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How Much Is A Diabetes Dog?

Diabetic Alert Dogs By Sdwr Diabetic Alert Dogs | Service Dogs By Warren Retrievers

Diabetic Alert Dogs By Sdwr Diabetic Alert Dogs | Service Dogs By Warren Retrievers

Living a balanced life as a Diabetic or diabetes care taker isnt always easy. With the unconditional support of a Diabetic Alert Dog, that balance becomes a possibility. SDWRs alert dogs for diabetics provide the stability, safety and support that more Diabetics desire in their life.SDWR places golden retrievers and labrador retrievers, in EXTREME cases due to doctor-verified allergies, we can also place doodles. As service dog providers, weve seen first hand how Diabetes can affect not only the individual, but his or her family as well. Constant care, a lack of sleep, and unshakable fear from highs and lows are all realities a diabetes care taker faces. Diabetic individuals themselves might have a hard time living life fully, due to the limitations of coping with diabetes. Through SDWRs highly-trained Diabetic Assistance Dogs, thousands of individuals and families lives have been touched. With our service dogs, those struck by invisible illness can find independence from fear and around-the clock care. Having a service dog as a companion promotes freedom, and keeps you safe from hitting sharp highs and lows. As we know, investing in a Diabetic Alert Dog is a solid investment in your mental and physical health. We Train Our Diabetic Alert Dogs To Help With The Following: To fulfill our mission as accessible service dog providers, SDWR does not have any geographic limitations. We service those with invisible illnesses around the world by traveling to each of our clients directly. No travel is ever required by our clients to us. Our program involves every family in our service dog training program for over 1 year to 18 months. Our initial delivery time is 4 5 consecutive days, with each subsequent visit every 90 120 days for durations of 2 4 days. Offering our services o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Alert Dogs

Diabetes Alert Dogs

Breanne Harris, 25, first encountered a diabetes alert dog when she was a counselor at a camp for children with diabetes. Two people from Dogs4Diabetics, Inc., (D4D) – a nonprofit organization that trains assistance dogs to detect hypoglycemia in people with diabetes – brought an alert-dog-in-training to camp. Every night, the counselors would make midnight rounds to check campers’ blood glucose levels. In the dormitory, the dog tore free from the trainer, ran to one teenager, jumped on the bed, and tried to awaken the girl. “We checked her blood sugar immediately, and her sugar was 32 mg/dl, which is severely low,” says Harris, who has lived with Type 1 diabetes since she was 4. “I was sold at that point and applied for a dog.” Kristen Beard, 24, who also has Type 1 diabetes, got a golden retriever puppy named Montana when she was about 19. One night Montana would not leave her alone as she slept. “He was crying and pawing at me. I was mad because he woke me up, but once I became aware, I thought maybe I should test my blood sugar. I tested it, and it was low,” Beard says. “I thought it was a fluke, but he started doing it regularly.” Now he wakes her at least twice a month to warn about her falling blood glucose. “He just started doing it on his own, and I reinforce the behavior with treats,” she says. Veterinarian Nicholas Dodman recalls a client who had a German shepherd that was afraid of men, including the woman’s husband. The dog would avoid him even if they were in the same room. But one night, the dog woke him. The man realized that his wife, who had diabetes, was becoming hypoglycemic. After that, if the woman’s blood glucose dropped dangerously low, the dog would overcome his fear and wake up the man to help her. “It was the on Continue reading >>

Diabetes Alert Dogs: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes Alert Dogs: Everything You Need To Know

