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How Much Water Should A Diabetic Drink A Day

How Much Water Should A Diabetic Drink Each Day

How Much Water Should A Diabetic Drink Each Day

Many Diabetics think that the reason why they experience frequent urination is that they drink too much water, so they hope to control the symptom by reducing their intake of water. However, this idea is actually not the truth. Reducing the intake of water will not help to relieve Diabetic symptoms. On the other hand, it may worsen the illness condition in Diabetics. To make it clear people with Diabetes first need to know why they experience diuresis. Diabetes, as we have known, is characterized by high blood glucose because pancreatic cells don’t function properly to produce insulin. Their blood glucose stays high and can no longer be used as energy by human body due to the insulin insufficiency. As physiological response, the high blood sugar will be forced to be filtered out of the body by the kidneys, and during this process large amount of water will be carried out together. Excessive urination cause water loss and concentrate bloodstream, which will stimulate central nerve system and make the patients feel thirsty. Drinking more water is a protective reflex. Restricting the intake of water will further concentrate bloodstream, so the excess sugar and toxic substances will not be effectively removed into urine. Elderly people with Diabetes have reduced central nerve sensitivity to thirst, so when they feel thirsty insufficiency of water is mostly very severe. Drinking plenty water, thereby, is recommended to Diabetics. How much water to drink per day for Diabetics? As common individuals, average water intake suggested to Diabetics is 2500ml per day. Boiled water or mineral water can be chosen, but sugar content drinks should be restricted. More water is needed after strenuous exercise or during obvious sweating. Soy bean milk is favorable for Diabetics with high Continue reading >>

Ckd And Diabetics Put At Risk By Diet-friendly Foods Which Inadvertently Add To Fluid Intake

Ckd And Diabetics Put At Risk By Diet-friendly Foods Which Inadvertently Add To Fluid Intake

We all know that many Chronic Kidney Disease patients cannot rid their bodies of fluid which may build up and cause their ankles and hands to swell and even cause heart failure. Moreover, Diabetic patients may suffer Overhydration. Though not particularly common, when a Diabetic suffers from Overhydration it prevents their kidneys from excreting excess water so the mineral content in the blood is diluted (Hyponatremia). Both of these situations highlight the reason why it is important for Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetic patients to consult their Primary Physician about how much liquid they should consume. Recommended Reading: Drink Which Limits Risk Of Diabetes Can Be Beneficial To Chronic Kidney Disease Patients The benefits of water are clear (pun intended); by drinking water Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetic patients can help prevent fatigue and improve their body's physical performance. Water also has no calories, no fat and no cholesterol which are ultimately things both a Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetic patient needs to avoid. Recommended Reading: A Strategy That Can Help Alleviate Chronic Kidney Disease Patient's Tiredness and Fatigue Obviously, however, water is not the only fluid most patients intake. This can become confusing for patients especially since they are often recommended to monitor their "fluid" intake by pouring water "equal to the amount of liquid you can drink during the day into a see-through container." Hence, this strategy may be ineffective when patients consume other foods and drinks which are allowed in their diets but also contain fluid such as gravy, Jello, Milk, Ice Cubes, syrup, coffee and tea, creamer, popsicles, and even fruits or vegetables. Recommended Reading: Fruits and Vegetables can Effectively Hydrate Individuals with Continue reading >>

How Much Water Should A Type 2 Diabetic Drink?

How Much Water Should A Type 2 Diabetic Drink?

A study published in Diabetes Care, a publication of the American Diabetes Association, suggests that drinking water reduces the complications of type 2 diabetes. But, the question is how much water should a type 2 diabetic drink? The best way to figure out the specific amount of water to be taken is by consulting a doctor. If a doctor doesn’t specify the amount of water intake necessary, a diabetic's water requirement is the same as of any healthy individual. Water Requirements of a Type 2 Diabetic The Institute of Medicine recommends 3 litres of water for diabetic men and 2.2 litres of water for type 2 diabetic women. The water requirement could also be met with other beverages i.e. other that drinking water. Health experts recommend consumption of caffeinated and carbonated beverages to be minimum, though herbal teas, such as green tea, work well for hydration. What Research Says A research conducted at the International Chair on Cardiometabolic Risk (ICCR) found that overconsumption of sugar-sweetened beverages plays a significant role in worsening diabetes complications. According to the study, taking care of what and how much to drink is as important as managing diet. Health experts opine that water is the most healthful way of keeping self hydrated as it contains no calories, additives or ingredients. French scientists examined 3,000 healthy men and women within the age group of 30 to 65 for a decade. All the subjects had normal blood sugar levels when the assessment began. After nine years, 800 developed type 2 diabetes or high blood sugar. It was found that those who consumed 17 to 34 ounces of water a day lowered the risk by 30 per cent than those who drank the least. How do Type 2 Diabetics Stay Hydrated? Type 2 diabetics experience thirst more frequently t Continue reading >>

Is Drinking Coconut Water Safe For Diabetics?

