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How Much Is Diabetes Medication For Dogs

Diabetes In Dogs

Diabetes In Dogs

Around one in every five hundred dogs will develop diabetes over the course of their lives, and so it is worth learning a little bit about the condition and its symptoms, causes and treatments so that you can be aware of potential risk factors in your dog and act quickly if a problem develops. Read on to find out more. What is diabetes? In healthy dogs, the food which they eat is broken down into elements which fuel the body. The breakdown of carbohydrates produces glucose, which is absorbed by the intestine and then used to provide the energy that the dog needs to live. The absorption and conversion of glucose is regulated by a hormone called insulin, which is produced naturally by the pancreas, a gland located near to the intestine. A dog whose pancreas does not produce sufficient insulin or where the cells within their blood do not respond adequately to the insulin produced, causes the illness called diabetes mellitus, or 'sugar diabetes.' This leads to the cells being unable to absorb the necessary amount of glucose needed for healthy functionality, and causes excessively high levels of glucose in the blood. What dogs can get diabetes? While any breed or type of dog can develop diabetes, some breeds are considered to be more susceptible to it than others. The Samoyed and the Cairn terrier are considered to be two 'high risk' breeds, with various other popular breeds including the Bichon Frise, Poodle and Yorkshire terrier falling under the 'moderate risk' category. While genetic and hereditary traits are the leading cause of diabetes in dogs, illnesses and diseases such as Cushing's disease and some conditions which affect the pancreas may lead to its development as well. The use of steroids over prolonged periods of time can also affect insulin production and lead Continue reading >>

How To Care For A Diabetic Dog

How To Care For A Diabetic Dog

Expert Reviewed Humans are not the only mammal that can get diabetes. Dogs can develop diabetes, especially later in life. If your dog has diabetes, there are many ways you can care for your dog. Make sure to medicate your dog with insulin correctly. Make changes to your dog's lifestyle to promote its health. Deal with the complications of a diabetic dog. You will have to be extra careful about managing things like vacations. 1 Make a plan for your dog's health with your vet. Diabetes requires swift treatment, but the treatment plan depends on your dog's current health. Insulin is usually required, and the vet will determine the amount. You also may have to make certain lifestyle changes. A long talk with a veterinarian is the first step [1] A simple test can diagnose diabetes in your dog. Your vet can also do blood tests to see how diabetes is affecting your dog's body. The sooner you begin treatment, the better. Your dog's health will suffer as long as diabetes goes untreated. Make sure to ask your vet any questions you have. Treating diabetes can be tricky, so you want to leave the office with a clear treatment plan in mind. If the vet has any pamphlets you can take home, take them with you. 2 Draw insulin correctly. You will have to give your dog insulin injections regularly. Make sure you know how to draw insulin safely. You will need a syringe to do so. Prior to injecting your dog, carefully draw out the correct amount of insulin.[2] First, remove the cap from the needle. Then, you will pull back the plunger of the needle until you reach the appropriate dose. Stick the needle in the spongy top of the bottle of insulin. Push down on the plunger, pushing air into the bottle. This will create a vacuum that allows you to more easily draw insulin from the bottle. Pull Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs - Overview

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs - Overview

This handout provides general information about diabetes mellitus in dogs. For information about its treatment, see the fact sheets "Diabetes Mellitus - Principles of Treatment" and "Diabetes Mellitus - Insulin Treatment". What is diabetes mellitus? Diabetes mellitus is a disease of the pancreas, a small but vital organ located near the stomach. The pancreas has two significant types of cells. One group of cells produces the enzymes necessary for proper digestion. The other group, called beta cells, produces the hormone insulin. Insulin regulates the level of glucose (sugar) in the bloodstream and controls the delivery of glucose to the tissues of the body. In simple terms, diabetes mellitus is caused by the failure of the pancreas to regulate blood sugar. The clinical signs of diabetes mellitus are related to elevated concentrations of blood glucose and the inability of the body to use glucose as an energy source. What are the clinical signs of diabetes and why do they occur? The four main symptoms of uncomplicated diabetes mellitus are increased thirst, increased urination, weight loss, and increased appetite. Glucose is a vital substance that provides much of the energy needed by cells, but it must first be absorbed by the cells. Insulin attaches to receptors on the surface of cells and opens "pores" in the cell wall that allow glucose molecules to leave the bloodstream and enter the cell's interior. Without an adequate amount of insulin to "open the door," glucose is unable to get into the cells, so it accumulates in the blood, setting in motion a series of events that result in diabetes mellitus. "When there isn't enough insulin, the cells of the body become starved for their promary source of energy - glucose." When there isn't enough insulin, the cells of the bod Continue reading >>

