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How Society Views Diabetes

Early And Late Nutritional Windows For Diabetes Susceptibility

Early And Late Nutritional Windows For Diabetes Susceptibility

This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef . Wells, Jonathan C. K.andMarphatia, Akanksha A.2018.The Palgrave Handbook of Biology and Society.p.561. View all Google Scholar citations for this article. Early and late nutritional windows for diabetes susceptibility To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure [email protected] is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the name part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle . Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. @free.kindle.com emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. @kindle.com emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply. Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service. Early and late nutritional windows for diabetes susceptibility By using this service, you agree that you will only keep articles for personal use, and will not openly distribute them via Dropbox, Google Drive or other file sharing services. Please confirm that you accept the terms of use. To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox . Early and late nutritional windows for diabetes susceptibility By using this service, you agree that you will Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Quality Of Life

Diabetes And Quality Of Life

Diabetes SpectrumVolume 13 Number , 2000, Page 48 Diabetes is a demanding disease, so it can affect your life in many ways. Managing your diabetes can be stressful. The way you feel when your blood glucose levels are low or really high adds to the stress. On top of that, there are the worries that you might develop complications, and the burden of dealing with any complications you may already have. It is no wonder that many people feel that diabetes affects their quality of life. Why is quality of life important for people with diabetes? Part of the answer is obvious: everyone wants to have the best possible quality of life. It just feels good to be satisfied and happy. But there is another reason, as well. Just as diabetes can affect your quality of life, your quality of life can affect your diabetes. When you are feeling good about your life in general and about your life with diabetes in particular, you have more energy to take good care of your diabetes. And when you take good care of yourself, you are likely to feel better day-to-day and to stay healthier in the long run. Feeling better and staying healthy give a further boost to your quality of life. So good quality of life activates a self-reinforcing positive cycle. How does diabetes affect quality of life? Aspects of life with diabetes that may affect your quality of life include: The never-ending demands of diabetes care, such as eating carefully, exercising, monitoring blood glucose, and scheduling and planning Symptoms of low or very high blood glucose Fears about or the reality of complications How can I judge my quality of life? The specific things each person needs to feel satisfied and happy are unique to him or her. Still, there are some things most people would agree are important. Your quality of lif Continue reading >>

Misunderstandings About Diabetes

Misunderstandings About Diabetes

Previous Topic | Adjustment to diabetes and changes in self-image There are 3.5 million people in the UK who have diabetes and yet some people we spoke to said that diabetes was poorly understood by society as a whole (Diabetes UK 2016). Several people expressed the view that they wanted some commonly-held myths and misconceptions about diabetes to be corrected. The current media portrayal of diabetes as a 'disease of fat people' was said by some people to be stigmatising and potentially damaging to their morale. Several people felt that the links made in the media between 'the obesity crisis' and diabetes was too simplistic. While they acknowledged that obesity was one of several possible contributory causes of diabetes, they said it was wrong for obesity to be portrayed as the main cause of diabetes. Many people said that they knew people with diabetes who were not overweight or obese. Helen is a retired head teacher and is married with 2 adult children aged 39 and 42. Ethnic background/Nationality: White Scottish. And I don't know, the research is, the research always seems at the moment, and it's something that does irritate, and the television really irritates me about the fact that they always say things like, 'Diabetes is exploding because the society is obese.' And it's that thing, I feel like saying, 'But I wasn't.' And people are saying, 'Oh, she certainly''.You know, if you've put down, 'Oh, she must have been some size.' And that really, you know, as you can see over there, that was me at, at you know. I've never been anything other than roughly the size, maybe 4 or 5 pounds, but that was all. But they always try to make out, you know, 'It was your fault. You, you ate too much.' And I don't think that is, I don't, I think that's counterproductive. And I thi Continue reading >>

The Australasian Diabetes In Pregnancy Society Consensus Guidelines For The Management Of Type 1and Type 2diabetes In Relation To Pregnancy

The Australasian Diabetes In Pregnancy Society Consensus Guidelines For The Management Of Type 1and Type 2diabetes In Relation To Pregnancy

