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How Smoking Can Cause Diabetes?

Smoking And Diabetes: 4 Smoking-related Problems

Smoking And Diabetes: 4 Smoking-related Problems

What are the risks of smoking? You’ve probably heard the grim statistics a million times over. Even if you don’t know all the numbers, you likely know that smoking is bad for your health. It has a negative effect on every organ in your body. It raises your risk of potentially fatal diseases, such as heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and many types of cancer. As bad as smoking is for the average person, it’s even worse if you have diabetes. You already have a condition that affects many parts of your body. When you add smoking to the mix, it raises your risk of health complications even more. If you have diabetes, you have to work hard enough already to keep your blood sugar in check. Smoking can make that task even more difficult. Smoking may make your body more resistant to insulin, which can lead to higher blood sugar levels. Uncontrolled blood sugar can lead to serious complications from diabetes, including problems with your kidneys, heart, and blood vessels. Like diabetes, smoking also damages your cardiovascular system. This double-burden can be lethal. At least 68 percent of adults age 65 and older with diabetes die from heart disease, reports the American Heart Association. Another 16 percent die from stroke. If you have diabetes, you’re two to four times more likely to develop heart disease or have a stroke than people without the condition. Smoking directly affects your lungs and can lead to chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and other respiratory diseases. People with these diseases are at higher risk of developing lung infections, such as pneumonia. These infections can be especially dangerous when you have diabetes. You might get sicker than you otherwise would and have a harder time recovering. Being sick also raises blood su Continue reading >>

Smoking And Diabetes

Smoking And Diabetes

What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a group of diseases in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal. Most of the food a person eats is turned into glucose (a kind of sugar) for the body’s cells to use for energy. The pancreas, an organ near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin that helps glucose get into the body’s cells. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn't make enough insulin or can't use the insulin very well. Less glucose gets into the cells and instead builds up in the blood.1 There are different types of diabetes. Type 2 is the most common in adults and accounts for more than 90% of all diabetes cases. Fewer people have type 1 diabetes, which most often develops in children, adolescents, or young adults.2 How Is Smoking Related to Diabetes? We now know that smoking causes type 2 diabetes. In fact, smokers are 30–40% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than nonsmokers. And people with diabetes who smoke are more likely than nonsmokers to have trouble with insulin dosing and with controlling their disease.3 The more cigarettes you smoke, the higher your risk for type 2 diabetes.3 No matter what type of diabetes you have, smoking makes your diabetes harder to control. If you have diabetes and you smoke, you are more likely to have serious health problems from diabetes. Smokers with diabetes have higher risks for serious complications, including:4 Heart and kidney disease Poor blood flow in the legs and feet that can lead to infections, ulcers, and possible amputation (removal of a body part by surgery, such as toes or feet) Retinopathy (an eye disease that can cause blindness) Peripheral neuropathy (damaged nerves to the arms and legs that causes numbness, pain, weakness, and poor coordination) If you are a smoker with diabetes, quitting Continue reading >>

Does Smoking Cigarettes Cause Type 2 Diabetes? It Could Depend On Your Race

Does Smoking Cigarettes Cause Type 2 Diabetes? It Could Depend On Your Race

Does Smoking Cigarettes Cause Type 2 Diabetes? It Could Depend On Your Race The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says smoking is a cause of Type 2 diabetes and makes the disease harder to control. The latest Surgeons General report and just about everyone else advises against this, too. But new results from the ongoing Multi-Ethnic Atherosclerosis Study doesnt find this to be the case not consistently, anyway. When we say smoking, we mean tobacco in all its forms: cigars, pipes, and smokeless tobacco such as chew . Studies have suggested that exposure can increase diabetes risk up to 40 percent; its thought to directly cause insulin resistance . The thing is, most of these studies have been conducted on groups that were either mostly white or mostly Asian, the authors said. The researchers were curious to find out if these findings would hold up across races and ethnicities, including AfricanAmericans, Latinos, and Chinese people. They recruited nearly 7,000 participants aged 45 to 84 and gave them urine cotinine tests . Smokers excrete nicotine through their urine, and the authors could see participants smoking histories. They considered those who had smoked fewer than 100 cigarettes or 20 cigars in their lifetime abstinent, while participants who had smoked more, but not in the past 30 days, were labeled former smokers. The rest were active smokers. The study authors compared these smoking habits to insulin resistance anddiabetes over a 10-year span. Results showed that current smokers had lower blood pressure and relied less on medications for high blood pressure and cholesterol than abstinent and former smokers. There was no significant difference in glucose or insulin levels, two markers of diabetes, across the groups. Overall, there was no significant a Continue reading >>