Note: This article has been reviewed by Dr. Dana Hardin MD, and Dr. Jennifer Cattet Ph.D. Many individuals with type 1 diabetes spend their days worrying about the possibility of having a low blood sugar level (hypoglycemia). Aside from frequent testing of blood glucose levels (self monitoring of blood glucose, SMBG), they may experience uncomfortable signs of hypoglycemia such as sweating, shaking, or confusion. These early symptoms of hypoglycemia are helpful, even though uncomfortable, because they help the person with diabetes know it is time to check their glucose level. Once the person checks and learns they are hypoglycemic, they are taught what food or drink to take to raise their blood sugar. If the low blood sugar is not treated in time, persistent hypoglycemia can lead to seizures, blackouts, or even coma. Unfortunately, over time (generally after 5 or so years) a person with 1 diabetes no longer feels symptoms when his/her blood glucose is low. This condition is known as Hypoglycemia Unawareness. When hypoglycemia unawareness develops, the person is at much greater risk for the development of persistent hyperglycemia and all of the dangerous problems listed above. Patients have reported feeling ok and not knowing they had low blood sugar until they wake up on the floor, or they have had a seizure. Some don’t realize what happened until they are taken to the hospital. If you are one of these individuals, you probably worry about your next hypoglycemia episode on a daily basis. You would likely feel much better if you were aware of something or someone which could help you monitor and alert your oncoming low blood sugar drop. Well, good news! A diabetes alert dog (DAD) can help you become aware of hypoglycemia even if you don’t feel any different. To give Continue reading >>

Service Dogs That Can Monitor Their Owners’ Diabetes

Service Dogs That Can Monitor Their Owners’ Diabetes

Hypoglycemia unawareness is a common — and dangerous — condition that can develop in those with type 1 diabetes. This condition means you don’t experience the symptoms most people do when their blood sugar gets too low. Normal symptoms of low blood sugar include sweating, shaking, or confusion. At very low levels, you may experience seizures, or go into a coma if your blood sugar is too low for too long. One of the solutions for this condition is man’s best friend: a diabetes service dog. Dogs have a naturally heightened sense of smell that makes them excellent hunters. Professional trainers have learned to harness these skills by training dogs to recognize certain smells. These could include the fruity smelling ketones a person’s body produces when they are experiencing a hyperglycemic episode when blood sugar is too high, or the unique scent a person gives off during a hypoglycemic episode when blood sugar is too low. A diabetes service dog isn’t a replacement for checking blood sugar levels. However, it is a safeguard for those who experience episodes low or high blood sugar, especially if they do not have warning symptoms. There are several service dog-training programs across the country. Examples include the National Institute for Diabetic Alert Dogs (NIDAD) and Diabetic Alert Dog University. These organizations train a dog to recognize the difference between certain scents. This includes the scent a person releases when their blood sugar is high or low. According to Dogs 4 Diabetics, there are two different levels of service dogs for people with diabetes. Medical response dogs for diabetes are trained to respond to signs that an owner may be experiencing low blood sugar levels, once they have become symptomatic. A diabetic alert dog, on the other hand Continue reading >>

Diabetic Alert Dogs By Sdwr How To Prepare For The Cost Of A Service Dog - Diabetic Alert Dogs By Sdwr

Diabetic Alert Dogs By Sdwr How To Prepare For The Cost Of A Service Dog - Diabetic Alert Dogs By Sdwr

How to Prepare for the Cost of a Service Dog How to Prepare for the Cost of a Service Dog We know investing in a service dog can be an expensive, yet life-changing opportunity for you and your family.Because SDWR provides the best service dog training, we know that you wont regret purchasing a service dog from us. Read on to find a few simple yet effective ways to prepare for the cost of a service dog. One of the best steps to saving for a service dog is through fundraising. Fundraising for service dogs lets you stay involved in your community, lets you stay active, and gives you a sense of satisfaction through raising awareness for a greater cause. There are many creative ways to run a fundraiser, whether through school, church, soccer games, online and more. Take the time today to brainstorm a few great fundraiser ideas, and ask around to see how your community is willing to help. SDWR takes pride in giving back to our friends who might need an assistance dog. We periodically award service dog grants to a few select winners who have completed the required applications. You can visit our Facebook page from time to time to check when submissions are open. You never know if you could be chosen for a service dog grant. Once you have a service dog, there will be costs associated for caring for it. Just as you might have budgeted to afford the cost of a service dog, you will have to budget for their care and upkeep. SDWR also offers payment plans to families and individuals looking to invest in a service dog. This is another option you might want to consider when planning for the cost of a service dog. Its hard to put a price on the love, protection, security and safety assistancedogs provide to children, families and individuals. With the service dog training, care, and e Continue reading >>

How Much Does Dog Diabetes Cost To Manage?

