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How Much Does It Cost To Get A Diabetic Alert Dog?

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For more information on this, visit the link below: http://www.amazon.com/Dogs-Diabetes-S... Warning Signs of Diabetes in Dogs 1. Weakness or Fatigue 2. Increased Thirst 3. Increased Urination 4. Increased Hunger 5. Sudden Weight Loss 6. Obesity 7. Thinning or Dull Hair 8. Cloudy Eyes 9. Vomiting http://www.care2.com/greenliving/10-w... Nicolas, selected from petMD Amazon link: http://www.amazon.com/Dogs-Diabetes-S... Is your dog consuming lots of water...more than you think is normal? Eating too much? Frequently urinating? He might have diabetes. Sugar diabetes, more specifically known as canine diabetes, is a common disease to dogs. It is a hormonal disorder that affects dogs of ages 5 to 9. Some species like German Shepherd, Poodles, Keeshonden and Golden Retrievers register the highest incidence of this disease. Obese dogs also stand a greater risk of being diabetic. The ratio of female to male infected with the disease is 3:1. This book addresses the most conspicuous symptoms of diabetes in dogs, the main causes, and how to effectively treat it.

Service Dogs Of Virginia

How do we make a Service Dog? Dedicated volunteers called “Puppy Raisers” raise and train potential service dogs in their own homes for the first 12 months of the dog’s life. At 12 months of age, dogs are returned to SDV for Advanced Training. During this time, the dogs are assessed to be matched with the appropriate person on the waiting list. We use operant conditioning as our training system. This is a positive training approach that teaches dogs to think and enjoy their work. Team Training occurs when the dogs are ready to be placed with their person, and clients come to the training center for a two-week intensive training period where they learn how to work with their dog. Our autism service dog training continues in the family’s home for additional preparation to work with the child. How does someone get a Service Dog? Contact us via mail, phone, or email. Submit a completed application and a $50 application fee. How much does a Service Dogs cost? It costs Service Dogs of Virginia approximately $40,000 over a two year period to purchase, raise, train, and place a service dog. There is a $50 application fee and a $500 fee for supplies at the time of placement. SDV rel Continue reading >>

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  1. music_rox84120

    Hey! I'm new to this blog forum. I was recently diagnosed 2 1/2 months ago. I was wondering if there was a time limit on how long you needed diabetes in order to get a dog. Also, my husband and I live in a condo that doesn't allow pets. I assume this would be an exception? If anyone knows, let me know. Thanks.

  2. Timbeak48

    Do you have lots of lows and can't feel them coming on? That's the biggest reason to have an alert dog. I'm just surprised if you do have lots of lows, because it's rare in a newbie.
    That being said, the longer you stay low, the less you will be able to tell when you are going low or are low. It's called "hypoglycemic blindness." The best way to get out of that cycle is to get your blood glucose up (sometimes even a little high) and eliminate lows.

    Over time, many diabetics lose the ability to tell when they are going low. That's why I test and many of us have CGMs. The CGM can often alert you that you're headed down and you can take steps to stop the plummeting BG. Alert dogs can tell when you're going low, too--but I don't have to feed my CGM Purina!

  3. music_rox84120

    Oh those are good points. I don't think I have problems knowing when I get low. It's mainly when I get high, unfortunately. I just don't always know it. Anyway, I don't have a CGM yet, but I'm not sure I'm ready to be a cyborg (as my uncle says) I just do MDI currently. I probably am not in need of it, after all

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Service Dog Academy - www.servicedogacademy.com Diabetic Alert Dog University - www.diabeticalertdoguniversity.com

There Are 5 Core Foundations Of The Diabetic Alert Dog 101tm Program

1. Stably temperamented dogs. Dogs need to be free from all signs of aggression and anxiety. 2. Affordable training. It shouldnt cost you $25,000 to train your own dog for diabetic alert. There has to be a better way. Thats where the Diabetic Alert Dog 101TM program comes in handy. 3. Ensuring that our dogs are happy and are allowed to be dogs. Some service dog organizations have a 75% drop out rate. Some of these dogs are dropped from the program for being unable to shut down everything that is dog about a dog. We think dogs should be allowed to play with other dogs, that dogs should be allowed to play with a ball or engage in a little telephone pole sniffing every once and a while. What is so wrong with that? We think there has to be a middle ground between robot dogs and ill behaved dogs. 4. Training using strict positive reinforcement methodologies. Dominance methodology creates a confrontational relationship with your dog. Do you really want to train a dog that is supposed to be saving your life in a confrontational manner? No way! If you wouldnt do it to your two year old, why would you do it to your dog? What the Diabetic Alert Dog 101TM training methodology creates is a dog Continue reading >>

