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How Much Does It Cost To Care For A Dog With Diabetes?

Type You Support Group

Type You Support Group

Frequently asked questions about Medical Assistance & Diabetic Alert Dogs What is a Service dog and why does it have special rights for access? Service dogs are individually trained to perform tasks for people with disabilities – such as guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling wheelchairs, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, or performing other special tasks. The Americans with Disabilities Act provides public access rights for these dogs and their disabled handlers. What is the difference between a Medical Assistance Dog, a Diabetic Alert Assistance Dog and a Medical Response Dog? Medical Assistance Dogs are service dogs that have been trained to respond to an identifiable element that is available to their senses in order to support the medical condition of their handler. Diabetic Alert Assistance Dogs are a specific type of Medical Assistance Dog that has been trained to use their highly sensitive scent capabilities to identify the changes in blood chemistry that occur during rapid changes in blood sugar levels. Medical Response Dogs are another type of Medical Assistance Dog that has been trained to assist persons based on recognition of symptoms pertaining to a specific medical condition. The differences between medical alert and medical response training is the trigger that the dog has been trained to identify. In the case of a Diabetic Alert Dog, the trigger is the change in blood chemistry, allowing the diabetic to treat hypoglycemia prior to becoming symptomatic. A Medical Response Dog for diabetes responds to the handler as symptoms are occurring. D4D’s testing and experience with its clients has shown that there is a 15 to 30 minute difference in this response. How can the dog notify its handler when it se Continue reading >>

How Much Does Cataract Surgery Cost For Dogs?

How Much Does Cataract Surgery Cost For Dogs?

Eye specialists typically do this complicated surgery. I would try getting an estimate from a vet teaching hospital to see if their cost is lower. They may be able to have a resident do the surgery... 1 Person found this answer helpful The only treatment for cataract is surgery. Your dog should be able to adopt to impaired vision. It should not affect his quality of life. 2 People found this answer helpful It is impossible to answer this question as fees vary from hospital to hospital. I would suggest calling several local hospitals and asking for an estimate for the cost of the surgery. As this should usually be done by a specialist the cost is quite high. Anywhere between 2000$-3500$ per ear.Make sure the surgery is indeed necessary before going through with it, as sometimes long... I am afraid it is impossible to answer this - it depends on the nature of the injury and any other complicating factors, the extent of the surgery and aftercare required, your location and the level... 1 Person found this answer helpful Dog cataracts are very much like people cataracts in that the actual lens of the eye goes through derangement (changes) that cause it to no longer be functional for the dogs vision. The way topical... 4 People found this answer helpful It depends on what area you live in and what type of surgery you're talking about (there are a few different procedures that can be done for a dislocated hip), but in my area, normal cost for that... 4 People found this answer helpful It depends, prices can vary from one vet to another. I wiuld recommend seeing one that has got lots of experience with Bulldogs and high standards of care. MollI had cataract surgery and back surgery recently. Been home about 3 wks. She started panting recently. Would like to know why? Panting i Continue reading >>