How Much Does Dog Diabetes Cost To Manage?

Pet owners worry about the cost of caring for dog diabetes. Test strips, insulin, needles and special diets cost money. Learn the average cost of managing dog diabetes and what you should expect. Mild cases of dog diabetes are treated simply by changing the dog's diet and increasing his exercise. If this alone doesn't stabilize blood sugar levels, you will need to give your dog insulin injections. Some dogs need one insulin injection per day, but larger dogs often need two doses. This will depend on the type of insulin and the size of the dog. Dietary Restrictions for Dog Diabetes Dogs must be given a diet that is high in fiber and protein. Foods should not be high in carbohydrates or high in fat. Feed your dog three times a day to keep his blood sugar levels optimized. Half an hour after your dog's first meal, administer the injection of insulin. You will need to test your dog's blood sugar levels every day to monitor insulin levels. This helps you understand when the insulin dosage needs to be altered. Cost of Dog Diabetes Testing Supplies When caring for a dog with diabetes, testing and insulin administration remains key to keeping your dog healthy. Your veterinarian will go over a plan of action with you, but there are tips you should know. You'll be testing your dog's insulin levels a minimum of once per day. The test strips usually come 50 to a box and cost upwards of $35. These strips are key in determining how much insulin is necessary. Make sure you always use the correct syringe and needle. 40 U/ml insulin needs a U-40 syringe just like 500 U/ml insulin needs a U-500 syringe. Using the wrong syringe size will lead to an improper dosage that could kill your dog. Before giving your dog the insulin, double check the expiration date. If it's past, throw it out and Continue reading >>

Diabetes Alert Dogs

Diabetes Alert Dogs

Tarra Robinson was afraid that she was going to lose her job. Diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was 18 months old, Tarra had recently developed hypoglycemic unawareness, which affects about 17% of type 1 diabetics. Tarra was passing out at work, and once she even crashed her car when her blood sugar dropped unexpectedly. She went on a pump and tried a CGM, but nothing seemed to help. She was still having frequent, dangerous lows. Scared of losing her job and her license, Tarra began to research Diabetes Alert Dogs. It took a year and a half to raise the nearly $10,000 dollars required, and then the training process for Duchess, her Labrador/Golden Retriever mix, began. “I can’t explain what she’s done to my world,” Tarra says. Trainers say that Diabetes Alert Dogs are right 90 percent of the time. These service dogs are “scent trained” with cotton balls of sweat from a person’s body during a low blood sugar. After a period of extensive training, Duchess came home to Texas with Tarra. Now, when she senses a low blood sugar, Duchess knows what to do. First, she will lick Tarra’s hand. If Tarra doesn’t respond by saying, “Glucose” which is the command for the dog to go get the glucose tabs, then Duchess will paw her leg or thigh and eventually her chest. Duchess sleeps next to Tarra at night, and will get on top of her to wake her up if she senses a low. “She doesn’t give up,” Tarra says. “She’s very good at her job.” Science Thus far, attempts to demonstrate that dogs can detect hypoglycemia are based on little more than anecdotal reports. Dr. Deborah L. Wells, Senior Lecturer at the School of Psychology at Queen’s University in Belfast, has studied dog responses to their type 1 owners. Her study, Canine Responses to Hypoglycemia Continue reading >>

What Are Diabetic Alert Dogs (dads)?

What Are Diabetic Alert Dogs (dads)?