Preventing And Treating Canine Diabetes

Preventing And Treating Canine Diabetes

The growing diabetes epidemic is not limited to people—diabetes mellitus is increasing among dogs as well. Researchers estimate that one in 200 dogs will develop the disease. Fortunately, treatment has made huge strides in recent years, and as a result, dogs with diabetes are living longer, healthier lives. The mechanism of diabetes is relatively simple to describe. Just as cars use gas for fuel, body cells run on a sugar called glucose. The body obtains glucose by breaking down carbohydrates in the diet. Cells then extract glucose from the blood with the help of insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas in specialized cells called beta cells. (The pancreas, an organ situated behind the stomach, produces several hormones.) In diabetes mellitus, cells don’t take in enough glucose, which then builds up in the blood. As a result, cells starve and organs bathed in sugary blood are damaged. Diabetes is not curable, but it is treatable; a dog with diabetes may live many happy years after diagnosis. Kinds of Diabetes Humans are subject to essentially three kinds of diabetes. By far the most common is Type 2, followed by Type 1 and gestational diabetes. Type 2 diabetes has typically been a disease of middle and old age (though it is being seen increasingly in young people), and has two causes: The beta cells don’t make enough insulin, or muscle cells resist insulin’s help and don’t take in enough glucose (or both). As a result, blood glucose levels climb. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs when the immune system attacks and destroys the beta cells, cutting off insulin production; the reason for this attack is thought to be a combination of genetic predisposition plus exposure to a trigger (research into possible triggers is ongoing). Glucose then stays in the blood and, aga Continue reading >>

Financial Aspects

Financial Aspects

"How much will this cost to treat?" This is one of the questions often asked by a caregiver with a newly diagnosed diabetic pet. The answer depends, of course, on the level of care one intends to give the animal. Less care means less cost. If all one intends to do is administer insulin and nothing else, there is only the cost of the insulin (which varies by type) and the syringes or insulin pen. Caregivers may be instructed by the veterinarian to leave the animal in their care for a few days, up to a week, to allow the animal to be "regulated" on a proper dose of insulin. That may cost $100 to $200 a day (US dollars and US price levels). The vet then may want the animal returned every month for a glucose curve; another $150 perhaps. Many caregivers feel these are unnecessary expenses because an animal rarely can be regulated in such a short period of time and the stress associated with the clinic stay can lead to atypical blood glucose readings. Those costs can be significantly lowered if the caregiver hometests blood glucose levels. Here are some typical costs in US dollars at US price levels for the most common supplies: BCP PZI insulin, 10ML U40, $40 This vial contains 400 units of insulin and if the caregiver gives 2U BID, the vial will provide shots for 100 days. Therefore, this insulin at this dosage costs ~$12/month. Syringes, box of 100 U100, $15 to $25 With BID shots, this box will last 50 days. Monthly costs: $9.50 to $15.50 One Touch Ultra Glucometer, $0 to $70, depending on source, sales, rebates, and "package deals" with test strips The glucometer, regardless of the brand or style, is not a significant cost because of the plethora of sales, rebates, and package deals. This is generally considered to be a one-time cost. However, you should have a back-up met Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Devastating But Preventable Disease That Threatens Your Pet

