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How Much Protein Should A Diabetic Eat To Lose Weight

Protein Content In Diabetes Nutrition Plan.

Protein Content In Diabetes Nutrition Plan.

1. Curr Diab Rep. 2011 Apr;11(2):111-9. doi: 10.1007/s11892-010-0171-x. Protein content in diabetes nutrition plan. (1)Department of Endocrinology, Harvard Medical School, Joslin Diabetes Center, One Joslin Place, Boston, MA 02481, USA. [email protected] Medical nutrition therapy plays a major role in diabetes management.Macronutrient composition has been debated for a long time. However, there isincreasing evidence that a modest increase in dietary protein intake above thecurrent recommendation is a valid option toward better diabetes control, weightreduction, and improvement in blood pressure, lipid profile, and markers ofinflammation. Increasing the absolute protein intake to 1.5-2g/kg (or 20-30% of total caloric intake) during weight reduction has been suggested for overweightand obese patients with type 2 diabetes and normal kidney function. Increasedprotein intake does not increase plasma glucose, but increases the insulinresponse and results in a significant reduction in hemoglobin A(1c). In addition,a higher dietary protein intake reduces hunger, improves satiety, increasesthermogenesis, and limits lean muscle mass loss during weight reduction using areduced calorie diet and increased physical activity. It is preferable tocalculate protein intake for patients with diabetes as grams per kilogram of bodyweight and not as a fixed percentage of total energy intake to avoid proteinmalnutrition when a hypocaloric diet is used. The relationship between proteinintake as grams per kilogram of body weight and albumin excretion rate is veryweak, except in hypertensive patients and particularly in those with uncontrolleddiabetes. A protein intake of 0.8-1g/kg should be recommended only for patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Other patients with Continue reading >>

How Much Protein

How Much Protein

My husband is just diagnosed Diabetes 2 and I have learned that it is probably good to eat protein along with the carbohydrate to help keep glucose under control. Until he can get advice from the doctor, can someone tell me how much is enough protein? Does he need a certain number of protein grams per serving of carbohydrate? Or does he just need to have "some"? There is already protein in oatmeal; is that enough or does he need to add some on the side? Most Diabetes Dietitions suggest eating a blanced diet. Read up on that. I weigh about 185 lbs and my dietition suggested a max of 180 carbs a day for me. I don't know if the two are related. In actual practice I usually eat about 40 per meal for a total of about 120 a day. Initially I wsa eating the Lean Cuisine and Weight Watchers frozen meals so I could get an idea of carb count from the label and an idea of portion sizes. I keep a daily log showing my AM and PM Glucose readings, weight, and the carbs and calories I eat in each meal. If I just wing it I get lost and eat too many carbs and calories. I allow myself an occasional "crazy day". For the last couple of years my A1c clucose readings have been on the 6.1-6.3 range Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

High Protein Foods Make People With Type 2 Diabetes Manage Blood Sugar

High Protein Foods Make People With Type 2 Diabetes Manage Blood Sugar

Across the country, more than 29 million Americans have diabetes and another 86 million have prediabetes, forecasting a future of higher rates. But new research presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes’ annual meeting may reverse that trend, as it’s found a protein-laden diet regimen may help type 2 diabetes patients improve their blood sugar levels. Over the course of six weeks, 37 participants diagnosed with type 2 diabetes were fed either a diet high in animal protein or plant protein. While the animal diet consisted of a combination of meat and dairy foods, the plant diet was bereft of any animal product, although both diets included the same number of calories. Researchers measured each participant’s blood sugar levels and liver fat before and after the experiment to see if there were any changes from the diet intervention. Both groups saw an improvement in their blood sugar (glucose) levels and liver fat, but only those who were part of the animal protein group experienced an improvement in insulin sensitivity. Insulin is a hormone responsible for lowering blood sugar levels and allowing glucose to enter the cells of the body for storage. Diabetes is a disease that occurs when insulin doesn’t function properly and sugar accumulates in the blood, resulting in several problems ranging from high blood pressure to vision loss. Those who are insulin sensitive only need a small amount of insulin to keep their glucose within a normal range, while those who are insulin-resistant need more insulin to keep levels in check. While animal protein dieters experienced improved insulin sensitivity, participants who ate plant-based protein saw an improvement in their kidney function. Normally, waste products from protein-rich foods are filtered in ti Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Plan: List Of Foods To Eat And Avoid

