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How Much Does It Cost To Care For A Dog With Diabetes?

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PET Scan kya hai and kaise kaam karta hai? PET scan explained in hindi. Positron emission tomography explained in hindi How CT Scan works? https://youtu.be/6_7NIbpXyrQ

Coverage For Chronic Pet Conditions

Whether your cat suffers from asthma or your dog has a much more serious condition like diabetes, it can easily cost many thousands of dollars to help them have a high quality of life. That cost is nothing to wheeze at! Fortunately, Healthy Paws Pet Insurance covers chronic conditions for the life of your pet. Chronic conditions in dogs and cats Most of the chronic conditions that humans deal with can cause our pets just as much, if not more pain and aggravation. These treatments can run into the thousands of dollars each year! Please note that chronic condition coverage only applies to chronic conditions that are not pre-existing. Both dogs and cats can suffer from these chronic conditions: Allergies Diabetes Obesity Cancer IBD (inflammatory bowel disease) These chronic conditions are more common in dogs: Dry eyes Glaucoma Hypothyroidism Arthritis These chronic conditions are more common in cats: Asthma Chronic upper respiratory issues Lower urinary tract disease Herpes Hyperthyroidism With far too many chronic diseases to list here, many of which can manifest at any age and are more prevalent in certain dog breeds, it really pays to be prepared. Get your instant pet insurance quo Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Susan F.

    How can I best care for my diabetic insulin-dependent dog without losing my mind (and all my money)?

    I live alone with my 7 year old dog and the strict 12 hour dosing schedule is almost impossible for me. I don't work, but any pair of times interferes with the occasional evening event, or daytime activity I want to plan. He was diagnosed in January and I thought I was doing okay until I was away recently for a week and I discovered an exhilarating lack of unrecognized stress in myself. Also, his care is expensive, with insulin, regular vet visits and tests, prescription food, antihistamines, etc etc etc. I'm on a fixed income. I have no family or friends who can help me out. I can't afford to leave him often with the wonderful http://Rover.com sitter I found.

  2. Susan F.

    I did check all the resources for financial assistance. I found lots of places that will help with acute needs, but none for chronic illness. I also had an offer to help me find a no-kill shelter. Looking for a poodle group is a great idea. I will check.

  3. Kathryn B.

    What prescription food are you feeding? I have learned in my years at working in a pet store that often prescription foods are not actually that great in quality. There is a food called Nulo I highly recommend looking into. It is low in glycemic index and great for diabetic dogs! I am not sure how it compares in price to your current food, however because such a great amount of protein comes from animal sources like eggs and meat instead of peas you don't feed as much as a lot of other foods because your dog is retaining more nutrients! Some pet stores will price beat others or have coupons/other deals. You may even be able to contact Nulo for a manufacturers coupon!

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Full body PET scan in hindi || PET || full body PET Scan for cancer diagnosis What is PET scan machine? https://youtu.be/8yNQvUu3NpE

Periodontal Disease - Why The Fine Print In Your Pet Insurance Plan Matters

In our series - Why The Fine Print In Your Pet Insurance Plan Matters - we are educating customers on loopholes in their dog insurance or cat insurance plans which could cause disappointment in coverage down the line. You can download our entire Pet Insurance Guide: Why The Fine Print Matters. Today's topic: Periodontal Disease What is this? Periodontal disease is essentially a gum disease which can be devastating to your dog’s mouth. Symptoms can include pain, inflamed gums, tissue destruction, bone loss and loss of teeth. Plus, periodontal disease is five times more likely in pets than in humans. There are studies stating 80% of dogs have some stage or periodontal disease by age 3. Periodontal disease can also lead to other issues like diabetes and heart disease. How does this affect you? As you can imagine, once your dog has developed periodontal disease and will need continued treatment, cleanings and possibly tooth extractions, the costs can definitely add up. Especially, if you pet develops a secondary condition like heart disease or diabetes from periodontal disease. Even if an insurer covers heart disease and diabetes, since it is caused by the periodontal disease they do Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Susan F.

    How can I best care for my diabetic insulin-dependent dog without losing my mind (and all my money)?

    I live alone with my 7 year old dog and the strict 12 hour dosing schedule is almost impossible for me. I don't work, but any pair of times interferes with the occasional evening event, or daytime activity I want to plan. He was diagnosed in January and I thought I was doing okay until I was away recently for a week and I discovered an exhilarating lack of unrecognized stress in myself. Also, his care is expensive, with insulin, regular vet visits and tests, prescription food, antihistamines, etc etc etc. I'm on a fixed income. I have no family or friends who can help me out. I can't afford to leave him often with the wonderful http://Rover.com sitter I found.

  2. Susan F.

    I did check all the resources for financial assistance. I found lots of places that will help with acute needs, but none for chronic illness. I also had an offer to help me find a no-kill shelter. Looking for a poodle group is a great idea. I will check.

  3. Kathryn B.

    What prescription food are you feeding? I have learned in my years at working in a pet store that often prescription foods are not actually that great in quality. There is a food called Nulo I highly recommend looking into. It is low in glycemic index and great for diabetic dogs! I am not sure how it compares in price to your current food, however because such a great amount of protein comes from animal sources like eggs and meat instead of peas you don't feed as much as a lot of other foods because your dog is retaining more nutrients! Some pet stores will price beat others or have coupons/other deals. You may even be able to contact Nulo for a manufacturers coupon!

