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How Much Fruit Should A Diabetic Eat

4 Sweet Science-backed Reasons That Diabetics Can Eat Fruit Worry-free

4 Sweet Science-backed Reasons That Diabetics Can Eat Fruit Worry-free

Extremely low-carb diets aren’t as healthy for you because they skimp on fruit and claim that fruit contains natural sugars that just turn to sugar in the body. It’s true that all carbohydrates from food eventually end up as blood glucose—including the carbs in fruit. That said, fruit has a much lower impact on blood sugar levels than other truly harmful foods like candy bars and soda. That’s because, like vegetables, fruit is mostly water. What isn’t water is fiber, and that fiber slows the progression of fruit sugars into the bloodstream, causing a slow, steady rise in blood sugar rather than a huge spike. Here’s more: Fruit isn’t just not bad for your diabetes. It’s good for it, and for your waistline too. 1. Fruit fights inflammation. Peaches, plums, and nectarines contain special nutrients called phenolic compounds that have anti-inflammatory properties. (These nutrient-rich foods also fight off inflammation.) These compounds travel through the bloodstream and then to your fat cells, where they affect different genes and proteins for the better, finds research done at Texas A&M University. 2. Fruit prevents diabetes. Flavonoids are nutrients found in plant foods, and especially in many types of fruit. Research shows that these compounds can lower the risk for developing type 2 diabetes, probably because these nutrients improve insulin sensitivity. Harvard’s long-running Nurses’ Health Study found that women who consumed more anthocyanins (the pigment that makes blueberries blue and strawberries red) were much less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than women who consumer fewer of these health-promoting compounds. Science says these are the 15 best foods for diabetics. 3. Fruit slims you down. New research suggests fruits may actually be more imp Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Friendly Fruits To Help You Manage Diabetes Better

10 Diabetic Friendly Fruits To Help You Manage Diabetes Better

Diabetes mellitus (DM) commonly referred to as Diabetes, is a chronic disorder. It occurs when the pancreas does not secrete enough insulin or when the cells of the body become resistant to insulin. In either case, the blood sugar cannot get into the cells for storage, which then leads to serious complications. Diabetes, perhaps more than any other disease, is strongly associated with the western diet, as it was uncommon in cultures consuming a 'primitive diet'. However as cultures switch from their native diets, to the foods of commerce; their rate of diabetes increases eventually reaching the proportions seen in the western societies. However, what's alarming is the fact that India Is home to 62 million diabetics and the number is estimated to be 100 million by 2030. Obesity is seen as one of the major contributing factors to the development of insulin resistance in approximately 90% of the individuals with type-2 diabetes. In most cases, achieving ideal body weight is associated with the restoration of normal blood sugar levels. Hence dietary modifications and treatment are fundamental to the successful treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. There are some specific foods that have been shown to produce positive effects on blood sugar control. These foods have a low glycemic index and glycemic load and are high in fiber. When it comes to diabetics eating fruits, there is a lot of confusion and information is very misleading. Just remember that moderation is the key here. TIPS TO ENJOY FRUITS IF YOU ARE DIABETIC: - Always eat fruits that are fresh, local and in season. - Eat fruits that have a low glycemic index. - Fruits should not be eaten with your main meals, its best to have fruits in between meals and as a snack. - Fruits with high glycemic index should be Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: What About Fruit?

Eating With Diabetes: What About Fruit?

By Amy Poetker, Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator 2/15/2012 Packed with vitamins, minerals, and fiber, fruit should be part of any healthy diet. As a diabetes educator, some of the most frequent questions from my clients have to do with fruit. Can I still eat fruit? How much fruit should I eat? What are the best fruits for someone with diabetes? Most people with diabetes are worried about eating fruit because they know that fruit contains sugar. And in the past, people with diabetes were told to avoid eating sugar. While it's true that fruit contains naturally-occurring sugarsand sometimes added ones, too (more on that below)fruit also provides a host of other healthy nutrients that are beneficial for everyone, including people with diabetes. In addition, it's important to remember that people who have diabetes can eat anything, including fruit! Here's why. All carbohydrate-containing foodsnot just those with sugaraffect blood sugar levels. It is the amount of carbohydrate you eat (not the type) that has the biggest influence on blood sugar levels. Because of this, people with diabetes can treat all carbohydrate-containing foods (including fruit) the same when meal planning. Too much of any carbohydrate at a given meal or snack will probably raise your blood sugar higher than you would like. Therefore, a big part of diabetes meal planning is devoted to carbohydrate counting or budgeting carbohydrates in some way. You should work with your diabetes educator or a dietitian that specializes in diabetes in order to determine how much carbohydrate you need. If you count carbohydrates to control your blood sugar, you simply include the carbohydrates in a serving of fruit into your carbohydrate budget for a meal or snack. For instance if you have a 45-gram Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Strawberries

