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How Much Pasta Can A Diabetic Eat

Can I Eat Pasta If I Have Diabetes

Can I Eat Pasta If I Have Diabetes

Having diabetes does NOT mean that if you like or love pasta, you will now have to give it up…nope, it does not. It DOES however mean that you should be choosier about the types of pasta you eat, your portion size and maybe how often you include pasta with your meals. We all need carbohydrates in our diet—it provides our bodies with the necessary fuel to keep us going. The critical question is how much and what kind of carbohydrate. Whole Grain Pasta versus Regular Pasta Whole grain pasta in general has lower calories, more fiber and more nutrients than regular pasta made from refined flour. Refining strips fiber, vitamins and minerals from the grain (usually wheat grain) and in return, you get a softer, smoother texture. 1 serving (1 cup) of whole grain pasta contains 174 calories, 37 grams of carbohydrate and 6.3 grams of fiber as compared to a serving of regular pasta with 221 calories, 43 grams of carbohydrate and 3 grams of fiber. That extra fiber in whole grain pasta (with fewer carbohydrates) can slow down the absorption of sugars from your digestive tract and this can mean that your blood sugars will not spike as much as they might with regular pasta. In addition, whole wheat pasta has a glycemic load of 15 while regular pasta has a glycemic load of 23. In both whole wheat pasta and regular pasta, about 80% of the calories are derived from carbohydrates.[1], [2] Put all this together and serving for serving, whole grain pasta gives you more fiber, more nutrients, fewer calories and fewer carbohydrates than regular pasta, making whole grain pasta a better choice, overall. Also, you can always opt for non-wheat based pasta such as corn, quinoa or rice-based pastas. I advise you to read the following diet tips for diabetes: Portion Size All the numbers given ab Continue reading >>

The Dreamfields Pasta Fraud

The Dreamfields Pasta Fraud

Dreamfields pasta is promoted as a low carb product. But it’s made from durum wheat and it tastes great. Actually, it looks, feels and tastes just like… regular pasta. Now, regular pasta is anything but low carb. It’s mostly starch, which turns into glucose in the gut and is absorbed as blood sugar. Exactly what low carbers try to avoid. Dreamfields pasta has 41 grams of carbs per serving. How can that be low carb? Well, Dreamfields claim that their “patent-pending” (since 2004) recipe and manufacturing process protects the carb from being digested. It sounds fantastic. But is it true? I decided to find out and the results were shocking. A beautiful tale Can you be a low carber and eat all the pasta you want? Can you have your (low carb) cake and eat it too? It sounds too good to be true, and two questions pop up: If their “patent-pending” manufacturing really made the starch indigestible, would that not affect the taste? (It’s great). If the starch really became indigestible, should it not end up being digested by bacteria in the large intestine, causing massive flatulence? (It does not). Now it’s time for answers. The package Here’s my package of Dreamfields pasta, bought in a “low carb” store. Let’s take a closer look. Big promises Basically the idea is that the carbs will pass straight through your body: Side There you have it: 36 grams of non-fiber carbs per 56 gram serving. It adds up to about 80 percent energy from carbs. That’s about as high carb a food as you could find. Of course – most of it is supposedly indigestible. I tested the pasta myself, eating it and testing my blood sugar 21 times. We’ll get to the test shortly. A good idea? It may sound too good to be true. But even if it was true, consider if it really is a good ide Continue reading >>

