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How Much Does Type 1 Diabetes Shorten Your Life?

The Lie That’s Killing Us: Pre-diabetes

The Lie That’s Killing Us: Pre-diabetes

Pre-diabetes is a lie. Pre-diabetes is Stage 1 diabetes. And I’m taking a stand now advocating that we call it what it is. Pre-diabetes doesn’t exist. And the lie we tell that it does does incredible harm. It stops the nearly 80 million Americans we say have it from making the lifestyle changes necessary to prevent advanced Type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is in truth the first stage of diabetes. My proposition is that recognizing pre-diabetes as “Stage 1” Type 2 diabetes will get millions more people to take action to stop their diabetes from progressing. About 80 million people is roughly the populations of California, Texas and New York combined. The International Diabetes Federation reports that in 2011, 280 million people worldwide were glucose intolerant (pre-diabetic). In only 17 years, 398 million people will be. We clearly need a new strategy. The 25-year campaign the American Diabetes Association has waged to raise awareness of diabetes and pre-diabetes and urge preventive and healthful behaviors has been sadly, and enormously, unsuccessful. Pre-Diabetes Is Stage 1 Diabetes Pre-diabetes literally says you don’t have diabetes — but you do. Your blood sugars are higher than normal, a defining characteristic of diabetes. A study performed at Crittenton Hospital Medical Center in Detroit showed 36 percent of people with pre-diabetes already had coronary artery disease, similar to the 42 percent with Type 2 diabetes and strikingly higher than the 21 percent with normal blood sugars. Higher than normal glucose levels impact hypertension (high blood pressure) and lipids like cholesterol and triglycerides. Plus, most people with pre-diabetes show signs of retinopathy (eye damage), nephropathy (kidney damage) and neuropathy (nerve damage), all diabetes complic Continue reading >>

People With Type 1 Diabetes Are Living Longer

People With Type 1 Diabetes Are Living Longer

Better blood sugar control may be the key to longer survival Ninety years ago, type 1 diabetes was a death sentence: half of people who developed it died within two years; more than 90% were dead within five years. Thanks to the introduction of insulin therapy in 1922, and numerous advances since then, many people with type 1 diabetes now live into their 50s and beyond. But survival in this group still falls short of that among people without diabetes. A Scottish study published this week in JAMA shows that at the age of 20, individuals with type 1 diabetes on average lived 12 fewer years than 20-year-olds without it. A second study in the same issue of JAMA showed that people with type 1 diabetes with better blood sugar control lived longer than those with poorer blood sugar control. Types of diabetes There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys cells in the pancreas that make insulin. This usually happens before age 20. Insulin is needed to get blood sugar (glucose) into cells for energy. Without insulin, glucose builds up in the bloodstream. This damages cells and tissues throughout the body. People who develop type 1 diabetes need to take insulin via shots or a pump for life. Type 2 diabetes tends to occur later in life, usually among individuals who are overweight or inactive. It accounts for about 90% of all diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes often make enough insulin, at least at first, but their cells don’t respond to it. As with type 1 diabetes, glucose builds up in the bloodstream, damaging cells and tissues throughout the body. Type 2 diabetes is initially treated with lifestyle changes such as weight loss, more exercise, and a healthier diet. Medications that make the Continue reading >>

