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How Many Years Does Type 2 Diabetes Take Off Your Life?

Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Life Expectancy? Live Longer By Spotting These Symptoms

Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Life Expectancy? Live Longer By Spotting These Symptoms

If type 2 diabetes isn't treated properly and well managed, it can lead to a number of other health problems including heart disease. However, there is no way of knowing how long someone with the condition is expected to live. It depends how soon diabetes was diagnosed, any other health conditions unrelated to diabetes and factors including how often people attend health checks and look after their own health. Knowing the symptoms of diabetes can boost the chances of living longer. Diabetes UK said: “Early diagnosis, treatment and good control are vital for good health and reduce the chances of developing serious complications.” Symptoms include urinating more than usual, feeling thirst, feeling tired, cuts or wounds which heal slowly and blurred vision. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the insulin produced does not work properly and can be linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight. High glucose levels - also known as blood sugar can damage blood vessels, nerves and organs. If diabetes is not properly managed it can lead to serious consequences such as sight loss, limb amputation, kidney failure and stroke. Experts also suggest a mildly raised glucose level that doesn't cause any symptoms can also have long-term damaging effects. The condition can impact life expectancy, how experts have said the length of time people are expected to live with the condition has increased. Seven years ago, Diabetes UK estimated that the life expectancy of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to be reduced, as a result of the condition, by up to 10 years. Wed, June 21, 2017 Living with diabetes - ten top tips to live normally with the condition. However, a report based on data collected by GP services in the UK between 1991 and 2014, Continue reading >>

Sitting For Hours Can Shave Years Off Life

Sitting For Hours Can Shave Years Off Life

(CNN) -- Sitting too much will probably shorten your life. That might sound ridiculous -- or obvious -- depending on your perspective, but the findings don't come from a fringe study. They come from the American Cancer Society, whose researchers studied 123,216 people's health outcomes during a 14-year period. In particular, the American Cancer Society study finds that women who sit for more than six hours a day were about 40% more likely to die during the course of the study than those who sat fewer than three hours per day. Men were about 20% more likely to die. That large study focused on the numbers of people who died. Other studies have focused on specific conditions affecting the most Americans, things such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes and depression. In those studies, too, extended periods of sitting increased risks of illness. And earlier this year the evidence against many hours of sitting expanded further: The American Journal of Epidemiology published a study finding that those who work a sedentary job have almost twice the risk of a specific type of colon cancer. What's particularly interesting about recent research is the revelation that sitting for extended periods of time does significant damage to human health that cannot be undone by exercising. Sitting for several hours each day is bad for you, like smoking is bad for you, regardless of whether you do healthful activities, too. The American Cancer Society points out that public health guidelines make little or no reference to reducing time spent sitting, instead focusing on increasing the activity level. For example, in 1995, the American College of Sports Medicine and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention jointly issued national guidelines called Physical Activity and P Continue reading >>

A Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis On Black-ish

A Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis On Black-ish

I always say that diabetes is more easily managed with a sense of humor. In the fall finale of the TV show black-ish, Dre is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Anthony Anderson, who plays Dre, also lives with diabetes. Right away the show lists some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes — excessive thirst, hunger, fatigue, frequent urination, and erectile dysfunction — and states that diabetes is manageable, you just have to make some adjustments like exercising, changing your diet, monitoring your blood sugar, and starting to take medication. I laughed when the doctor and Bow were talking about learning how to give injections during med school and he asked, “Did you practice on oranges?” Bwah! Didn’t we all practice on oranges at diagnosis?! As a long-time fan of the show and a caregiver to someone with diabetes, I personally loved this black-ish episode. Of course there were some stereotypes, but they did a really good job of highlighting the symptoms, trying to cure yourself, being afraid to use the lancing device, etc. And they threw in some fun diabetes lingo like “diabuddy” and “dia-beat-this.” Also, the opening sequence was fantastic in talking about the higher incidence of diabetes in African Americans, that some T2D is genetic, that some of it is obesity/diet related, and the barriers that African Americans may face to having a healthier lifestyle. While the conference table banter is usually offensive on so many levels, it did put out there the many diabetes myths including losing feet and that it takes years off your life. (Someone who doesn’t watch the show regularly might not understand that the horrible comments that are made during the conference table banter each episode are actually highlighting how out of touch the coworkers are… Continue reading >>