Currently, there are nine drug classes of oral diabetes medications approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Sulfonylureas, for example, glimepiride (Amaryl) and glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL) Meglitinides, for example, nateglinide (Starlix) and repaglinide (Prandin) Thiazolidinediones, for example, pioglitazone (Actos) DPP-4 inhibitors, for example, sitagliptin (Januvia) and linagliptin (Tradjenta) What types of foods are recommended for a type 2 diabetes meal plan? A diabetes meal plan can follow a number of different patterns and have a variable ratio of fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. The carbohydrates consumed should be low glycemic load and come primarily from vegetables. The fat and proteins consumed should primarily come from plant sources. What type of carbohydrates are recommended for a type 2 diabetic diet plan? Carbohydrates (carbs) are the primary food that raises blood sugar. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure the impact of a carbohydrate on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. The main factors that determine a food's (or meal's) glycemic load are the amount of fiber, fat, and protein it contains. The difference between glycemic index and glycemic load is that glycemic index is a standardized measurement and glycemic load accounts for a real-life portion size. For example, the glycemic index of a bowl of peas is 68 (per 100 grams) but its glycemic load is just 16 (lower the better). If you just referred to the glycemic index, you'd think peas were a bad choice, but in reality, you wouldn't eat 100 grams of peas. With a normal portion size, peas have a healthy glycemic load as well as being an excellent source of pro Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Should A Person With Diabetes Eat?

How Much Protein Should A Person With Diabetes Eat?

How Much Protein Should a Person With Diabetes Eat? Protein itself does not have much of an effect on blood sugar levels, though the food the protein is in may. Typically, people with diabetes don't need any more protein than people who don't have diabetes. There are, however, times when less protein isbetter. Protein is one of three essential macronutrients; the other twoare fat and carbohydrate. These are needed in large amounts to maintain health and vital functions. The body uses protein to build, repair, and maintain most of your body's tissues and organs. Proteins are also necessary for immune system function and they help some additional physiological processes. As long as your kidneys are healthy, about 15 to 20 percent of your daily calories should come from protein. This is the same amount suggested for a balanced non-diabetic diet. About 45 to 50 percent of your caloric intake should come from carbohydrates and the rest should come from fat. A person who needs 2,000 calories per day needs about 75 to 100 grams protein per day. It would be more accurate, however, to use the standard formula of 0.8 grams protein per kilogram of body weight. To do the kilogram conversion, divide your weight in pounds by 2.2. For instance, if you weigh 150 pounds, that is equal to 68 kilograms. Divide that by 0.8 and you get a protein goal of 85 grams. According to the USDA Dietary Guidelines , it is recommended to eat 5 1/2 ounces of protein-rich food each day. Foods that are high in protein include meat, fish, seafood, chicken, eggs, dairy products, legumes, nuts, and seeds. One-half chicken breast has 29 grams protein A 3-ounce portion of steak has 26 grams protein When choosing proteins for a diabetic diet, the concern is more with the fats and carbohydrates that these foods Continue reading >>

High Protein Foods Make People With Type 2 Diabetes Manage Blood Sugar

High Protein Foods Make People With Type 2 Diabetes Manage Blood Sugar

High Protein Foods Make People With Type 2 Diabetes Manage Blood Sugar Across the country, more than 29 million Americans have diabetes and another 86 million have prediabetes, forecasting a future of higher rates. But new research presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes annual meeting may reverse that trend, as its found a protein-laden diet regimen may help type 2 diabetes patients improve their blood sugar levels. Over the course of six weeks, 37 participants diagnosed with type 2 diabetes were fed either a diet high in animal protein or plant protein. While the animal diet consisted of a combination of meat and dairy foods, the plant diet was bereft of any animal product, although both diets included the same number of calories. Researchers measured each participants blood sugar levels and liver fat before and after the experiment to see if there were any changes from the diet intervention. Both groups saw an improvement in their blood sugar (glucose) levels and liver fat, but only those who were part of the animal protein group experienced an improvement in insulin sensitivity. Insulin is a hormone responsible for lowering blood sugar levels and allowing glucose to enter the cells of the body for storage. Diabetes is a disease that occurs when insulin doesnt function properly and sugar accumulates in the blood, resulting in several problems ranging from high blood pressure to vision loss. Those who are insulin sensitive only need a small amount of insulin to keep their glucose within a normal range, while those who are insulin-resistant need more insulin to keep levels in check. While animal protein dieters experienced improved insulin sensitivity, participants who ate plant-based protein saw an improvement in their kidney function. Normall Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should Dieters Eat For Weight Loss?