Myths & Facts

Myths & Facts

There are many myths about diabetes which can make separating fact from fiction difficult. To cut through the confusion, we’ve broken down some of the common misconceptions: Fact - There is no such thing as “mild” diabetes. All types of diabetes are serious and can lead to complications if not well managed. Diabetes can affect quality of life and can reduce life expectancy. Fact - There are a number of types of diabetes. The most common are type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes Other forms of diabetes are less common. Each type of diabetes has different causes and may be managed in different ways but once someone has any type of diabetes except gestational diabetes, it needs to be managed every day. Gestational diabetes goes away after pregnancy, however it does significantly increase someone's risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. All types of diabetes are complex and serious. Fact - Not all types of diabetes can be prevented. Type 1 is an autoimmune condition, it cannot be prevented and there is no cure. The cause of type 1 diabetes is still unknown. Strong international evidence shows diabetes prevention programs can help prevent type 2 diabetes in up to 58 per cent of cases. There is no single cause of type 2 diabetes, but there are well-established risk factors. Your risk of developing diabetes is also affected by things you cannot change such as family history and ethnicity. Fact - Being overweight or obese is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes but it is not a direct cause. Some people who are overweight may not develop type 2 diabetes while some people who are of a healthy weight will develop type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is not preventable and not associated with weight, physical inactivity or any other lifestyle factors. Fact - The onset o Continue reading >>

Life Expectancy For Type 1 Diabetes

Life Expectancy For Type 1 Diabetes

New study shows recent improvement in years of life lost. With minimal studies to evaluate the impact of type 1 diabetes on life expectancy, studies have been developed to retrospectively look at the effects of diabetes on mortality. Diabetes was also compared to other disease states and causes that had an influence on years of life lost (YLL). The YLL of patients with type 1 diabetes and patients with other disease states were compared to those of the general healthy population. This autoimmune disorder accounts for 10% of all Americans diagnosed with diabetes, and the ability to prevent the development of type 1 diabetes is minimal. Causes have been linked to genetics, and viral infections such as mumps, rubella, cytomegalovirus, measles, influenza, encephalitis, polio, or Epstein-Barr virus. In a study conducted on Australians with type 1 diabetes between the years of 1997 and 2010, researchers looked at the estimated YLL of the type 1 diabetic patients compared to the general public. Researchers used the Chiang method to estimate life expectancy and Arriaga’s method to estimate the impact of age-specific and cause-specific mortalities. Results showed no disparity in terms of YLL from type 1 diabetes in women vs. men. When the YLL was organized into two groups, 1997-2003 and 2004-2010, the 2004-2010 groups showed improvement in life expectancies of 1.9 years in men and 1.5 years in women. Overall, over the time period of the study, patients with type 1 diabetes had a life expectancy of 12.2 years less than the general population. The majority of the YLL was attributed to endocrine and metabolic diseases that occurred between the ages of 10-39, and circulatory diseases that occurred after the age of 40. Medical advances over the years may account for the YLL improve Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Person With Age 35 Can Have A Life Span Of 70 And How To Manage It By Not Taking Medication

Can A Diabetic Person With Age 35 Can Have A Life Span Of 70 And How To Manage It By Not Taking Medication

Kapalbhati & anulomvilom are Yoga exercise and if you do some exercise of 30 minutes in the morning & 30 minutes in the evening you can definitely control diabetes & if possible about 15 minutes fast walk. The Yoga book /C.D is available at almost every book shop. Diabetes UK estimates in its report, Diabetes in the UK 2010: Key Statistics on Diabetes, that the life expectancy of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to be reduced, as a result of the condition, by up to 10 years. People with type 1 diabetes have traditionally lived shorter lives, with life expectancy having been quoted as being reduced by over 20 years. However, improvement in diabetes care in recent decades indicates that people with type 1 diabetes are now living significantly longer. * Overall, the risk for death among people with diabetes is about twice that of people of similar age without diabetes. * Adults with diabetes have heart disease death rates about 2 to 4 times higher than adults without diabetes. * The risk for stroke is 2 to 4 times higher among people with diabetes. Monitoring and controlling the levels of diabetes indicators, including HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), postprandial plasma glucose (PPG), body mass index (BMI), blood pressure and lipids, is an integral component of diabetes care at every stage of the disease. Diabetic patients should conduct the following tests periodically. A: HbA1c. HbA1c is a lab test that shows the average level of blood sugar (glucose) over the previous 3 months. It shows how well you are controlling your diabetes. B: Control your high Blood pressure, if any. Normal blood pressure- <120/80 mmHg. C: Control your blood Cholesterol: Normal cholesterol < 200 mg/dL. LDL <100 mg/dL HDL > 40 mg/dL Triglyceride < 150 mg/dL. D: Diabetic education. Denta Continue reading >>