Diabetic Alert Dogs — affectionately known as DADs — are service dogs that are trained specifically to assist diabetics. Their primary task as service dogs is to alert diabetics of an oncoming hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic event (low or high blood sugar!) DADs are able to do this by reacting to particular smells that are emitted from the human body due to chemical shifts caused by either hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia (undetected by a human nose). There are various ways that the dog can alert their human of a low or high blood sugar, which all depends on how it is trained. These skills require rigorous training from professional service dog trainers. In addition to being on alert for blood sugar malfunctions, Diabetic Alert Dogs are known to provide a tremendous amount of love and emotional support to its owner, resulting in an increased sense of security and balance in the daily life of someone with Type 1. How can I find my own DAD? Getting a Diabetic Alert Dog of your very own is a process. The first step is to find a legitimate, accredited organization made up of trainers that will assist you in both the acquiring and the training of your new DAD. Alternatively, there are Diabetic Alert Dog Training schools that will assist in the training and development of the dog of your own choosing. After being matched with the right dog for you, you may be asked to provide a “scent collection kit” so that your dog can learn your body chemistry during its training. Home visits are scheduled in order to begin the bonding process. Organizations & Resources How long do I have to wait for my dog? The average wait time for your DAD to be ready to come home with you for good is approximately six months to a year. What is the cost? The exact cost will depend on the particular o Continue reading >>

3 Things Your Vet Might Not Tell You About Treating Your Diabetic Dog

3 Things Your Vet Might Not Tell You About Treating Your Diabetic Dog

3 Things Your Vet Might Not Tell You About Treating Your Diabetic Dog Diabetic dogs can live happy and healthy lives, but you may need to do additional research when learning how to manage their care. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, diabetes affects approximately one in every 500 dogs. Chuck, my senior Pug mix, was diagnosed with the disease shortly after I adopted him. He was 10 years old and severely overweight when he camefrom the shelter. Although I did get his weight down by 25 percent thanks to a lot of walks, all that extra heft undoubtedly contributed to the onset of his disease. (Please dont let your dogs get fat , its so dangerous to their health!) When your dog is diagnosed with diabetes, there is a ton of information to learn. Yet, there are quite a few things you may justtake at face value without even thinking to question. Trust me, dont do that. Always be inquisitive. Here is what I learned by managing Chucks diabetes. Chuck was 10 when diagnosed and is 12 years old now. (Photo byAmber Avines) When Chuck got his first insulin prescription, it was for Humulin N. I went to Costco and paid $130 for a bottle that would last a month. Over the next few days, I did some research and discovered Chuck could be moved to Novolin N (a different type of insulin). This is an equally expensive drug, but I finally found it for $24.88 at my local Walmart. Never underestimate the value of shopping around. Pharmacies frequently have contracts with certain drug companies that affect which drugs they sell and how much they cost. When your dog is diagnosed, invest the time into exploring your medication options. When asked, Chucks vet didnt even know there were two insulins (she just jotted down the one she knew about), and it took some independent r Continue reading >>

Diabetic Alert Dog - 4 Paws For Ability

Diabetic Alert Dog - 4 Paws For Ability

Diabetic Alert Dog, Pip sensing a change in Megans blood sugar There are many tools to use in dealing with diabetes, and the Diabetic Alert Dog is one more tool to add to the toolbox used to help families deal with their child who has diabetes. With the use of a Diabetic Alert Dog the child can gain the independence they need as they grow up and mature and the parents are not afraid to allow them to do so. Here at 4 Paws we place Diabetic Alert Dogs with children who have insulin-dependent Type 1 Diabetes. As with all medical alert dogs, Diabetic Alert Dogs are trained to smell the chemical body changes that occur as the insulin levels increase or drop. When a child is experiencing a high or low, their body is releasing chemicals that change their typical scent. A 4 Paws Dog with the right training in scent-based work is able to respond to those chemical changes, at the onset of the changes long before any adverse medical reactions occur, by alerting the parents or caregivers to the change at its onset. The parents and/or child are then able to check their blood sugar level and take appropriate action. Training Diabetic Alert Dogs for children means that we must train a dog that is unique in its ability to meet the needs of both the child with diabetes and the childs family. Most agencies do not work with children, especially very young children. Here at 4 Paws we have no minimum age requirement and believe strongly in early intervention. In addition to the alert work, these dogs provide a measure of comfort for the child, increased self-esteem and confidence, a distraction during unpleasant medical procedures, and of course companionship. USA WEEKEND recently published an article on Megan Rittingerand her service dog, Pip. Full story . . . Continue reading >>

