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How Much Has Diabetes Increased Over The Years

Diabetes Rate Has Doubled Over Past 30 Years

Diabetes Rate Has Doubled Over Past 30 Years

Diabetes Rate Has Doubled Over Past 30 Years June 28, 2011 (Boston, Massachusetts and London, United Kingdom) The incidence of hyperglycemia is rising at an alarming rate, with the number of adults with diabetes worldwide having more than doubled over the past three decades, a new study suggests [1]. The study, published online in the Lancet on June 25, 2011, was conducted by a group led by Drs Goodarz Danaei and Mariel Finucane (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA), and Dr Majid Ezzati (Imperial College London, UK) Ezzati commented to heartwire : "Raised glucose is one of the most important risk factors for coronary heart disease and stroke, and the increased prevalence of diabetes will offset the gains we are making in preventing these conditions through reducing smoking, blood pressure, and cholesterol. The problem with diabetes is that if prevention fails and people develop the condition, the treatments available are not that effective and have many side effects. It is not like blood pressure and cholesterol, where there are lots of effective drugs." He added: "Unless we develop better programs for detecting people with elevated blood sugar and helping them to improve their diet and physical activity and control their weight, diabetes will inevitably continue to impose a major burden on health systems around the world." Noting that the driving factor is obesity, which is rising fast as a direct result of the worsening diet of the population, Ezzati called for urgent action by governments to prevent this from continuing. "There are many tools they can use to affect what people eat and drink, such as taxing unhealthy food and subsidizing healthy food. And they also need to do more to encourage physical activity. We should be seriously restricting the availabi Continue reading >>

100% Growth In Diabetes Patients In India In The Last 15 Years

100% Growth In Diabetes Patients In India In The Last 15 Years

Diabetes mellitus is a kind of metabolic ailment wherein either the body is incapable of producing insulin or the cells are not able to respond to insulin efficiently, leading to high blood glucose in the body. Obesity is one of the main causes of diabetes apart from other lifestyle factors. What was once majorly perceived as a western phenomenon has now crept deep into Asian lifestyles. "Diabetes, perhaps more than any other disease, is strongly associated with the western diet, as it was uncommon in cultures consuming a 'primitive diet'. However as cultures switch from their native diets, to the foods of commerce; their rate of diabetes increases eventually reaching the proportions seen in the western societies. However, what's alarming is the fact that India is home to 63 million diabetics and the number is estimated to be 100 million by 2030," noted weight management, fitness and nutrition expert, Shilpa Arora. According the official WHO estimates, the total global diabetic population in the year 2000 stood at 171,000,000 which is estimated to spike up to a whopping 366,000,000. India had an estimated 31,705,000 diabetics in the millennium year which is estimated to grow by over 100% to 79,441,000 by 2030. According to the International Diabetes Federation Atlas 2015, an estimated 69.2 million Indians are diabetic, which as per the WHO assessment, stood at 63 million in the year 2013. The estimates depict that diabetes prevalence has alarmingly doubled and so far has grown by over 100% in the past 15 years. Ahead of the World Health Day, WHO has urged all South Asian countries to take "vigorous and concerted" actions to battle the ever increasing prevalence of diabetes in the region. According to the global health organization, diabetes has the potential to become o Continue reading >>

Cdc: U.s. Deaths From Heart Disease, Cancer On The Rise

Cdc: U.s. Deaths From Heart Disease, Cancer On The Rise

By AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NEWS Heart disease is the No. 1 cause of death in the United States. But after nearly three decades in decline, the number of deaths from heart disease has increased in recent years, a new federal report shows. Meanwhile, the number of cancer deaths have been climbing for decades, bringing the nation’s top two killers closer than ever in the rankings for leading cause of death. The report, released Wednesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, showed that heart disease deaths increased by 3 percent between 2011 and 2014, and that cancer deaths rose by 2.6 percent during that time. This is the first time the CDC has published a report looking specifically at the number of deaths from heart disease and cancer. Statisticians at the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics had expected cancer to surpass heart disease as the top killer a few years ago and planned to release the report then, said Robert Anderson, Ph.D., chief of the CDC’s mortality statistics branch and coauthor of the report. “When I started working here 20 years ago, I never thought that we’d see a convergence like this,” Anderson said. “As we’ve watched them get close and closer together, we started to think, ‘Gee, we might see a crossover here.’” The number of cancer deaths is going up because the population is getting older, Anderson said. That makes the decline in heart disease deaths in the 1990s and 2000s “all that much more remarkable,” he said. But the recent rise in deaths from both diseases caught the CDC’s attention, Anderson said. It is “impossible to say” whether cancer will soon overtake heart disease as the No. 1 cause of death in the United States because “there’s a certain amount of randomness to mortality, Continue reading >>