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  1. FartyBanana

    This is Duncan the Service dog. He alerts his owner by bumping him with his nose when he senses that his blood glucose levels are out of range. Another alert/response he has been trained to do is to bring a juice box to his owner when they are at home. This has actually saved my friend's life once when he fell into a paralyzed-like state and couldn't get up. Duncan brought him a juice box and he was able to get his glucose back up.
    Edit: holy crap I wasn't expecting this! I just want to address some common questions:

    He'll close the damn fridge if you tell him to. He can open and shut doors, but he's gonna make sure you're solid first. He is apparently no longer asked to shut the fridge due to his nails scratching the stainless steel.

    I termed it a "paralyzed-like" state for lack of knowing what to call it. He was more "stuck" and needed some help. He wasn't stable enough to stand, but had use of his arms.

    We don't really know why exactly Duncan brought me a juice, as he isn't supposed to do that for other people. I remember that I was starving at the time, so my sugar was probably low, and my friend had stepped out for a few minutes, so he probably just didn't know what to do. "You smell that way that Dad isn't supposed to smell like. Here's a juice."

    If you want to help with service dogs, look into a training facility near you. If you can't give monetary donations, volunteers are usually needed.

  2. styroducky

    How does he sense glucose levels?

  3. FartyBanana

    It is a scent. The trainers provide scent samples, preferably from the future owner of the dog, though sometimes they obtain them from volunteers. My friend would actually ziplock and freeze a shirt he was wearing when he was out of range and mail it to the company to use to train with.

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Learn how to train your service dog to alert you to sounds (hearing alerts) and do diabetic and other medical alerts. Note the star (*) indicates when the clicker marks the behavior. Note that barking is not a behavior that is desirable for an alert behavior for assistance dogs. In public is is disruptful and is only used for emergencies to call attention to a person that needs help. Look for our two way alert video and check out a detailed 'how to' description on our blog: http://viassistancedogs.blogspot.com/... Book a Skype or FaceTime session to have all your questions about service dogs and training them answered. http://servicedogtraininginstitute.ca... Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/E6YL/

Diabetic Alert Dogs

A flight from Pittsburgh back to her desert home near Bakersfield, California, could have turned deadly for type 1 diabetic Patti Kasper had she not had her trusty service dog, Tzaylie, by her side. “There we were, mid-air, and Tzaylie, which actually translates to ‘my shadow’ in Hebrew, starts to alert me like crazy,” Patti says, explaining that, as a diabetic alert dog, her beloved four-and-a-half-year-old black Labrador Retriever is trained to give a paw when she senses her master’s blood sugar levels are about to go or are going out of range. A second paw means high or going high while a nudge of the nose means low or going low—both dangerous situations that could result in seizures, comas, and even death. Tzaylie is also trained to retrieve third-party support, get food and medication—such as glucose tabs, insulin, juice, and meters—and even dial 911 on a special device. “It took an entire bag of dried pineapple and four glasses of orange juice to get me back to normal, and I wouldn’t even have known it if it hadn’t been for her,” Patti continues. “She really saved my life that day—and saved hundreds of other passengers the inconvenience of having t Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. music_rox84120

    Hey! I'm new to this blog forum. I was recently diagnosed 2 1/2 months ago. I was wondering if there was a time limit on how long you needed diabetes in order to get a dog. Also, my husband and I live in a condo that doesn't allow pets. I assume this would be an exception? If anyone knows, let me know. Thanks.

  2. Timbeak48

    Do you have lots of lows and can't feel them coming on? That's the biggest reason to have an alert dog. I'm just surprised if you do have lots of lows, because it's rare in a newbie.
    That being said, the longer you stay low, the less you will be able to tell when you are going low or are low. It's called "hypoglycemic blindness." The best way to get out of that cycle is to get your blood glucose up (sometimes even a little high) and eliminate lows.

    Over time, many diabetics lose the ability to tell when they are going low. That's why I test and many of us have CGMs. The CGM can often alert you that you're headed down and you can take steps to stop the plummeting BG. Alert dogs can tell when you're going low, too--but I don't have to feed my CGM Purina!

  3. music_rox84120

    Oh those are good points. I don't think I have problems knowing when I get low. It's mainly when I get high, unfortunately. I just don't always know it. Anyway, I don't have a CGM yet, but I'm not sure I'm ready to be a cyborg (as my uncle says) I just do MDI currently. I probably am not in need of it, after all

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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