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How Much Do Diabetes Educators Make

Why Are We Ignoring Diabetes Education?

Why Are We Ignoring Diabetes Education?

Diabetes is a self-managed condition. That means the person with diabetes must take care of it each and every day —- and know how to do so. There’s an infinite amount of things they must know including how foods impact blood sugar, blood pressure and kidney health. The benefits of exercise and when it’s dangerous to exercise. The importance of taking your medicine, or not. What the blood sugar numbers on their glucose meter mean and what to do with that information. How to prevent and recover from devastating low blood sugar and prevent frequent high blood sugars. Knowing how to manage one’s diabetes can be the difference between living a fairly normal life or suffering from debilitating diabetes complications. Complications can be devastating for both the person with diabetes and his or her family. They include losing your vision, having your foot or leg amputated, feeling constant pain, tingling or absolutely nothing in your feet and dying prematurely from heart disease, as two out of three people do with type 2 diabetes. Nearly 400 million people in the world have diabetes and half don’t know it. 86 million people in the U.S. have prediabetes, 7 million more than a few years ago. Every 6 seconds a person dies from diabetes. Since this education, called diabetes self-management education (DSME), is essential to one’s quality of life with diabetes, why isn’t it one of the first things healthcare providers make sure patients get? A study reveals that only an estimated 6.8 percent of people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes received DSME during their first year with diabetes. What’s even more dismaying is that the study participants had private health coverage that would cover the cost of their initial self-management education. Equally hard to believe Continue reading >>

Why Do I Need To See A Diabetes Educator?

Why Do I Need To See A Diabetes Educator?

Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects more than 23 million people in the United States. If managed well, people with diabetes can live normal, healthy lives. However, the many devastating effects of uncontrolled or poorly controlled diabetes are fairly well known: Diabetes, which increases a person's chances of heart attack or stroke by 200% to 400%, respectively, is the seventh leading cause of death and the leading cause of adult blindness, kidney failure and lower-limb amputation. But with proper management and control through daily food, fitness, medication and lifestyle choices, people with diabetes can reduce their risk of diabetes related complications. That said, diabetes is largely a "self-care" disease, which means that most of the time, you are in charge of many day-to-day decisions that affect your condition. This responsibility puts an individual with diabetes in the driver’s seat of their personal care team—and that's a lot of pressure! So what's the most important tool you need to successfully manage diabetes? Knowledge. There is a lot of information available about diabetes. In the information age, there is certainly no shortage of diabetes related books, cookbooks, websites, and magazines. Unfortunately, information about diabetes is not always credible and some of the information out there is just flat-out incorrect or bad advice. How do you decide whether the information you read or hear about diabetes is safe and reliable? Fortunately, you don’t have to do this on your own. A diabetes educator can help! A Certified Diabetes Educator is a qualified professional—typically, a registered nurse, registered dietitian, or a pharmacist— that provides diabetes self-management education (DSME) or diabetes self-management training (DSMT). The Ame Continue reading >>

Certified Diabetes Educators (cdes): What You Should Know

Certified Diabetes Educators (cdes): What You Should Know

We get a lot of questions about Certified Diabetes Educators (CDEs) – what they can offer patients, how to find one, and even how to become a diabetes educator yourself if interested. We’ve queried some top diabetes education experts in the country to compile this at-a-glance guide. Read on for practical information about the world of CDEs, along with lists of the Top Tips for Patients to Make the Most of Their CDE Appointments, and Top Things You Should Know About Becoming a CDE. A huge thank you to the following expert contributors: Deborah Greenwood, Diabetes Clinical Specialist and 2015 president of the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) Jane K. Dickinson, RN, PhD, CDE, Coordinator of the Columbia University Master’s in Diabetes Education and Management program, and person with type 1 diabetes herself Jennifer Smith, CDE, Registered Dietitian & Director of Lifestyle and Nutrition at Integrated Diabetes Services, also living with type 1 diabetes herself Marissa Town, RN, CDE and a type 1 diabetes patient too, who was the inspiration for the Children With Diabetes (CWD) community Diabetes Educator Basics What is a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE)? CDEs are healthcare professionals trained specifically to coach patients with diabetes through their own self-care. This means coaching on glucose testing, medication dosing, insulin delivery, results logging and more. Some CDEs even have specialized training as insulin pump educators, focusing on helping patients get set up on those advanced devices. What Does a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) Do? CDEs work with patients and their families to teach diabetes self-management skills, and help with everyday challenges that doctors often don’t have time to address. They work in hospitals, clinics and sm Continue reading >>