Diabetes Has 'quadrupled' Around World In About 30 Years, Says Who

Diabetes Has 'quadrupled' Around World In About 30 Years, Says Who

Poor eating habits from an early age, smoking and sugary drinks have all be closely linked with the rise in diabetes ( Getty ) Diabetes has 'quadrupled' around world in about 30 years, says WHO About 422 million adults worldwidewere living with the disease in 2014 The number of people with diabetes has quadrupled around the world over the last 35 years, according to a new report. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has warned that diabetes is nowa "serious threat to population health" as obesity fuels a rise in thedisease. And, while itwas once more confined to richer countries, the 2016 WHO report warns that diabetes is nowrising fastestinmiddleand lower-income countries. Sharing the full story, not just the headlines Margaret Chan, director-general at the WHO, said those with diabetesinpoorercountries were in particularly difficult situations. "No longer a disease of predominantly rich nations, the prevalence of diabetes is steadily increasing everywhere, most markedly in the world's middle-income countries," said Dr Chan. "People with diabetes who depend on life-saving insulin pay the ultimate price when access to affordable insulin is lacking." Diabetes is a chronic disease which occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin -the hormone which regulates blood sugar. Ingredients: 2 full eggs, 3 egg whites, asparagus, peppers, 50g of smoked salmon 1) Boil your asparagus in water for around five minutes.2) Meanwhile, mix your eggs and egg whites in a jug, and add a splash of skimmed milk. Chop some peppers up and throw them in too. 3) Once your asparagus is cooked, drain it and chop into smaller chunks. Add these to your egg mixture.4) Whisk your mixture and season with salt and pepper.5) Pour the mix into a hot pan with a small knob of butter or a teaspoon Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes On The Rise

Type 1 Diabetes On The Rise

For years, public health officials in the United States — and around the world — have been concerned about rising rates of Type 2 diabetes. While the causes of Type 2 diabetes are complex, rising rates of the disease have generally mirrored rising rates of obesity over the last few decades. But earlier this month, researchers reported a landmark discovery: For the first time in decades, the rate of new cases of Type 2 diabetes has been confirmed as falling, not rising. While this is great news, it didn’t take long for bad news about diabetes rates to come along. Even though Type 2 diabetes is apparently on the decline, Type 1 diabetes is on the rise — and researchers have no easy explanations for what might be causing this trend. For a study published earlier this month in the journal Diabetes Care, researchers analyzed a large database of U.S. commercial insurance claims to look for evidence of Type 1 diabetes in children and teenagers. As noted in a HealthDay article on the study, they found that the rate of Type 1 diabetes in this population has risen from 1.5 cases per 1,000 people in 2002 to 2.3 cases per 1,000 people in 2013 — an increase of almost 60%. As the article notes, this rise in Type 1 diabetes in the United States is part of a larger worldwide trend. The researchers also found a large increase in kidney damage among children and teens with Type 1 diabetes, but some or most of this increase can probably be explained by more widespread testing of kidney function at a younger age. Overall rates of Type 1 diabetes, on the other hand, are highly unlikely to be explained by better detection because the disease is so noticeable — and deadly — if it’s left untreated. Initial symptoms of Type 1 diabetes include excessive thirst and urination, fati Continue reading >>

Why Has The Divorce Rate In Pakistan Increased So Much Over The Years? How Can This Be Controlled?

Why Has The Divorce Rate In Pakistan Increased So Much Over The Years? How Can This Be Controlled?

By changing the society we live in. High divorce rates aren’t due to new practices which we’ve suddenly adopted; but old problematic practices. For example, women weren’t allowed - by family or society - to part from her husband even if she was domestically abused. Women today are in a better position to change their situation and they do, but the problem doesn’t lie with the choice, but the reasons behind why a particular choice had to be made. Fix the reasons and you’ll see divorce rates fall. Most don’t get into contractual relationships in hope they’ll break it off some day and many do stay far longer than they should. Also I want to make this clear: Women and men who have legitimate reasons for divorcing should not be penalized. No law or amendment should be made. Steps should be taken for improving society and lowering valid concerns of those in marriages through social messages only. Continue reading >>