Is Drinking Coconut Water Safe For Diabetics?

Coconut water is one of the best natural drinks abundantly available around us. I’m not kidding. One look at the web magazines and web pages, and you’ll see celebrities promoting this refreshing drink as their ultimate ‘weight control’ weapon. It’s sweet, tasty, nutrient-dense—all without being too high in calories. And this is why coconut water is often recommended to those with high blood sugar levels. But, is it advisable to drink coconut water for diabetes? Let’s find out. Coconut Water—A Brief So, what’s so unique about this drink? Coconut water is fresh, sterile, and devoid of artificial sweeteners and preservatives. It is, therefore, safe for all to consume coconut water without worrying about any health risk. This drink is also an excellent electrolyte replenishment. It is rich in two essential salts—potassium and sodium, along with calcium, phosphorous, zinc, manganese, iron, copper, and fundamental amino acids. Coconut water also contains natural sugars like fructose (15%), glucose (50%) and sucrose (35%). Now let’s find out here can diabetic patient drink coconut water. Coconut Water For Diabetes – Is It Safe? Good news for people with diabetes around the world! Call it a work of the plentiful natural sugars or its sterile nature—coconut water has joyfully passed the safety test for diabetes—as stated in the February 2015 edition of the Journal of Medicinal Food (1). However, one should not exceed the limit of drinking coconut water every day, no matter how much you like it. This is because despite being a healthy drink coconut water does contain fructose, and although low in content (around 15%), fructose can interfere with your blood sugar levels. So, when should you stop? An ideal recommendation is 8 ounces (250 ml) twice a day. Continue reading >>

Drinking Water May Cut Risk Of High Blood Sugar

Drinking Water May Cut Risk Of High Blood Sugar

June 30, 2011 (San Diego) -- Drinking about four or more 8-ounce glasses of water a day may protect against the development of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia), French researchers report. In a study of 3,615 men and women with normal blood sugar levels at the start of the study, those who reported that they drank more than 34 ounces of water a day were 21% less likely to develop hyperglycemia over the next nine years than those who said they drank 16 ounces or less daily. The analysis took into account other factors that can affect the risk of high blood sugar, including sex, age, weight, and physical activity, as well as consumption of beer, sugary drinks, and wine. Still, the study doesn't prove cause and effect. People who drink more water could share some unmeasured factor that accounts for the association between drinking more water and lower risk of high blood sugar, says researcher Ronan Roussel, MD, PhD, professor of medicine at the Hospital Bichat in Paris. "But if confirmed, this is another good reason to drink plenty of water," he tells WebMD. The findings were presented here at the annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association. About 79 million Americans have prediabetes, a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to result in a diagnosis of diabetes, according to the CDC. It raises the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. An additional 26 million have diabetes, the CDC says. Roussel notes that recent research indicates an association between the hormone vasopressin, which regulates water in the body, and diabetes. Despite the known influence of water intake on vasopressin secretion, no study has investigated a possible association between drinking water and risk of high blood sugar, he Continue reading >>

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

Having diabetes means that you have to be aware of everything you eat or drink. Knowing the amount of carbohydrates you ingest and how they may affect your blood sugar is crucial. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends zero-calorie or low-calorie drinks. The main reason is to prevent a spike in blood sugar. Choosing the right drinks can help you avoid unpleasant side effects, manage your symptoms, and maintain a healthy weight. Water Unsweetened tea Unsweetened coffee Sugar-free fruit juice Low-fat milk Zero- or low-calorie drinks are typically your best bet when choosing a drink. Squeeze some fresh lemon or lime juice into your drink for a refreshing, low-calorie kick. Whether you’re at home or at a restaurant, here are the most diabetes-friendly beverage options. 1. Water When it comes to hydration, water is the best option for people with diabetes. That’s because it won’t raise your blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels can cause dehydration. Drinking enough water can help your body eliminate excess glucose through urine. Women should drink approximately 8 glasses of water each day, while men should drink about 10 glasses. If plain water doesn’t appeal to you, create some variety by: adding slices of lemon, lime, or orange adding sprigs of flavourful herbs, such as mint, basil, or lemon balm crushing a couple of fresh or frozen raspberries into your drink 2. Tea Research has shown that green tea has a positive effect on your general health. It can also help reduce your blood pressure and lower your LDL cholesterol levels. Some research suggests that drinking up to six cups a day may lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. However, more research is needed. Whether you choose green, black, or herbal tea, you should avoid sweeteners. For a refreshi Continue reading >>

How Much Water Should You Drink A Day?