How Many Carbs Should Dieters Eat For Weight Loss?

The low carbohydrate diet has been the topic of much controversy. One reason cutting carbs is so popular, however, is because it is a quick way of dropping the pounds. Carbohydrates are the body's main source of energy, as well as fuel for vital organs, such as the kidneys, central nervous system , and brain. Healthful carbs, such as so-called complex carbs, are necessary for the body to work optimally. Carbohydrates are broken down into a simple form of energy called glucose. The body uses insulin to carry the glucose into the cells. When too many carbohydrates are consumed, the blood sugar level spikes, insulin rises, and the result of this is often weight gain. In this article, we take a look at how many carbs someone needs to eat to lose weight, and whether or not a low-carb diet is healthful? We also examine the best and worst sources of carbohydrates to eat. Low-carb diets may lead to rapid weight loss, but there could be side effects. Low-carb diets restrict the number of calories a person gets by limiting their carbohydrate food sources. This includes both good and bad carbs. Low-carb diets tend to be higher in proteins and fats to compensate. Carbohydrates are the body's main source of energy. If this supply is reduced, the body burns its stores of protein and fat for fuel. Low-carb diets, such as the Atkins diet and the Dukan diet, have been found to lead to rapid weight loss. However, these diets are extreme and can have some unwanted side effects. For most people, it may be healthier to take a more moderate approach when reducing carbohydrate intake to help lose weight. How many carbs and calories should people eat to lose weight? Although many studies indicate that low carb diets promote fast weight loss, often this reduction in weight is short-term. Recen Continue reading >>

High-protein Diet Can Help Type 2 Diabetes Patients Control Blood Sugar

High-protein Diet Can Help Type 2 Diabetes Patients Control Blood Sugar

A new clinical study suggests that diets high in protein, independent of caloric intake, improve metabolic health. High-protein diets in type 2 diabetes patients are controversial. Such diets have been linked to increased risk of heart disease and certain cancers. However, these diets have also been praised because they result in less carbohydrate intake and weight loss. A clinical study conducted by researchers in Germany studied the effects of two high-protein diets on patients. The diets were isocaloric, with the only difference being the source of protein: animal or plant (pulses). The study included 30 type 2 diabetes patients. The average age of participants was 65 years, the average BMI was 30.5, and average HbA1c was 7.0%. Both diets were 30% protein, 40% carbohydrates, and 30% fat. Length of the trial was 6 weeks. The study authors analyzed different metabolic and molecular parameters before and after the diet. Both subject groups saw an improvement in liver health with reductions AST, ALT, and GGT. The fat content of the liver and Hba1c levels also improved in all subjects. The animal protein diet reduced liver fat content by 43.6% whereas the plant diet reduced liver fat content by 37.1% (p < 0.001). Hba1c levels were reduced by 0.58% in the animal protein diet group and 0.41% in the plant diet group (p < 0.001). Insulin sensitivity, derived from hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps, improved significantly only in the animal protein diet group with a change of 0.88 mg/kg BW/min (p < 0.05). The plant protein diet group saw an improvement in kidney function, which was not found in the animal protein diet group. The serum creatinine reduction was 7.79 micromols per liter (p < 0.01). Glomerular filtration rate also improved in the plant protein diet group. This fin Continue reading >>