The Increasing Incidence Of Diabetes In The 21st Century

The Increasing Incidence Of Diabetes In The 21st Century

1 An assessment of the geographic distribution of newly diagnosed diabetes on a state-by-state basis was realized through the use of Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) surveys for the periods 1995–1997 and 2005–2007. Among the 33 states that participated during both time periods, the age-adjusted incidence of diabetes increased 90%, from 4.8 per 1000 in 1995–1997 to 9.1 in 2005–2007. The number of incident cases of diagnosed diabetes was defined as cases with duration of zero full years plus one-half of the cases with duration of 1 year. Incidence rates were calculated by dividing the number of incident cases by the number of persons without diabetes plus the number of incident cases. The calculated incidence was adjusted for age with 2000 U.S. census population data according to each state. The BRFSS is a state-based, random digit-dialed, landline telephone survey of the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population.2 More than 350,000 adults are interviewed each year, making the BRFSS the largest telephone health survey in the world. This collaborative project of CDC and U.S. states and territories is a data collection program for measuring behavioral risk factors in the adult population. BRFSS field operations are managed by state health departments, which adhere to guidelines developed by CDC. The BRFSS was initiated in 1984, with 15 states collecting surveillance data on risk behaviors through monthly telephone interviews. Eventually, the number of states participating in the survey increased, and by 2001, all 50 states, as well as the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Virgin Islands, were participating in the BRFSS. State health departments either conduct the BRFSS interviews themselves or else outsource the work to contracto Continue reading >>

The Prices For Life-saving Diabetes Medications Have Increased Again

The Prices For Life-saving Diabetes Medications Have Increased Again

A Type 1 diabetes patient holds up bottles of insulin. Reuters/Lucy Nicholson Insulin prices have been rising — increases that mean some people are spending as much on monthly diabetes-related expenses as their mortgage payment. It's led some people living with diabetes to turn to the black market, crowdfunding pages, and Facebook pages to get access to the life-saving drug. At the same time, the companies that make insulin have faced pressure from politicians including Senator Bernie Sanders, class-action lawsuits that accuse the companies of price-fixing, and proposed legislation in Nevada. Even in the face of this criticism, two of those drugmakers — Eli Lilly and Novo Nordisk — raised the list price of their insulins again in 2017. Diabetes is a group of conditions in which the body can't properly regulate blood sugar that affects roughly 30 million people in the US. For many people living with diabetes — including the 1.25 million people in the US who have type-1 diabetes — injecting insulin is part of the daily routine. Insulin, a hormone that healthy bodies produce, has been used to treat diabetes for almost a century, though it's gone through some modifications. As of May 2, the list price of Humalog, a short-acting insulin, is $274.70 for a 10 ml bottle, an increase of 7.8% from what the list price had been since July 2016. On May 2, Lilly also took a 7.8% list price increase to Humulin, an older form of insulin. Novo Nordisk, which also makes a short-acting insulin, increased its prices to the drug in 2017. In February, the drugmaker raised its price to $275.58 for a 10 ml bottle, up 7.9% from what the list price had been since July 2016. In December, Novo Nordisk committed to limiting all future drug list price increases from the company to single d Continue reading >>

The Last Ice Age Was 20,000 Years Ago. How Can We Claim Man-made Global Warming Exists With Only 135 Years Of Temperature Data And Much Much Less More Advanced Data?

The Last Ice Age Was 20,000 Years Ago. How Can We Claim Man-made Global Warming Exists With Only 135 Years Of Temperature Data And Much Much Less More Advanced Data?

We can claim global warming exists, and that it will get warmer in the next 50 to 100 years, because people are good at physics, chemistry and math. That gas engine in your car, air conditioner in your house, all your house hold appliances, the coal fired power plants all around you, the display that you are looking at right now, bridges and highways that you drive on, and on and on and on, all require the application of math, physics, and chemistry. Global warming is a prediction of the Earth’s climate through the application of math, physics and chemistry. The air conditioner in your house has refrigerant loops, compressors, blowers/fans, and ducting. Same thing, for the volume of a house, people know how much air flow is needed, how much ducting is needed, how much power is needed, etc, to cool a house. People don’t just magically know. They had to develop math models, design parts, understand refrigerants, etc. The refrigerant isn’t magically extracted from the ground, but it is actually designed by people to have a lowish vaporization point (lower than room temperature). In the early 20th century, chlorofluorocarbons were used as the refrigerant. By the 1970s, people figured out that CFCs were reducing the ozone layer in the atmosphere, which would increase the amount of UV radiation hitting the surface, and therefore increasing health risks to humans world wide. People knew this because they were able to measure how much CFCs and ozone was in the atmosphere. Through chemistry, people knew what the CFC was doing to reduce ozone in the atmosphere. Health hazards were UV radiation related ones like cancer, cataracts, etc. People informed the governments of the world what was going to happen if CFCs continued to be released in the atmosphere. Governments listene Continue reading >>