Pasta And Diabetes: 5 Healthy Ways To Eat Pasta

Pasta And Diabetes: 5 Healthy Ways To Eat Pasta

Pasta and Diabetes: 5 Healthy Ways to Eat Pasta Pasta and Diabetes: 5 Healthy Ways to Eat Pasta Here's how to put some pasta on your plate without sending your blood sugars soaring! Written by Marina Chaparro, RD, CDE, MPH For me, little compares to a meal of freshly-made fettuccine with a sprinkle of olive oil. Fortunately, it's possible to eat spaghetti without sending blood sugar soaring. Pasta! Mangia bene pasta! For meand countless othersthere's nothing like eating freshly-made fettuccine with a sprinkle of olive oil, parmesan cheese and a nice glass of wine. Yet, for many people with diabetes, pasta is on the top 10 list of worst foods to eat. For years, the health message given to people with diabetes was to avoid pasta at all cost. Reasons included causing blood glucose spikes, weight gain, spiking excessive insulin and simply being a white food with too many carbs. Yes, pasta can be problematic for some people with diabetes. But, the problem with pasta is not the grain itself, but rather the quantities Americans are accustomed to eating. The appropriate serving size is not what you get at Olive Garden (equivalent to 3 cups of pasta), but rather the size of your fist or about 1 cup. Contrary to what most people think, pasta is a l ow glycemic food . One cup of fettuccine, which yields 45 grams of carbohydrates, has a glycemic index of 32 and a glycemic load of 15. Compare that to the same portion of Jasmine rice and the glycemic index more than triples,111 glycemic index and 45 glycemic load. Does pasta make you gain weight? Not according to the research. A recent Italian study published in the Journal Nutrition & Diabetes surveyed over 14,000Italians and found that those who ate more pasta had, in fact, a lower body mass index and smaller waist circumference, Continue reading >>

Pasta: To Eat, Or Not To Eat?

Pasta: To Eat, Or Not To Eat?

One of my favorite foods is pasta. I think I could eat pasta every day and never tire of it. And when I’ve had a rough day, nothing comforts me as much as a plate of pasta with butter (or trans-fat-free margarine), Parmesan cheese, and freshly ground black pepper. Yet pasta is much maligned in the diabetes world. I’ve noticed that people who have diabetes become very passionate when discussing this food. There’s the camp that is indignant at the idea that pasta even exists — it spikes up blood glucose, causes weight gain, and may just be responsible for global warming (OK, that’s an exaggeration). There’s another camp who still eats pasta, but feels horribly guilty for doing so, and will swear with their right hand in the air that, “I really only ate a half a cup” (and 99% of the time, it’s just not the case). I don’t mean to trivialize the subject. Pasta can be tricky to fit into one’s diabetes eating plan. But not because it sends blood glucose levels to the moon. My belief (and you’re welcome to disagree with me) is that most of us struggle with portion control. It’s been engrained in us that pasta is a main dish: that it should be piled high on the plate and smothered in red sauce, with a crusty, buttery slice of garlic bread resting on the side. This is where the problems come in. Here’s what I mean. Take a look at the calories and carbs in the pasta meal that I just mentioned: 3 cups of pasta: 135 grams of carbohydrate, 663 calories 1 cup of sauce: 30 grams of carbohydrate, 185 calories 1 slice of garlic bread: 24 grams of carbohydrate, 170 calories Total: 189 grams of carbohydrate, 1,018 calories If you dine in an Italian restaurant and manage to clean your plate, you’ll consume even more carbohydrate and calories. When you look at p Continue reading >>

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Pasta?

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Pasta?

Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a master’s degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. Ahhh, pasta. Everyone loves it! But it is one of those foods that has confusing messages attached to it. It’s a carbohydrate and sometimes carbs get a bad rap, as we all know. Any carbohydrate-rich food is going to cause a rise in blood sugar, whether you have diabetes or not. If you have diabetes, however, you need to manage that rise in blood sugar in order to stay healthy and avoid complications over time. So how do you enjoy pasta and manage blood sugar? One way is to choose different types of non-traditional pasta. Regular pasta is made from white flour, which is digested and absorbed easily by the body causing a spike in blood sugar after eaten. But there are many different types of pasta on the market shelves these days that can be part of a healthy diet and not cause such havoc with blood sugar. Most of these pastas are referred to as “whole grain,” but can have very different properties and tastes. Whole Wheat/Whole Grain Pasta Whole wheat pasta is commonly referred to as whole grain pasta. It is made from whole wheat flour and contains five grams of fiber per serving. Compared to regular pasta that has two grams of fiber per serving, this is a wise choice. Fiber slows down the digestion process and allows for a slower release of sugar in to the bloodstream, resulting in more even blood glucose levels as opposed to sharp spikes. Whole wheat pasta has a different look and taste than regular pasta. It is brown and tastes a little nuttier. If you are sensitive to this different color or taste, try this type of pasta in soups or in a dish that has a Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Pasta If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Pasta If I Have Diabetes?