The Australasian Diabetes in Pregnancy Society consensus guidelines for the management of type 1and type 2diabetes in relation to pregnancy Aidan McElduff, N Wah Cheung, H David McIntyre, Janet A Lagstrm, Barry N J Walters, Jeremy J N Oats, Peter Wein, Glynis P Ross and David Simmons Strict control of blood glucose levels should be pursued before conception and maintained throughout the pregnancy (glycohaemoglobin [HbA1c] level as close as possible to the reference range). high-dose (5mg daily) folate supplementation should be commenced; oral hypoglycaemic agents should be ceased; and diabetes complications screening should take place. Management should be by a multidisciplinary team experienced in the management of diabetes in pregnancy. Blood glucose monitoring is mandatory during pregnancy, and targets are: fasting 4.05.5mmol/L; postprandial <8.0mmol/L at 1hour; <7mmol/L at 2hours. A first trimester nuchal translucency (possibly with first trimester biochemical screening with pregnancy-associated plasma protein A and -human chorionic gonadotropin) should be offered. Ultrasound should be performed for fetal morphology at 1820weeks, if required, for cardiac views at 24weeks and for fetal growth at 2830and 3436weeks. Induction of labour or operative delivery should be based on obstetric and/or fetal indications. Level 3neonatal nursing facilities may be required and should be anticipated when birth occurs before 36weeks, or if there has been poor glycaemic control. Insulin requirements fall rapidly during labour and in the puerperium. At this time, close monitoring and adjustment of insulin therapy is necessary. The management of pregnancy in women who have type 1or type 2diabetes mellitus remains challenging. The St Vincent declaration of 1989set a 5-year target to re Continue reading >>

The Impact Of Diabetes On Employment And Work Productivity

The Impact Of Diabetes On Employment And Work Productivity

Abstract OBJECTIVE—The purpose of this study was to longitudinally examine the effect of diabetes on labor market outcomes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Using secondary data from the first two waves (1992 and 1994) of the Health and Retirement Study, we identified 7,055 employed respondents (51–61 years of age), 490 of whom reported having diabetes in wave 1. We estimated the effect of diabetes in wave 1 on the probability of working in wave 2 using probit regression. For those working in wave 2, we modeled the relationships between diabetic status in wave 1 and the change in hours worked and work-loss days using ordinary least-squares regressions and modeled the presence of health-related work limitations using probit regression. All models control for health status and job characteristics and are estimated separately by sex. RESULTS—Among individuals with diabetes, the absolute probability of working was 4.4 percentage points less for women and 7.1 percentage points less for men relative to that of their counterparts without diabetes. Change in weekly hours worked was not statistically significantly associated with diabetes. Women with diabetes had 2 more work-loss days per year compared with women without diabetes. Compared with individuals without diabetes, men and women with diabetes were 5.4 and 6 percentage points (absolute increase), respectively, more likely to have work limitations. CONCLUSIONS—This article provides evidence that diabetes affects patients, employers, and society not only by reducing employment but also by contributing to work loss and health-related work limitations for those who remain employed. The medical care costs associated with diabetes create a considerable economic burden for patients, families, and society (1,2). Productivit Continue reading >>

Is Someone With Type 1 Diabetes “disabled”?

Is Someone With Type 1 Diabetes “disabled”?

I have never been one to feel limited by monikers or labels. I am a woman, I am an athlete, I am diabetic, I am a sister, I am a friend, and I am disabled. None of those terms define me, but they are an authentic representation of who I am. The epithet in that list that might have surprised you (especially if you have seen me at work as a professional skier) is “disabled.” Now, I know what many of you are thinking. It goes something along the lines of, “My child with diabetes is not disabled,” or “I do not want to be viewed as disabled.” I have some news for you: if you have Type 1 diabetes, you are disabled. Now before you jump all over me, let explain few things about disability to you. I promise, I do not mean to marginalize you or the diabetes community by calling those with Type 1 diabetes “disabled.” Here is the thing, according to the Americans with Disabilities Act “An individual with a disability is defined as a person who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities or a person who has a history or record of such an impairment.” When a person’s pancreas doesn’t make insulin, the person’s body is unable to convert glucose into useable energy without exogenous insulin. Useable energy is required to live. Failure to thrive due to an organ not producing a hormone required to sustain life is a “physical impairment that substantially limits” the major life activity of living. If this isn’t enough to convince you that diabetes is a disability covered under the ADA, let’s take a look at the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, which explicitly names diabetes as a disability covered by the ADA. Simply put by the Department of Justice, “The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a civil righ Continue reading >>

