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How Much Sugar Diabetes Type 2

Fat Is The Cause Of Type 2 Diabetes

Fat Is The Cause Of Type 2 Diabetes

ron: I’m glad you asked this question, because it gets at a common issue that many people share. Due to science education in schools and the way media reports on scientific news, the general public is under the impression that each new study sort of wipes out any study that came before. Say that yesterday there was a study or article in favor of say butter, then you would see those headlines and think that the latest and greatest WORD from science is that butter is healthy. And then tomorrow, when another study comes out showing that butter is indeed unhealthy, there is another headline and people think that the latest “word” is that butter is now unhealthy. Another problem is that because people think the latest study is the latest word and since studies are not all going to agree, people think that the science keeps flip flopping and get frustrated with that. The media makes this worse by only reporting studies that they can make appear to be a “flip flop” as the media makes money off of eye catching headlines. . But that’s not how science actually works. When done in good faith, science is about hitting a subject from a whole bunch of different angles and attempting to replicate results multiple times. Understanding that life is messy and it’s extremely difficult (impossible?) to create perfect studies for subjects as complex as nutrition on long term health, we *expect* that not all the studies will agree with each other. However, over time, if we do our job, we can also expect that the *body of scientific evidence* will paint a fairly clear picture. I say all the time, “It’s not about any one study. It’s about the body of evidence.” . Did you know that there are over 100 studies showing that smoking is either neutral or health-promoting? But t Continue reading >>

If I Have Diabetes, Will I Have To Stop Eating Sugar?

If I Have Diabetes, Will I Have To Stop Eating Sugar?

What is that saying? Everything is good but only in moderation? Well this rings true when it comes to eating sugar with diabetes too. You probably already know that eating a lot of sugar is not great for your body. The problem is that sugar comes in a natural form and in an added form, so sometimes you have no idea that you are consuming it. Also, it is in many foods that you don’t even think to consider. Foods that you think are healthy, such as tomato sauce and protein bars, are packed full of sugar. This article breaks down the facts about eating sugar with diabetes and how you can make the best choices for your body in order to effectively manage your diabetes. How does sugar impact the blood sugar levels? Normally, when you eat something that contains sugar, your pancreas releases insulin. This insulin partners up with the sugar molecules and together they enter into the cells and provide energy to your body. When you have diabetes, your body either isn’t making enough insulin anymore, or your body is resistant to the insulin that you are creating. This prevents the sugar from being used by your cells and it just hangs out in your bloodstream causing high blood sugar levels. Having sugar in your bloodstream can lead to many problems and is dangerous for your health. Sugar, which is also known as carbohydrates or glucose, is found naturally in many different foods such as dairy, fruits, and starchy vegetables. It is also added to many foods like pastas, grains, baked goods, processed foods, and beverages. Since liquids are digested faster, they increase your blood sugar faster than solids do. More about what contains sugar is found later in this article. The myth about sugar and diabetes There are many myths about diabetes in general. One of the biggest ones is Continue reading >>

How Low Is Low Carb?

How Low Is Low Carb?

Many agree: People with diabetes should eat a low-carb diet. Last week we looked at what “carbs” are. But what is meant by “low?” How much carbohydrate should you eat? The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010, (PDF) recommend that healthy people get 50–65% of their calories from carbohydrates. A study posted on the American Diabetes Association (ADA) Web site agrees. For a woman eating a below-average 2,000 calories a day, 50–65% would be 250–325 grams of carb a day. The Dietary Guidelines call for “a balanced diet that includes six one-ounce (28.3 g) servings of grain foods each day.” This would mean 170 grams of carbohydrate from grains alone each day. And the average American diet includes many other carb sources. Most men eat closer to 3,000 calories a day, so their numbers would be higher. Sixty percent of 3,000 would be 1,800 calories, equivalent to 450 grams of carbohydrate each day. Anything less than the recommended range is sometimes considered “low-carb.” Most popular low-carb diets, like Atkins, South Beach, Zone, and Protein Power, are much lower, from 45% of calories down to 5%. Many diabetes experts recommend somewhat lower carb intakes than ADA does. On our site, dietitian Jacquie Craig wrote, “Most people need between 30–75 grams of carbohydrate per meal and 15–30 grams for snacks.” So that sounds like between 120 and 300 grams a day. Dr. Richard Bernstein, an MD with Type 1 diabetes and a long-time advocate of the low-carb approach to diabetes, suggests much lower intakes. He says eat 6 grams of carbs at breakfast, and snacks, 12 grams each at lunch and dinner. So that would be about 40 grams of carbs per day. If 12 grams per meal sounds like a small amount, it is. It’s about the amount in an average slice of bread. An Continue reading >>

Q: Can Eating A Lot Of Sugar Give You Diabetes?