Why Is Enough Eating Protein So Important? | Grunberger Diabetes Institute

Why Is Enough Eating Protein So Important? | Grunberger Diabetes Institute

Why is eating enough protein so important? Protein is responsible for maintaining you muscle mass, which is critical for maintaining your metabolic rate. It is also especially important after exercise because your muscle fibers are being broken down. For your muscle to grow and heal properly, a diet of adequate is required. Protein stabilizes blood sugar levels. Although insulin levels are required for all foods to be metabolized, protein requires far less when compared to such as carbohydrates. When we eat starchy carbs high in sugar, blood sugar spikes quickly and our body releases a surge of insulin.Protein however, has little effect on blood sugar levels and has even been shown to slow down the absorption of glucose. Eating enough protein then is very important in order to prevent highs and lows throughout the day. Protein keeps you fuller longer. It has been shown that eating higher protein foods caused higher satiety levels than carbohydrate filled foods. Eating a diet higher in protein can also help prevent over eating throughout the day as well as those late night hunger pains. Eating more protein may help you burn more calories. In order for your body to break down protein, more energy is required for its digestion than foods high in carbohydrates which require very little. Just eating more protein will help you burn more calories though out the day! This makes eating enough protein a key part of any weight loss program. Eating more protein could help you lower your blood pressure. Several studies have found that those who eat a diet higher in lean protein showed a decrease in both systolic and diastolic blood pressures. In addition to lower triglyceride levels as well a decrease in bad cholesterol, LDL cholesterol. So then how much protein should we eat in da Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The right diabetes diet is crucial to managing type 2 diabetes, maintaining stable blood sugar levels, and preserving your overall health. However, it's not as complex or out of the ordinary as you might expect. A smart diabetic diet actually looks a lot like the healthy eating plan doctors recommend for everyone: plenty of fruits and vegetables, simple carbohydrates in moderation, and fats sparingly. Count Calories to Manage Diabetes The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommends the following calorie guidelines for people who are managing diabetes: About 1,200 to 1,600 calories a day for small women who are physically active, small or medium-sized women interested in weight loss, or medium-sized women who are not physically active. About 1,600 to 2,000 calories a day for large women interested in weight loss, small men at a healthy weight, medium-sized men who aren't physically active, or medium-sized or large men interested in weight loss. About 2,000 to 2,400 calories a day for medium-sized or large men who are physically active, large men at a healthy weight or who are medium-sized, or large women who are very physically active. Reach for the Right Carbohydrates You can't avoid carbohydrates completely. They are our main source of energy, but they also lead to the biggest fluctuations in blood sugar levels. Choosing your carbohydrates wisely is critical to managing diabetes. Complex carbohydrates, or those that are rich in fiber, should constitute between 45 and 65 percent of your daily caloric intake. To make the best choices, keep these guidelines in mind: Get most or all of your carbohydrates from high-fiber sources like vegetables, beans, fruits, and whole grains. High-fiber foods are digested more slowly, which helps keep your blood sugar levels stable. Av Continue reading >>

Understanding Protein

Understanding Protein

Excess protein can mean excess calories and fat. It's best to get what you need from low-fat protein sources like lean meats, poultry, fish, low-fat dairy products, and tofu. Protein is an essential part of your diet — and your body. But too much of a good thing can be bad for you. Most meats have fat as well as protein. So excess protein from animal sources can mean excess calories and fat — which means a greater chance at gaining weight. Proteins are found in: Poultry Fish and shellfish Eggs Dairy products, like cottage cheese and regular cheese Plant-based proteins, like beans, nuts and tofu The best advice about protein? Get what you need from low-fat protein sources like lean meats, poultry and fish, low fat or nonfat dairy products, and vegetarian protein sources like tofu. How much protein do I need each day? For most people with diabetes, the amount of protein you need is the same as for people without diabetes. The National Institutes of Medicine recommend protein should typically provide 10-35% of total calories. The average intake for adults in the U.S. and Canada is about 15% of total calories. For most people, this amounts to 6 to 8 ounces of lean meat, poultry or fish daily. Think of a 3-ounce portion of protein as the size of a deck of playing cards. Aim for including roughly two of these in your diet daily. If you have kidney problems, you may need to limit how much protein you eat. Excess protein can make kidney damage worse. Your registered dietitian can help select the amount of protein that is right for you. Are All Proteins Created Equal? The source of protein is something else to consider – because some proteins are higher in calories and fats than others. Saturated fats and cholesterol are found in many protein-rich foods, contributing to bl Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

