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How Soon Can You Get Gestational Diabetes?

What Happens After Birth With Gestational Diabetes?

What Happens After Birth With Gestational Diabetes?

The healthcare team will usually stop any diabetes-related medication as soon as you have given birth. However, you or your baby will receive extra monitoring, and perhaps extra care, as a result of the gestational diabetes. Your baby after the birth Gestational diabetes can directly affect your baby’s blood glucose levels. That means that he could be born with low blood glucose. This could lead to serious consequences if it is not treated, but your team will be aware of these risks and will know what to do. He may also have jaundice (which is usually harmless if treated) and may also have increased risk of breathing difficulties. You will be encouraged to feed your baby within half an hour after birth and then every two-to-three hours until his blood glucose levels stabilise. Two-to-four hours after the birth, the healthcare team will test his blood glucose level. They will do this by pricking his heel to get a drop of blood for testing. Your baby will not enjoy this, but try not to let it upset you. The test is done to keep your baby safe. If your baby’s blood glucose remains low, he might need some extra help to increase his blood glucose levels, such as being put on a drip or being tube fed. He may need to spend some time being monitored or treated in the neonatal unit – especially if there are extra complications. However the hospital will try to keep him in the ward with you wherever this is possible. "I was an emotional wreck afterwards for a whole week, crying all the time. I didn't like seeing my baby with tubes in him and he had jaundice as well so we weren't allowed to go home. But now, he's fabulous; constantly crawling around, he's a really busy baby!" Aisha, mum of one You after the birth Your blood glucose should be tested before you leave the hospi Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational diabetes has become one of the most common pregnancy complications in the US, with about 7 percent of pregnant women developing the condition. But just because it’s more widespread doesn’t mean it comes without risks. So what is gestational diabetes—and how can you minimize your chances of getting it? In this article What is gestational diabetes? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes symptoms Gestational diabetes treatment How to prevent gestational diabetes What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes means your body can’t properly regulate your blood sugar levels while you’re pregnant—either because you don’t produce enough insulin or your body can’t properly use the insulin it does produce. That causes your blood sugar levels to spike when you eat, leading to a condition called hyperglycemia. Most moms-to-be diagnosed with gestational diabetes experience diabetes only during pregnancy, and the condition clears up soon after birth. But 5 to 10 percent of women continue to have type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, and those whose diabetes clears up after childbirth are still at a 20 to 50 percent risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. So why are doctors so concerned about this condition? “Gestational diabetes puts the mom and baby at increased risk for pregnancy complications,” says Sherry A. Ross, MD, a Santa Monica, California-based ob-gyn and author of She-ology: The Definitive Guide to Women’s Intimate Health. Period. For moms, those include: High blood pressure Preeclampsia Preterm labor C-section Gestational diabetes effects on baby can increase the risk of: Higher birth weight Shoulder dystocia (when the shoulders get stuck in the birth canal) Congenital malformations (such as abnormal sp Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes -- The Basics

Gestational Diabetes -- The Basics

Gestational diabetes -- diabetes that develops during pregnancy -- is a relatively common complication of pregnancy, affecting about 6% of all pregnant women. You may have a greater risk of developing gestational diabetes if you: Are obese when you become pregnant Have high blood pressure or other medical complications Have given birth to a large (greater than 9 pounds) baby before Have given birth to a baby that was stillborn or suffering from certain birth defects Have had gestational diabetes in previous pregnancies Have a family history of diabetes Come from certain ethnic backgrounds, including African, Hispanic, Asian, Native American, or Pacific Islander Are older than 30 But half of women who develop gestational diabetes have no risk factors. If left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause serious complications for your newborn. For example, babies of untreated mothers with gestational diabetes may grow too large (called macrosomia), increasing the risk of problems during delivery, such as injuries to the baby's shoulders and arms and nerves in these areas. Having a very large baby may also increase your risk for requiring a cesarean section or other assistance during delivery (such as a forceps or vacuum delivery). Your baby may also experience a sudden drop in blood sugar after birth, requiring treatment with a sugar solution given through a needle in the vein. Your newborn baby may also have a higher risk of developing jaundice (a condition that causes yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes) and breathing problems. The risk of birth defects in infants whose mothers have gestational diabetes is very low because most pregnant women develop gestational diabetes after the 20th week of pregnancy, when the fetus has already fully developed. The risk of birt Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes definition and facts Risk factors for gestational diabetes include a history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, There are typically no noticeable signs or symptoms associated with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause the fetus to be larger than normal. Delivery of the baby may be more complicated as a result. The baby is also at risk for developing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Following a nutrition plan is the typical treatment for gestational diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight and following a healthy eating plan may be able to help prevent or minimize the risks of gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes, or high blood sugar levels, that develops during pregnancy. It occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies. It is usually diagnosed in the later stages of pregnancy and often occurs in women who have no prior history of diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is thought to arise because the many changes, hormonal and otherwise, that occur in the body during pregnancy predispose some women to become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by specialized cells in the pancreas that allows the body to effectively metabolize glucose for later usage as fuel (energy). When levels of insulin are low, or the body cannot effectively use insulin (i.e., insulin resistance), blood glucose levels rise. What are the screening guidelines for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy (see Continue reading >>