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BRZZSQS - homemade dog food 10 tips for making homemade dog food tip 1 - Make sure you chop or grind the vegetables up really well. Keep in mind that dogs have a shorter intestinal tract. They also don't chew their food as much as we do. Both of these factors affect food breakdown and the amount of nutrients being absorbed. Make sure you chop or grind the vegetables up really well. article: http://turtlewoman.hubpages.com/hub/H... tip 2 - Poultry, Meats, and Fish Are Excellent Sources of Protein Use protein sources that you would use in your regular diet, but stay away from bean sources of protein such as soy, as well as pork, as they can be difficult for your dog to digest. Choose poultry, and red meats such as beef, lamb, venison or even buffalo. article: How to Find Good Protein Sources for Dogs | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_2212985_find-... tip 3 -make sure your dog gets enough calcium Calcium is generally one of the deficiency concerns when feeding a homemade dog food recipe diet. Calcium is also found in broccoli, spinach, and kelp seaweed. You may supplement calcium with plain yogurt, cheese, egg shells, and sardines. article: http://turtlewoman.hubpages.com/hub/H... tip 4 Add Omega 3 Fatty Acids Into Your Dogs Diet Omega 3 fatty acids are found in salmon fish oil. Omega-3 fatty acids are used to control inflammation and maintain joint health. The most bioavailable Omegs 3 appears to be salmon oil. article: http://www.dogarthritisblog.info/trea... tip 5 Avoid feeding your dog chocolate Chocolate in any form is as dangerous to a dog as caffeine. The darker the chocolate, the higher the danger to the dog. The chemical theobromide present in cocoa can cause damage to the kidneys, heart, lungs and the central nervous system.Typical symptoms include seizures, tremors, and over-excitement, diarrhea, vomiting, hyperthermia, abnormal heart rhythm and coma Tip 6 - Add Probiotics to You Dogs diet for Better Digestion Adding a probiotic to your dogs food helps reduce gas, control loose stools, help in some cases of diarrhea, and may be helpful in constipation. Probiotics are also suggested for dogs that have skin problems that may be secondary to digestive problems. article: http://drmark1961.hubpages.com/hub/do... Tip 7 A scratching dog is a sign of food allergies Dogs can develop allergies to their food, just like humans can. Of all allergies that dogs experience, about 10% are caused by food. 20% of itching is caused by food allergies and another 20% by food allergies with atopy . article: http://barbara-kay.hubpages.com/hub/F... TIP 8 - FEED YOUR DOG RAW BONES Perhaps you have heard that there are several different types of bones you should never feed your dog. There are a few, but typically any bone in raw form is going to be safe for your dog. Much to most owner's amazement and initial disbelief this includes chicken bones, turkey bones, lamb bones and even oxtails, all fed in a natural raw state. In addition whole fish, including the head, can also be fed to dogs on raw food diets. These bones are known as the soft bones and the dog will actually chew and eat the bone, bone marrow and the attached meat. The only bones to avoid are those that that break into shards. This only happens when they have had their nutrients depleted from heat. article: http://julieannamos.hubpages.com/hub/... TIP 9 Use brown rice flour in homemade dog food recipes Use of brown rice flour is advised as it is easily digestible.Avoid white flour as there is no worthy nutrient content when compared to whole grain. Flour made from whole grains like rice, wheat, oats, etc can be used. article: http://EzineArticles.com/6453873 Tip 10 - Avoid Soy and By-products According to the Rodale Instituteavoid soy because it leads to bloat, which is potentially fatal in dogs. Rodale advises you to skip anything labeled as a "byproduct" because it is a leftover waste product resulting from the removal of the more nutritional aspects of the original product. article: http://pets.thenest.com/veterinary-ad... dog eating bone phot0 http://s4.hubimg.com/u/1166971_f520.jpg dog with carrot photo http://www.rodale.com/files/images/do... probiotic photo http://www.baselinenutritionals.com/p... For more great homemade dog food information, recipes, and ideas go here now http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BRZZSQS

Paying For Pet Emergencies: The Importance Of A Financial Plan For Your Dog

There’s no question you are a responsible pet owner. You’ve taken all the steps to create a safe environment and are vigilant about keeping your pet healthy. However, no matter how much you prepare, there is always the possibility that your pet will develop an unexpected illness or become accidentally injured, prompting an unplanned trip to the vet. And it’s important to have a financial plan in place if this happens. Many pet owners still don’t understand how expensive it can be to treat an unexpected illness or injury. Here are some actual pet emergencies and the costs associated with treatment: Cat bite abscess (cat): $1,250 Hit-by-car (dog): $5,600 Urethral obstruction (cat): $2,700 Toxin ingestion (ate mushrooms, dog): $6,500 Heatstroke (dog): $4,200 Gastrointestinal foreign body surgery (ate a diaper, dog): $3,275 Vomiting and diarrhea (pancreatitis, dog): $3,000 Diabetic Ketoacidosis (cat): $4,600 Back surgery for ruptured disc (dog): $5,600 These are just a few examples of actual emergency costs, and though many emergencies have a lower price tag, plenty have a higher one, as well. It’s important to consider how you would handle such situations before they happen Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Issabellasmum

    Hi everyone I'm completely new to diabetes looking for some guidance and help with this, my 11yr old border collie Issabella has been diagnosed with diabetes and today we gave her the first insulin injection .
    Our main concern after her well being is the cost of this illness and it's treatment . At the present time it's costing £60 approx per two weeks for syringes and insulin ,never mind vets fees blood tests etc any advice on how we could save on the cost would be greatly appreciated .
    Many thanks
    Issabellasmum

  2. noblehead

    Do you have pet insurance, most policies will cover you for conditions like diabetes.

  3. Issabellasmum

    No we do not have insurance

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