Pet Inflation: How Owning A Cat Or A Dog Will Cost You £17k Over Its Life

Pet Inflation: How Owning A Cat Or A Dog Will Cost You £17k Over Its Life

‘A dog is for life, not just for Christmas.’ A popular phrase etched into our vocabulary from a 1970s charity campaign to make people aware that they shouldn't impulse buy a puppy without thinking about the long-term impact. And one of those long-term impacts is the financial implications having a pet, especially a cat or a dog, entails – they do not come cheap. The average lifetime cost of owning a dog today stands at around £16,900 and for a cat £17,200, according to research by Sainsbury’s pet insurance. And it's set to get even more expensive. The average annual cost of owning a dog is currently £1,183. However, pet inflation will bump this up over its lifetime. When you take into account inflation and rising costs, if you bought a new puppy today, Sainsbury’s estimate the annual cost could easily rise by about 20 per cent to £1,418 during its life expectancy, which is on average 13 years. This would take the cost of owning a dog to nearly £18,500 in its lifetime. This research also doesn't take into account how much the dog cost to buy to start with - some would-be dog owners in the UK can expect to pay £700 or more for a pedigree pup who will often enjoy the best of everything, even when times are hard. The average annual cost of owning a cat is slightly lower at £1,028, but this could increase to annual cost of £1,270 in 15 years’ time – the average life expectancy of a pet cat in the UK. This equates to an increase of 23.5 per cent in the annual cost of owning a cat and means a feline friend would set you back over £19,000 in its lifetime. Where does the money go? Sainsbury’s research found that food accounts for around 33.7 per cent of the average spend on a pet dog and 41 per cent for a pet cat. Vet fees account for 15 per cent for a d Continue reading >>

The Cost Of Having A Diabetic Dog

The Cost Of Having A Diabetic Dog

Here, the cost of having a diabetic dog will be discussed. Insulin Dogs that are diabetic are unable to regulate their blood sugar after meals, due to insufficient insulin in their bloodstream. Therefore, pet owners must inject insulin into their pets once or twice daily. The amount of insulin required will depend both on dog’s size, and the severity of his or her diabetes. The monthly cost of insulin for most pet owners ranges $20 - $90. Syringes Insulin is injected with a sterile syringe, which cannot be reused. Depending how much insulin is required by your pet, the monthly syringe cost is $8 - $16. Glucose Meter Pet owners have one of two options: they can purchase a glucose meter for testing their pets at home, or travel to the veterinarian for low-cost testing. The cost of a glucose machine ranges from $20 - $500, whereas owners will spend $10 - $40 per month (not to mention time spent driving) when performing testing at the veterinarian’s office. Lancets / Test Strips There are two methods for testing a dog’s blood sugar at home: via blood or urine. A blood test requires both lancets and testing strips, while a urine test may be more difficult to perform, but is painless. Altogether, pet owners can expect to pay $5 - $15 per month on these supplies. Diabetic Dog Food The cost of diabetic dog food is difficult to factor, because dogs must eat regardless of whether they are diabetic. However, dog food that is specifically suited for diabetic animals can be more expensive than a regular dog food formula. For instance, Hill’s Prescription Diet for Digestive / Weight / Glucose Management costs $80 for a 27.5 lb bag. Veterinary Visits Diabetic dogs will also cost require more veterinary visits than the average dog. Insulin prescriptions must be written every 3 Continue reading >>

Pet Expenses: How Much Does It Cost To Bring Up Fluffy?

Pet Expenses: How Much Does It Cost To Bring Up Fluffy?

Having a pet can be a wonderful experience. But pets come with expenses. Before you adopt a furry family member, make sure you know what to expect. Furry kids are less expensive than human kids but they can still cost a small fortune. Once you adopt a pet, their care is your responsibility so it’s a good idea to know what some of the expenses might be and to set money aside for them. Until he passed away in June, I had a kitty friend named Shadow. I got him as a tiny kitten while I was in college and we were together nearly half my life. He was a great cat and I love him but because he developed diabetes late in life, he cost me thousands of dollars. I would gladly spend every penny on him again but if I’m honest, it was one of the reasons I don’t think I’ll ever have a pet again. I would love it if every one of you would give an animal a good home. They bring so much love and pleasure into your life and you do the same for them. But because I know you all to be wonderful people, I know that if something went wrong with your friend, you would spend your last penny if it would help them. So if you would rather not be in that situation, please think twice about adopting. When I found out Shadow was diabetic, the vet asked if I wanted to give him up. I was appalled at the heartlessness of the question but I understand now that lots of people do give up their pet when they develop an illness. Especially a chronic one like diabetes that required twice daily insulin injections at precisely timed intervals. Even if your pet remains healthy all through their life, there are still costs. We’ll break down what they are so you can make an informed decision. Adoption Costs Please go the adoption route. There are so many animals that need a home. Even if you have your hear Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pets