Q: Can Eating A Lot Of Sugar Give You Diabetes?

A: Not specifically. But too much of any unhealthy food can make you fat, which can cause diabetes. Our expert: Prof Ian Caterson It's a warning that rings harshly in the ear of anyone with a sweet tooth. You're about to tuck into a bag of your favourite lollies when someone shrieks in horror: "Don't eat those! You'll get diabetes!!" But do high-sugar foods really pose this risk? It's true that diabetes is a disease where there's too much glucose — a type of sugar — in your blood. But just because you have high blood sugar doesn't mean eating a lot of sugar is what got you there, says Ian Caterson, Boden Professor of Human Nutrition at the University of Sydney. In fact, the notion there's a direct link between eating sugar and developing diabetes is a myth, Caterson says. However, eating too many sugary foods can lead to weight gain, a key trigger for the most common form of diabetes: type 2. But so can eating too much of many other unhealthy foods, not just those high in sugar. "It is more being overweight — particularly around the waist — that is linked with type 2 diabetes than any particular food you eat," he says. Body fat and insulin Weight gain can lead to diabetes because extra body fat causes chemical changes in your body. "We used to think fat was just a storage tissue but we now know it's more than that," Caterson says. It's an active tissue which produces hormones — chemical messengers that influence processes in the body, he says. In particular, hormones produced by fat influence the activity of another hormone, insulin, which controls the uptake of glucose from your blood. Glucose is the body's main source of energy and it comes from carbohydrates such as potatoes, bread, pasta and rice, fruit and milk. After food is digested, the glucose is rele Continue reading >>

Pears And Diabetes

Pears And Diabetes

Pears: A Sweet You Can Eat Type 2 Diabetes: Overview We naturally have sugar in the bloodstream that provides energy to every body cell. Healthy levels of this sugar, glucose, are maintained by insulin, a hormone secreted when blood sugar rises too high. Type 2 diabetes happens when your body doesn’t make enough insulin or your body’s cells don’t respond normally to insulin, called insulin resistance. This causes high blood sugar and immediately starts to starve cells of energy. Over time, high blood sugar damages sensitive tissues, such as those in the extremities, eyes, and kidneys. What Should I Eat? Following a regular meal plan, being active, taking medications, and tracking your blood sugar levels will help you manage your diabetes. Indeed, you may be able to control your diabetes just by eating healthfully and exercising regularly. Most people benefit from 3 meals plus 2 to 3 snacks every day. For easy snacking ideas, click here. What are Carbohydrates? Carbohydrates provide energy, and every cell needs energy. Carbohydrates are found in fruits, vegetables, grains, nuts, seeds, beans, and dairy and come in three forms, sugars, starches, and fiber. Sugars are the simplest, most easily absorbed carbohydrates and include glucose needed to sustain energy. Starches are longer chains of sugars. Fiber is the indigestible part of a plant. While it is generally not digested, it may offer cardiovascular and digestive benefits. Why Pears? Everyone’s digestive system needs carbohydrates, and it is best to balance them with fiber, protein, or fat at every meal. Balancing carbohydrates decreases the rate of absorption of glucose, so your blood sugar won’t spike as dramatically. Good carbohydrate choices are those that already contain these nutrients, such as fiber-ri Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms, Signs, Diet, And Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms, Signs, Diet, And Treatment

Type 2 diabetes is a condition in which cells cannot use blood sugar (glucose) efficiently for energy. This happens when the cells become insensitive to insulin and the blood sugar gradually gets too high. There are two types of diabetes mellitus, type 1 and type 2. In type 2, the pancreas still makes insulin, but the cells cannot use it very efficiently. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas cannot make insulin due to auto-immune destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. Type 2 can be caused by: Lack of activity (sedentary behavior) Genetics Risk factors include: Being overweight Being sedentary including watching more than 2 hours of TV per day Drinking soda Consuming too much sugar and processed food The signs and symptoms of this type of this type of diabetes are sometimes subtle. The major symptom is often being overweight. Other symptoms and signs include: Urinating a lot Gaining or losing weight unintentionally Dark skin under armpits, chin, or groin Unusual odor to urine Blurry vision Often there are no specific symptoms of the condition and it goes undiagnosed until routine blood tests are ordered. A blood sugar level more than 125 when fasting or more than 200 randomly is a diagnosis for diabetes. Treatment is with diet and lifestyle changes that include eating less sugary foods, and foods that are high in simple carbohydrates (sugar, bread, and pasta.) Sometimes a person will need to take drugs, for example, metformin (Glucophage). People with both types of diabetes need monitor their blood sugar levels often to avoid high (hyperglycemia) and low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia). Complications include heart and kidney disease, neuropathy, sexual and/or urinary problems, foot problems, and eye problems. This health condition can be prevented by following a Continue reading >>