Smoking And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Smoking And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: INTRODUCTION Smoking is one of the modifiable risk factors for many chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, chronic obstructive lung disease, asthma, and diabetes. However, the adverse effects of smoking on diabetes have been generally under recognized. In the guidelines from the Korean Diabetes Association, smoking cessation is recommended as one of the most important steps in preventing the cardiovascular complications of diabetes [1]. Many studies have shown that the adverse effects of smoking on diabetes mellitus are not only diabetic macrovascular complications but the causal nature of its association with diabetes and the progression of diabetic microvascular complications has yet to be explored. Although smoking is known to decrease body weight, it is associated with central obesity [2]. Smoking also increases inflammation and oxidative stress [3], to directly damage β-cell function [4] and to impair endothelial function [5]. The prevalence of smoking in Korean men is near 50%, which is the highest smoking rate in the Western Pacific region. In addition to obesity, the high prevalence of smoking is one of the major health problems for Korea's public health. This review is about the various smoking effects on diabetes mellitus, diabetic complications, and diabetic incidence. Understanding the hazardous effects of smoking on diabetes mellitus may lead to more emphasis on smoking prevention and smoking cessation as important strategies in the management of diabetes mellitus. Continue reading >>

Smoking And Diabetes: Risks, Effects, And How To Quit

Smoking And Diabetes: Risks, Effects, And How To Quit

Smoking and diabetes: Risks, effects, and how to quit Reviewed by Natalie Olsen, RD, LD, ACSM EP-C The health risks of smoking are well known, and most smokers already know the risks they are taking. For people with diabetes , however, smoking is a serious risk factor for numerous health issues they may face. Smoking may even cause diabetes. Quitting is the best course of action smokers can take for their health. However, some strategies may reduce the health effects for some of those with diabetes. Smoking and diabetes: Can smoking cause diabetes? Smokers are more likely to develop diabetes than non-smokers. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for at least 90 percent of cases worldwide. Type 2 diabetes is also closely linked to certain lifestyle factors, including smoking. In fact, smokers are 30-40 percent more likely than non-smokers to develop diabetes. People who have diabetes already and who smoke are more likely to have uncontrolled diabetes. Smoking damages cells and tissues, increasing inflammation . It also causes oxidative stress , which is when molecules called free radicals damage cells. Both these conditions are linked to an increased risk of diabetes. They can cause other health problems, as well, including cardiovascular disease. Research further suggests that heavy smoking increases abdominal fat . Even in people who aren't obese or overweight, excess abdominal fat is a risk factor for diabetes. The health risks of smoking are numerous, and researchers are constantly uncovering new health concerns associated with smoking. The habit of smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States, while more than 16 million Americans have a smoking-related disease. cancer , including lung, oral, bladder, colon, pancr Continue reading >>

Cigarette Smoking Affects Glycemic Control In Diabetes

Cigarette Smoking Affects Glycemic Control In Diabetes

Tight glycemic control in diabetes is one of the cornerstones of management. Glycemic control is usually assessed with HbA1c. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial showed that in type 1 diabetes, decreasing HbA1c from 9.0 to 7.2% resulted in a 50–75% reduction in retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy (1). The U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) showed that in type 2 diabetes, decreasing HbA1c from 7.9 to 7.0% decreased retinopathy and nephropathy (2). Increased insulin resistance occurs in smokers with and without diabetes (3,4). Smoking is also a risk factor for development of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine whether smoking cessation was associated with improved glycemic control. This study was a prospective cohort design and included 34 patients who ceased smoking, were followed for 1 year, and continued not to smoke at 1 year. Two control groups were randomly selected from patients participating in a prospective diabetes complications study (DCS). A DCS includes history, examination, ophthalmological review, and investigations, including HbA1c. The control groups were 34 never smokers and 34 current smokers. Smoking status was assigned based on patient self report. HbA1c was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, with 3.5–5.7% as the normal range. Results are presented as means ± 1 SD. The study was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Average consumption before cessation was 24 cigarettes per day. Mean age for the group who stopped smoking was 60 ± 15 years. A total of 7 subjects had type 1 diabetes, and 27 had type 2 diabetes. Mean HbA1c was 7.7 ± 2.2% while smoking and 7.0 ± 1.6% after smoking cessation (P = 0.048) (Fig. 1). Thus, the change in HbA1c was −0.70% (P < 0.0001 vs. expected change Continue reading >>