Yes, you can eat pasta if you have diabetes. Pasta is a source of carbohydrate with 1/3 cup cooked pasta containing 15 grams of carbohydrate (1 carb choice). One third cup of pasta is not a lot of pasta therefore a couple suggestions are to: 1) use two or three of your carbohydrate servings for pasta (2/3 to 1 cup of pasta); and 2) add low carbohydrate vegetables such as cooked, broccoli, carrots, zucchini squash, and green beans to your pasta dish to increase the volume of food without adding more carbohydrate to your meal. Serve your pasta and steamed vegetables with a lean protein choice (baked fish, beef tenderloin, or boneless, skinless chicken breast. You can most definitely eat pasta if you are diabetic. However there are specific guidelines you should follow in order to keep blood sugars normal: Use whole wheat pasta that is enriched with fiber. This will slow down the digestion and not cause your blood sugars to rise as rapidly. Choose a lean meat or protein to accompany the pasta. Be sure to watch portion control and do not exceed 30-45 gm Carb from your pasta. Usually 2/3 cup pasta is a great portion! Be sure to meet with a Registered Dietitian to calculate exactly how many Carbs per meal you should consume. Think comforting bowls of pasta are off the menu because you have diabetes? Think again. Whole-grain pastas are a great source of B vitamins and fiber, and reduce inflammation in the blood vessels. However, this food does come with a couple warning flags. First, overcooking pasta raises its glycemic load (follow the package directions and pull the pasta off the heat when it's al dente). Second, beware of portion size. A good bet is to pair 1/2 to 1 cup of cooked pasta with a bevy of vegetables and a bit of lean protein and healthy fat for a dish that's ea Continue reading >>

5 Diabetes Pasta Alternatives You Will Want To Try

5 Diabetes Pasta Alternatives You Will Want To Try

Lucky for us, great alternatives to traditional pasta are all the rage these days. We’d like to share some pasta ideas that may work better for you and your blood sugar levels. 5 Diabetes Pasta Alternatives: Shirataki “Miracle Noodles” A serving of these has zero grams of carbohydrate and zero calories! These noodles are sold in ready-to-eat packages and can be purchased online and in health food stores. These translucent Japanese noodles are made from a kind of fiber that comes from the konjac plant and don’t have a lot of flavor. These are amazing as a noodle replacement in chicken noodle soup and stir-fry recipes. Shirataki noodles are super healthy, acting as a prebiotic in your gut due to the type of fiber they contain which also delays stomach emptying and keeps you feeling full for longer. Zucchini Linguini You can make this simply by using a julienne peeler or spiralizer to get thin strips of zucchini that resemble noodles. Then toss them raw with vegetables and olive oil. Or you could sauté, boil, or microwave the noodles and top with chicken and pesto. Zucchini has such a mild flavor, the possibilities are endless and with 2 grams of carbs per every 2 oz, you may be able to have a nice, hearty serving. Spaghetti Squash Pasta To make spaghetti squash pasta that tastes heavenly with meatballs and marinara you just slice a spaghetti squash in half and spoon out the seeds. Then, brush with olive oil and top with salt and pepper. place in a pan covered in parchment paper with the cut side facing up and roast for about 45 minutes. Finally, you’ll just use a fork to pull out all the “noodles”, which only contain about 3-4 grams of carbs per 2 oz serving. Eggplant Lasagna Do you miss eating lasagna? Try replacing the flat pasta noodles with strips of fi Continue reading >>