Diabetes In Pets

Just like humans, pets can get diabetes, and unfortunately, it is gradually becoming more common. There are two types of diabetes. Diabetes insipidus is a rare condition that prevents the body from conserving water, and diabetes milletus is the body’s malfunction of sugar processing. This article will focus on diabetes milletus. What is it? Diabetes mellitus is defined by the pancreas’ inability to produce enough insulin. Insulin is needed for the body to efficiently process sugars, fats, and proteins. Who gets it? This condition typically occurs in middle-aged to older dogs and cats, but it can also occur in younger pets (which is usually genetic). Overweight animals and those with pancreas issues are at a higher risk of developing diabetes. Pets taking cortisone-type drugs may also be at a higher risk. Interestingly, it occurs more commonly in female dogs and male cats. What are the symptoms? Without proper insulin levels, the brain becomes deprived of sugar and the animal is constantly hungry. You may notice weight loss, excessive thirst and urination, and eating more than usual. Dogs may also develop cataracts. How is it treated? In severe cases, the pet may need intravenous fluids and rapid acting insulin. The long-term goal is to regulate the body’s insulin and treatment includes insulin injections once or twice a day. Oral medications may work for some cats. Untreated pets may develop infections in the bladder, kidneys, or skin. If completely left untreated, the condition can lead to malnutrition, dehydration, and death, but with treatment pets can live just as long as similar non-diabetic pets. How much does it cost? Monthly cost varies on your particular situation (if you do at-home testing vs. at the vet, whether you feed your pet a special diet, the cos Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs

Diabetes In Dogs

Around one in every five hundred dogs will develop diabetes over the course of their lives, and so it is worth learning a little bit about the condition and its symptoms, causes and treatments so that you can be aware of potential risk factors in your dog and act quickly if a problem develops. Read on to find out more. What is diabetes? In healthy dogs, the food which they eat is broken down into elements which fuel the body. The breakdown of carbohydrates produces glucose, which is absorbed by the intestine and then used to provide the energy that the dog needs to live. The absorption and conversion of glucose is regulated by a hormone called insulin, which is produced naturally by the pancreas, a gland located near to the intestine. A dog whose pancreas does not produce sufficient insulin or where the cells within their blood do not respond adequately to the insulin produced, causes the illness called diabetes mellitus, or 'sugar diabetes.' This leads to the cells being unable to absorb the necessary amount of glucose needed for healthy functionality, and causes excessively high levels of glucose in the blood. What dogs can get diabetes? While any breed or type of dog can develop diabetes, some breeds are considered to be more susceptible to it than others. The Samoyed and the Cairn terrier are considered to be two 'high risk' breeds, with various other popular breeds including the Bichon Frise, Poodle and Yorkshire terrier falling under the 'moderate risk' category. While genetic and hereditary traits are the leading cause of diabetes in dogs, illnesses and diseases such as Cushing's disease and some conditions which affect the pancreas may lead to its development as well. The use of steroids over prolonged periods of time can also affect insulin production and lead Continue reading >>