Diabetes: The Devastating But Preventable Disease That Threatens Your Pet

As of this writing, I haven’t yet seen a copy of The Diabetes Report, but from what I gather from the linked article and others I’ve read, it approaches the subject from the viewpoint of managing the disease, not preventing it. And yet, the report makes the following points: Diabetes is tied to obesity. Did the authors point out that obesity in dogs and cats is clearly preventable? Diabetes is more common in older animals. Does the report then make the point that since diabetes occurs primarily in older animals -- but isn’t a disease of aging -- it is therefore a disease brought on by lifestyle obstacles? Pet owners can prevent unhealthy lifestyles for their pets. According to vetlearn.com, The Diabetes Report references a study done in 2006, which showed that “… insulin was stopped in twice as many cats that were on a high protein-low carb diet than cats on a high fiber-low carb diet." Common sense seems to dictate, if a high-protein, low-carb diet can eliminate the need for insulin in cats with diabetes, it seems logical the same diet might prevent kitties -- and their canine counterparts -- from developing the disease in the first place. I suspect one of the reasons more cats than dogs get diabetes is because so many cats eat kibble-only diets. Not only do kitties require very few carbs and fiber, which most kibbles (dry food) are loaded with, but more cats are fed dry food because if their owners need to be away from home, they can stay alone for a few days with a litter box, water, and a supply of dry food that won’t spoil at room temperature. In many ways, kitties are lower maintenance than dogs, so people who are gone from home frequently are more likely to have cats as pets and feed them a diet that is convenient. Add to that the finicky appetite of Continue reading >>

You Were Just Told Your Pet Has Diabetes.

You Were Just Told Your Pet Has Diabetes.

The initial shock and fear you feel when the vet tells you that your pet has diabetes can be overwhelming. Yet diabetes is a treatable condition and your pet can live a normal, happy, healthy life. Diabetes is not a death sentence for your pet! You can manage this condition, maintaining your own sanity and budget. You are likely wondering, "How long will my pet live?" Every pet is different, but very often your pet can live a normal life span. If you own an older cat, no doubt you've wondered if it's "better" to put it to sleep. This is a very complicated issue and depends on the overall health of your pet. But age alone should not be the deciding factor in determining whether to treat your diabetic pet or whether to euthanize it. Many older pets have been diagnosed with diabetes, and with commitment and loving care have lived many more years. Our cat was diagnosed at age 14, and for years was still very healthy and dominating the household. We've heard of many diabetic cats that are quite elderly (18 years old or more) who are in very good health. You Can Get Through This. Caring for a diabetic pet, just like a non-diabetic pet, does involve commitment from both the caregiver and the vet. You must provide a consistent level of care for your pet on a daily basis. Gone are the days of putting out food and water, giving a quick pat on the head, and hurrying out the door. Every day you will have to give your pet medication, feed a proper diet, and watch his behavior. Don't get the impression that you are now a prisoner....you aren't, but you will have to pay much closer attention to your pet's needs and behavior, and you will have to make arrangements for someone to care for your pet if you leave for an extended period of time. Your hard work and commitment will be reflect Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs And Cats: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes In Dogs And Cats: Everything You Need To Know

Certain triggers cause us vet types to start thinking in overdrive during our examinations of pets. A seemingly innocent question, like “How’s his appetite? Has he been drinking more or less than usual?” can actually represent a significant clue in our hunt for answers. A dog or cat, for example, who suddenly starts drinking and urinating a ton more than usual is giving us a big hint that something is wrong with its body—and of the several possible causes, diabetes is one that owners seem to dread hearing the most. As one of the most common health conditions in middle-aged cats and dogs, a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus is frightening for owners. And it’s true, diabetes is usually a lifelong condition that requires vigilance on the part of owners in order to control. But that also leads to the good news: in many cases it can be managed, and often pets with diabetes continue on to lead long and happy lives. What is Diabetes in Dogs and Cats? Diabetes can refer to two unrelated conditions in veterinary medicine: diabetes mellitus (sugar diabetes), and less common diabetes insipidus (water diabetes). As diabetes insipidus is a much rarer condition with a completely different cause and treatment, this article focuses on the prevalent type of diabetes: diabetes mellitus. The pancreas is an essential organ; it is here that the beta cells that produce insulin reside. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose (sugar) in the bloodstream to enter the body’s cells to be used as an energy source. Diabetes is a condition caused by a loss or dysfunction of the beta cells of the pancreas. In some cases, the pancreas completely loses the ability to manufacture insulin—insulin deficient diabetes, also described as Type 1 diabetes—and the pet is dependent on external ad Continue reading >>