The Cost Of Having A Diabetic Dog

The Cost Of Having A Diabetic Dog

Here, the cost of having a diabetic dog will be discussed. Insulin Dogs that are diabetic are unable to regulate their blood sugar after meals, due to insufficient insulin in their bloodstream. Therefore, pet owners must inject insulin into their pets once or twice daily. The amount of insulin required will depend both on dog’s size, and the severity of his or her diabetes. The monthly cost of insulin for most pet owners ranges $20 - $90. Syringes Insulin is injected with a sterile syringe, which cannot be reused. Depending how much insulin is required by your pet, the monthly syringe cost is $8 - $16. Glucose Meter Pet owners have one of two options: they can purchase a glucose meter for testing their pets at home, or travel to the veterinarian for low-cost testing. The cost of a glucose machine ranges from $20 - $500, whereas owners will spend $10 - $40 per month (not to mention time spent driving) when performing testing at the veterinarian’s office. Lancets / Test Strips There are two methods for testing a dog’s blood sugar at home: via blood or urine. A blood test requires both lancets and testing strips, while a urine test may be more difficult to perform, but is painless. Altogether, pet owners can expect to pay $5 - $15 per month on these supplies. Diabetic Dog Food The cost of diabetic dog food is difficult to factor, because dogs must eat regardless of whether they are diabetic. However, dog food that is specifically suited for diabetic animals can be more expensive than a regular dog food formula. For instance, Hill’s Prescription Diet for Digestive / Weight / Glucose Management costs $80 for a 27.5 lb bag. Veterinary Visits Diabetic dogs will also cost require more veterinary visits than the average dog. Insulin prescriptions must be written every 3 Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Alert Dogs Help Sniff Out Low Blood Sugar?

Can Diabetes Alert Dogs Help Sniff Out Low Blood Sugar?

For people with diabetes who take insulin, the risk of losing consciousness from low blood sugar is a constant fear. Devices called continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) can alert wearers to dropping levels, but not everyone has access to them. And even among those who do, some prefer a furrier and friendlier alert option: a service dog with special training to alert owners when their blood sugar reaches dangerously low levels. These dogs are trained in a variety of ways, and although they receive certification, there is no universally accepted test to ensure their competence. Fully trained dogs can cost in the $20,000 range and typically aren't covered by insurance, although some nonprofit organizations can help offset the cost. But as the popularity of diabetes alert dogs to detect hypoglycemia has increased dramatically, their effectiveness is largely unknown, according to Evan Los, a pediatric endocrinologist at Oregon Health & Science University who has studied their use. "Though dog trainers and dog users are generally enthusiastic," he notes. Moreover, it's not clear exactly what the dogs may be detecting. Are they actually "smelling" low blood sugar, or are they reacting to typical hypoglycemia symptoms in their owner, such as sweating or shaking? Two new studies add scent to the trail. One, published in the journal Diabetes Care, suggests that the dogs may be smelling a particular substance in the person's breath that rises as blood sugar falls. But a second study, presented by Los at the recent meeting of the American Diabetes Association in New Orleans, found that although the dogs do appear to detect low blood sugar, they also often alerted owners when they didn't have low blood sugar, and were usually slower than a CGM to alert to actual low blood sugar. Sniff Continue reading >>

