagnosed in middle-aged or older adults, but anyone can develop type 2 diabetes. It can be managed through diet, exercise, and medication. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn’t use insulin as it should or when the pancreas doesn Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects The Digestive System

How Diabetes Affects The Digestive System

While we may hesitate to associate our mouths with certain other parts of the gastrointestinal tract, make no mistake: Your mouth is where food processing begins. As the jaws move up and down, teeth chop and mince your meals into smaller pieces, while your tongue shapes bits of food into little balls that will fit down your windpipe. Digestion actually begins the instant you chomp on a hot dog or bagel, as enzymes in saliva are already at work, turning big, bulky molecules into smaller ones. In particular, the enzyme amylase starts to break down starchy carbohydrates. As little chunks of food move to the back of the mouth, they enter a chamber called the pharynx, continuing south into the esophagus. Once they enter this narrow tube, food and drink move through the digestive tract thanks to the contractions of tiny smooth muscles, the process known as peristalsis. After a quick trip through the esophagus, your most recent meal drops into the stomach. Digestion continues in this big pouch, which -- when you're really pigging out -- can hold up to three pints of food and drink. The stomach produces acids that start breaking down proteins. What's more, muscles in the stomach contract and relax, churning food and converting it into a semi-liquidlike substance. (Extra credit: This goo is known as chyme, which is pronounced "kime" and rhymes with "slime.") After about four hours, your lunch empties from the stomach into the intestines. Now the serious digestion begins. In the uppermost section of the small intestine, known as the duodenum, fat is dissolved by bile, which is made by the liver. Meanwhile, digestive juices (produced in the lining of the intestines and by our old friend the pancreas) break down carbohydrates, fats, and protein. After these nutrients are converted Continue reading >>

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