Nearly Half Of All Americans Will Get Type 2 Diabetes, Says Study

Nearly Half Of All Americans Will Get Type 2 Diabetes, Says Study

How much worse can the type 2 diabetes epidemic get? Shockingly, a new study published by a leading medical journal says that 40% of the adult population of the USA is expected to be diagnosed with the disease at some point in their lifetime. And among Hispanic men and women and non-Hispanic black women, the chances are even higher - one in two appear to be destined to get type 2 diabetes. As Public Health England spelled out in a recent report urging local authorities to take action, 90% of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. There is no mystery behind the rise in diagnoses - they match the soaring weight of the population. The climb dates back to the 1980s and is associated with our more sedentary lifestyles and changing eating habits - more food, containing more calories, more often. It is those things that will have to be tackled if the epidemic is to be contained. The new study in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal, from a team of researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, shows that the risk of developing type 2 diabetes for the average 20 year-old American rose from 20% for men and 27% for women in 1985–1989, to 40% for men and 39% for women in 2000–2011. The study was big - involving data including interviews and death certificates from 600,000 Americans. Americans are generally living longer, which is a factor in their increased lifetime chance of developing type 2 diabetes. They are also not dying in the same proportions that they were, because of better treatment. However, that means they are going to spend far more years of their lives suffering from type 2 diabetes, which can lead to blindness and foot amputations as well as heart problems. This is very bad news for the US healthcare system, say Continue reading >>

Families With Children With Diabetes: Implications Of Parent Stress For Parent And Child Health

Families With Children With Diabetes: Implications Of Parent Stress For Parent And Child Health

Families With Children With Diabetes: Implications of Parent Stress for Parent and Child Health Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, 2Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, and 3University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Search for other works by this author on: Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, 2Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, and 3University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Search for other works by this author on: Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, 2Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, and 3University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Search for other works by this author on: Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, 2Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, and 3University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Search for other works by this author on: Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Volume 37, Issue 4, 1 May 2012, Pages 467478, Vicki S. Helgeson, Dorothy Becker, Oscar Escobar, Linda Siminerio; Families With Children With Diabetes: Implications of Parent Stress for Parent and Child Health, Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Volume 37, Issue 4, 1 May 2012, Pages 467478, Objective To examine the relation of parent stress to parent mental health and child mental and physical health. Methods We interviewed children with type 1 diabetes (n = 132; mean age 12 years) annually for 5 years and had one parent complete a questionnaire at each assessment. Parents completed measures of general life stress, stress related to caring for a child with diabetes, benefit finding, and mental health. Child outcomes were depressive symptoms, self-care behavior, and glycemic control. Multilevel modeling was used to examine concurrent and longitudinal relations. Results Greater parent general stress and greater parent diabetes-specific stress were assoc Continue reading >>

Social Issues For The Type 1 Diabetic

Social Issues For The Type 1 Diabetic

Diabetes is more than a health condition. For most people, it’s a new way of life, and it affects relationships in all areas as much as it affects eating and physical activity. School The first challenge facing parents of a Type 1 diabetes student is the ongoing medical care required during school hours. The “School Bill of Rights for Children with Diabetes” requires that diabetic children be allowed to: Check blood sugar Use emergency sugar to treat hypoglycemia Inject insulin, eat snacks, drink water, and use the bathroom whenever necessary Eat lunch at an appropriate time, and with enough time to finish Participate fully in all activities It’s up to the parents to be sure the school officials, nurse(s), teachers, and all other applicable staff are educated to and comply with their child’s needs. Having a section 504 plan will help. The second challenge is helping your child fit in. Often other children will not have any experience with or understanding of diabetes. Coupled with a perception that the child is being treated “specially,” that can lead to teasing and even bullying. Talk to your child about how to educate their friends and classmates about what’s going on. Perhaps you’d be able to be a guest speaker in their classroom. Parents of your child’s friends may need education, too. Some parents are concerned about how to handle your child’s condition at a party or other event. Leaders of scout troops and clubs, as well as coaches and youth group volunteers can also be recruited onto your team. Throughout your child’s education, communication with many of the people with whom they come in contact will be key to productive, healthy, fun experiences. Sports Sports are an important part of many people’s lives. Teamwork, camaraderie, and phy Continue reading >>