Pregnancy And Gestational Diabetes Screening

Pregnancy And Gestational Diabetes Screening

All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Screening may be done by taking the woman's medical history and examining certain risk factors, but an oral glucose tolerance test is also recommended. The oral glucose tolerance test is used to screen for gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is a specific type of diabetes that can develop in some women late in pregnancy (usually after the 24th week). Women who develop this complication do not have diabetes before becoming pregnant. The test is generally given between the 24th and 28th week of pregnancy. If you have had gestational diabetes before, or if your health care provider is concerned about your risk of developing gestational diabetes, the test may be performed before the 13th week of pregnancy. The oral glucose tolerance test involves quickly drinking a sweetened liquid (called Glucola), which contains 50g of glucose. The body absorbs this glucose rapidly, causing blood glucose levels to rise within 30 to 60 minutes. A blood sample will be taken from a vein in your arm about 60 minutes after drinking the solution. The blood test measures how the glucose solution was metabolized (processed by the body). A blood glucose level of 140mg/dL or higher will identify 80% of women with gestational diabetes. When that cutoff is lowered to 130mg/dL, the identification increases to 90%. If your blood glucose level was greater than 130 mg/dL, your provider will likely recommend you take another diabetes screening test that requires you to fast (not eat anything) before the test. During this second test, called the 100-gram oral glucose tolerance test, your blood glucose level will be tested four times during a three-hour period after drinking the sweetened (many flavors are availabl Continue reading >>