Obesity Could 'rob You' Of 20 Years Of Health

Obesity Could 'rob You' Of 20 Years Of Health

"Obesity knocks 20 years of good health off your life and can accelerate death by eight years," the Mail Online reports. A study has estimated very obese men aged 20 to 39, with a body mass index (BMI) of 35 or above, have a reduced life expectancy of eight years. This is as a result of their higher risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. For women of this age, the life expectancy is six years less. What is also worrying is the much larger number of healthy years of life lost because of the chronic illness caused by these two conditions, which are obesity related. Obesity in this age group is estimated to cause 11 to 19 fewer years of healthy life, which could have a considerable negative impact on a person's quality of life. This is likely to be an underestimate, however, as it did not take into account other illnesses associated with increased weight, such as certain cancers, liver and kidney diseases. A truism is that a model is only as good as the data you put into it. Reassuringly, the researchers used a well-regarded data set. The researchers hope these results can help healthcare professionals give people a greater understanding of how much obesity is putting people at risk of long-term chronic ill health. Where did the story come from? The study was carried out by researchers from the University Health Centre in Montreal, McGill University, the University of British Columbia and the University of Calgary. It was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. The study was published in the peer-reviewed medical journal The Lancet: Diabetes & Endocrinology. The UK media's reporting was generally accurate, although some of the details were fudged. The Mail Online went with, "obesity knocks 20 years of good health off your life", which referred to Continue reading >>

People With Type 1 Diabetes Are Living Longer

People With Type 1 Diabetes Are Living Longer

Better blood sugar control may be the key to longer survival Ninety years ago, type 1 diabetes was a death sentence: half of people who developed it died within two years; more than 90% were dead within five years. Thanks to the introduction of insulin therapy in 1922, and numerous advances since then, many people with type 1 diabetes now live into their 50s and beyond. But survival in this group still falls short of that among people without diabetes. A Scottish study published this week in JAMA shows that at the age of 20, individuals with type 1 diabetes on average lived 12 fewer years than 20-year-olds without it. A second study in the same issue of JAMA showed that people with type 1 diabetes with better blood sugar control lived longer than those with poorer blood sugar control. Types of diabetes There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys cells in the pancreas that make insulin. This usually happens before age 20. Insulin is needed to get blood sugar (glucose) into cells for energy. Without insulin, glucose builds up in the bloodstream. This damages cells and tissues throughout the body. People who develop type 1 diabetes need to take insulin via shots or a pump for life. Type 2 diabetes tends to occur later in life, usually among individuals who are overweight or inactive. It accounts for about 90% of all diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes often make enough insulin, at least at first, but their cells don’t respond to it. As with type 1 diabetes, glucose builds up in the bloodstream, damaging cells and tissues throughout the body. Type 2 diabetes is initially treated with lifestyle changes such as weight loss, more exercise, and a healthier diet. Medications that make the Continue reading >>

Can You Live Long With Type 2 Diabetes?

Can You Live Long With Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes mellitus. Unfortunately, it still has no cure. Once you’re diagnosed with it, you will have it for the rest of your life. But although it’s chronic and incurable condition, it’s manageable. The chance to live long with it is pretty good, too! Type-2 diabetes develops gradually You body needs hormone called insulin to help regulate blood sugar. This hormone is made by special cells called beta cells in the pancreas (an organ behind and below stomach). It is required to help move glucose (sugar) from bloodstream into cells of the body. Diabetes occurs when something goes awry with your insulin. There are several types of diabetes; type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes (it only occurs in pregnancy, as the name suggests). In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t produce adequate insulin or the body cannot use insulin effectively (insulin resistance)! As a result, blood sugar level is more difficult to manage and easier to fluctuate abnormally. Making the diagnosis of the disease as early as possible is important. Early diabetes is easier to manage. On the other hand advanced diabetes, especially when it has caused its complications, is more difficult to treat. If you experience some of the following diabetes symptoms, see a doctor promptly: Frequent urination (you pass urine more often than usual). Increased thirst. See also the reasons of why diabetics can get so thirsty in this post! Frequent infections and difficult (slow) to heal. Changes in appetite, which may also be followed with weight changes especially unplanned weight loss. Unfortunately, there is usually no early sign of the disease. People with type 2 may not have the symptoms for many years. Typically, type 2 develops more slowly than type 1. There Continue reading >>