The Numbers Of Shame And Blame: How Stigma Affects Patients And Diabetes Management

The Numbers Of Shame And Blame: How Stigma Affects Patients And Diabetes Management

By Alexander Wolf and Nancy Liu Twitter summary: What’s the impact of #dstigma on people w/ #diabetes? A survey of 5,000 patients finds stigma is real 4 majority+impacts management Short summary: In a survey of over 5,000 people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, the market research company dQ&A found that stigma affects a majority of patients. Find out which groups of people feel the most stigmatized, the feelings and experiences of stigma, and how it can affect the ability of people to manage their care. Does diabetes come with a social stigma? For many type 1 or type 2 patients, the unfortunate answer is “yes.” Arguably, only a few diseases carry the same feelings of shame and blame as diabetes, and these negative emotions can affect the way people view their disease and approach their management. And yet, for such an important topic, there has been little research done to understand the matter. Recently, the market research company dQ&A (“Diabetes Questions and Answers”) asked patients how stigma affects their diabetes management. The results were presented at ADA and at this year’s Friends for Life conference. dQ&A surveyed 5,410 people with diabetes (~30% with type 1 and ~70% with type 2) – many of them readers of diaTribe – and the study results were eye opening. Does diabetes come with social stigma? Social stigma is described as a set of negative beliefs or a mark of disapproval that society has for a certain group or disease. The study affirmed what many people touched by diabetes have said for years: Stigma is real, and it affects the majority of people living with diabetes. Overall, type 1 patients reported experiencing more stigma than people with type 2. Parents of children with type 1 diabetes reported the most stigma of all, and stigma tend Continue reading >>

How Society Influences Diabetes Management

How Society Influences Diabetes Management

This is part two of my conversation with Dr. Ann Albright, director of the Division of Diabetes Translation at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In part one Albright talks about meeting the challenges and opportunities to improve diabetes care through public health programs. Q: What stands in most people’s way regarding preventing and managing diabetes? AA: I can best answer that question with a model many of us in the public health sector use. Imagine concentric rings, and in the middle ring is the individual. For those of us who have diabetes or are at risk, there are things we personally need to do: pay attention to the foods we eat, get physical activity, look at how we manage stress. All the things we do have some impact and influence on us, but we’re not an island. We all live influenced by the things around us. So the next ring in this model is your family and those in your close network. They also impact how an individual lives with this disease. The next ring out is your life systems, where you work, go to school, your place of worship, where people spend a lot of time interacting with others. Those entities also have a big impact on us. For instance, what are the policies in your workplace? What support do you get for health care coverage from your job? What types of health care are available to you? All these things have an impact. The final ring in the model is policy and the bigger community. These are things where you might change people’s access to things. For instance, are there food deserts in the community? How far do people have to travel to get fresh fruits and vegetables? Can they afford them? All these things affect our ability to make healthy choices. So while we have to think about what the individual does and individual Continue reading >>

How Public Perceive Diabetes: A Qualitative Study

How Public Perceive Diabetes: A Qualitative Study

How public perceive diabetes: A qualitative study Nursing and Midwifery Care Research Centre, Nursing and Midwifery Faculty, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran 1Nursing and Midwifery Faculty, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran 2ICU Department, Parsian Hospital, Tehran, Iran Address for correspondence: Dr Samereh Abdoli, Nursing and Midwifery Care Research Centre, Nursing and Midwifery Faculty, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran. E-mail: [email protected]_heremas Author information Copyright and License information Copyright : Iranian Journal of Nursing and Midwifery Research This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Diabetes has a high prevalence in Iran, and its incidence is estimated to increase from 3.5 million adults in 2005 to 5.1 million by 2025. Given the high prevalence of diabetes in Iranians, it is surprising that little is known about understanding of diabetes in the general population. This study aimed to explore how people without diabetes interpreted the disease. This study was conducted as a qualitative content analysis, using unstructured and in-depth interviews, with the participation of 21 individuals without diabetes (13 women and 8 men), 18-61 years old, who were selected for this purpose from the cities of Isfahan and Tehran from October 2010 to May 2011. The data were analyzed using latent content analysis method. The participants had different beliefs and ideas about diabetes and most of them gave a negative and black imag Continue reading >>