Early Detection: Gestational Diabetes & Preeclampsia

Early Detection: Gestational Diabetes & Preeclampsia

Diabetes and preeclampsia are among two of the reasons why regular prenatal visits are so important. Gestational Diabetes: The Basics Chances are you'll sail through pregnancy without trouble. But even if you're feeling great, you should still seek regular prenatal care because some health problems that could hurt your baby are symptomless. These include gestational diabetes, which raises blood sugar levels during pregnancy, and preeclampsia, a form of high blood pressure. But with early detection and treatment, you can manage these problems and still have a healthy baby. What Is It? Gestational diabetes occurs when pregnancy hormones interfere with the body's ability to use insulin, the hormone that turns blood sugar into energy, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Each year, up to 4 percent of women develop this serious illness in pregnancy. While most women with gestational diabetes have no symptoms, a small number may experience extreme hunger, thirst, or fatigue. How Do I Know If I Have It? Your doctor will probably screen you for gestational diabetes between your 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. If you have certain risk factors (see "Who's at Risk?" below), your doctor may opt to screen you sooner. During your screening, you'll drink a sugary liquid, then take a blood test. If your blood sugar levels appear high, you'll need to take a longer test, during which you'll drink more liquid and your blood sugar will be tested several times to determine whether you have gestational diabetes. What Are the Risks Associated with It? Women who fail to seek treatment for gestational diabetes run the risk of giving birth to big babies (9 pounds or more), since much of the extra sugar in the mother's blood ends up going to the fetus. Larger babies are more likely to suffer b Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Overview Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy (gestation). Like other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes affects how your cells use sugar (glucose). Gestational diabetes causes high blood sugar that can affect your pregnancy and your baby's health. Any pregnancy complication is concerning, but there's good news. Expectant women can help control gestational diabetes by eating healthy foods, exercising and, if necessary, taking medication. Controlling blood sugar can prevent a difficult birth and keep you and your baby healthy. In gestational diabetes, blood sugar usually returns to normal soon after delivery. But if you've had gestational diabetes, you're at risk for type 2 diabetes. You'll continue working with your health care team to monitor and manage your blood sugar. Symptoms For most women, gestational diabetes doesn't cause noticeable signs or symptoms. When to see a doctor If possible, seek health care early — when you first think about trying to get pregnant — so your doctor can evaluate your risk of gestational diabetes as part of your overall childbearing wellness plan. Once you're pregnant, your doctor will check you for gestational diabetes as part of your prenatal care. If you develop gestational diabetes, you may need more-frequent checkups. These are most likely to occur during the last three months of pregnancy, when your doctor will monitor your blood sugar level and your baby's health. Your doctor may refer you to additional health professionals who specialize in diabetes, such as an endocrinologist, a registered dietitian or a diabetes educator. They can help you learn to manage your blood sugar level during your pregnancy. To make sure your blood sugar level has returned to normal after your baby is born, your health care team wil Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar that develops during pregnancy and usually disappears after giving birth. It can occur at any stage of pregnancy, but is more common in the second half. It occurs if your body cannot produce enough insulin – a hormone that helps control blood sugar levels – to meet the extra needs in pregnancy. Gestational diabetes can cause problems for you and your baby during and after birth. But the risk of these problems happening can be reduced if it's detected and well managed. Who's at risk of gestational diabetes Any woman can develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy, but you're at an increased risk if: your body mass index (BMI) is above 30 – use the healthy weight calculator to work out your BMI you previously had a baby who weighed 4.5kg (10lbs) or more at birth you had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy one of your parents or siblings has diabetes your family origins are south Asian, Chinese, African-Caribbean or Middle Eastern If any of these apply to you, you should be offered screening for gestational diabetes during your pregnancy. Symptoms of gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes doesn't usually cause any symptoms. Most cases are only picked up when your blood sugar level is tested during screening for gestational diabetes. Some women may develop symptoms if their blood sugar level gets too high (hyperglycaemia), such as: But some of these symptoms are common during pregnancy anyway and aren't necessarily a sign of a problem. Speak to your midwife or doctor if you're worried about any symptoms you're experiencing. How gestational diabetes can affect your pregnancy Most women with gestational diabetes have otherwise normal pregnancies with healthy babies. However, gestational diabetes can cause problems s Continue reading >>

Early Screening Of Women At High Risk For Gestational Diabetes Recommended

Early Screening Of Women At High Risk For Gestational Diabetes Recommended

Early Screening of Women at High Risk for Gestational Diabetes Recommended May 13, 2008 (New Orleans) The outcome of gestational diabetes appears similar whether a woman is screened early (during the first trimester of pregnancy) or later (during the second trimester). Furthermore, more women can be managed with oral agents rather than with insulin if risk is managed early. Two teams of investigators announced these results here during presentations at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists 56th Annual Clinical Meeting. In the first study, Patricia L. Maran, MD, of Lehigh Valley Hospital, in Allentown, Pennsylvania, and colleagues took a retrospective look at 152 patients with gestational diabetes presenting for prenatal care from December 1, 2004, to June 30, 2006. The patients were matched 2:1 for age, race, and parity with nondiabetic controls. Their objective was to determine whether early screening, using a 50-g glucose challenge, improves pregnancy outcomes. Women were screened either at their first prenatal visit or between 24 and 28 weeks' gestation, at the discretion of the physician. Women with a negative early screen underwent repeat screening at 24 to 28 weeks, using a 3-hour glucose-tolerance test. Of the 252 women screened, Dr. Maran's team identified 84 patients with gestational diabetes. Those screened early were more likely to be Hispanic (76% vs 55% of other ethnic origin; P=.02), to have a family history of diabetes mellitus (41% vs 27% with no family history; P=.02), or to have a history of gestational diabetes (21% vs 5% with no history; P=.001). Women with a higher body-mass index (BMI) (average, 31.9kg/m2) had a higher risk for gestational diabetes than those with a BMI less than 28.4kg/m2 (P=.002). Overall, 51% of those with a B Continue reading >>