Why Smoking Is Especially Bad If You Have Diabetes

Why Smoking Is Especially Bad If You Have Diabetes

Smoking is a health hazard for anyone, but for people with diabetes or a high risk of developing the disease, lighting up can contribute to serious health complications. Researchers have long known that diabetes patients who smoke have higher blood sugar levels, making their disease more difficult to control and putting them at greater danger of developing complications such as blindness, nerve damage, kidney failure and heart problems. Now a new study offers the most definitive evidence why: the nicotine in cigarettes. Xiao-Chuan Liu, a professor of chemistry at the California State Polytechnic University, presented results from his study of blood samples from smokers at the American Chemical Society national meeting and exposition. He found that nicotine, when added to human blood samples, raised levels of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) by as much as 34%. Liu expects a similar effect occurs with diabetic smokers, whom he hopes to test in a follow up study. Hemoglobin A1c — a combination of hemoglobin (which ferries oxygen) and glucose — is a standard indicator of blood sugar content in the body. Doctors always knew smoking can make diabetes worse, but, Liu says, “now we know why. It’s the nicotine. This study also implies that if you are a smoker, and not diabetic, that your chances of developing diabetes is higher.” The higher A1c levels rise in the blood, he says, the more likely it is that other protein complexes, which build up in various tissues of the body, from the eyes, heart and blood vessels, can form, leading to blockages in circulation and other complications. But perhaps more importantly, the results also suggest that nicotine replacement products such as patches and nicotine-containing electronic cigarettes, aren’t a safe option for diabetes patients Continue reading >>

Quitting Smoking With Diabetes

Quitting Smoking With Diabetes

Pretty much anyone who smokes knows that its important to quit. Smoking affects so many aspects of your health, and it definitely has an impact on your diabetes management. But, according to the website Smokefree.gov , Many ex-smokers say quitting was the hardest thing they ever did. However, millions of Americans have quit smoking, so it can be done. Read on to learn the whys and hows of quitting smoking, and find out whats worked for others. Think back to when you started smoking. Maybe you were a teenager or a young adult. Maybe you had friends or parents who smoked. You might have seen ads, TV shows, or movies that glamorized smoking. But once you start to smoke, its all too easy to get hooked, thanks to nicotine, an addictive substance found in tobacco. Nicotine can make you feel good, and it promotes relaxation and stress relief. It acts on the nervous system and the brain to boost levels of dopamine, a feel-good chemical. The effects of nicotine wear off quickly, though, which is why someone who smokes feels the urge to light up frequently. Over time, the body starts to build up a tolerance, and more nicotine is needed to prevent feeling irritable or edgy, setting in motion a vicious cycle of dependency. If you smoke, chances are you reach for a cigarette when youre stressed out, anxious, or upset. Smoking provides quick relief and helps you calm down. According to the American Cancer Society, two out of three smokers want to quit, and half try to quit every year, but most wont succeed without help. Nicotine causes a physical and emotional dependence thats tough to break. Research shows that its easier to stop using hard-core drugs, such as cocaine, than it is to stop smoking. And going through nicotine withdrawal, without help, is challenging, causing unpleasan Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Smoking

Diabetes And Smoking

Smoking is bad for everyone, and it's especially risky if you have diabetes. The nicotine in cigarettes makes your blood vessels harden and narrow, curbing blood flow around your body. And since diabetes makes you more likely to get heart disease, you definitely don't want the extra risk that comes from smoking. No matter how much or how long you have smoked, quitting helps your health. You'll feel better, look better (since smoking gives you wrinkles before you're old), and you'll save money, too. If you have diabetes, here are some tips to help you quit, based on guidelines from the American Cancer Society. 1. Set a quit date. You don't have to quit immediately. If you know it's more realistic for you to kick the habit after a big event or deadline, make that your quit date. 2. Tell your doctor the date. You'll have built-in support. 3. Make smoking inconvenient. Don't have anything you need to smoke on hand, like ash trays, lighters, or matches. 4. Breathe deeply when you crave a cigarette. Hold your breath for 10 seconds, and then exhale slowly. 5. Spend time in places where you can't smoke because it's banned, such as a library, theater, or museum. 6. Hang out with friends who are also working on kicking the habit. Go to places that don't allow smoking. 7. Reach for low-calorie, good-for-you foods instead of smoking. Choose fresh fruit and crisp, crunchy vegetables. 8. Exercise to ease your stress instead of lighting up. 9. Go decaf. Pass up coffee, soft drinks that have caffeine, and alcohol, as they all can increase the urge to smoke. 10. Keep your hands too busy for cigarettes. Draw, text, type, or knit, for examples. 11. Hack your habits. If you always had a cigarette on your work break, take a walk, talk to a friend, or do something else instead. 12. Wrap a ci Continue reading >>

Why Stop Smoking?