Evolving Mechanistic Views And Emerging Therapeutic Strategies For Cystic Fibrosisrelated Diabetes

Evolving Mechanistic Views And Emerging Therapeutic Strategies For Cystic Fibrosisrelated Diabetes

beta cell , CFRD , CFTR , cystic fibrosis , diabetes , pancreatic insufficiency Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. It is the most common life-limiting genetic condition in people of Caucasian ancestry and affects about one in 3000 newborns in Europe, North America, and Australia [ 1 ]. The incidence is lower in other parts of the world, such as in Africa (Cape Town, South Africa, one in 12,000) and Asia (Japan, one in 350,000). More than 2000 variants of the CFTR gene have been identified to date, and close to 300 are known cystic fibrosiscausing variants [ 2 ]. On the basis of functional consequence, the mutations are broadly grouped into six classes ( Table 1 ) [ 3 , 4 ]. The CFTR protein acts as an anion (primarily Cl) channel that controls ion movement across the cell membrane and is regulated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent phosphorylation. In pancreatic ductal cells, the Cl secretion via CFTR is functionally coupled to a Cl-bicarbonate exchanger, producing net bicarbonate secretion, and CFTR itself may also secrete bicarbonate [ 5 , 6 ]. Defective CFTR function reduces the volume of pancreatic secretions, predisposing to plugging of small ducts, and increases acidity, promoting premature activation of digestive enzymes [ 7 ]. In the digestive, respiratory, and reproductive systems, dysfunction of the CFTR protein leads to inspissated secretions and obstruction of epithelium-lined ducts, eventually resulting in inflammation and tissue damage [ 8 ]. Pulmonary infections, sinus disease, exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency, hepatobiliary disease, and male infertility are commonly observed in individuals with cystic fibrosis, with respira Continue reading >>

Society | Introduction - Czech Diabetes Society

Society | Introduction - Czech Diabetes Society

Czech Diabetes Society (DS) is a non-profit, multidisciplinary, academic and scientific organization dedicated to study and education around diabetes management and representing the health care professionals in the Czech Republic interested in diabetes and related subjects. The society was founded in 1963 as a part of Czech Medical Society of Jan Evangelista Purkyn. The mission of DS is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the life of people with diabetes in the Czech Republic and to promote excellence in diabetes care through research and education providing recommendations for the care of patients with diabetes and its complications guaranteeing postgraduate education in diabetes and related subjects creating and updating the National Diabetes Program approving and monitoring diabetes centres across Czech Republic co-ordinating and supporting diabetes outpatient clinics organising annual scientific meetings and other courses and lectures in the diabetes supporting the national health data registers (insulin pumps, gestational diabetes, children with diabetes etc.) The Society has two Working Groups: Diabetic Foot Working Group and Psychological Working Group. Continue reading >>

Risk Of Diabetes Type 1 'can Be Tripled By Childhood Stress'

Risk Of Diabetes Type 1 'can Be Tripled By Childhood Stress'

Stressful life events in childhood such as family break-up, death or illness, can triple the risk of developing type 1 diabetes, research suggests. In a study, researchers found that children who experienced an event associated with “major stress” were almost three times more likely to develop the condition than those who had not. The Swedish study analysed more than 10,000 families with children aged between two and 14, who did not already have the condition. The aim was to pinpoint any family conflicts, unemployment problems, alteration of family structure, or intervention from social services. Subsequently, 58 children were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. The causes of type 1 diabetes are unknown but it is usually preceded by the immune system attacking and killing beta cells in the pancreas, which produce insulin. Based on the results, the researchers, from Linkoping University, said they thought the stressful events could contribute to beta cell stress due to increased insulin resistance as well as increased insulin demand due to the physiological stress response, such as elevated levels of the stress hormone cortisol. In the paper, published on Thursday in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes), the authors write: “Consistent with several previous retrospective studies, this first prospective study concludes that the experience of a serious life event (reasonably indicating psychological stress) during the first 14 years of life may be a risk factor for developing type 1 diabetes. “The current study examined serious life events experienced at any time before diagnosis; further studies are thus needed to determine when in the autoimmune process psychological stress may contribute, and in association with which other Continue reading >>

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