New Blood Test Predicts Gestational Diabetes Risk Early In Pregnancy

New Blood Test Predicts Gestational Diabetes Risk Early In Pregnancy

For pregnant women, gestational diabetes can be a troubling complication. A form of diabetes that develops during pregnancy, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) causes glucose levels in the bloodstream to be higher than normal, which can pose significant risks to the unborn baby’s health. While GDM can often be controlled through proper diet, exercise and medication, early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for women hoping to manage their high blood sugar and prevent complications during their pregnancy. In order to better identify the condition in pregnant women earlier, researchers from Tokyo Women’s Medical University have identified a biomarker in pregnant women’s blood that can help determine her risk of developing gestational diabetes. “Currently, at mid-pregnancy – 24 to 28 weeks – a glucose challenge test is performed to find GDM,” study author Dr. Atsuhiro Ichihara, of Tokyo Women’s Medical University, told FoxNews.com. “However, earlier detection of GDM has been needed for early intervention or prevention,” Ichihara noted that usually only women who have risk factors such as obesity or a family history of GDM are screened earlier on in pregnancy. Therefore, women who develop GDM and do not have these common risk factors often remain undiagnosed until the second trimester – and a delay in diagnosis often means therapies for GDM are less effective. If left untreated, GDM can increase the risk of jaundice, breathing issues and hypoglycemia in the newborn child. More extreme side effects of uncontrolled GDM include the risk of premature delivery, preeclampsia, and even the death of the child before or shortly after birth. Through previous research, Ichihara and his team had determined that the protein renin receptor (P)RR plays a significan Continue reading >>

Are We Testing For Gestational Diabetes Too Late?

Are We Testing For Gestational Diabetes Too Late?

A new study shows that babies are already showing the effects of gestational diabetes by the time expectant moms are tested for it. So are we testing too late? No one likes the glucose tolerance test—having to chug down that nasty orange drink, and hoping there are no side effects. Unfortunately, screening for high blood sugar is a necessity in pregnancy, as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) can cause problems ranging from stillbirth to childhood obesity. But a new study published in journal Diabetes Care suggests that unborn babies are showing the effects of GDM before expectant mothers are even tested for it, throwing the screening's relevance into question. Should pregnant women be tested even earlier? Diagnosis after baby is already affected Researchers looked at data from over 4,000 pregnant women to measure baby's growth, as large size is an indicator of gestational diabetes, and compared that info to the 171 moms who actually developed GDM later on. They also looked at which women were obese, another risk factor for GDM. "Gestational diabetes and obesity were both associated with accelerated growth of the [baby's] abdomen between 20 and 28 weeks," study author Gordon Smith, M.D., Ph.D., the head of the department of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Cambridge in the UK, tells Fit Pregnancy. "In relation to gestational diabetes, measurements were normal at 20 weeks, but were large by 28 weeks. Women who were both obese and had a diagnosis of gestational diabetes were almost five times more likely to have a baby with a large abdominal measurement at 28 weeks." Because GDM wasn't actually diagnosed in the women until 28 weeks, "the effects of gestational diabetes [are] already present at the time we normally make the diagnosis," Dr. Smith says. Alth Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes And Pregnancy

Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that is first seen in a pregnant woman who did not have diabetes before she was pregnant. Some women have more than one pregnancy affected by gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes usually shows up in the middle of pregnancy. Doctors most often test for it between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Often gestational diabetes can be controlled through eating healthy foods and regular exercise. Sometimes a woman with gestational diabetes must also take insulin. Problems of Gestational Diabetes in Pregnancy Blood sugar that is not well controlled in a woman with gestational diabetes can lead to problems for the pregnant woman and the baby: An Extra Large Baby Diabetes that is not well controlled causes the baby’s blood sugar to be high. The baby is “overfed” and grows extra large. Besides causing discomfort to the woman during the last few months of pregnancy, an extra large baby can lead to problems during delivery for both the mother and the baby. The mother might need a C-Section to deliver the baby. The baby can be born with nerve damage due to pressure on the shoulder during delivery. C-Section (Cesarean Section) A C-section is an operation to deliver the baby through the mother’s belly. A woman who has diabetes that is not well controlled has a higher chance of needing a C-section to deliver the baby. When the baby is delivered by a C-section, it takes longer for the woman to recover from childbirth. High Blood Pressure (Preeclampsia) When a pregnant woman has high blood pressure, protein in her urine, and often swelling in fingers and toes that doesn’t go away, she might have preeclampsia. It is a serious problem that needs to be watched closely and managed by her doctor. High blood pressure can cause harm to both Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