How Much Water Should You Drink A Day?

Reader Question: “I have a question about how much water should you have in a day and if you drink it in a sport bottle what size should it be? And if you put stuff in it like flavored stuff is that ok?” Great questions. Let's chat about how much water you should drink per day if you're a diabetic, how it can help, and how to get your quota in every day. Water keeps our body functioning Here are some of the important things water does for your body: Carries nutrients and waste products Maintains the structure of molecules in the body Helps metabolic functions Helps minerals, vitamins, amino acids, glucose and other molecules perform their job Needed for body temp regulation Maintains blood volume, which has an influence over blood pressure and blood glucose As you can see, the body needs it for quite a few important things and yet most of us don't get enough water every day. Water Helps Avoid The Side Effects Of Dehydration By the time you feel like you have a dry mouth you are already dehydrated. You see, there's a time delay between your body’s water needs and your sensory awareness. Being thirsty is the first sign that your body is already lacking 1-2% body water. That's why we need to be sipping it all throughout the day. Otherwise we're doing catch up or might suffer some of the consequences. One surprising consequence of dehydration is more aches and pains. Water actually acts as a lubricant and cushion around joints and the spinal cord, so dehydration can contribute to increased inflammation and more aches and pains. If you have been feeling tired and fatigued, disoriented, lack concentration, or feel grumpy. Or if you suffer from headaches, migraines, or depression, ask yourself if you’re drinking enough water. You may not relate these things to dehydrat Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Drinking Water

Type 2 Diabetes And Drinking Water

Adopting good eating and drinking habits is important to manage diabetes. Drinking water is a healthy solution to reduce sugar impact in a diabetic diet. The number of types 2 diabetes cases will increase by 50% in 2015 as compared to 2005, according to the WHO. Moreover, type 2 diabetes, which used to be diagnosed in middle-aged individuals a few decades ago, is now reaching the paediatric population. If someone has diabetes symptoms he has to see a doctor without waiting more. Though there are a variety of factors that lead to type 2 diabetes, the trend is highly correlated to an increase in calorie intake, especially from added sugars. No sugar for a better blood glucose In case of diabetes, decrease quantity of calories related to sugars in drinking habits is highly recommended. According to the American Heart Association, added sugars shouldn’t exceed : 100 calories for a woman 150 calories for a man Pure water contains no calories and no sugar. That is why drinking water should be considered as the main source of hydration. ​ Continue reading >>

How Much Water Should You Drink?

How Much Water Should You Drink?

The key to staying hydrated is drinking fluids throughout the day You probably know that it's important to drink plenty of fluids when the temperatures soar outside. But staying hydrated is a daily necessity, no matter what the thermometer says. Unfortunately, many of us aren't getting enough to drink, especially older adults. "Older people don't sense thirst as much as they did when they were younger. And that could be a problem if they're on a medication that may cause fluid loss, such as a diuretic," says Dr. Julian Seifter, a kidney specialist and associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. Water keeps every system in the body functioning properly. The Harvard Medical School Special Health Report 6-Week Plan for Health Eating notes that water has many important jobs, such as: carrying nutrients and oxygen to your cells maintaining electrolyte (sodium) balance. Giving your body enough fluids to carry out those tasks means that you're staying hydrated. If you don't drink enough water each day, you risk becoming dehydrated. Warning signs of dehydration include weakness, low blood pressure, dizziness, confusion, or urine that's dark in color. So how much water should you drink? Most people need about four to six cups of water each day. The daily four-to-six cup rule is for generally healthy people. It's possible to take in too much water if you have certain health conditions, such as thyroid disease or kidney, liver, or heart problems; or if you're taking medications that make you retain water, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) , opiate pain medications, and some antidepressants. How much water a day should you drink if you fit into that category? There's no one-size-fits-all answer. Dr. Seifter says water intake must be individualiz Continue reading >>