How To Become A Diabetes Educator

How To Become A Diabetes Educator

Expert Reviewed A diabetes educator specializes in treating and educating diabetic patients at clinics or hospitals. You can become a diabetes educator by getting hands-on experience as a doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other medical professional. Formalize your ability to provide diabetes patients with counseling and lifestyle management advice by obtaining official certification through the American Association of Diabetes Educators or the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators. Continue reading >>

Nurse Entrepreneur Series: Q&a With Founder Of Diabetes Education Services

Nurse Entrepreneur Series: Q&a With Founder Of Diabetes Education Services

Author: Nurse.com Categories: Archived Welcome to our Nurse Entrepreneur Series! Meet Beverly Thomassian, RN, MPH, CDE, BC-ADM. Registered nurse, diabetes educator and founder/owner of Diabetes Education Services, Beverly is dedicated to making an impact in diabetes education through training clinicians and teaching patients how to take control of the disease. Q. How long have you been a nurse? What’s your nursing background/experience? A. I graduated from Pierce College in Los Angeles in 1985 and have been an RN for 29 years. My first job was on a med/surg unit, back in the day when gallbladder surgery patients stayed for five days. After a few years, I was hired at UCLA on the head and neck and urology unit. Working there was a game-changer. I witnessed so much suffering from potentially preventable diseases (mouth and throat cancers) and saw many patients lose their kidneys to the complications of diabetes, that I knew I had to do something to help prevent these complications. I returned to school at UCLA to earn a master’s degree in public health, with a focus on health education and prevention. I also spent six months in Mexico, volunteering in a little pueblo as a community health worker. This time in Mexico shaped my views and values on how best reach people and provide education in a way that was meaningful and relevant to them and their situation. Shortly after, I was hired as a manager and health educator at an HMO where I provided group classes to patients on diabetes, asthma, weight management and other topics. This experience gave me hundreds of hours of practice teaching patients. How to word things, how to reach their hearts, not just their heads. That’s when I fell in love with teaching about diabetes. So many people are living with it and don’t Continue reading >>

Evolving Roles: From Diabetes Educators To Advanced Diabetes Managers

Evolving Roles: From Diabetes Educators To Advanced Diabetes Managers

In Brief The evolution of advanced practice in diabetes management has emulated the advanced practice efforts of nursing groups. However, many disciplines are involved in the care and education of people with diabetes. This article reviews the expanded role of health professionals in diabetes and describes the development of a new clinical management credential for nurses, dietitians, and pharmacists with advanced degrees and advanced practice experience in diabetes. In the mid-1970s, the first health care professionals known as “diabetes educators” provided basic patient education to complement the medical care provided by diabetes specialists. They taught patients the skills of self-monitoring, meal planning, and medication administration. In the 1970s and early 1980s, people with diabetes were frequently hospitalized for hyperglycemia to “get their blood glucose under control.” Diabetes educators provided education for such hospitalized patients and for people newly diagnosed with diabetes. Often, this was the only diabetes education patients ever received. Changes in insurance reimbursement policies during the 1980s led to a decrease in hospitalizations for hyperglycemia, and outpatient diabetes education programs were developed to meet the continuing need for education among people with diabetes. Still, despite the growing numbers of diabetes educators and diabetes outpatient education programs throughout the 1980s, only about 35% of patients with diabetes attended a class or program about diabetes at some time during the course of their disease.1 Patients and health care professionals often cited the lack of insurance reimbursement for diabetes education services as the reason for this inadequate level of diabetes education. The National Institutes of Heal Continue reading >>