only happens during pregnancy. It means you have high blood sugar levels, but those levels were normal before you were pregnant. If you have it, you can still have a healthy baby with help from your doctor and by doing simple things to manage your blood sugar, also called blood glucose. After your baby is born, gestational diabetes usually goes away. Gestational diabetes makes you more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, but it won’t definitely happen. During pregnancy, the placenta makes hormones that can lead to a buildup of glucose in your blood. Usually, your pancreas can make enough insulin to handle that. If not, your blood sugar levels will rise and can cause gestational diabetes. It affects between 2% and 10% of pregnancies each year. You are more likely to get gestational diabetes if you: Were overweight before you got pregnant Are African-American, Asian, Hispanic, or Native American Have high blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diabetes Have a family history of diabetes Have had gestational diabetes before Have high blood pressure or other medical complications Have given birth to a large baby before (greater than 9 pounds) Have given birth to a baby that was stillborn or had certain birth defects Gestational diabetes usually happens in the second half of pregnancy. Your doctor will check to see if you have gestational diabetes between weeks 24 and 28 of your pregnancy. Your doctor may test sooner if you're at high risk. To test for gestational diabetes, you will quickly drink a sugary drink. This will raise your blood sugar levels. An hour later, you’ll take a blood test to see how your body handled all that sugar. If the results show that your blood sugar is higher than a certain cutoff (anywhere from 130 milligrams per deciliter [mg/dL] or hig Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Gestational Diabetes

How To Avoid Gestational Diabetes

Expert Reviewed Four Parts:Determining Your Risk FactorsLowering Your Risk Through Medical ScreeningLowering Your Risk Through DietLowering Your Risk Through ExerciseCommunity Q&A Gestational diabetes mellitus, sometimes also referred to as (GDM), is a potentially serious condition that develops during pregnancy. Basically defined, gestational diabetes affects how the mother's body produces and uses insulin to control her blood sugar levels which can be harmful to both her and the baby. The good news is that GDM is can be prevented, or your risk for developing it at least minimized. There are no guarantees, but the more healthy habits you adopt before and during your pregnancy, the better you and baby will be. 1 Get a family history. The first step in preventing GDM is determining your risk factors for developing it. If it turns out that you are at high risk, then you and your doctor take steps towards lowering your risk and keeping you and the baby healthy. Before talking with your immediate relatives about their diabetic history, it might help to know the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, is an autoimmune disorder, whereas type 2 diabetes is closely tied to lifestyle and eating habits. Your risk of developing gestational diabetes increases if a close family member, such as a parent or sibling, has type 2 diabetes. Talk to your family to see if this applies to you.[1] 2 Determine your other risk factors. Besides heredity, there are a number of other risk factors in that you should think about and bring to your doctor’s attention.[2] These include: Being overweight before your pregnancy. Being 25 years of age or older. If you developed GDM in a previous pregnancy. If you previously had large baby (9 pounds or more) or a stillbirth. A his Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Gestational diabetes refers to diabetes that is diagnosed during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes occurs in about 7 percent of all pregnancies, usually in the second half of the pregnancy. It almost always goes away as soon as your baby is born. However, if gestational diabetes is not treated during your pregnancy, you may experience some complications. Causes Pregnancy hormones cause the body to be resistant to the action of insulin, a hormone made by your pancreas that helps your body use the fuels supplied by food. The carbohydrates you eat provide your body with a fuel called glucose, the sugar in the blood that nourishes your brain, heart, tissues and muscles. Glucose also is an important fuel for your developing baby. When gestational diabetes occurs, insulin fails to effectively move glucose into the cells that need it. As a result, glucose accumulates in the blood, causing blood sugar levels rise. Diagnosis Gestational diabetes is diagnosed with a blood test. Your blood glucose level is measured after you drink a sweet beverage. If your blood sugar is too high, you have gestational diabetes. Sometimes one test is all that is needed to make a definitive diagnosis. More often, an initial screening test is given and, if needed, a longer evaluation is performed. Gestational diabetes usually does not occur until later in pregnancy, when the placenta is producing more of the hormones that interfere with the mother's insulin. Screening for gestational diabetes usually takes place between weeks 24 to 28. However, women at high risk are usually screened during the first trimester. Risk Factors There are a number of risk factors associated with gestational diabetes, including: Being overweight Giving birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds Having a parent or siblin Continue reading >>

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