Diabetes Now Affects More Than 4 Million People In Uk, Charity Says

Diabetes Now Affects More Than 4 Million People In Uk, Charity Says

The number of people living with diabetes in the UK has topped 4 million for the first time, a charity says. Based on 2014-15 GP patient data, Diabetes UK says there are 4.05 million people with the condition, including 3.5 million adults who have been diagnosed, an increase of 65% over the past decade and around 120,000 more than the previous year. There are thought to be 549,000 with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. Melanie Davies, professor of diabetes medicine at the University of Leicester and University Hospitals of Leicester NHS trust, who was made a CBE in the New Year’s honours list, said that numbers with the condition were growing across the world, often outstripping estimates. As such, she said, the 4 million figure is “not surprising but quite alarming. There are also lots of people at very high risk of developing diabetes over the next five to 10 years. The large driver is the increase in the number of people with type 2 diabetes, associated with obesity in the population. “We know that we have an ageing population so of course there are lots of ageing people with diabetes, but we’re seeing in the [Leicester] clinic, teenagers and even children with type 2 diabetes and we wouldn’t have seen that 10 years ago. Even under the age of 30 there are many more people developing it than before and having it for a longer time, so there are more complications.” The National Audit Office recently criticised the poor standard of diabetes care, and Diabetes UK says that unless this is remedied more people will end up experiencing potentially preventable diabetes-related complications such as blindness, kidney failure and amputation. The charity says more than 24,000 people a year with diabetes die before their time. Diabetes UK’s chief executive, Chris Askew, Continue reading >>

Statistics About Diabetes

Statistics About Diabetes

If your deductible reset on January 1, there are new programs to help you afford your insulin prescription| Learn more Prevalence: In 2015, 30.3 million Americans, or 9.4% of the population, had diabetes. Approximately 1.25 million American children and adults have type 1 diabetes. Undiagnosed: Of the 30.3 million adults with diabetes, 23.1 million were diagnosed, and 7.2 million were undiagnosed. Prevalence in seniors: The percentage of Americans age 65 and older remains high, at 25.2%, or 12.0 million seniors (diagnosed and undiagnosed). New cases: 1.5 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes every year. Prediabetes: In 2015, 84.1 million Americans age 18 and older hadprediabetes. Deaths: Diabetes remains the 7th leading cause of death in the United States in 2015, with 79,535 death certificates listing it as the underlying cause of death, and a total of 252,806 death certificates listing diabetes as an underlying or contributing cause of death. About 193,000 Americans under age 20 are estimated to have diagnosed diabetes, approximately 0.24% of that population. In 20112012, the annualincidenceof diagnosed diabetes in youth was estimated at 17,900 withtype 1 diabetes, 5,300 withtype 2 diabetes. The rates of diagnosed diabetes in adults by race/ethnic background are: Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States in 2015 based on the 79,535 death certificates in which diabetes was listed as the underlying cause of death. In 2015, diabetes was mentioned as a cause of death in a total of 252,806 certificates. Diabetes may be underreported as a cause of death. Studies have found that only about 35% to 40% of people with diabetes who died had diabetes listed anywhere on the death certificate and about 10% to 15% had it listed as the underlying c Continue reading >>