Feeding And Treating Your Diabetic Pet

Feeding And Treating Your Diabetic Pet

If your dog or cat is diagnosed with diabetes, this will mean a lifetime of treatment for your pet, starting with insulin injections. When caring for a diabetic dog or cat, pet owners also must pay closer attention to their pet’s diet. There are a lot of important things to consider when feeding your four-legged family member suffering from diabetes, even if your pet is just starting to show early signs of this disease. Symptoms of Diabetes Diabetes is a medical condition where your pet’s body doesn’t produce enough insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar levels. There are a few telling signs your dog or cat could have diabetes. Increased Urination Increased Thirst Increased Appetite Weight Loss Caring for a Pet with Diabetes There are several areas you’ll want to keep a close eye on when feeding a canine or feline suffering from diabetes. Below are some key points to remember: Watch water intake. First, a major symptom of diabetes is when your pet drinks abnormally large amounts of water. Even after diagnosis, keep and eye on how much your pet drinks. Get in a routine. Feed your pet the exact recommended amount of food ever day. Also, find a mealtime for your pet and stick to it. Sweat with your pet. Make sure your dog or cat is getting regular exercise to help reach a healthy body weight. Then keep exercising to maintain that weight. Inquire before the injection. It’s important your pet actually eats his or her meal to keep a consistent blood sugar level. If your pet doesn’t eat, contact your vet before giving your dog or cat an insulin shot. Track treatment. Keep a very close record of your pet’s meals and insulin injections. If friends or family must care for your pet, ask they do the same. It’s important to eliminate any chance of an accidenta Continue reading >>

Dog Diabetes: A Natural And Effective Alternative

Dog Diabetes: A Natural And Effective Alternative

56 Yet another human disease that also impacts dogs is diabetes. Diabetes is caused by either a lack of insulin or an insufficient response to the hormone. In a dog’s typical digestive process, the system breaks food down into components like glucose. Those components are carried to cells by pancreas-secreted insulin. When a dog doesn’t produce enough insulin or is unable to use it properly, glucose has nowhere to go. This elevates blood sugar levels, resulting in hyperglycemia and a number of associated health complications. The good news is that canine diabetes is adaptable; many diabetic dogs lead hale and hearty lives. Types of Diabetes There are two types of diabetes: Type I and Type II. Type I diabetes refers to the lack of overall insulin production and is the most common form of the disease. This happens because the pancreas fails to secrete sufficient levels of the stuff. Dogs with Type I diabetes, as you may have guessed, need insulin. Type II diabetes is more common in our feline friends and is a lack of “normal” reaction to insulin the body is already producing. Symptoms of Diabetes There are a number of symptoms of diabetes in dogs. Remember, though, that diabetes is identified through blood tests, a full medical examination and a urinalysis. Do not diagnose your own dog. Among the symptoms of diabetes in dogs are: Disproportionate thirst or a surge in consumption of water Loss of weight Increased levels of urination Fatigue Vomiting Forming of cataracts or attendant vision difficulties Skin infections Sweet-smelling or “fruity” breath Sticky urine Causes and Considerations The exact cause of diabetes in dogs is unknown. There are a number of contributing factors, including obesity and genetics, that play a role in how and if the disease develop Continue reading >>

How Do You Cure Diabetes Naturally Without Medication?

How Do You Cure Diabetes Naturally Without Medication?