6 Great Low-carb Pastas (and 1 To Avoid!)

6 Great Low-carb Pastas (and 1 To Avoid!)

6 Great Low-Carb Pastas (and 1 to avoid!) Well there areplenty low-carb bread options out there nowadayswe keep adding to this list of great low-carb breads but what do you do about those pasta cravings? While a traditional slice of bread will pack 16 grams of carbs ormore per slice, a serving of pasta is no joke! At 40+ grams of carbs for one cup of pasta, it isnot easy on the blood sugar! Fortunately, the creators of food are listening to your demands, because more and more low-carb pasta choices continue to pop up. Here are 6 great low-carb pasta choices that weve found so far: 1. B lack Bean Pasta from ExploreAsian, Gluten-Free: This pasta is a favorite of mine because itsgluten-free,it cooks really fast (in about 5 to 7 minutes) and it holds together. Oh wait, did I mention the only ingredients are black beans and water? Very clean and very healthy! After subtracting the 12 grams of dietary fiber from the total carbohydrates, youre left with 5 grams of very low-impact carbohydrates! Feel free to have two servings at that count! 2. Adzuki Bean Pasta from ExploreAsian, Gluten-Free: This one has a different flavor than its black bean counterpart, and has twice as many carbs. But at 11 grams of carbs per serving,thats still a lot fewer carbs than traditional pasta. You could even mix this pasta into the pot of boiling water with the black bean pasta to change things up and reduce the carbs in your bowl at the same time. (This company has some higher carb bean pasta variations, too!) 3. Dreamfields Low-Carb Pasta: Now this pasta really comes down to the individual. The company says theyve created this whole-wheat pasta in a way that wont impact your blood sugar significantly, Its blend of fiber and plant proteins helps create a pasta that offers many healthy benefits w Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Eat Spaghetti?

Can A Diabetic Eat Spaghetti?

After a diabetes diagnosis, your may fear you have to give up your favorite carbohydrate-rich meals like spaghetti and other pastas. Although it’s true that you need to keep careful watch over how many carbs, calories and fat you take in, you can accommodate an occasional serving of spaghetti. Make sure your eating is always within the context of a healthy, carb-balanced meal plan and that you are following the advice of your doctor or dietitian. You can also make small changes to your traditional spaghetti dish that make it just as palatable but reduce the impact on your blood sugar. Video of the Day Is Spaghetti OK? “The short answer to the pasta question is yes, you can eat pasta,” writes registered dietitian Cindy Moore on EatBetterAmerica.com. People with diabetes do not need to give up their favorite spaghetti meals. In fact, it’s important to have carbohydrates such as pasta at each meal. The “but” is you must ensure you are adhering the eating plan created by your doctor or dietitian. Spaghetti is “carbalicious,” and eating too much can spike your blood sugar. To keep it balanced, be sure to always eat the appropriate amount of carbohydrate servings when you have spaghetti. The nutrition facts on the spaghetti package will tell you how many carbohydrates are in a serving. A cup of cooked plain spaghetti without sauce has roughly 43 g of carbohydrates. If that’s more than your allowance of carbohydrates per meal, you can reduce your portion size, to 1/3 or 2/3 of a cup. Remember that the sauce will add more carbohydrates — close to 18 g for a typical 1/2 cup of tomato-based sauce. In addition, if you make meatballs with carbohydrate-containing items like breadcrumbs, that’s an additional carbohydrate source you need to account for. Choosing Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2 Symptoms: Add Whole Grain Pasta To Your Diet To Help Control Blood Sugar | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes Type 2 Symptoms: Add Whole Grain Pasta To Your Diet To Help Control Blood Sugar | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes type 2 diet: Eating this type of pasta can help reduce the risk of symptoms You can avoid a blood sugar spike by opting for whole grain pasta A study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found whole grain consumption benefited insulin sensitivity. Fasting insulin rates were 10 per cent lower after consumption. Nutritionists at Healthline recommend when shopping or eating out, opt for whole grains like millet or quinoa instead of white grains. The site says: White grains are high in carbohydrates and can cause spikes. Whole grains have higher amounts of fibre, phytochemical and nutrients, and can help to regulate blood sugar. Regular snacks can have a negative effect on blood sugar levels, so if you do get peckish between meals, there are three snacks you should always opt for. Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. Diabetes type 2 symptoms: Many people will not even realise they have the condition Certain foods should be avoided to manage symptoms of diabetes and reduce the risk of the condition. Eating carbohydrates can make your blood sugar shoot up, and Matthew Freeby, MD, director of the Gonda Diabetes Center at UCLA Health, says one particular food that falls into the carbohydrate category should be avoided all together. Speaking to Prevention, Mr Freeby said popular breakfast item, the bagel, should be crossed off the menu. He explained: Many of my patients with diabetes think about sugar as being the worst thing thats impacting their blood sugar, but its really about carbohydrates. I tell them to look at nutrition labels for the total carbohydrate content, not just the sugar content. Donuts a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet Success