Why Stop Smoking?

I started to write a stop smoking column. But after researching nicotine, I’m thinking of taking the habit up myself. Yes, it kills more people than all the other bad habits I can think of put together. It makes diabetes far worse. But what a drug! Nicotine affects your brain much like cocaine does, but they don’t arrest you for having it. Nicotine hits your brain within 10–20 seconds after a puff and immediately starts raising dopamine levels. Dopamine is our “reward chemical”; it tells you “you’re doing the right thing, so feel good.” A family of enzymes called MAOs (monoamine oxidase) breaks down dopamine and serotonin, another feel-good chemical. Nicotine is an MAO inhibitor; it blocks MAOs, so you have more dopamine and serotonin, so you feel better right away. And you don’t need a prescription! Nicotine also promotes release of epinephrine (adrenaline) and endorphins, so you feel more energetic and more relaxed at the same time. (According to Wikipedia, small puffs/doses are more energizing, while higher doses/deeper puffs are more relaxing.) Nicotine makes you more alert and improves concentration. It relieves pain and anxiety. As a drug, it’s even better than sugar, but unlike sugar, it suppresses appetite and raises metabolism, making it great for weight loss. So why would anyone want to stop smoking? So Why Stop? According to the Web site Diabetes UK, “smoking can double the likelihood of [diabetes-related] heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, and erectile dysfunction.” About.com says that, “Both [smoking and diabetes] can damage your heart and your circulation. Both can raise your blood pressure and your cholesterol levels. Smokers also have a harder time controlling their blood glucose levels, because insulin resistance is increa Continue reading >>

Smoking And Diabetes: The Connection Between 2 U.s. Epidemics

Smoking And Diabetes: The Connection Between 2 U.s. Epidemics

An icon of a printer created by Alexander Wiefel. The increase in diabetes in the U.S. to epidemic levels has gained a lot of attention in recent years. Over 29 million Americans have the disease and many more1 in 3 adultsare at risk of developing it in the next five years (known as pre-diabetes). Diabetes and smoking are two of the biggest public health challenges of our time, and they are connected in some surprising ways. Smoking increases the risk of developing diabetes and the risk of organ damage from the disease. To learn more about the connection between smoking and diabetes, we turned to the experts behind BecomeAnEX, a digital quit-smoking programby Truth Initiative and developed in collaboration with Mayo Clinic. How does smoking make me more likely to develop diabetes? People with diabetes have bodies that can't make or use insulina hormone that turns glucose (sugar) from the food you eat into energy. Over time, high blood sugar levels can damage organs such as your kidney, heart, blood vessels and eyes. This damage can cause these organs to malfunction or failone reason why diabetes is one of the top 10 causes of death in the country. Smoking increases the risk of developing diabetes because it can change how your body processes and regulates sugar. Smoking can also make it harder to control your blood sugar levels if you have diabetes.If you smoke, you have a 30 to 40 percent higher chance of developing diabetes than someone who has never smoked. And, the more you smoke, the higher your chance of developing diabetes. Once you quit, your risk of developing diabetes goes down. The longer you've been smoke-free, the less likely it is you'll become diabetic. How does smoking affect me if I already have diabetes? If you already have diabetes, smoking increases Continue reading >>

Can Smoking Cause Diabetes?

Can Smoking Cause Diabetes?

Diabetes is caused by a combination of genes and triggers. If your DNA, the genetic blue print that makes you...well, YOU...carries the foundation for diabetes, then the right combination of age and weight sets the process in motion. So you cannot give yourself diabetes simply by eating too much sugar, by smoking, or by kissing a diabetic. But, before you go away, now that you have diabetes, smoking is an even worse idea than it was before you had diabetes. And what I’m worried about is your heart. Most diabetics actually die from heart disease. Diabetes is a huge risk factor for heart disease. Others include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and yep—you guessed it—smoking! Now smoking is not good for anyone, regardless of the rest of their health. It can quite literally kill you overtime. The great news is that once you stop smoking your body begins to repair the damage in a matter of days. Of course, it takes years to repair all the damage but consider the following: 20 minutes after your last cigarette your blood pressure drops to normal, your pulse rate falls to normal levels, and your body temperature in your hands and feet rises to normal. 8 hours after your last cigarette the carbon dioxide level in your blood drops to normal and the oxygen level in your blood returns to normal levels. 24 hours after your last cigarette your chance of a heart attack drops measurably. 48 hours after your last cigarette nerve endings start to re-grow, increasing your ability to smell and taste. 72 hours after your last cigarette your body is free of nicotine, your bronchial tubes relax and your lung capacity increases. 2 weeks after your last cigarette your circulation improves, walking becomes easier again. 3 months after your last cigarette your lung function has incre Continue reading >>