Can Diabetics Eat Strawberries

Some fruits contain a very high amount of carbohydrates that can cause high blood sugar levels in diabetics. The 30 grams of carbohydrates found in a banana, the 50 grams found in a mango and the 52 grams found in a 16-ounce serving of orange juice can be too much for some people with diabetes. Checking your blood sugar levels after eating is the best way to determine whether the foods and fruits you eat allow you to keep your blood sugar levels under control. Strawberries and most other berries tend to contain less carbohydrates per serving and constitute excellent fruit options for all diabetics. Slow-Release Carbs Diabetics need not only to pay attention to the amount of carbs they eat, but also to the type. Some carbs are called high glycemic or quick-release carbs, which have the potential to result in a sharp rise in your blood sugar levels. Fruit juices, dried fruits and tropical fruits tend to be more problematic for diabetes control because of their high glycemic index. Strawberries and all other berries, such as blackberries, raspberries, blueberries and cranberries, contain slow-release carbohydrates, the best kind to optimize diabetes control. Another advantage of strawberries is that they contain fewer carbohydrates compared to most other fruits. A generous 1-cup serving of strawberries has 11 grams of carbs including 3 grams of fiber, which corresponds to the equivalent of only 8 grams of available carbs. Available carbs represent the portion of the carbs found in a food that can raise your blood sugar levels and can be calculated by removing the grams of fiber from the total carbs. Replacing your usual serving of fruit with a serving of strawberries can help you reduce your carb intake and keep your blood sugar levels in the target range. A serving of fru Continue reading >>

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

If you are living with diabetes, you've probably been told to minimize or eliminate your intake of fruit because "fruit is high in sugar." And if this is the case, maybe you refrain from eating fruits because it causes your blood glucose to spike. Attracted by the smell, color and taste, you may find yourself asking a simple question: "Should I avoid fruit in the long-term? And if so, will I ever be able to eat fruit again?” It turns out that this ant-fruit message is a perfect example of pseudoscience at its best. A recent study published in PLOS medicine tracked the health of 512,891 Chinese men and women between the ages of 30 and 79 for an average of 7 years, in order to understand the effect that their diet had on their overall health (1). We like these types of studies because they are: For those who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who had a higher fruit consumption were 12% less likely to develop diabetes, compared with those who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. The researchers found a dose-response relationship, which means that the more frequently these nondiabetic individuals ate fruit, the lower the risk for developing diabetes. Amongst those living with diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who ate fruit 3 times per week reduced their risk of all-cause mortality (death from any cause) by 17%, compared with diabetic individuals who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. In addition, researchers uncovered that those who ate fresh fruit 3 days per week were 13-28% less likely to experience macrovascular complications (heart disease and stroke) and microvascular damage (kidney disease, retinopathy and neuropathy). Even though this study was observational, the results of the study have profound implications for people living with Continue reading >>

A Guide To Fruit: How Much Can People With Diabetes Safely Eat?

A Guide To Fruit: How Much Can People With Diabetes Safely Eat?

Q: What are the recommended servings depending on calorie needs for people with diabetes? A: The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse (part of the National Institutes of Health) recommends different amounts of fruit depending on how many calories you eat in a day. 1,200-1,600 calories per day: Two fruit servings per day 1,600-2,000 calories per day: Three fruit servings per day 2,000-2,400 calories per day: Four fruit servings per day A: It depends what kind of fruit you’re talking about. If it’s a round fruit like an apple or orange, it should be on the smaller size—about the size of a tennis ball. For fruit that can be measured by the cup like cubed melon or fresh berries, a serving is one cup. Q: Is fruit juice a nutritious choice? A: Unfortunately, not really. Drinking fruit juice doesn’t give you the same nutritional benefits as eating the entire fruit. And it’s tough to stick to four ounces or less, which is all you should be drinking at a time. A: Some fruit is higher in sugar than others. Recommended fruits for diabetics include cantaloupe, strawberries, clementine, avocado, banana, blackberries and more. If you go with frozen or canned fruit, make sure there aren’t any added sugars (the syrup is often packed with sugar). And when eating dried fruit, keep a close watch on portion sizes—they’re small and one serving (usually just a few tablespoons) and can be eaten really quickly. Try your best to stay away from syrup-filled canned fruit, fruit rolls, regular jam and jelly and sweetened applesauce. For other advice about what diabetics should and should not eat, check out these blogs: Continue reading >>