Diabetes Diet Success

I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 4 years ago when I was 36. I noticed I'd get up to go to the bathroom a couple of times a night, something I'd never done before, and that was the trigger that something was wrong. My doctor ordered lab work, and then I knew. My grandmother had type 2 diabetes, my uncle has it, and now I do. I'm Italian, and I grew up eating rich Italian foods such as ravioli and other homemade pastas. For someone who loves to eat, finding out I had diabetes felt like a cruel trick. But after I was diagnosed, I completely changed my diet and lifestyle. I went to the American Diabetes Association web site, looked up what foods I could eat, and started eating only low-carb foods. I counted carbs: 15 carbs for every snack and 45 for meals. I gave up bread, pasta, even most cheeses. And though I'm not a big exerciser, I got on the treadmill for 30 minutes every night. I lost 50 pounds in about 4 months. The weight just fell off of me. My A1c [a test that shows blood sugar control] went down, and I felt great. But then after 6 months, I got burned out. I missed the big homemade Italian meals my mother and grandmother used to make. So I started cheating on the weekends. Monday morning I'd be back to counting carbs and eating lots of vegetables and protein. But I'd gain a few pounds over the weekend, and lose them during the week. This yo-yoing wasn't healthy. Eventually I just went back to eating whatever food I wanted, like pizza, cheeseburgers, and fries. My A1c shot up to 10. I started getting neuropathy in my feet -- it feels like you have a blister on the inside rather than the outside of your foot. I even had pains in the upper part of my stomach, and I knew I needed to do something. Now I'm trying to eat healthier and lose the weight I gained back. Continue reading >>

Best Pasta For Diabetics

Best Pasta For Diabetics

We ALL love pasta, right?! It's just one of those foods that is such a comfort food. I know for me it's always been like that BUT I also know that because it is such a comfort food it is VERY easy to over eat it! Seriously…I know there have been times when I've eaten an enormous bowl and still gone back for more. SOund familiar? But when you're a diabetic it's not really possible to eat an enormous bowl of pasta because you will soon see your blood sugar sky rocketing. And even if you're not diabetic, you will soon see those pounds stacking on if you over consume the carbs! So let's go over some facts and talk about the best pasta options for diabetics. Pasta Nutrition Facts Let's compare the nutrition facts for 1 serving of pasta. One serving is equivalent to half a cup. As you can see from these comparisons there is between 18-22 g total carbs and between 15-20 net carbs. If you're confused about carb counting, check out our easy tutorial over here. Realistic Serving Sizes These images show the reality of pasta servings. The first one is only half a cup and as you can see it doesn't really amount to much when put on a normal sized dinner plate. Then we have what might be someones typical serving of pasta (if not more). In the second image we see about 3 times as much, so 3 serves of white spaghetti like this amounts to 64.8 g total carbohydrates. Too Many Carbs I love using visual comparisons because it really lets you see the difference. While you could try to justify that eating whole wheat spaghetti would be okay with 2 serves being around 30 g net carbs, over the long term this is just too many carbs and you will find you can't control your blood sugar properly. So What's The Best Pasta For Diabetics? Sure, the traditional pasta might not be the best pasta for d Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Noodles