The Four Key Times To See A Diabetes Educator

The Four Key Times To See A Diabetes Educator

Twitter Summary: Why is #diabetes education SO critical? Major orgs come together for joint position statement on #DSMES. Plus, how to find an educator near you! Last month, several major organizations (ADA, AADE, and AND) released a joint position paper on Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support, abbreviated DSMES. This publication for the first time lays out a process for when and how people with type 2 diabetes should receive DSMES (while the paper focused on type 2 diabetes, the authors note that similar recommendations hold true for type 1). According to the paper, people with diabetes should be referred for DSMES, which may be delivered by a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) or healthcare provider working with the CDE, at four key stages: diagnosis, annual assessments, when new complicating factors arise (e.g., new health conditions, the onset of a diabetes-related complication), or when there are transitions in care (e.g., moving to a new city, switching health care providers, etc.). Increasing the number of people who obtain DSMES is a critical issue. According to a 2014 CDC/AADE analysis of health claims from people with private health plans and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes, less than 7% of patients were ever referred for DSMES, though 83% of those who are referred end up participating in diabetes education programs. What do diabetes educators do? Diabetes educators aim to collaborate with the full health care team to help people develop personalized strategies to manage their diabetes, incorporating many factors from medications, lifestyle, eating habits, etc. into a cohesive plan they are able to follow. In addition to teaching the skills and behaviors to help them manage diabetes – how to dose insulin, what foods to eat and how much – diabetes Continue reading >>

Lessons Learned As A Diabetes Educator

Lessons Learned As A Diabetes Educator

Diabetes Spectrum Volume 13 Number 2, 2000, Page 69 Editorial Lessons Learned as a Diabetes Educator Martha M. Funnell, MS, RN, CDE Editor's note: This article is adapted from the address Ms. Funnell delivered as the recipient of the American Diabetes Association Outstanding Educator in Diabetes award for 1999. She delivered the address in June 1999 at the Association's 59th Annual Meeting and Scientifc Sessions in San Diego. As educators, we generally view ourselves as teachers rather than learners. However, as I reflect on my years as a nurse and what is means to be a diabetes educator, I realize that I have learned a great deal, probably far more than I have ever taught. While I have had many opportunities for learning during the past 16 years, I have not always taken time to reflect on what they meant or what they were teaching me. In the busy day-to-day world of taking care of and teaching our patients, we do not often take the time to think about what we do and what we are learning. So I decided to take advantage of this opportunity to put some of what I have learned into words and to share with you some of the things that are in my heart. Now, I am very well aware that those who are reading this article are experts in this field and have learned many of these same lessons. But I hope that after you read this you will also take the opportunity to reflect on what you have learned from your patients, from your families and colleagues, and from being part of an organization such as the American Diabetes Association. Lessons Learned From Patients I am writing from my heart because one of the lessons I have learned is that diabetes care and education happen in the heart. Most of our efforts as educators are aimed for the head. I used to think that by filling up my pati Continue reading >>

Guidance For Becoming A Diabetes Educator/cde

Guidance For Becoming A Diabetes Educator/cde

How do I become a diabetes educator? One must be a healthcare professional who has a defined role as a diabetes educator, not for those who may perform some diabetes related functions as part of or in the course of other usual and customary duties. Practice as a diabetes educator means actively employed for compensation, providing a direct or indirect professional contribution to the care and self-management education of people with diabetes. Diabetes education, also referred to as diabetes self-management education or diabetes self-management training, is performed by health care professionals who have appropriate credentials and experience consistent with the particular profession's scope of practice. Diabetes self-management education is defined as the interactive, collaborative, ongoing process involving the person with diabetes or pre-diabetes and/or the caregivers and the educator(s). The process includes: Assessment of the individual's specific education needs Identification of the individual's specific diabetes self-management goals Education and behavioral intervention directed toward helping the individual achieve identified self-management goals Evaluation(s) of the individual's attainment of identified self-management goals Proper documentation of all education encounters Diabetes educators can be found in a variety of settings: hospitals, physician offices, clinics, home health, wellness programs, to name a few. They most often work within accredited or recognized diabetes education programs. This means that the diabetes education program has met requirements set forth by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and can bill for diabetes self-management training through two different codes: G0108 and G0109, which are for individual and group diabetes ed Continue reading >>