Treatment

Treatment

Treatment for diabetes aims to keep your blood glucose levels as normal as possible and control your symptoms to prevent health problems developing later in life. If you've been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, your GP will be able to explain your condition in detail and help you understand your treatment. They'll also closely monitor your condition to identify any health problems that may occur. If there are any problems, you may be referred to a hospital-based diabetes care team. Making lifestyle changes If you're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you'll need to look after your health very carefully for the rest of your life. This may seem daunting, but your diabetes care team will be able to give you support and advice about all aspects of your treatment. After being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, or if you're at risk of developing the condition, the first step is to look at your diet and lifestyle and make any necessary changes. Three major areas that you'll need to look closely at are: You may be able to keep your blood glucose at a safe and healthy level without the need for other types of treatment. Lifestyle changes Diet Increasing the amount of fibre in your diet and reducing your sugar and fat intake, particularly saturated fat, can help prevent type 2 diabetes, as well as manage the condition if you already have it. You should: increase your consumption of high-fibre foods, such as wholegrain bread and cereals, beans and lentils, and fruit and vegetables choose foods that are low in fat – replace butter, ghee and coconut oil with low-fat spreads and vegetable oil choose skimmed and semi-skimmed milk, and low-fat yoghurts eat fish and lean meat rather than fatty or processed meat, such as sausages and burgers grill, bake, poach or steam food instead of frying Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is the type of diabetes that typically develops in children and in young adults. In type 1 diabetes the body stops making insulin and the blood sugar (glucose) level goes very high. Treatment to control the blood glucose level is with insulin injections and a healthy diet. Other treatments aim to reduce the risk of complications. They include reducing blood pressure if it is high and advice to lead a healthy lifestyle. What is type 1 diabetes? What is type 1 diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Diabetes mellitus (just called diabetes from now on) occurs when the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood becomes higher than normal. There are two main types of diabetes. These are called type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes usually first develops in children or young adults. In the UK about 1 in 300 people develop type 1 diabetes at some stage. With type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

Diabetes News: People With Condition Are Now Living Longer And This Is Why

Diabetes News: People With Condition Are Now Living Longer And This Is Why

The findings, based on data collected by GP services in the UK between 1991 and 2014, also show a marked increase in life expectancy for people with the disease, explaining in part its increased prevalence. The study, by the University of Cardiff, found the increased number of people with the disease has also been linked to better diagnosis and rising levels of obesity. Between 1993 and 2010 the proportion of obese people in the UK went from 13 per cent to 26 per cent for men and from 16 per cent to 26 per cent for women. “The number of people with type 2 diabetes in the UK has gone from 700,000 to around 2.8m over two decades, and it continues to increase,” said Professor Craig Currie from Cardiff University’s School of Medicine. “We are also seeing increased life expectancy from the disease which could be due to earlier diagnosis of the condition as well as drugs such as blood pressure tablets and statins for blood cholesterol.” “We are also seeing increased life expectancy from the disease which could be due to earlier diagnosis of the condition as well as drugs such as blood pressure tablets and statins for blood cholesterol.” The data also reveal that the prevalence of diagnosed type 2 diabetes increased with age, although this increase is lower in people aged 80 years and above. The disease prevalence was also generally higher in men than in women above the age of 40 years. Below the age of 40 it was similar. Around 4.5m people live with diabetes in the UK, with more than 90 per cent of those affected having type 2 diabetes. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. The condition, which can Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Whether you have type 2 diabetes, are a caregiver or loved one of a person with type 2 diabetes, or just want to learn more, the following page provides an overview of type 2 diabetes. New to type 2 diabetes? Check out “Starting Point: Type 2 Diabetes Basics” below, which answers some of the basic questions about type 2 diabetes: what is type 2 diabetes, what are its symptoms, how is it treated, and many more! Want to learn a bit more? See our “Helpful Links” page below, which provides links to diaTribe articles focused on type 2 diabetes. These pages provide helpful tips for living with type 2 diabetes, drug and device overviews, information about diabetes complications, nutrition and food resources, and some extra pages we hope you’ll find useful! Starting Point: Type 2 Diabetes Basics Who is at risk of developing type 2 diabetes? What is the risk of developing type 2 diabetes if it runs in the family? What is type 2 diabetes and prediabetes? Behind type 2 diabetes is a disease where the body’s cells have trouble responding to insulin – this is called insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone needed to store the energy found in food into the body’s cells. In prediabetes, insulin resistance starts growing and the beta cells in the pancreas that release insulin will try to make even more insulin to make up for the body’s insensitivity. This can go on for a long time without any symptoms. Over time, though, the beta cells in the pancreas will fatigue and will no longer be able to produce enough insulin – this is called “beta burnout.” Once there is not enough insulin, blood sugars will start to rise above normal. Prediabetes causes people to have higher-than-normal blood sugars (and an increased risk for heart disease and stroke). Left unnoticed or Continue reading >>