Fruit For A Diabetes Diet: What To Know Before You Snack

Fruit For A Diabetes Diet: What To Know Before You Snack

People with type 2 diabetes know that they need to pay attention to their carbohydrate intake. Of the three main macronutrients in food — protein, fat, and carbohydrates — it's the carbohydrates that directly affect blood sugar levels, and this includes the carbohydrates in fruit. But a study published in August 2013 in the British Medical Journal looked at the association between fruit and type 2 diabetes and found that fruit can still be a crucial part of a good diabetes diet. The study, which followed nearly 190,000 people over a number of years, found that eating whole fruits — especially blueberries, grapes, and apples — significantly reduces the risk for type 2 diabetes. On the flip side, drinking more fruit juices actually increases the risk for diabetes. “If you have type 2 diabetes, you do need to watch your sugar," says Katie Barbera, RD, CDE, of Northwell Health Systems in New Hyde Park, New York. She explains that while both whole fruit and fruit juice have carbohydrates, a small piece of whole fruit is equal to about 4 ounces (oz) of fruit juice. So if you drink 12 oz of fruit juice, you could be getting more than you need. “And whole fruits have a lot of other advantages for a diabetes diet," Barbera adds. Understanding the Carbohydrates in Fruit Like vegetables and grains, fruits contain carbs. You need the fruits for a healthy diet, but with type 2 diabetes you also need to keep track of the carbs. Still, figuring out which fruits are best for diabetes is about more than counting carbs — it's also important to take into account the beneficial nutrients certain fruits provide. “Whole fruits are an excellent source of antioxidants," Barbera says. "They have a lot of fiber, so they make you feel fuller and satisfy your hunger. They also add Continue reading >>

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat As Much Fruit As They Want?

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat As Much Fruit As They Want?

Someone with diabetes, whether type 1 or type 2, can eat fruit but portion size and quantity is an important part of balancing blood sugar levels. Fruit is a healthy food choice containing very little to no fat or sodium. Since fruit contains carbohydrate, people with diabetes will need to calculate the amount of carbohydrate into their meal plan. A typical fruit serving of ½ cup of juice, ¼ cup dried fruit, 1 medium piece of fresh fruit or ½ cup canned fruit packed in its own juice will provide about 15 grams of carbohydrate. Someone with diabetes cannot eat all the fruit they want unless they calculate the carbohydrate from fruit into their meal plan. It is best to have a balanced diet from all food groups to achieve the best nutrition from foods. People with type 2 diabetes cannot eat as much fruit as they may want, even though fruit is rich in vitamins, minerals and fiber. The problem is that it contains carbohydrates that break down into glucose (sugar) when digested. Insulin is needed to allow the glucose to be used by the body’s cells. People with type 2 diabetes either have cells resistant to the effects of insulin or they simply don’t make enough of it. That’s why part of managing type 2 diabetes is watching what you eat and limiting the number of carbohydrates you consume. Depending on your size, activity level and the need to lose weight, you can have two to four servings of fruit a day. Choose fresh fruit, or frozen or canned fruit without added sugar. Talk to your dietitian or diabetes educator about what your meal plan should include. Remember that one serving size of fruit equals: a small piece of whole fruit, like an apple or orange 1/2 cup of frozen or canned fruit (canned in juice or light syrup) 3/4 to 1 cup of berries or melon 2 tablespoons Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Fruit is not off-limits if you have type 2 diabetes. It has too many good things going for it, such as fiber and nutrients, as well as its natural sweetness. These fruits are good choices. Keep in mind that fruit gives you carbs, and “as with any carbohydrate, it's important to be mindful of serving sizes,” Shira Lenchewski, RD, says. Pairing fruit with some protein, such as nonfat or low-fat yogurt or a few nuts, also helps. “This super fruit literally has it all,” says Lynn A. Maarouf, RD, nutrition educator at the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch. “It supplies enough beta-carotene and vitamin C to meet your daily requirements and is an excellent source of potassium (an antioxidant which can help lower blood pressure).” Portion Size: 1/3 of a melon Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs One serving of strawberries gives you 100% of your daily requirement of vitamin C. “Also, these sweet berries contain potassium, which help keep blood pressure down, and fiber, which makes you feel full longer while keeping blood sugar levels in check,” Maarouf says. In a recent study, people who ate strawberries along with white bread needed less insulin to steady their blood sugar, compared to people who ate just the white bread. “The research suggests it’s the polyphenols in strawberries that may slow down the digestion of simple carbohydrates, thereby requiring less insulin to normalize blood glucose,” Lenchewski says. Portion Size: 1 cup Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs These tiny tangerine hybrids are high in both vitamin C and folate, which has been shown to improve blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes. “They fit nicely into a backpack or briefcase, and they have a peeling that slides Continue reading >>