Water And Diabetes

Water And Diabetes

Have you ever been dying of thirst and a coworker or friend said, "You know, you may have diabetes?" Sounds like a stretch, but in reality, thirst can be a signal of this disease that is taking America by storm. So why is thirst linked to diabetes? According to a 1995 CNN.com article, with diabetes, excess blood sugar, or glucose, in your body draws water from your tissues, making you feel dehydrated. To quench your thirst, you drink a lot of water and other beverages which leads to more frequent urination. If you notice unexplained increases in your thirst and urination, see your doctor. It may not necessarily mean you have diabetes. It could be something else. If you already have diabetes, then you know that you already have to make some changes to your diet. As mentioned above, drinking water in place of the sugary options is crucial. Water is, according to diabetes-specialists, important for everybody, but especially for diabetes-patients, because even a small decrease of the hydration-level could cause serious health problems for diabetics. One of the best warning signs that glucose levels are high is thirst. And, water is the best way to quench that thirst, and to break down those sugars. Also, in order to keep the body functioning normally, water should be a constant. But, water can be lost through exercise and normal exposure to high temps. With that, being hydrated will help prevent fatigue and help physical performance. A study presented at the annual meeting of American diabetes association included 3,615 men and women with normal blood sugar levels at the beginning of the study. Those who reported they drank more than 36 ounces of water a day (4.5 cups) were 21% less likely to develop hyperglycemia over the next 9 years than those who said they drank 16 ounc Continue reading >>

Why You Should Drink More Water If You Have Diabetes

Why You Should Drink More Water If You Have Diabetes

While everyone talks about the right diet and foods that a diabetic should eat, nobody gives any emphasis on the water intake for diabetic patients. Know that fluid intake is equally important for diabetics. That being said, sugary fruit juices or colas don’t fall into the category of healthy liquids for diabetics. ‘In fact, a diabetic patient who doesn’t suffer from any other health condition, can drink as much water as he needs. Remember, drinking water will also help to limit the intake of other high caloric juices and colas, which in a way will keep your blood sugar in check,’ says Dr Pradeep Gadge diabetologist, Shreya Diabetes Centre, Mumbai. There are a few vegetables too that diabetics should eat. In fact, a recent study showed that drinking adequate water over other liquids like tea, coffee or sweetened and unsweetened beverages helped to keep blood sugar level under control. People who drank less that 0.5 litre of water each day needed more therapeutic and preventive measures in place to keep their blood sugar under control [1]. Here is an ideal diet plan to follow if you have diabetes. How much is too much? When it comes to drinking water here are few rules a diabetic should follow: Drink 1 ml of water per calorie consumed, which means if your caloric intake in 2000 your water intake should be 2000 ml or 2 litre. There is no harm if you exceed your water intake to even 3 litre, given that you do not have problems like kidney diseases or have medications that can influence your frequency of urination. If you are taking diuretics for one or the other health conditions, limit your water intake to the regular 8 to 10 glasses else you might be visiting the restroom every hour. Diabetics with chronic kidney problems can limit their water intake to 1000 ml a Continue reading >>

Can Drinking Lots Of Water Lower My Blood Sugar?

Can Drinking Lots Of Water Lower My Blood Sugar?

The answer is yes, indirectly it will reduce insulin resistance and help a person reduce their hunger. Drinking 8 glasses of water a day appears to bring down one's blood sugars by reducing insulin resistance due to proper hydration. While at the same time the more water you drink the less hungry a person is so they tend to eat less during the day, similar to drinking a glass of water prior to eating fills the stomach causing a person who is dieting to reach satiation (fullness) sooner. If your blood sugars are very high and your kidney is not able to process all the sugar, water will help remove the excess sugar and ketones out of your system. Drinking water is important for everyone but for diabetics, especially type 1 diabetics, it is crucial to remove excess ketones from the blood stream and reduce dehydration when blood sugars are high. Continue reading >>

The Low Carb Diabetic: How Much Water Should You Drink Per Day?

The Low Carb Diabetic: How Much Water Should You Drink Per Day?