The Lie That’s Killing Us: Pre-diabetes

The Lie That’s Killing Us: Pre-diabetes

Pre-diabetes is a lie. Pre-diabetes is Stage 1 diabetes. And I’m taking a stand now advocating that we call it what it is. Pre-diabetes doesn’t exist. And the lie we tell that it does does incredible harm. It stops the nearly 80 million Americans we say have it from making the lifestyle changes necessary to prevent advanced Type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is in truth the first stage of diabetes. My proposition is that recognizing pre-diabetes as “Stage 1” Type 2 diabetes will get millions more people to take action to stop their diabetes from progressing. About 80 million people is roughly the populations of California, Texas and New York combined. The International Diabetes Federation reports that in 2011, 280 million people worldwide were glucose intolerant (pre-diabetic). In only 17 years, 398 million people will be. We clearly need a new strategy. The 25-year campaign the American Diabetes Association has waged to raise awareness of diabetes and pre-diabetes and urge preventive and healthful behaviors has been sadly, and enormously, unsuccessful. Pre-Diabetes Is Stage 1 Diabetes Pre-diabetes literally says you don’t have diabetes — but you do. Your blood sugars are higher than normal, a defining characteristic of diabetes. A study performed at Crittenton Hospital Medical Center in Detroit showed 36 percent of people with pre-diabetes already had coronary artery disease, similar to the 42 percent with Type 2 diabetes and strikingly higher than the 21 percent with normal blood sugars. Higher than normal glucose levels impact hypertension (high blood pressure) and lipids like cholesterol and triglycerides. Plus, most people with pre-diabetes show signs of retinopathy (eye damage), nephropathy (kidney damage) and neuropathy (nerve damage), all diabetes complic Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Person With Age 35 Can Have A Life Span Of 70 And How To Manage It By Not Taking Medication

Can A Diabetic Person With Age 35 Can Have A Life Span Of 70 And How To Manage It By Not Taking Medication

Kapalbhati & anulomvilom are Yoga exercise and if you do some exercise of 30 minutes in the morning & 30 minutes in the evening you can definitely control diabetes & if possible about 15 minutes fast walk. The Yoga book /C.D is available at almost every book shop. Diabetes UK estimates in its report, Diabetes in the UK 2010: Key Statistics on Diabetes, that the life expectancy of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to be reduced, as a result of the condition, by up to 10 years. People with type 1 diabetes have traditionally lived shorter lives, with life expectancy having been quoted as being reduced by over 20 years. However, improvement in diabetes care in recent decades indicates that people with type 1 diabetes are now living significantly longer. * Overall, the risk for death among people with diabetes is about twice that of people of similar age without diabetes. * Adults with diabetes have heart disease death rates about 2 to 4 times higher than adults without diabetes. * The risk for stroke is 2 to 4 times higher among people with diabetes. Monitoring and controlling the levels of diabetes indicators, including HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), postprandial plasma glucose (PPG), body mass index (BMI), blood pressure and lipids, is an integral component of diabetes care at every stage of the disease. Diabetic patients should conduct the following tests periodically. A: HbA1c. HbA1c is a lab test that shows the average level of blood sugar (glucose) over the previous 3 months. It shows how well you are controlling your diabetes. B: Control your high Blood pressure, if any. Normal blood pressure- <120/80 mmHg. C: Control your blood Cholesterol: Normal cholesterol < 200 mg/dL. LDL <100 mg/dL HDL > 40 mg/dL Triglyceride < 150 mg/dL. D: Diabetic education. Denta Continue reading >>

Will Crohn’s Disease Affect My Life Span?

Will Crohn’s Disease Affect My Life Span?