What Is A Good Sugar Level?

What Is A Good Sugar Level?

The Diabetes Forum - find support, ask questions and share your experiences with 250,009 people. Join the Forum A A blood sample for a random plasma glucose test can be taken at any time. This doesnt require as much planning and is therefore used in the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes when time is of the essence. The NICE guidelines regard a fasting plasma glucose result of 6.1 to 6.9 mmol/l as putting someone at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, particularly when accompanied by other risk factors for type 2 diabetes. An oral glucose tolerance test involves taking a first taking a fasting sample of blood and then taking a very sweet drink containing 75g of glucose. An HbA1c test does not directly measure the level of blood glucose, however, the result of the test is influenced by how high or low your blood glucose levels have tended to be over a period of 2 to 3 months. The second is the HbA1c reading, which gives a good idea of our average control over a period of 2 to 3 months. The target blood glucose levels vary a little bit depending on your type of diabetes and between adults and children. Where possible, try to achieve levels of between 4 and 7 mmol/L before meals and under 8.5 mmol/L after meals. The target level for HbA1c is under 48 mmol/mol (or 6.5% in the old units). Keeping blood glucose above 4 mmol/l for people on insulin or certain medications for type 2 diabetes is important to prevent hypos occurring, which can be dangerous. Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Honey? The Research Will Surprise You

Can Diabetics Eat Honey? The Research Will Surprise You

Honey is an all-natural food nicknamed Nature’s Sweetener. Humans have likely been eating it for tens, if not hundreds of thousands of years. And not only for its sweet flavour, but for its medicinal properties too. Sounds like something we should be eating more of right? Yet when you break it right down, honey is essentially sugar. We know that a high sugar diet is bad for you, which is why many consider honey unhealthy. So is honey good for us or not? Perhaps more importantly… Can diabetics eat honey? Honey vs Sugar: How does it compare? Honey is made in the bee-hive from flower nectar. The process is a collective effort that requires honey bees to consume, digest and regurgitate nectar repeatedly. For this reason the nutritional properties of honey depend on the nectar available around the hive. A typical batch of honey compared with sugar looks like this (1): You can see honey contains water and many trace vitamins and minerals that sugar doesn’t. That’s why honey is only 82% sugar by weight, while sugar is 99.9%… And that’s also why honey contains fewer calories than sugar. It’s hard to argue the winner here. Honey is also reported to contain at nearly 200 different substances, especially antioxidants. Antioxidants are thought to protect against many forms of disease (2). The Glycemic Index (GI) ranges considerably depending on the type of honey, but the entire GI concept itself is unpredictable anyway. Summary: Honey is not pure sugar. It also contains water and small amounts of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, which vary depending on the type of honey. Honey vs Sugar: Effects on blood sugar and insulin The impact of honey consumption on blood sugar levels tends to be slightly better than regular sugar. One small experimental study on healthy sub Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Curable?

Is Diabetes Curable?

Caveat: I am neither a doctor nor a nutrition expert. However, I do have type 2 diabetes. I was diagnosed in August 2015 after several years of deep denial and ignoring my escalating A1C levels. My personal experience with diabetes is that with significant lifestyle changes, I have been able to manage it. But I know that if I were to stop exercising and go back to the way I used to eat, my blood sugar would go up and my health would surely deteriorate. On the day I was diagnosed, I cried for about three hours. Then I dried my tears and started doing research. I found a great TEDx talk by Dr. Sarah Hallberg on YouTube. Her message was very simple: Food is made up of protein, fats and carbohydrates. Protein raises blood sugar some. Fats don't raise it at all. Carbohydrates raise it a lot, every time you eat them. So if you eat fewer carbohydrates and more fats, your blood sugar won't go up as much. If your blood sugar doesn't go up, your diabetes is controlled. It made perfect sense to me. That day I decided to change my diet and eliminated grains, starchy vegetables, legumes, sugar, and fruit. I ate protein, non-starchy vegetables, and fat - a lot of fat. I hadn’t heard the terms “keto” or “ketogenic diet” at that point, but that’s basically what I’ve been following. Extremely low carbohydrate, moderate protein, high fat. Within three months, my A1C was down into high-normal territory. Three months after that, it was normal. And it's been coming down ever since. I lost 40+ pounds, but weight loss was never my goal. I just don’t want to suffer the long-term negative health consequences of uncontrolled diabetes. I’ve written about my battle with diabetes on my blog. Here’s a recent post: I cut out sugar and carbs to treat my type 2 diabetes, and here's Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Counting & Diabetes