Can Diabetics Eat Noodles

Diabetics can eat and enjoy noodles as part of a healthy diet that emphasizes moderation, portion control and balancing diet with physical activity. Whole grain noodles, in particular, are full of nutrients. Noodles should be paired with other nutrient-dense foods to control blood sugar, maintain a healthy weight and prevent other chronic diseases. A healthy diabetic diet focuses on whole grains, fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products, lean proteins and healthy fats. Foods high in saturated and trans fats, added sugar, sodium, refined grains and fatty meats should be avoided because these can contribute to weight gain, obesity, diabetic complications and other diseases like cancer, high blood pressure and heart disease. Whole Grains Noodles are a type of grain. Federal dietary guidelines recommend making at least half of all grains whole grain. Whole wheat, brown rice, quinoa and barley are types of whole grains. Whole grains contain more vitamins, minerals and fiber than refined grains because they are less processed. MayoClinic.com says fiber slows sugar absorption, which can improve blood sugar levels. Fiber can also help lower cholesterol, increase satiety and improve digestive health. Easy-to-find whole grain noodles include whole wheat or whole grain pasta, quinoa pasta and brown rice noodles. Nutrition and Serving Size The American Diabetes Association says to control portion size by making 25 percent of your plate grains or starch. Diabetics that use the diabetes exchange list can consider 1/3 cup of cooked noodles or pasta one serving or one starch exchange. 1/3 cup of whole wheat pasta has approximately 58 calories, 2 grams of protein, 12 grams of carbohydrate, 1 to 2 grams of fiber and less than 1 gram of fat. It is also a good source of iron, magnesium, Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Carbohydrates – Yes, You Can Eat Pasta!

Diabetes And Carbohydrates – Yes, You Can Eat Pasta!

By Christina Zavaglia, MHSc, RD, CDE We’re thrilled to introduce Christina Zavaglia, a registered dietitian and trained certified diabetes educator. We asked Christina to tackle the myth of carbohydrates specifically pertaining to diabetes. It’s a common question asked to us about our pasta. She breaks down the components of managing diabetes and the necessity for a healthy diet versus a ‘special’ diet that people with diabetes feel they have to follow. Eating healthy is an important component of diabetes management but it is a myth that people with diabetes need to eat a “special” diet. In fact, “a diabetic diet” is just a healthy diet, and healthy eating is for everyone. For someone living with diabetes, no foods need to be off limits however portion control of carbohydrates and moderation of less healthy foods is important. Living with diabetes people sometimes believe they should avoid carbohydrates, this is not true! Carbohydrates are our bodies main source of energy and are found in grain products, legumes (such as chickpeas, kidney beans, and lentils), fruits, some vegetables, and some dairy products – these foods are all great sources of a variety of vitamins and minerals and you do not want to do your body a disservice by excluding them. Chickapea pasta is made from only organic red lentils and chickpeas and is a source of carbohydrates as well as rich in iron, folate, thiamine, fiber and protein, all of which are all essential for good health. Fiber and protein are also very filling which means that you can fill up on a smaller portion and feel satisfied. Eating a high-fiber diet can help manage blood sugar. Diabetes Canada recommends that people living with diabetes consume between 25-50 g of fiber per day*. Fiber is considered a carbohydrat Continue reading >>

The 10 Best Carbs For Diabetics

The 10 Best Carbs For Diabetics

Forget what you've been told—a diabetes diagnosis does not mean you've been sentenced to a life without carbs. Well, doughnuts may be off the list, but the right carbs can and should be part of a balanced diet for everyone, explains Anna Taylor, RD, a registered dietitian at Cleveland Clinic. In fact, for those with (type 1 or 2) diabetes, getting enough good-for-you carbs is essential for keeping blood sugar levels under control. The key is to pick carb-containing foods that are also rich in fiber and/or protein, nutrients that actually slow the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates, resulting in a more gradual rise and fall of blood sugar levels. Here are Taylor's top 10 diabetes-friendly carb picks, all of which pack additional nutrients that can help prevent chronic conditions or diabetes complications down the line. Lentils and Beans gettyimages-84763023-lentils-zenshui-laurence-mouton.jpg Lentils and beans are excellent sources of protein and fiber. The 19 grams of carbs from a half cup serving of cooked lentils come with 9 grams of protein and 8 grams of fiber (3 grams per serving is considered a "good" source of fiber; 5 and up is considered an "excellent" source, per FDA guidelines). One thing to note: You get the same benefits from canned beans as you do from cooked, dried beans—but you may want to rinse them first, which can eliminate more than 40% of the sodium. (Diabetes doesn't have to be your fate; Rodale's new book, The Natural Way To Beat Diabetes, shows you exactly what to eat and do to prevent the disease—and even reverse it.) Peas Black-eyed, split, and classic green peas have protein and fiber benefits similar to those of beans and lentils. One cup of green peas (before cooking) packs 8 grams of protein, 7 grams of fiber, and 21 grams of c Continue reading >>

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