How To Become A Certified Diabetes Educator

How To Become A Certified Diabetes Educator

After receiving the diagnosis of diabetes, many patients, myself included, feel a strong desire to somehow integrate their illness with their professional career path. Because let’s face it, if you’re going to live with a disease day in and day out, you might as well find a way to make some money off of it, right?! There are certainly many avenues to travel down and options for potential workplace settings range from pharmaceutical companies, to non-profit organizations, and everything imaginable in between. It seems the opportunities to combine one’s chronic illness with their professional life and future career is limitless! One of the first major diabetes career paths that comes to mind when I think of working in the diabetes sphere is that of a certified diabetes educator (CDE). An integral part of the healthcare team, becoming a CDE is an excellent career choice for a person looking to combine patient interaction with extensive diabetes knowledge. Though there is quite a bit of education and professional experience within the field required, this is a role that puts you on the front lines of diabetes education and patient empowerment. With many initial degree options to choose from, there is an opportunity to explore the career track most in line with your specific and unique interests. What Is a CDE? The National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators (NCBDE) describes a certified diabetes educator as a “health professional who possesses comprehensive knowledge of and experience in prediabetes, diabetes prevention, and management.” These professionals provide self-management education and support so that people can better understand and cope with the condition they are living with. Diabetes education is recognized by most health insurance plans and i Continue reading >>

Diabetes Educators And You

Diabetes Educators And You

Credentialled Diabetes Educators are specialists in diabetes. They are health professionals who have completed further study to focus their efforts on helping people with diabetes self-manage their diabetes effectively and prevent complications. A diabetes educator can be the first point of call when you are wanting more information, support and/or motivation in the management of your diabetes and the link between other health professionals. They have in-depth knowledge on all aspects of diabetes and can recognise when you need to see other members of your health care team for example, an optometrist or podiatrist. When should I see a diabetes educator? Credentialled Diabetes Educators can be there with you the entire way through your journey. When you are first diagnosed, Credentialled Diabetes Educators explain what diabetes is and provide individualised advice on how to get your blood glucose levels within the appropriate target range. They will also help you organise tests and screenings for diabetes complications. This will vary depending on your diabetes, your lifestyle and your age. Credentialled Diabetes Educators can also help you when your blood glucose levels fluctuate. According to Credentialled Diabetes Educator, Rachel McKeown, this could be changing when you are feeling stressed or anxious. “Lifestyle changes and events like exams, weddings, divorce, somebody close to you dying, can send up blood glucose levels,” Rachel said. “The main aim of a Credentialled Diabetes Educator is to empower the person that has diabetes to self-manage their diabetes through knowledge, motivation and support.” Who should see a diabetes educator? Everyone should see a diabetes educator even people with pre-diabetes. Credentialled Diabetes Educators can provide you wit Continue reading >>

Diabetes Education

Diabetes Education

Diabetes Education Why are you here . . . . Your doctor recently told you that you have diabetes or pre-diabetes? You don’t know what to eat or not to eat to control blood sugars? You are afraid of the damage diabetes can do to your heart, eyes, kidneys, etc.? You DON’T want to have to take pills or insulin for the diabetes? You lack energy, concentration and you don’t sleep well after being diagnosed with diabetes? You hate how much weight you have gained and how it makes you feel? What if you could . . . . Get your blood sugars closer to normal? Have your energy back? Reduce the need for diabetes medication? Shrink your waistline? Learn simple steps anyone can do to control their diabetes? Clear up the confusion on what to eat with diabetes? Reverse your diabetes all together? Why do I need diabetes education? During counseling, you will be introduced to different strategies to meet your individual needs. Along with your referring physician, through close supervision, NADEC can help you develop a treatment plan to ensure your blood sugar goals are achieved. Since diet is considered the cornerstone of diabetes management, the control of your blood sugar is achieved with a meal plan that caters to your individual food preferences, lifestyle and medication schedule coupled with exercise. Eating properly and being more physically active plays a major role in keeping blood sugar levels under control, thereby helping to prevent most of the serious complications that affect your body the longer you have diabetes. Research shows profound benefits from real changes you make in your life in a time frame as short as 6-12 weeks. Our comprehensive Diabetes Management Program teaches you how to better manage your glucose values in all types of eating and exercise situations. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Education Programs Are Essential