Pet Care Costs Can Top Human Medical Bills, New Report Reveals

Pet Care Costs Can Top Human Medical Bills, New Report Reveals

Pet owners may shell out as much — or more — money for their pets’ health care as they do for their own, a new report suggests. Pricey new technologies and more advanced treatment options drive up costs in many cases. For a clearer picture of the types of animal illnesses, accidents, and resulting costs that pet owners face, Healthy Paws Pet Insurance, a company that sells medical coverage for dogs and cats, crunched data from 215,000 claims submitted by their customers during a one-year period. According to their Cost of Pet Care 2016 report, the most common accidents and illnesses for dogs include stomach issues — often from ingesting dangerous human foods, such as chocolate and other sweets; skin conditions; ear and eye infections; growths; and chronic allergies and pain. Stomach and skin issues plague cats, too, as well as urinary tract infections, cancer, kidney disease, eye and ear conditions, and heart and respiratory problems. The report found stomach ailments in pets can cost more than $6,000 to diagnose and treat. Growths and lumps can tally upwards of $15,000. Heart surgeries can run as high as $20,000 and monthly medication bills can add up to more than $100. Even less life-threatening conditions can be expensive: ear infections can cost up to $250 a visit. Veterinarians rely on many of the same diagnostic tools and treatments that doctors use for human patients, including MRI and CT scans, hip and knee surgery, laser surgery, cancer vaccines, flu shots, ultrasound, and alternative medicine techniques such as acupuncture. “While advances in veterinary care are leading to more effective treatments for dogs and cats, the costs associated can become a big burden to pet parents,” Rob Jackson, co-founder of Healthy Paws Pet Insurance, said in a statem Continue reading >>

The True Cost Of Having A Diabetic Dog – Revisited

The True Cost Of Having A Diabetic Dog – Revisited

A reader commented on this post about The True Cost of Having a Diabetic Dog. After reading the article I thought I should make a few updates. It has been over a year and a half since I wrote that article, a lot has changed and I’ve learned a lot. Diabetes will be different for every dog. There are so many variables. Food, insulin production, metabolism, weight, etc… It is about finding the right combination of food, insulin, and exercise that works for your dog. Plus getting them down to the right weight. When I posted The True Cost of Having a Diabetic Dog Bender was overweight and my costs was roughly this for TWO months. 2 bag of W/D food 30lbs – $124 4 Vetsulin 10ml – $100 ($25/each) 124 needles – $14.26 (11.5 cents each) 10 testing strips – $10 ($1 each) Total: Roughly $250 for TWO months. As I became more aware of Bender’s diabetes and researched it I found ways to improve Bender’s diabetic regiment and cut costs without sacrificing. I learned that exercise plays a major role in managing diabetes. And also getting your dog down to a healthy weight. I learned that Hill’s Science Diet W/D was not the best food for diabetics (Many posts about it here). But at the time there wasn’t a good commercial food that didn’t cost the same or more as W/D so I started to make his own food. When that started to cost even more I searched for a good commercial food and found several natural foods, Wellness and Blue Buffalo (both healthy weight). With the switch I cut my cost down to $50. The next thing I found was Vetsulin was not stable, which is why it was pulled from the market. Since I’ve switched Bender to Humilin N I feel that it works much better than Vetsulin. He receives less insulin. His numbers are better and more constant. With Walmart’s ReliO Continue reading >>

Coverage For Chronic Pet Conditions

Coverage For Chronic Pet Conditions

Whether your cat suffers from asthma or your dog has a much more serious condition like diabetes, it can easily cost many thousands of dollars to help them have a high quality of life. That cost is nothing to wheeze at! Fortunately, Healthy Paws Pet Insurance covers chronic conditions for the life of your pet. Chronic conditions in dogs and cats Most of the chronic conditions that humans deal with can cause our pets just as much, if not more pain and aggravation. These treatments can run into the thousands of dollars each year! Please note that chronic condition coverage only applies to chronic conditions that are not pre-existing. Both dogs and cats can suffer from these chronic conditions: Allergies Diabetes Obesity Cancer IBD (inflammatory bowel disease) These chronic conditions are more common in dogs: Dry eyes Glaucoma Hypothyroidism Arthritis These chronic conditions are more common in cats: Asthma Chronic upper respiratory issues Lower urinary tract disease Herpes Hyperthyroidism With far too many chronic diseases to list here, many of which can manifest at any age and are more prevalent in certain dog breeds, it really pays to be prepared. Get your instant pet insurance quote today! I just had to post and say THANK YOU! Healthy Paws Pet Insurance is amazing when it comes to helping us give the best care we can to our furry loved ones! Continue reading >>