Figuring out how many carbs to eat when you have diabetes can seem confusing. Meal plans created by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) provide about 45% of calories from carbs. This includes 45–60 grams per meal and 10–25 grams per snack, totaling about 135–230 grams of carbs per day. However, a growing number of experts believe people with diabetes should be eating far fewer carbs than this. In fact, many recommend fewer carbs per day than what the ADA allows per meal. This article takes a look at the research supporting low-carb diets for diabetics and provides guidance for determining optimal carb intake. Glucose, or blood sugar, is the main source of fuel for your body's cells. In people with diabetes, the body's ability to process and use blood sugar is impaired. Although there are several types of diabetes, the two most common forms are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to produce insulin, a hormone that allows sugar from the bloodstream to enter the body's cells. Instead, insulin must be injected to ensure that sugar enters cells. Type 1 diabetes develops because of an autoimmune process in which the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells, which are called beta cells. This disease is usually diagnosed in children, but it can start at any age, even in late adulthood (1). Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is more common, accounting for about 90% of people with diabetes. Like type 1 diabetes, it can develop in both adults and children. However, it isn't as common in children and typically occurs in people who are overweight or obese. In this form of the disease, either the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or the body's cells are resistant to insulin's effects. Therefore, too much sugar stays Continue reading >>

Protein And Diabetes

Protein And Diabetes

Tweet Protein is one of the three main energy providing macronutrients, along with carbohydrate and fat. It helps the body to grow new tissue, therefore helping to build muscle and repair damage to the body. Protein is also a constituent part of each cell of our bodies and makes up approximately a sixth of our body weight. Protein and blood glucose In addition to helping the body grow, protein can also be broken down by the body into glucose and used for energy (a process known as gluconeogenesis). Protein can be broken down into glucose by the body and the effects are more likely to be noticed if you are having meals with less carbohydrate. Protein is broken down into glucose less efficiently than carbohydrate and, as a result, any effects of protein on blood glucose levels tend to occur any where between a few hours and several hours after eating. People with type 1 diabetes, or type 2 diabetes on insulin, may need to bear the effects of protein in mind if having a largely protein based meal. It’s best to learn how your sugar levels react to such meals so that you can judge the right insulin requirements. How much protein should I be eating? The UK Food Standards Agency has a sliding scale for recommended protein intake, varying by age: 1 to 3 years: 15g 4 to 6 years: 20g 7 to 10 years: 28g 11 to 14 years: 42g 15 to 18 years: 55g 19 to 50 years: 55g Over 50 years: 53g Some diets, such as the Zone diet, advocate eating an amount of protein in proportion to your lean body mass (body weight minus body fat). Can protein be bad for you? A number of studies have found there to be correlations between intake of red meat and the development of type 2 diabetes and cancers (including lung cancer liver cancer and notably bowel cancer). The studies found that if people were con Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

Have you heard that eating too much sugar causes diabetes? Or maybe someone told you that you have to give up all your favorite foods when you’re on a diabetes diet? Well, those things aren’t true. In fact, there are plenty of myths about dieting and food. Use this guide to separate fact from fiction. MYTH. The truth is that diabetes begins when something disrupts your body's ability to turn the food you eat into energy. MYTH. If you have diabetes, you need to plan your meals, but the general idea is simple. You’ll want to keep your blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. Choose foods that work along with your activities and any medications you take. Will you need to make adjustments to what you eat? Probably. But your new way of eating may not require as many changes as you think. MYTH. Carbs are the foundation of a healthy diet whether you have diabetes or not. They do affect your blood sugar levels, which is why you’ll need to keep up with how many you eat each day. Some carbs have vitamins, minerals, and fiber. So choose those ones, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Starchy, sugary carbs are not a great choice because they have less to offer. They’re more like a flash in the pan than fuel your body can rely on. MYTH. Because carbs affect blood sugar levels so quickly, you may be tempted to eat less of them and substitute more protein. But take care to choose your protein carefully. If it comes with too much saturated fat, that’s risky for your heart’s health. Keep an eye on your portion size too. Talk to your dietitian or doctor about how much protein is right for you. MYTH. If you use insulin for your diabetes, you may learn how to adjust the amount and type you take to match the amount of food you eat. But this doesn't mean you Continue reading >>

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