Diabetes Cases Nearly Quadruple Worldwide

Diabetes Cases Nearly Quadruple Worldwide

GENEVA --The world has seen a nearly four-fold increase indiabetes cases over the last quarter-century, driven by excessive weight, obesity, aging and population growth, the World Health Organization reported Wednesday, adding that 422 million people were affected in 2014. In a new report on diabetes, the U.N. health agency called for stepped-up measures to reduce risk factors for diabetes and improve treatment and care. WHO said 8.5 percent of the world population had diabetes two years ago, up from 4.7 percent, or 108 million, in 1980. "We need to rethink our daily lives: to eat healthily, be physically active and avoid excessive weight gain," WHO Director-General Dr. Margaret Chan said Wednesday. The Geneva-based agency blamed growing consumption of food and beverages high in sugar for the increase in diabetes. The disease increased around the world but affects lower- and middle-income people more often than wealthier populations. Diabetes rates rose the most in Africa, the Middle East and Asia, with the "Eastern Mediterranean" region more than doubling its prevalence to 13.7 percent of the population, the only world region with a double-digit percentage. Diabetes is a chronic condition in which the body either does not make enough insulin to break down the sugar in foods or uses insulin inefficiently. It can cause early death or serious complications like blindness, stroke, kidney disease, amputation and heart disease. In its report, WHO says diabetes caused 1.5 million deaths in 2012, and another 2.2 million deaths were caused by high blood sugar levels, increasing the risks of cardiovascular and other diseases. The report does not distinguish between Type 1 diabetes, where the body cannot make enough insulin and requires daily insulin injections for survival, and Continue reading >>

How Has Diabetes Treatment Changed Over The Years?

How Has Diabetes Treatment Changed Over The Years?

The last few years have seen a lot of novel (aka, medications from new drug classes) treatments available in the market including SGLT-2 (sodium glucose cotransporter 2) inhibitors, GLP-1 (glucagon peptide 1) agonists. There are also better ways to deliver insulin, including a wide assortment of insulin pumps that make monitoring pre- and post-prandial glucose as easy as possible while also reducing the incidence of hypoglycemia. Edited later 01/13/2015 -- let me know if you want or need more explanation about the novel drugs and I will try to provide it. I don't normally provide such detailed information on Quora because such is easily available on Google. In fact, one of my pet peeves with question posters on Quora is that most of the time their questions could be answered with easy and quick searches on Google. Continue reading >>

Number Of People With Diabetes Up 60 Per Cent In Last Decade

Number Of People With Diabetes Up 60 Per Cent In Last Decade

Save for later The number of people living with diabetes in the UK has soared by 59.8 per cent in a decade, according to a new analysis by Diabetes UK. The new figures, extracted from official NHS data from the Quality and Outcomes Framework, 2004-05 to 2013-14, show that there are now 3,333,069 people diagnosed with diabetes, which is an increase of more than 1.2 million adults compared with ten years ago when, in 2005, there were 2,086,041 people diagnosed with the condition. This doesn’t take into account the 590,000 adults estimated to have undiagnosed diabetes in 2013-2014. Diabetes UK is warning that this exponential growth in numbers reflects an urgent need for effective care for people living with diabetes, as well as highlighting the importance of prevention and that failure to act on this threatens to bring down the NHS. At present only six in ten people with diabetes in England and Wales receive the eight care processes recommended by the National Institute for Health Care and Excellence (NICE). These are the checks identified as essential in high quality care for people with diabetes and include getting blood pressure and blood glucose levels measured, as well as the kidney function monitored, otherwise poorly managed diabetes can lead to devastating and expensive health complications such as kidney disease, stroke and amputation. This is why it’s critical that the government takes urgent action to ensure that everyone with diabetes receives the eight care processes, reducing their risk of further health complications and the costs these incur for the already strained NHS budget. Barbara Young, Chief Executive of Diabetes UK, said: "Over the past decade, the number of people living with diabetes in the UK has increased by over 1 million people, which is Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Diabetes mellitus, or diabetes, is a disease that causes high blood sugar. It occurs when there is a problem with insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes sugar from foods and moves it to the body's cells. If the body does not make enough insulin or does not use insulin well, the sugar from food stays in the blood and causes high blood sugar. There are several different types of diabetes, but the most common is type 2. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Diabetes Report, 2014, 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes in the United States have type 2. Just 5 percent of people have type 1. Contents of this article: Key facts about diabetes in the U.S. Diabetes is at an all-time high in the U.S. The CDC's Division of Diabetes Translation states that 1 percent of the population, which is about a half of a million people, had diagnosed diabetes in 1958. Today, nearly 10 percent of the population have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). That's 29.1 million Americans, and more than a quarter of these people do not know they have it. The ADA report that the number of people who have diabetes increased by 382 percent from 1988 to 2014. The risk of developing diabetes increases with age. The CDC report that 4.1 percent of people age 20-44 have diabetes, but the number jumps to 25.9 percent for people over 65 years old. As obesity has become more prevalent over the past few decades, so too has the rate of type 2 diabetes. An article in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology states that 25.6 percent of Americans are obese, much higher than the 15.3 percent of obese people in 1995. In that same period, the incidence of diabetes increased by 90 percent. Although the link between obesity and diabetes is well Continue reading >>

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