Please check out our website www.lowcarbdiabetic.co.uk We created and maintain this site without any help from anyone else. In doing so, we do not receive direct or indirect funding from anyone. We do not accept money or favours to manipulate the evidence in any way. Please visit our Low Carb food and recipe blogwww.lowcarbdietsandrecipes.blogspot.com "The body is about 60% water, give or take. Were constantly losing water from our bodies, primarily via urine and sweat. There are many different opinions on how much water we should be drinking every day. The health authorities commonly recommend eight 8-ounce glasses, which equals about 2 liters, or half a gallon. This is called the 88 rule and is very easy to remember. However, there are other health gurus who think were always on the brink of dehydration and that we need to sip on water constantly throughout the day even when were not thirsty. As with most things, this depends on the individual and there are many factors (both internal and external) that ultimately affect our need for water. Id like to take a look at some of the studies on water intake and how it affects the function of the body and brain, then explain how to easily match water intake to individual needs. Can More Water Increase Energy Levels and Improve Brain Function? Many people claim that if we dont stay hydrated throughout the day, our energy levels and brain function can start to suffer. There are actually plenty of studies to support this. Bottom Line: Mild dehydration caused by exercise or heat can have negative effects on both physical and mental performance. Does Drinking a Lot of Water Help You Lose Weight? There are many claims about water intake having an effect on body weight that more water can increase metabolism and reduce appetite. B Continue reading >>

Hemodialysis And Fluid Intake: How Much To Drink?

Hemodialysis And Fluid Intake: How Much To Drink?

Hemodialysis and fluid intake: How much to drink? Posted June 24, 2014 in FAQ by Sara Colman, RD, CDE. People on in-center hemodialysis usually have dialysis treatments three times a week. The amount of fluid they can have is limited since the kidneys lose the ability to remove excess fluid from the body. Too much fluid can increase blood pressure, make the heart to work harder, and may cause shortness of breath. To determine how much fluid to consume each day several things are considered, starting with urine output. Many hemodialysis patients no longer urinate due to complete kidney failure. In this case, liquids are usually limited to 32 ounces or 1000 ml each day. This amount will result in a daily fluid weight gain of 1 kilogram, or 2.2 pounds. Some hemodialysis patients still urinate due to residual renal function. For them, the fluid intakeis usually more liberal. All obvious liquids like coffee, tea, juice and water plus items that are liquid at room temperature like ice, sorbet and gelatin count as part of a persons fluid allowance. How much liquid can dialysis patientsconsume each day if theystill make urine? To find out, a 24-hour urine collection is measured. The measured volume is added to 1000 ml (1 liter or approximately 32 ounces) fluid allowance. For example, if the 24-hour urine collection is 500 ml, the fluid restriction is 1500 ml per day instead of 1000 ml. This is approximately 48 ounces or 6 cups of liquid each day. Residual renal function can decrease over time and fluid goals may change as a result. For people on home hemodialysis the treatments are usually more frequent5 to 6 days a week. Fluid is removed more often so the daily allowance is greater. Dialysis patients are advised to weigh themselves daily to help keep track of weight and fluid Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Drinks For Type 2 Diabetes

Best And Worst Drinks For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 8 Best and Worst Drinks for Type 2 Diabetes If you have type 2 diabetes, you know it's important to watch what you eat — and the types of drinks you consume. Drinks that are high in carbohydrates and calories can affect both your weight and your blood sugar. "Generally speaking, you want your calories and carbs to come from whole foods, not from drinks," says Nessie Ferguson, RD, CDE, a nutritionist at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. The best drinks have either zero or very few calories, and deciding on a beverage isn't really difficult. "When it comes right down to it, good beverage choices for type 2 diabetes are good choices for everyone," she says. Some good drinks for type 2 diabetes include: Water Fat-free or low-fat milk Black coffee Unsweetened tea (hot or iced) Flavored water (zero calories) or seltzer But sugary soda is one of the worst types of drinks for type 2 diabetes, according to the Mayo Clinic. The problems with soda include: Empty calories. Soft drinks are very high in sugar, have zero nutritional value, and are often used in place of healthy drinks such as milk. Cavities. The high sugar combined with the acid in soda dissolves tooth enamel, which increases the risk of cavities. Weight gain. Sugary sodas have about 10 teaspoons of sugar per 12-ounce can. Boosts risk of diabetes and risk of complications for those who have diabetes. Some people with type 2 diabetes continue to drink alcohol, but you should be aware that any alcohol consumption may result in dangerously low blood sugar levels for up to 24 hours. That’s why it’s important to check your blood sugar often and get your doctor's okay before you drink alcohol. People with diabetes should only consume alcohol if their diabetes is well controlled and should always wear a medical Continue reading >>

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