What To Know About Diabetes And Life Expectancy

What To Know About Diabetes And Life Expectancy

Twenty-nine million Americans and more than 400 million people worldwide have diabetes. There are two main types of diabetes with different underlying causes. But when either type 1 or type 2 diabetes is not well controlled, they lead to a dangerous buildup of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Over time, the damage this does to blood vessels and nerves can lead to serious complications, such as blindness, limb amputation, heart disease, and kidney failure. Diabetes: a Chronic Disease Diabetes is a chronic condition that requires consistent, daily care, which makes it more difficult to control than some other conditions. When damage from diabetes takes too heavy a toll on the body, it can shorten lifespan. In the United States, diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death. Thinking about life expectancy is uncomfortable. But, it’s important to know that advances in diabetes care and in how people are taking care of their health can make living a long life with diabetes a reality. Life Expectancy With Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin—a hormone that helps carry glucose to the body’s cells to use for energy. Five to 10% of people with diabetes have type 1. Type 1 diabetes is most frequently diagnosed in childhood or adolescence. This means that people with type 1 diabetes can spend a large part of their lives with the condition. The average person with type 1 diabetes has a shorter lifespan than a person without it—but the life expectancy gap is shrinking. Research in the 1970s estimated that people with type 1 diabetes could expect to live 27 fewer years, on average, than people without the disease. However, a recent study out of Scotland reports that men with type 1 diabetes lose an estimated 11 years and women 13 years of l Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes 'takes 12 Years Off Your Life': Alarming Figures Reveal Life Expectancy Has Not Improved In Two Decades

Type 1 Diabetes 'takes 12 Years Off Your Life': Alarming Figures Reveal Life Expectancy Has Not Improved In Two Decades

Type one diabetes knocks 12 years off a person’s life, according to a major new study. The shocking toll of the condition, which 78,000 children worldwide are diagnosed with every year, has not improved since the 1990s. Researchers examined the life expectancy of type one diabetic patients in Australia from 1997 to 2010. Although life expectancy improved marginally throughout the period, it rose no more than life expectancy for the rest of the population, meaning the gap stayed the same. The team, from the Diabetes Institute in Melbourne, found that people with type one diabetes had a life expectancy of 68.6 years, which was 12.2 years less than the general population. Type one diabetes is an irreversible autoimmune disease which usually strikes in childhood, and stops the body producing insulin. Its cause is unclear, but it is thought to be genetic. Unlike type two diabetes, type one, has nothing to do with lifestyle. The authors, writing in the journal Diabetologia, said: ‘Early onset of diabetes tended to be a predictor of premature mortality. ‘Deaths from circulatory disease and endocrine and metabolic disease contributed most to early mortality in type one diabetes. ‘For improvements in life expectancy, greater attention must therefore be paid to both the acute metabolic and chronic cardiovascular complications of type one diabetes. ‘A failure to address either one will continue to leave type one diabetic patients at risk of premature mortality.’ They added: ‘As this is a contemporary nationwide registry-based cohort study of type one diabetes, the results are likely to be applicable to other similar Western countries.’ In a linked comment article, Dr Lars Stene, of the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in Oslo, said: ‘It seems that the gap in Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetics Thriving And Living Longer