It can be scary to learn that you have any kind of chronic disease. But if you’ve been diagnosed with Crohn’s, know this: With the right treatment and medication, you can expect to live a long, full life. Thanks to “better treatment, surgery, and use of medications,” says Ashwin Ananthakrishnan, MPH, a gastroenterologist with the Massachusetts General Hospital Digestive Healthcare Center’s Crohn’s and Colitis Center in Boston, “it’s very rare for people to die of Crohn’s today.” While there’s still no cure for Crohn’s disease, you can manage your symptoms by taking medication. What’s more, the current treatments for Crohn’s disease are less likely to cause side effects than the ones used in the past. For example: Doctors don’t use steroids over the long term as much as they once did, says Ananthakrishnan. These medications can trigger serious side effects like bone loss and cataracts over time, according to the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation (CCFA). Here’s what you can expect instead. Preventing Complications of Crohn’s Disease Managing your Crohn’s and preventing serious complications are possible if you take the right steps. This includes sticking to your treatment plan and making healthy lifestyle choices, like quitting smoking. The people who are most at risk for serious complications are those who smoke and those who are not getting proper treatment for inflammation, says Ananthakrishnan. “People with poorly controlled Crohn’s wind up with a lot of bowel damage and repeated, resistant, or undertreated inflammation,” he says. Plus, letting your Crohn’s disease go untreated can also cause nutritional deficiencies, he says. It’s also worth noting that people with inflammatory bowel disease can be three times more likely Continue reading >>

Life Expectancy For Type 1 Diabetes

Life Expectancy For Type 1 Diabetes

New study shows recent improvement in years of life lost. With minimal studies to evaluate the impact of type 1 diabetes on life expectancy, studies have been developed to retrospectively look at the effects of diabetes on mortality. Diabetes was also compared to other disease states and causes that had an influence on years of life lost (YLL). The YLL of patients with type 1 diabetes and patients with other disease states were compared to those of the general healthy population. This autoimmune disorder accounts for 10% of all Americans diagnosed with diabetes, and the ability to prevent the development of type 1 diabetes is minimal. Causes have been linked to genetics, and viral infections such as mumps, rubella, cytomegalovirus, measles, influenza, encephalitis, polio, or Epstein-Barr virus. In a study conducted on Australians with type 1 diabetes between the years of 1997 and 2010, researchers looked at the estimated YLL of the type 1 diabetic patients compared to the general public. Researchers used the Chiang method to estimate life expectancy and Arriaga’s method to estimate the impact of age-specific and cause-specific mortalities. Results showed no disparity in terms of YLL from type 1 diabetes in women vs. men. When the YLL was organized into two groups, 1997-2003 and 2004-2010, the 2004-2010 groups showed improvement in life expectancies of 1.9 years in men and 1.5 years in women. Overall, over the time period of the study, patients with type 1 diabetes had a life expectancy of 12.2 years less than the general population. The majority of the YLL was attributed to endocrine and metabolic diseases that occurred between the ages of 10-39, and circulatory diseases that occurred after the age of 40. Medical advances over the years may account for the YLL improve Continue reading >>

Unhealthy Lifestyle Can Knock 23 Years Off Lifespan

Unhealthy Lifestyle Can Knock 23 Years Off Lifespan

The true cost of an unhealthy lifestyle of little exercise, poor diet and smoking has been quantified by scientists who found that it can reduce lifespan by 23 years. People who develop largely preventable conditions like heart disease, stroke and type two diabetes are cutting their life short by decades, a 50 year study has shown. It is estimated that around 80 per cent of cases could be prevented by keeping weight under control, exercising more, eating a healthy diet, and not smoking or drinking too much. For a man in his 40s, suffering from all three conditions reduces life by 23 years. It means that a 40-year-old's life expectacy would drop from 78 to just 55. Likewise someone in their 60s could lose 15 years, meaning a 60-year-old man might have just three years of life left. The cost is far greater than smoking, which is thought to limit lifespan by 10 years. "We showed that having a combination of diabetes and heart disease is associated with a substantially lower life expectancy," says Dr Emanuele Di Angelantonio from the Department of Public Health and Primary Care at the University of Cambridge "An individual in their sixties who has both conditions has an average reduction in life expectancy of about 15 years." More than three million people in Britain suffer from diabetes, while 2.7 million are living with heart disease and 1.2 million are recovering from a stroke. Nearly 100,000 suffer from all three conditions. The researchers analysed data from 700,000 people who were recruited for Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration (ERFC) cohort between 1960 and 2007 and 500,000 participants fro, the UK Biobank who were recruited between 2006 and 2010. From the 1.2 million people studied, 135,000 died during the research period. The study authors used the information to Continue reading >>

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