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Yes, alcohol and tobacco use may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Alcohol Although studies show that drinking moderate amounts of alcohol may actually lower the risk of diabetes, the opposite is true for people who drink greater amounts of alcohol. Moderate alcohol use is defined as one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65, and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger. Too much alcohol may cause chronic inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which can impair its ability to secrete insulin and potentially lead to diabetes. Tobacco Tobacco use can increase blood sugar levels and lead to insulin resistance. The more you smoke, the greater your risk of diabetes. People who smoke heavily — more than 20 cigarettes a day — have almost double the risk of developing diabetes compared with people who don’t smoke. Continue reading >>

Smoking And Diabetes

Smoking And Diabetes

Smoking increases your risk of getting Type 2 diabetes. The more you smoke, the more chance you have of getting diabetes (DYE-uh-BEE-teez). If you smoke 16 to 25 cigarettes a day, your risk for Type 2 diabetes is 3 times greater than a non-smoker’s risk. When you quit smoking, your risk decreases during the years that follow. Smoking affects the way insulin works in your body. In Type 2 diabetes, the body does not respond to the insulin (IN-suh-lin) made by the pancreas (PAN-kree-us). Insulin helps blood glucose, or glucose (GLOO-cose), enter the body’s cells for fuel. When you smoke, your body is less able to respond to insulin. When your body resists insulin, your glucose levels increase. Resistance does not start to reverse until you do not smoke for 10 to 12 hours. Smoking makes it harder to control your diabetes. Studies show that smokers have poorer glucose control than non-smokers do. Ex-smokers have the same blood glucose control as non-smokers. When you have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, glucose control is very important. The A1c (read “A-one-C”) test checks how well you control your glucose level over 3 months. The goal is to keep your A1c at 7 percent or less. When you have diabetes and you smoke, your A1c level increases. If you quit smoking, your A1c level may decrease to the same level as a non-smoker’s. Smoking increases your risk for getting other problems from diabetes. When you have diabetes and smoke, your chances are greater for getting other health problems from diabetes. These other health problems are called complications (COM-pli-KAY-shuns). You can get serious eye problems, kidney problems, and nerve problems. You can get heart and blood vessel disease, such as heart attack, stroke, and hardening of the arteries, especially in the legs. E Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Smoking

Diabetes And Smoking

Tweet The information that smoking is bad for us is everywhere, but for diabetics, smoking can be even more damaging. Beyond the usual reasons, why shouldn’t I smoke if I have diabetes? Smoking is now proven to be an independent risk factor for diabetes, and amongst diabetics it increases the risk of complications. Diabetes complications already include heart disease, stroke and circulation problems. Smoking adds to the risk of developing all of these things. In some cases, smoking can double the likelihood of these conditions, as well as doubling the chances of suffering from kidney problems and erectile dysfunction. For type 2 diabetics, the major cause of death is cardiovascular disease. How does smoking increase my heart disease risk as a diabetic? Smoking and diabetes both increase the risk of heart disease in very similar ways, and so when combined, they greatly exacerbate the chances of suffering a heart related condition such as a heart attack or stroke. Both high levels of glucose in the blood and smoking damage the walls of the arteries in such a way that fatty deposits can build up much easier. As this occurs, the blood vessels narrow and make circulating blood much harder. When this happens to the coronary arteries (the arteries that supply the heart muscle with blood and therefore oxygen) a heart attack can occur. Similarly, a stroke is when not enough blood can get to the brain, and so anything that may limit blood flow increases the risks of a stroke. High blood glucose levels also have this effect on the blood vessels and blood flow, so if you smoke when you have diabetes, you are putting yourself at a much greater risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke. I am not diabetic, but I am a smoker. Could smoking lead me to develop diabetes? Smoking is als Continue reading >>

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