Type 1 Diabetics Thriving And Living Longer

People who have thrived with Type 1 diabetes for 50 years or more are inspiring doctors in Toronto to investigate why and how they've accomplished the feat in order to help other patients. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that stops the pancreas from producing the hormone we need to use carbohydrates as fuel. People with Type 1 diabetes must inject insulin to prevent serious illness or death. The life expectancy for those with Type 1 diabetes may be shortened by as much as 15 years, according to the Canadian Diabetes Association. "In the 1940s, roughly half of people with Type 1 diabetes were getting end-stage kidney disease in their 40s and dying in their 40s," said Dr. Bruce Perkins, an endocrinologist at Toronto’s Mount Sinai Hospital. Diabetes longevity A U.S. modelling estimate based on data from the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications suggests that the life expectancy at birth for someone diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes between 1965 and 1980 was estimated to be 68.8 years compared to 72.4 years for the general population. In comparison, for someone diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes between 1950 and 1964, the estimated life expectancy at birth was 53.4 years. Most Canadian provinces lack diabetes registries. That’s why researchers aren’t able to identify the type of diabetes someone has using billing codes and administrative databases. Perkins is leading the Diabetes Longevity Study — the first Canadian study of its kind looking at the personal experiences of Canadians who have lived with Type 1 diabetes for 50 years or more. Perkins attributes their success to "relentless vigilance of taking care of their diabetes." "These are people who’ve managed that vigilance to take such good care of themselves to manage that fine balance of blood Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

A person with type 1 diabetes cannot produce insulin themselves, so needs to take insulin to manage their blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetes is known as an autoimmune condition, because the body's defences - the immune system - wrongly attacks the cells in the pancreas responsible for making insulin. Although the condition usually appears before the age of 40 and more than half the people with type 1 are diagnosed under the age of 15, type 1 diabetes may occur at any age, according to Diabetes UK. Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2 diabetes and accounts for around 10% of the UK's 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes, according to Diabetes UK. Insulin and type 1 diabetes Normally, the hormone insulin is secreted by the pancreas. When you eat a meal, sugar (glucose) from food stimulates the pancreas to release insulin. The amount that is released is proportional to the amount that is required by the size of that particular meal. Insulin's main role is to help move certain nutrients - especially sugar - into the cells of the body's tissues. Cells use sugars and other nutrients from meals as a source of energy to function. The amount of sugar in the blood decreases once it enters the cells. Normally that signals the beta cells in the pancreas to reduce the amount of insulin secreted so that you don't develop low blood sugar levels ( hypoglycaemia). But the destruction of the beta cells that occurs with type 1 diabetes throws the entire process into disarray. In people with type 1 diabetes, sugar isn't moved into the cells because insulin is not available. When sugar builds up in the blood instead of going into cells, the body's cells are starved of nutrients. This means other systems in the body must provide energy for many important bodily functions. As a re Continue reading >>

Life Expectancy Of A Dog With Diabetes

Life Expectancy Of A Dog With Diabetes

If your dog's been diagnosed with diabetes, don't assume he won't be around much longer. The life expectancy of a dog with diabetes depends on various factors, including his age at diagnosis. Your willingness to treat him by giving daily insulin injections and his response to them are major considerations in your pet's prognosis. Without treatment, dogs might develop diabetes-related conditions, including blindness, and likely will die from the disease. Canine diabetes mellitus occurs when a dog's pancreas no longer produces sufficient insulin, a hormone necessary for glucose regulation, or his body no longer uses it effectively. The result is a soaring level of blood sugar. Diabetes symptoms include excessive drinking and urination, with increased appetite but subsequent weight loss. Your dog's breath might smell unusually sweet, and he may develop skin infections. Eye issues, especially cataracts, could indicate diabetes. The disease most often appears in middle-aged and older canines, with overweight animals at a higher risk. Fortunately, insulin injections and dietary changes can allow your pet to live a relatively normal life. Proper treatment of a dog with diabetes is a big commitment. Your commitment to your dog affects his prognosis. It's not so much giving him the once or twice daily insulin injections along with his food, but maintaining a consistent schedule. If work or other obligations means you can't always give your dog his injection and food at approximately the same times each day, you'll have to find someone who can do it for you. That means vacations and business trips require extra planning for dog care. Your vet might know of a reputable pet sitter who can give your dog insulin injections. You must bring your dog to the vet for regular monitoring, e Continue reading >>