Periodontal Disease - Why The Fine Print In Your Pet Insurance Plan Matters

Periodontal Disease - Why The Fine Print In Your Pet Insurance Plan Matters

In our series - Why The Fine Print In Your Pet Insurance Plan Matters - we are educating customers on loopholes in their dog insurance or cat insurance plans which could cause disappointment in coverage down the line. You can download our entire Pet Insurance Guide: Why The Fine Print Matters. Today's topic: Periodontal Disease What is this? Periodontal disease is essentially a gum disease which can be devastating to your dog’s mouth. Symptoms can include pain, inflamed gums, tissue destruction, bone loss and loss of teeth. Plus, periodontal disease is five times more likely in pets than in humans. There are studies stating 80% of dogs have some stage or periodontal disease by age 3. Periodontal disease can also lead to other issues like diabetes and heart disease. How does this affect you? As you can imagine, once your dog has developed periodontal disease and will need continued treatment, cleanings and possibly tooth extractions, the costs can definitely add up. Especially, if you pet develops a secondary condition like heart disease or diabetes from periodontal disease. Even if an insurer covers heart disease and diabetes, since it is caused by the periodontal disease they don’t cover – those issues would be covered either. The average vet bill for a periodontal disease claim is $456.45, but we have seen surgeries for periodontal disease cost $5,367.16 for one pet parent last year. Where it really stacks up is with the secondary conditions. For example, a pet with diabetes will need continuing care and will need to visit the vet several times a year for treatment. The average bill for a diabetic visit is $363.04, which can run into the thousands easily. Heart diease is another chronic condition requiring on-going care for the rest of the pet’s life, and can Continue reading >>

Diabetes Alert Dogs: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes Alert Dogs: Everything You Need To Know

Note: This article has been reviewed by Dr. Dana Hardin MD, and Dr. Jennifer Cattet Ph.D. Many individuals with type 1 diabetes spend their days worrying about the possibility of having a low blood sugar level (hypoglycemia). Aside from frequent testing of blood glucose levels (self monitoring of blood glucose, SMBG), they may experience uncomfortable signs of hypoglycemia such as sweating, shaking, or confusion. These early symptoms of hypoglycemia are helpful, even though uncomfortable, because they help the person with diabetes know it is time to check their glucose level. Once the person checks and learns they are hypoglycemic, they are taught what food or drink to take to raise their blood sugar. If the low blood sugar is not treated in time, persistent hypoglycemia can lead to seizures, blackouts, or even coma. Unfortunately, over time (generally after 5 or so years) a person with 1 diabetes no longer feels symptoms when his/her blood glucose is low. This condition is known as Hypoglycemia Unawareness. When hypoglycemia unawareness develops, the person is at much greater risk for the development of persistent hyperglycemia and all of the dangerous problems listed above. Patients have reported feeling ok and not knowing they had low blood sugar until they wake up on the floor, or they have had a seizure. Some don’t realize what happened until they are taken to the hospital. If you are one of these individuals, you probably worry about your next hypoglycemia episode on a daily basis. You would likely feel much better if you were aware of something or someone which could help you monitor and alert your oncoming low blood sugar drop. Well, good news! A diabetes alert dog (DAD) can help you become aware of hypoglycemia even if you don’t feel any different. To give Continue reading >>

How Much Does Dog Diabetes Cost To Manage?

How Much Does Dog Diabetes Cost To Manage?