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Eating fruit is a delicious way to satisfy hunger and meet daily nutritional needs. However, most fruits contain sugar, which raises questions about whether they are healthy for people who have diabetes. Is fruit unhealthy for people with diabetes? This article will look at what you need to know about fruit and diabetes. Contents of this article: What is fruit? Most people can probably name several fruits such as oranges and apples, but not know why they are fruits. Fruits contain seeds and come from plants or trees. People eat fruits that are stored in many ways - fresh, frozen, canned, dried, and processed. But aren't tomatoes and cucumbers also fruits because they have seeds? There are many foods that are classed as fruits that may surprise some people. Tomatoes, cucumbers, avocados, peas, corn, and nuts are all fruits. It's fine to think of tomatoes and cucumbers as vegetables rather than fruits, however. What's important is how much energy (calories) and nutrients each food has. The bottom line: it's not important to know the difference between fruits and vegetables but to know that both are good for health. Does eating fruit play a role in managing diabetes? Eating enough fiber plays an important role in managing diabetes. A diet high in soluble fiber can slow the absorption of sugar and control blood sugar levels. Many fruits are high in fiber, especially if the skin or pulp is eaten. Many fruits are filling because they contain fiber and a lot of water. Diets containing enough fruits and vegetables can reduce the risk of obesity, heart attack, and stroke. Obesity has been linked to type 2 diabetes. Fruits are high in fiber and nutrients, so they are a good choice in meal planning. Fruits that have been processed such as applesauce and fruit juices have had their Continue reading >>

Diabetes Nutrition Guide: Understanding The Glycemic Index

Diabetes Nutrition Guide: Understanding The Glycemic Index

The glycemic index (GI) is one nutritional tool you can use to help rate the quality of carbohydrates that you eat. The index measures how quickly the carbohydrates in a specific food impact your blood sugar. They are rated low, medium, or high, depending on how quickly they raise your blood sugar level, compared to either glucose or white bread (these foods have a glycemic index rating of 100). By choosing low glycemic index foods, you can minimize dramatic increases in your blood sugar. Additionally, if you eat a high glycemic index food, you can expect that it will increase your blood sugar more significantly. It may also cause a higher post-meal blood sugar reading. Many factors can change the glycemic index of a food. These factors include its composition and how the food is cooked. The glycemic index of food also changes when it is mixed together. The glycemic index of food is not based on a normal serving of a particular food. For example, carrots have a high glycemic index, but to get the amount measured for carrot’s glycemic index you would have to eat a pound and a half. A different measure, called glycemic load, is also available. This measure takes into account both the speed of digestion and the amount present in a normal serving of a food. It may be a better way to measure the impact a carbohydrate food has on blood sugar. To assign a GI number, foods are assigned to one of three categories: low, medium, or high. low GI foods: have a GI of 55 or less medium GI foods: between 56 and 69 high GI foods: 70 or higher For glycemic load, under 10 is considered low, 10 to 20 is considered medium, and over 20 is consider high. Several factors are taken into account when assigning a food a glycemic rating. These factors include: Acidity Foods that are highly acidi Continue reading >>

How Much Fruit Should Be Eaten By Diabetics?

How Much Fruit Should Be Eaten By Diabetics?