Best Ways To Increase Diabetes Life Expectancy

Best Ways To Increase Diabetes Life Expectancy

With diabetes becoming more prevalent, our children, for the first time in history, could have a shorter life expectancy than their parents. This doesn’t have to be. On average, diabetes will shorten life expectancy 7.5 years (for diabetic men aged 50) to 8.2 years (for diabetic women of 50). But you don’t have to be “average.” Typically, less than 60% of diabetics take medications correctly. So following the doctor’s orders is one step to beating the odds. Also, most people aren’t living healthy. Be different! Don’t skip health screenings, practice good nutrition, stay active. Here are some tips to get started. It is shocking how many people get medicine prescribed by a doctor and then simply don't take it. Medications (and surgery) are the main tools that doctors have to help people get well. If you have been prescribed medication (or lifestyle changes), the single best thing you can do for your life expectancy and to manage your diabetes is, well, take your medicine. It's not as easy as it sounds -- take some time to read up on how to create a strong, daily medication habit. Diabetes can wreak havoc with your circulation and your feet are one of the first places to show damage. One thing you can do to prevent damage to your feet when you have diabetes is to wash your feet daily in warm water, use lots of moisturizer, check your feet carefully for blisters and other problems and, most importantly, make sure your shoes actually fit. Making sure your shoes fit, are comfortable and don't damage your feet of one of the simplest things you can do to live better with diabetes. Everyone needs to exercise, but people with diabetes not only need to exercise to increase their life expectancy and improve their health (just like everyone else), people with diabetes Continue reading >>

Shorter Life Expectancy Persists In Type 1 Diabetes

Shorter Life Expectancy Persists In Type 1 Diabetes

For best viewing, click the bottom right corner for full screen. BARCELONA -- Differences in life expectancy between patients with type 1 diabetes and the general population have come down over the past few decades, but wide gaps still remain, researchers reported here. In an analysis of Scottish data, men and women with type 1 diabetes had shorter life expectancy than the general population -- a gap of about 11 years for men and 14 years for women when measured in their early 20s, according to Helen Colhoun, MD, MBBCh, of the University of Dundee in Scotland, and colleagues. That's a much smaller gap than the 27-year difference reported in a 1975 analysis, but more work needs to be done to minimize the discrepancy, Colhoun said during a press briefing at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes meeting here. "It's very good news for people with type 1 diabetes that there has been a substantial reduction in the difference in life expectancy ... in this dataset compared with historical reports in the literature," Colhoun said. "Clearly, changes in the care of people with type 1 diabetes are having an impact in driving down the mortality disadvantage suffered by people with type 1 diabetes." "But more work is needed to drive down even further the differences in life expectancy between people with type 1 diabetes and the general population," she added, "and we also need to try to understand why those differences are slightly worse for women than they are for men." Colhoun said there have been few large-scale evaluations of life expectancy in type 1 diabetes, with the largest from the 1970s. To attain more current estimates, the researchers looked at data on 24,971 patients from Scotland with the disease -- a cohort in which there were 1,079 deaths. They then comp Continue reading >>