Pet owners worry about the cost of caring for dog diabetes. Test strips, insulin, needles and special diets cost money. Learn the average cost of managing dog diabetes and what you should expect. Mild cases of dog diabetes are treated simply by changing the dog's diet and increasing his exercise. If this alone doesn't stabilize blood sugar levels, you will need to give your dog insulin injections. Some dogs need one insulin injection per day, but larger dogs often need two doses. This will depend on the type of insulin and the size of the dog. Dietary Restrictions for Dog Diabetes Dogs must be given a diet that is high in fiber and protein. Foods should not be high in carbohydrates or high in fat. Feed your dog three times a day to keep his blood sugar levels optimized. Half an hour after your dog's first meal, administer the injection of insulin. You will need to test your dog's blood sugar levels every day to monitor insulin levels. This helps you understand when the insulin dosage needs to be altered. Cost of Dog Diabetes Testing Supplies When caring for a dog with diabetes, testing and insulin administration remains key to keeping your dog healthy. Your veterinarian will go over a plan of action with you, but there are tips you should know. You'll be testing your dog's insulin levels a minimum of once per day. The test strips usually come 50 to a box and cost upwards of $35. These strips are key in determining how much insulin is necessary. Make sure you always use the correct syringe and needle. 40 U/ml insulin needs a U-40 syringe just like 500 U/ml insulin needs a U-500 syringe. Using the wrong syringe size will lead to an improper dosage that could kill your dog. Before giving your dog the insulin, double check the expiration date. If it's past, throw it out and Continue reading >>

Testing For Canine Diabetes

Testing For Canine Diabetes

Introduction Canine diabetes mellitus is a chronic disorder of the endocrine system that occurs when the pancreas is unable to produce an adequate supply of insulin, or alternatively when a dog’s cells are unable to take up the insulin that is produced. If your dog is showing clinical signs that are suggestive of diabetes mellitus, your veterinarian will run a series of tests to confirm the diagnosis. Several other diseases can cause the same or similar symptoms as canine diabetes mellitus, so several tests are usually necessary to rule out other conditions and to confirm a definitive diagnosis of diabetes. Testing for Diabetes Mellitus in Dogs Your veterinarian will conduct a thorough physical examination to assess your dog’s general health. She probably will ask you about any changes in your dog’s behavior and body, such as increased or decreased urination, thirst or appetite, weight loss or lethargy, among other possible signs. Some tests are fairly standard in the assessment of diabetes. A urine sample will be collected and tested for the presence of glucose or bacteria in the urine. A bladder or urinary tract infection can mimic the clinical signs of diabetes, but also commonly accompanies the disease. Blood samples will be analyzed for a number of things, especially for the levels of blood glucose, cholesterol and liver enzymes. Your dog likely will need to fast for 12-24 hours before this particular blood test, to ensure accurate results. A single blood test may not be sufficient for a definitive diagnosis, so additional tests may be necessary. Some other things your veterinarian may recommend include abdominal ultrasound and assessment of serum thyroid hormone concentration, serum pancreatic enzyme levels, blood progersterone concentration in intact female Continue reading >>

Diabetic Care Of Dogs

Diabetic Care Of Dogs

Diabetes is caused by deficiency of insulin, which is an important hormone made by beta cells in the pancreas. The signs of diabetes in dogs are typically weight loss despite a good appetite, and excessive thirst and urination. How is diabetes treated in dogs? Treatment of diabetes in dogs usually requires daily administration of insulin injections and appropriate nutrition, and must be specifically tailored for each individual. The goal is to control the signs of diabetes (weight loss despite a good appetite; excessive thirst and urination) and to avoid low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia) due to insulin over-dose. The best outcome tends to be achieved when the owner of the diabetic pet and their veterinarian work together as a team. What is diabetic remission? Diabetic remission is a period of time when a diabetic animal does not require insulin injections to control the signs of diabetes. What commitment is required at home when treating a diabetic dog? Insulin injections are typically administered by the owner to a diabetic pet every 12 hours. It is very important that injections are given at the exact time that they are due. If it is ever not possible to give an insulin injection on time, then it is better to miss that particular injection than to give it at another time. Appropriate nutritional strategies can complement insulin therapy in diabetic dogs and so it is often beneficial to make changes to the diet or feeding regimen. Information collected at home about a diabetic dog’s progress helps to monitor the success of treatment and can provide clues about the risk of hypoglycaemia. The most useful information comes from routine recording of general demeanour, daily water intake, changes in body weight, and the presence or absence of glucose in the urine. Collectin Continue reading >>

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