Carbohydrate Counting & Diabetes

What is carbohydrate counting? Carbohydrate counting, also called carb counting, is a meal planning tool for people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Carbohydrate counting involves keeping track of the amount of carbohydrate in the foods you eat each day. Carbohydrates are one of the main nutrients found in food and drinks. Protein and fat are the other main nutrients. Carbohydrates include sugars, starches, and fiber. Carbohydrate counting can help you control your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, levels because carbohydrates affect your blood glucose more than other nutrients. Healthy carbohydrates, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, are an important part of a healthy eating plan because they can provide both energy and nutrients, such as vitamins and minerals, and fiber. Fiber can help you prevent constipation, lower your cholesterol levels, and control your weight. Unhealthy carbohydrates are often food and drinks with added sugars. Although unhealthy carbohydrates can also provide energy, they have little to no nutrients. More information about which carbohydrates provide nutrients for good health and which carbohydrates do not is provided in the NIDDK health topic, Diabetes Diet and Eating. The amount of carbohydrate in foods is measured in grams. To count grams of carbohydrate in foods you eat, you’ll need to know which foods contain carbohydrates learn to estimate the number of grams of carbohydrate in the foods you eat add up the number of grams of carbohydrate from each food you eat to get your total for the day Your doctor can refer you to a dietitian or diabetes educator who can help you develop a healthy eating plan based on carbohydrate counting. Which foods contain carbohydrates? Foods that contain carbohydrates include grains, such as b Continue reading >>

Does Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar either because of the inability of the body to produce enough insulin or the inability to respond to the insulin so produced. It is classified as follows: Type 1, Type 2 and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. Glucose is the primary energy source in humans and its levels are majorly regulated by pancreatic insulin. Insulin facilitates the breakdown of glucose and its entry into respiring cells and tissues. In Type 1 diabetes, the body fails to produce insulin and requires injected insulin. People suffering from Type 1 diabetes face daily challenges of monitoring glucose levels, controlling eating habits, exercising and insulin administration. In Type 2 diabetes, cells fail to use insulin properly (insulin resistance) which may be combined with an absolute insulin deficiency. Type 1 is observed more frequently in children and adolescents while Type 2, which account for more than 90% of the diabetes cases worldwide, is commonly detected in adults. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus currently occurs in 5% of the pregnancies and its prevalence is expected to rise along with the incidence of worldwide obesity. Pregnancies suffering from Gestational Diabetes Mellitus are at a greater risk of other complications like pre-eclampsia, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disorders, Type 2 diabetes and gestational hypertension. Offspring of these women are also predisposed to conditions like obesity, Type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Other forms of diabetes include congenital diabetes caused due to genetic defects of insulin secretion, cystic fibrosis-related diabetes, steroid diabetes induced by high doses of glucocorticoids etc. (How to Prevent Diabetes Induced Foot Injuries) Some of the important features Continue reading >>

Sugars And Type 2 Diabetes

Sugars And Type 2 Diabetes

What is type 2 diabetes? Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person’s blood sugar to be too high. There are two forms of diabetes: type 1 and type 2 [1]. Insulin is a hormone that is key in regulating blood glucose levels. Type 2 diabetes can occur either as a result of insulin receptors becoming desensitised and as a result no longer responding to insulin; or, due to the beta cells of the pancreas no longer producing insulin. Often it is a combination of these two factors that leads to this condition known as type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is by far the most common type – of all the adults who have diabetes, 90% of them have type 2. Diabetes is an increasing health problem in the UK with 3.2million people diagnosed with diabetes and a further 850,000 estimated to be undiagnosed [1]. Diabetes is a growing health burden and it is estimated that by 2025, 5 million people will have been diagnosed in the UK [2]. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in the UK and the disease’s complications cause more than 100 amputations to take place each week. Each year, 24 000 people die early from diabetes-associated complications [3]. Its total cost is estimated at £13.8billion each year [4]. It is predicted that the annual NHS cost of the direct treatment of diabetes in the UK will increase to £16.9 billion over the next 25 years, which is 17 per cent of the NHS budget [5], believed to potentially bankrupt the NHS What are the causes of Type 2 diabetes? There is a complex combination of genetic and environmental risk factors that play a part in the development of diabetes – it tends to cluster in families, but there is also a strong link to environmental risk factors. Ethnicity also plays a major role in its development, with people of South Asian descent Continue reading >>