Yes, Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed. By Dr. Candice Hall, D.C. I admit, this is a topic about which I am passionate. At the helm of the integrative/functional health practice I founded in Irvine, Calif., I’ve worked with hundreds of people suffering from diabetes, thyroid disease, immune disorders and a myriad of chronic and degenerative conditions. It is amazing to see so many patients in our practice reduce the symptoms of, or even reverse, their condition. I am particularly gratified when considering how many patients have found it possible to reduce, or even eliminate, their need for prescription drugs. How is this possible? Much has to do with the vantage point of “upstream” versus “downstream” approaches to illness and health. When a blood test indicates that you have diabetes, what happens? In a “downstream” approach to illness and treatment, the symptom that produced the diagnoses — high blood sugar — is treated with drugs. For example, insulin brings the blood sugar measurements into a normal range, and you’re “managing” diabetes. Except that you’re not. In contrast, an “upstream” view of health looks to determine the “whys” of a patient’s condition. For instance, many diabetics are confused and frustrated by the fact that they eat better than many people they know, yet they struggle with weight and diabetes, while others eat whatever they want and don't have to worry about their blood sugars. In an “upstream” approach, the real question is — why? Why are my blood sugars high or volatile? Why am I being given medications to “manage” my condition, rather than solutions to address the underlying cause of the problem? The course of action each individual takes is highly personal, clearly. And in some cases, medication Continue reading >>

My Dog Has Diabetes And We Can't Afford Treatment

My Dog Has Diabetes And We Can't Afford Treatment

Diabetic dogs suffer from Type I disease where there is destruction of the islet cells in the pancreas. In contrast, diabetic cats suffer from Type II disease. We manage these differently in terms of diet. A high protein, low carbohydrate diet is appropriate for cats, but it is not what we use in dogs. In dogs, extra fibre helps slow down the absorption of carbohydrates so that their blood sugars aren't bouncing up and down. So, in dogs we use high fibre diets to manage their diabetes, NOT high protein. Usually, I would prescribe Hill’s w/d diet for my diabetic dogs. Here are links to it: For owners who wish to make their own food for their dogs, I provide this recipe provided by Hill’s for their high fibre reducing diet, R/D recipe - canine (also known as Canine Reducing Diet): 1/4 lb ground round or other lean beef 1/2 cup cottage cheese (uncreamed) 2 cups drained canned carrots 2 cups drained canned green beans 1+1/2 teaspoons (7g) dicalcium phosphate (available at drug and health food stores, substitute bone meal) Also add a balanced supplement which fulfills the canine minimum daily requirements (MDR) for all vitamins and trace minerals. This would be available from a veterinary clinic. Cook beef in skillet, stirring until lightly browned. Pour off fat and cool. Stir in remaining ingredients and mix well. Keep covered in refrigerator. Yield: 1+3/4lbs Feeding Guide - feed sufficient to maintain normal body weight Body wt Approx Daily Feeding 5lb 1/3lb 10 lb 2/3lb 20lb 1lb 40lb 1+3/4lb 60lb 2+1/2lb 80lb 3lb 100lb 3+2/3lb Snacking and scavenging should be absolutely forbidden during the reducing period. However, since so many obese dogs are accustomed to begging (and receiving) an occasional tidbit of raw vegetable will only add roughage, vitamins and minerals, no Continue reading >>

Can Dogs With Diabetes Be Treated Without Insulin Injections?

Can Dogs With Diabetes Be Treated Without Insulin Injections?