Type You Support Group

Type You Support Group

Frequently asked questions about Medical Assistance & Diabetic Alert Dogs What is a Service dog and why does it have special rights for access? Service dogs are individually trained to perform tasks for people with disabilities – such as guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling wheelchairs, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, or performing other special tasks. The Americans with Disabilities Act provides public access rights for these dogs and their disabled handlers. What is the difference between a Medical Assistance Dog, a Diabetic Alert Assistance Dog and a Medical Response Dog? Medical Assistance Dogs are service dogs that have been trained to respond to an identifiable element that is available to their senses in order to support the medical condition of their handler. Diabetic Alert Assistance Dogs are a specific type of Medical Assistance Dog that has been trained to use their highly sensitive scent capabilities to identify the changes in blood chemistry that occur during rapid changes in blood sugar levels. Medical Response Dogs are another type of Medical Assistance Dog that has been trained to assist persons based on recognition of symptoms pertaining to a specific medical condition. The differences between medical alert and medical response training is the trigger that the dog has been trained to identify. In the case of a Diabetic Alert Dog, the trigger is the change in blood chemistry, allowing the diabetic to treat hypoglycemia prior to becoming symptomatic. A Medical Response Dog for diabetes responds to the handler as symptoms are occurring. D4D’s testing and experience with its clients has shown that there is a 15 to 30 minute difference in this response. How can the dog notify its handler when it se Continue reading >>

It Costs What To Treat A Diabetic Pet?

It Costs What To Treat A Diabetic Pet?

Pet diabetes is more common than you may think. Statistics show that up to 1 in 500 dogs and up to 1 in 200 cats become diabetic. Whenever I diagnose a pet with diabetes, I discuss the costs of ongoing care with clients, as they will likely need to budget for diabetic supplies. In general, there are monthly costs (insulin, syringes, test strips, perhaps an increased cost of food relative to the prior food), and there are the initial costs of diagnosis and equipment (glucose meters, test strips, sometimes urine strips). If a pet is diagnosed when ill with a complication, such as diabetic ketoacidosis, the initial costs could escalate quickly. Each situation is different. Each patient is different. Medicine is an art. You are unlikely to find 2 veterinarians who will treat any given patient exactly the same way. Some veterinarians (like me) ask clients with a diabetic pet to get a glucose meter and do the blood glucose curves at home. I find the results can be more accurate at home as the pet typically eats more normally at home than in a clinic setting. In addition to the improved results, the cost of glucose curves goes down significantly. I’ve worked in many practices over the years and have seen a blood glucose sample cost anywhere from a mere $8 to a whopping $49 per blood glucose sample. Most veterinary clinics charge somewhere between $10 and $20 per sample. By the time a vet has checked 6 to 8 blood glucose samples and hospitalized a pet for the day, it could end up costing up to $200 for a glucose curve. A client can purchase a glucose meter and 50 test strips for about the cost of one glucose curve in a hospital setting. Some diabetics are relatively simple uncomplicated patients. Others may make their veterinarians want to pull their hair out! If your diabeti Continue reading >>

There Are 5 Core Foundations Of The Diabetic Alert Dog 101tm Program

There Are 5 Core Foundations Of The Diabetic Alert Dog 101tm Program

1. Stably temperamented dogs. Dogs need to be free from all signs of aggression and anxiety. 2. Affordable training. It shouldnt cost you $25,000 to train your own dog for diabetic alert. There has to be a better way. Thats where the Diabetic Alert Dog 101TM program comes in handy. 3. Ensuring that our dogs are happy and are allowed to be dogs. Some service dog organizations have a 75% drop out rate. Some of these dogs are dropped from the program for being unable to shut down everything that is dog about a dog. We think dogs should be allowed to play with other dogs, that dogs should be allowed to play with a ball or engage in a little telephone pole sniffing every once and a while. What is so wrong with that? We think there has to be a middle ground between robot dogs and ill behaved dogs. 4. Training using strict positive reinforcement methodologies. Dominance methodology creates a confrontational relationship with your dog. Do you really want to train a dog that is supposed to be saving your life in a confrontational manner? No way! If you wouldnt do it to your two year old, why would you do it to your dog? What the Diabetic Alert Dog 101TM training methodology creates is a dog that who thinks you are the sun, moon and the stars, a dog that thinks you are the granter of all good things in their life, a dog that not only enjoys his job but is obsessed over it 5. Creation of a THINKING dog Have you ever had a low blood sugar before? What does it feel like? It seems like the first thing to go is critical thinking skills. What type of dog would you rather have? A dog that you have to tell what to do when you are in a state of brain dysfunction or a dog who assesses the situation a responds to it again and again and again trying to get your attention in many different wa Continue reading >>

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