Life Expectancy Increases For People With Type 1

Life Expectancy Increases For People With Type 1

An Australian study finds people with Type 1 are living longer, but not as long as the average population. A new study on life expectancy and Type 1 diabetes has brought results that can be seen as glass half-empty or glass half-full. The bad news is that life expectancy for people with Type 1 is still shorter than that of the average population; the good news is that people with Type 1 are living longer than ever before. For the study, Australian researchers used government data to measure the life expectancy of people with Type 1 from 1997 to 2010, according to a report in Diabetes in Control. By the end of the study period, men with Type 1 had gained an average of 1.9 years in life expectancy, while women with Type 1 had gained 1.5 years in the same time period. People with Type 1 still had a life expectancy that was 12 years shorter, on average, than that of the average population, however. Researchers attribute the gains in lifespan to rapid medical advances, emerging research, and deepening understanding of Type 1 diabetes. When it comes to children with Type 1, more children are being diagnosed earlier, and intensive insulin therapy is beginning at a younger age to get blood sugar levels under control. Also, insulin pump and blood sugar monitoring technology has improved greatly in the 21st century, creating the possibility for better long-term blood sugar control. With the promise of the development of new therapeutic techniques and smarter pumps, there’s hope that the gap in life expectancy between those with and without Type 1 can continue to close. Thanks for reading this Insulin Nation article. Want more Type 1 news? Subscribe here. Have Type 2 diabetes or know someone who does? Try Type 2 Nation, our sister publication. Continue reading >>

How Long Will I Live Calculator - Health And Diet

How Long Will I Live Calculator - Health And Diet

BACK Academic Research on Longevity We’ve broken this into two sections: information the dietary habits that lead to longer life expectancies and how disease factors into life expectancy. A HEALTHY DIET Here’s a summary of the dietary habits scientific research has shown to have a meaningful impact on how long you’ll live. So much to digest! There’s a lot of information about the drinking habits and diet that can help you live longer. It can be overwhelming to figure out what’s reliable and what’s not proven by the data. Our approach? Ignore the fads and the faux science and focus on the findings that have held up under rigorous scientific and medical tests. Here’s some of the most reputable peer-reviewed research that has appeared in medical journals tying certain diets and drinking habits to longevity. A Diet Rich in Superfoods The European Food Information Council (EUFIC) defines a superfood as “a nutrient-rich food considered to be especially beneficial for health and well-being.” Basically, superfoods are foods with health benefits that go beyond the simple nourishment of other foods. While the list of superfoods seems to be constantly changing, a few key players make the list time and time again. These include blueberries (which are especially rich in antioxidants), pomegranate juice (which lowers blood pressure and the risk of blood clots), green tea (an especially good agent in weight loss and preventing gastrointestinal cancers) and salmon (which has immense cardiovascular benefits, and aids in joint pain relief.) In a study from researchers at The University of California San Francisco School of Medicine Dr. Lynda Frassetto spoke to a low-acid diet, full of vegetables, some fruits, nuts, and lean meats. This diet lowers blood pressure, improv Continue reading >>

Pricks And Needles: What Living With Type 1 Diabetes Is Like

Pricks And Needles: What Living With Type 1 Diabetes Is Like

Type 1 diabetes, a rarer form of the chronic disease, affects three million Americans. Here's one of them. Back in early 2001, I was a happy, but slightly overweight, 13-year-old boy. Just before the summer I decided to start eating less junk food in hopes of shedding a couple of pounds from my 135-pound frame. I got results quickly -- and my weight kept dropping. Looking back, the signs that something was amiss were obvious. I couldn't make it through 50-minute class periods in middle school without having to run off and pee. It felt like my thirst could never be satiated. I was always tired. But the weight loss was the most obvious sign. Weight kept coming off. 125 pounds, 120, 115. My parents called my pediatrician, but diabetes never came up as a potential cause. An unusual teenage growth spurt prior to puberty was a possibility. An eating disorder was also suggested. By the time I arrived for my annual physical on Nov. 6, 2001, none of my clothes fit and I weighed just 98 pounds -- nearly 30 percent less than my peak weight. More phone calls and doctors' appointments revealed nothing. Back at home after the appointment, I hopped in the shower but was almost immediately interrupted by my mom. The doctor's office called with results from my blood test and I had to get to the emergency room. When I checked into the hospital, my blood sugar was 971. The normal range is 80-150. The doctors said I would have fallen into a diabetic coma within another week. Back then, diabetes seemed like a death sentence. My whole life routine would have to change. I would have to check my blood glucose at least five times a day and stick myself with needles at least four times a day. But for the past ten years, I've been living with an illness that could shorten my life expectancy by 15 Continue reading >>

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