In almost all cases of canine diabetes, insulin is the recommended treatment. Insulin must be injected and often needs to be given twice daily. However, many dog owners are less than enthusiastic about the thought of giving their dog insulin injections. If you are one of those people who do not like the thought of administering insulin to your dog, you may be wondering if there are other options available for treating your diabetic dog. Are Options Other than Insulin Available for Dogs with Diabetes? Unfortunately, other options for treating diabetes in dogs have proven to be less than successful. At one time, there was hope that the oral hyperglycemic agents that act to lower blood glucose when given by mouth would be useful in treating diabetic dogs. That has not proven to be the case in most instances. Reasons Why Insulin Is the Best Treatment for Diabetic Dogs The primary reason that insulin is the best treatment for canine diabetes is the fact that dogs with diabetes almost always suffer from insulin-dependent diabetes. This means that the cells in the pancreas that normally secrete insulin are no longer functional and the pancreas can no longer secrete insulin in quantities sufficient to regulate your diabetic dog's blood glucose levels. This differs from feline diabetes because, especially early in the disease, cats may suffer from non-insulin dependent diabetes, meaning that their pancreas still retains some ability to secrete insulin. Because some insulin-secreting ability exists for these cats, oral hypoglycemic products may (or may not) be effective. However, in dogs, these products do not work well because the canine diabetic pancreas simply cannot rally to secrete insulin. So, in most cases of canine diabetes, insulin is a necessary part of treatment. In fa Continue reading >>

Oral Medication

Oral Medication

Because caregivers are often reluctant to begin insulin injections on their pets, vets will often offer an oral-medication alternative such as Glucotrol, Glipizide, Metaformin, or Acarbose. These oral medications either reduce insulin resistance or stimulate the pancreas to produce more insulin (assuming it still can). Unfortunately for cats, diabetes is a condition with many vicious circles, and these medications, in the ~80% of feline cases where they don't work, tend to make diabetes worse instead. Worse, vet literature often says that 6 to 8 weeks of oral med treatment should be tried before giving up, and it's quite possible for an untreated diabetic (or one on an ineffective treatment) to die of starvation, dehydration, or ketoacidosis within that time. The odds of oral medication leading to a successful regulation of your cat are poor, and the odds of things getting much worse during the treatment are more likely. Recent studies in cats (including those below) are now pointing toward a deterioration cycle of in cats. (Type II diabetes -> (hyperglycemia <-> amyloidosis) -> Insulin dependence) Since Glucotrol/Glipizide are shown[1] to promote amyloidosis in the presence of hyperglycemia (hardly an unusual condition in a diabetic), there is every reason to believe that these meds can only make things worse.[2] (Though Dr. Galloway disagrees[3]. ) Possible reasons why veterinarians keep trying this course on cats: Most caregivers are (or the vets believe they will be) unwilling or unable to give regular insulin shots Diabetic cases that are well-treated are rare enough for many vets that they don't have a chance to track successful versus unsuccessful treatments Nobody is financially motivated to show negative results of a drug therapy. In dogs, results of oral insul Continue reading >>

You Just Learned Your Pet Has Diabetes

You Just Learned Your Pet Has Diabetes

The first day Commitment, patience & education Expenses Your emotions People think you're crazy Your social life The bottom line I wrote this essay to help people whose pet has recently (or not so recently) been diagnosed with diabetes. Many of the things discussed below will probably go through your thoughts. Hopefully this will help you understand your new situation and you won't feel so overwhelmed. The First Day The initial shock and fear you feel when the vet tells you that your pet has diabetes can be overwhelming. Diabetes is a treatable condition and your pet can live a normal, happy, healthy life. Diabetes is not a death sentence for your pet. A question that is often asked is “My pet is older, should I put him to sleep”. This is a very complicated issue and depends on the overall health of your pet. Age alone should not be the deciding factor in determining whether to treat your diabetic pet or whether to euthanize it. Many older pets have been diagnosed with diabetes and with commitment and loving care, they have lived many more years. Our cat was diagnosed at age 14, and after almost three years with diabetes he is very healthy and happy. There are diabetic cats and dogs that are quite elderly (18 years old or more) and are in very good health. You may want to read some of the Quality of Life stories that are on this site. Commitment, Patience and Education Caring for a diabetic pet takes a very strong commitment from both the owner / caregiver and the vet. You must provide a very high level of care for your pet on a daily basis. Gone are the days of putting out food and water, giving a quick pat on the head, and hurrying out the door. Every day you will have to give your pet medication, feed a proper diet, and watch his behavior. But don’t get the imp Continue reading >>

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