An October 2011 study published in the “Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics” found that diabetics who ate adequate amounts of fruit were able to reduce two medical risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease. If you have diabetes, eating fruit daily provides your body with essential nutrients, helps control your blood sugar and reduces your risk for other illnesses such as cardiovascular disease. Ask your health care provider or registered dietitian how to include fruits in your meal plan. Video of the Day 2 to 4 Servings Daily The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse suggests that people with diabetes consume two to four servings of fruit a day, depending on their calorie needs. If you require between 1,200 and 1,600 calories, aim for two fruits daily. Three fruits should be your goal if you need between 1,600 and 2,000 calories daily. People requiring 2,000 to 2,400 calories should consume four fruits daily. A serving is equivalent to a small piece of fruit roughly the size of a tennis ball, 1/2 cup of juice or canned fruit, 2 tablespoons of dried fruit or 3/4 cup to 1 cup of fresh berries or melon. Avoiding the Blood Sugar Roller Coaster Because fruits contain natural sugars, they will raise your blood sugar. Balancing them throughout your day will help prevent peaks and valleys in your blood sugar levels. The American Diabetes Association suggests that the best fruits to choose include fresh, frozen or canned without added sugar. Canned fruits in juice or light syrup, dried fruits and juices contain more sugar, and you should limit these. Melons and pineapple have a higher glycemic index and so may raise your blood sugar more than other fruits, but they can still be included in your diet. An important component of fruit for diabetics Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Fruits To Eat If You Have Diabetes

The Best And Worst Fruits To Eat If You Have Diabetes

Good news for fruit lovers everywhere: eating fresh fruit is associated with a lower risk of diabetes and a lower risk of complications if you already have the disease, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine. Featured recipe: Fresh Fruit Salad If you've been steering clear of fruit because of the sugar content, there's no reason to do so, according to this study. Over a seven-year time period, researchers analyzed the diet and health outcomes of more than 500,000 Chinese adults. The researchers found that higher fruit consumption was not associated with higher blood sugar, even for people with diabetes. Adults who consumed fruit more frequently actually had a lower risk of developing diabetes. The study only analyzed fresh fruit consumption, not dried fruit or fruit juice, so we turned to a few registered dietitians and certified diabetes educators to clarify the best and worst fruits, appropriate serving sizes, and how many carbohydrates you should get from fruit each day. First it's important to note that "diabetes care is individualized," says Staci Freeworth, RD, CDE, and professor of nutrition at Bowling Green State University. This is why it is important for people with diabetes to see a certified diabetes educator (CDE). These specialists can break down how many carbohydrates you should be eating each day based on your individual needs and health history. Best Fruits to Eat Recipe to Try: Purple Fruit Salad Whether you have diabetes or not, the consensus from dietitians is the same regarding which fruits are best to eat. "The best fruits for everyone to eat are the ones that create the least influence on blood sugar, often termed 'low glycemic load,'—even if you don't have diabetes," says Daphne Olivier, RD, CDE, founder of My Food Coach. "These in Continue reading >>

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

If you are living with diabetes, you've probably been told to minimize or eliminate your intake of fruit because "fruit is high in sugar." And if this is the case, maybe you refrain from eating fruits because it causes your blood glucose to spike. Attracted by the smell, color and taste, you may find yourself asking a simple question: "Should I avoid fruit in the long-term? And if so, will I ever be able to eat fruit again?” It turns out that this ant-fruit message is a perfect example of pseudoscience at its best. A recent study published in PLOS medicine tracked the health of 512,891 Chinese men and women between the ages of 30 and 79 for an average of 7 years, in order to understand the effect that their diet had on their overall health (1). We like these types of studies because they are: For those who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who had a higher fruit consumption were 12% less likely to develop diabetes, compared with those who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. The researchers found a dose-response relationship, which means that the more frequently these nondiabetic individuals ate fruit, the lower the risk for developing diabetes. Amongst those living with diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who ate fruit 3 times per week reduced their risk of all-cause mortality (death from any cause) by 17%, compared with diabetic individuals who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. In addition, researchers uncovered that those who ate fresh fruit 3 days per week were 13-28% less likely to experience macrovascular complications (heart disease and stroke) and microvascular damage (kidney disease, retinopathy and neuropathy). Even though this study was observational, the results of the study have profound implications for people living with Continue reading >>

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