Diabetes Education Programs Are Essential

(Program Manager, Diabetes Education & Treatment Center, White Plains Hospital Center, NY) Diabetes has a major impact on the lives of 16 million Americans and their families. Health care costs for diabetes continue to climb, and people with diabetes have average medical costs almost four times higher than people without diabetes. Diabetes affects more Americans, and costs more money, than AIDS and breast cancer combined (an estimated $100 billion each year). It is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States today. Can anything be done? Yes. The good news is that there is a simple and effective way for people to arm themselves for the diabetes battle--Diabetes Education Programs. Such programs are essential in helping individuals with diabetes to understand the importance of proper blood sugar control. People with diabetes are at higher risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, eye disease, kidney disease, nerve damage and amputations. Studies have proven that people who manage their blood sugar can significantly reduce the onset and severity of complications. The Diabetes Education and Treatment Center (DETC) at White Plains Hospital Center, White Plains, NY, is one example of how a patient education program helps set a solid foundation for better diabetes care. The DETC, an outpatient education program recognized by the American Diabetes Association, is designed to provide patients with the necessary knowledge and skills for successful diabetes self-management. Patients are shown the significant role they play in self-managing their diabetes, and in maintaining the delicate balance between diet, exercise and medication. They receive individual and/or group instruction on topics such as: understanding diabetes, how medications and insulin work, b Continue reading >>

The Crisis In Diabetes Education: How Can We Fix The Problems

The Crisis In Diabetes Education: How Can We Fix The Problems

Diabetes educators are no less than a lifeline for patients, providing vitalinsights into the self-care behaviors that keep diabetes in check: managingblood sugar, dosing medications and insulin, exercising, and understanding allthe numbers involved. Yet many patients never get referred to these specialists at all. Even whenthey do manage to get a doctor’s referral for diabetes education, insurance maycover only a few hours per year of this critical counseling – not nearly enoughto learn how to manage the disease for a lifetime. Ironically, certified diabetes educators (CDEs) are more overworked than ever,struggling to reach existing patients even as diabetes reaches epidemicproportions. According to the National Centers for Disease Control, diabetesdrains the U.S. economy of over $130 billion each year. That’s more than threetimes the annual amount spent on diabetes patients all across Europe. While new diabetes drugs and high-tech treatment devices are coming to marketfaster than ever, recruiting of new educators is almost at a standstill. This ishappening for two reasons: First, the current certification process essentiallyserves as a barrier to becoming a CDE. Second, health insurance companies simplydon’t pay for enough hours with a CDE, a policy that has led to the closure ofmany diabetes education centers. No matter how you slice it, the field of diabetes education is facing a crisis.There are only about 15,000 CDEs in the U.S., yet nearly 21 million Americansare already affected by diabetes, and the number is growing every day. Who willhelp all these patients manage their disease? In order to serve them all, everyeducator would have to see at least 1,400 people four times a year: this worksout to more than 22 people every single weekday. Why these discon Continue reading >>

Q & A With Debra Ollanketo, Rn And Certified Diabetes Educator (cde)

Q & A With Debra Ollanketo, Rn And Certified Diabetes Educator (cde)

What does a Diabetes Educator do? A CDE provides education to help an individual learn diabetes care skills, also called diabetes self management training. This includes teaching about the condition and its treatment; medications, blood sugar testing, exercise, nutrition, preventing and managing complications, behavior change, and coping skills. Diabetes educators are licensed healthcare professionals, including registered nurses, registered dietitians, and pharmacists. A Certified diabetes educator has earned the CDE credential which demonstrates specialized knowledge in the field of diabetes education. The CDE must stay current in diabetes care and be re-certified every five years. When a patient comes to see you, what information should they bring? It’s important to know any medications and supplements, such as vitamins and herbal supplements the individual is taking. Patients should carry a current list of medications and show it to every healthcare provider they meet with. If the person has a blood sugar meter, we ask them to bring it with them as well. We will ask medical history questions and we usually receive information about lab results from the patient’s doctor when they are referred to our service. Diabetes self management training is usually covered by Medicare and most insurance plans, however, deductibles and payment varies widely between insurance plans. The person can call their insurance company to find out about coverage for diabetes education. An important factor in being covered by Medicare is that the Diabetes program is recognized by the American Diabetes Association. Memorial Medical Center is an ADA recognized program and must be recognized every 4 years. What are three questions patients should consider asking during their visit? What type Continue reading >>

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