What Are The Advancements In The Treatments Of Diabetes?

What Are The Advancements In The Treatments Of Diabetes?

Up until relatively recently doctors were on the wrong track with diabetes. Some were still injecting insulin into patients with type 2 diabetes. They now know this is not the best first course of action. Three types of diabetes in layman’s terms Type 1 is where the pancreas can not secrete enough insulin Type 2 where too much insulin is produced because receptors are resistant to insulin. Reversible in the majority of cases through diet alone. Type 3 is Alzheimer’s (due to glycated proteins) Recent discoveries mean that diagnosis of type 1 and type 2 are not as clear as once thought. I’m a specialist practitioner in obesity and diabetes. Yes that’s right, type 2 diabetes can be reversed through diet. Absolutely. Firstly this is what is a normal insulin reaction looks like: Insulin is manufactured in the pancreas and secreted when your blood sugar levels rise. Blood sugar needs to be not too high and not too low. Insulin’s mechanism to remove sugar from blood is to put it into cells, like your muscles. If there is an excess after blood glucose has gone into cells it is then put in the liver and further excess becomes fat. What happens with type 2 When insulin is secreted the body’s cells have ‘‘receptors’ that accept the insulin’s key that then open the doors to the cell to let the glucose in. Sadly in type 2 the receptors become resistant to the insulin key. Therefore not enough energy gets into the cell. The body has a negative feedback system. Once the cells do not get enough energy a signal is sent back to the pancreas to manufacture even more insulin. This is a vicious cycle. Insulin keeps going up and resistance keeps getting worse. A drug, called metformin works by making cells receptive again but it has limitations and eventually other drugs Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Give You Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Give You Diabetes?

I’m going to assume you’re talking about adult onset type 2 diabetes. You need to understand the phrase “correlation does not mean causation.” High sugar consumption is strongly correlated with developing type 2 diabetes. There are population studies that combine 175 countries that show this relation. When you add this data to what is known about the metabolic effects of sugar, the link between high sugar consumption and type 2 diabetes gets stronger. Still, when you have a disease that has multiple causes you cannot say that any one factor actually causes type 2 diabetes. For instance, fat cell dysfunction plays a big role in type 2 diabetes. So, you can’t say that sugar “causes” diabetes. Of course, what often triggers fat cell dysfunction? High consumption of sugar. Continue reading >>

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

The recent film What the Health raised the question as to whether sugar or other carbohydrates cause diabetes. The notion is understandable. Blood sugar levels are high in diabetes, so a common idea has held that eating sugar somehow triggers the disease process. However, the major diabetes organizations take a different view. The American Diabetes Association1 and Diabetes UK2 have labelled this notion a “myth,” as has the Joslin Diabetes Center,3 which wrote, “Diabetes is not caused by eating too much sugar.” These and other organizations have worked to educate people about the causes of diabetes and the role that foods play in the disease process. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. Type 2 diabetes—the most common form of the disease—is caused by insulin resistance and pancreatic failure. Here is what you need to know: Sugar Is the Body’s Fuel The human body runs on glucose, a simple sugar. Just as gasoline powers your car, glucose powers your muscles, your brain, and the rest of your body. Glucose comes from fruit and from starchy foods, such as grains, beans, and potatoes, and your body can also produce it when needed. Without it you would die. Diabetes means having higher-than-normal blood glucose values. It comes in three common forms: Type 1 diabetes is caused by the destruction of the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, usually through an autoimmune process. The triggers for this process are under investigation and may include dairy proteins, viruses, or other factors. Type 2 diabetes typically starts with insulin resistance. That is, the cells of the body resist insulin’s efforts to escort glucose into the cells. What causes insulin resistance? It appears to be caused by an accumulation of microscopic fat particles within muscle and Continue reading >>

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