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How Many Women Have Diabetes?

7 Signs You May Have Type 2 Diabetes

7 Signs You May Have Type 2 Diabetes

Not exercising. Supersize portions. Our love affair with food has taken a drastic turn. The number of Americans with type 2 diabetes—21 million, including adults and children—has risen with the obesity epidemic. Should you or you child get tested? Yes, if you have a family history of the disease and/or any of the following: You're overweight. Even being just 10 to 15 pounds overweight can increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. If your child is overweight, make sure his pediatrician tests him, because type 2 diabetes is on the rise in kids. The encouraging news is that losing just 5% to 7% of your body weight can reduce your risk of diabetes, according to research from the Diabetes Prevention Program. Testing usually involves screening your blood for high glucose (sugar) levels. If they're too high, you could have either type 1 or type 2. (See box, right, for explanations of the two types.) Your doctor will most likely be able to sort it out based on your age and symptoms. In some cases, you may also need to see an endocrinologist (specialist). You're constantly running to the bathroom. "If your body doesn't make enough insulin [a hormone that carries glucose into your cells to give them energy]," which can happen with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, "glucose builds up in your bloodstream and comes out in your urine," explains Janet Silverstein, MD, chief of pediatric endocrinology at the University of Florida. Because you're urinating a lot, you'll probably also be very thirsty and drinking more than usual. Your vision is blurry. High blood sugar levels cause glucose to build up in the lens of your eyes, making it harder for you to focus. This could mean that you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. You're losing weight for no apparent reason. This is usually a sig Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Read on to learn some of the key facts and statistics about the people who have it and how to manage it. Risk factors Many risk factors for type 2 diabetes include lifestyle decisions that can be reduced or even cut out entirely with time and effort. Men are also at slightly higher risk of developing diabetes than women. This may be more associated with lifestyle factors, body weight, and where the weight is located (abdominally versus in the hip area) than with innate gender differences. Significant risk factors include: older age excess weight, particularly around the waist family history certain ethnicities physical inactivity poor diet Prevalence Type 2 diabetes is increasingly prevalent but also largely preventable. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults. The CDC also gives us the following information: In general Research suggests that 1 out of 3 adults has prediabetes. Of this group, 9 out of 10 don't know they have it. 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. More than one in every 10 adults who are 20 years or older has diabetes. For seniors (65 years and older), that figure rises to more than one in four. Cases of diagnosed diabetes cost the United States an estimated $245 billion in 2012. This cost is expected to rise with the increasing diagnoses. In pregnancy and parentingAccording to the CDC, 4.6 to 9.2 percent of pregnancies may be affected by gestational diabetes. In up to 10 percent of them, the mother is diagnosed w Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. When you are pregnant, high blood sugar levels are not good for your baby. About seven out of every 100 pregnant women in the United States get gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is diabetes that happens for the first time when a woman is pregnant. Most of the time, it goes away after you have your baby. But it does increase your risk for developing type 2 diabetes later on. Your child is also at risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Most women get a test to check for diabetes during their second trimester of pregnancy. Women at higher risk may get a test earlier. If you already have diabetes, the best time to control your blood sugar is before you get pregnant. High blood sugar levels can be harmful to your baby during the first weeks of pregnancy - even before you know you are pregnant. To keep you and your baby healthy, it is important to keep your blood sugar as close to normal as possible before and during pregnancy. Either type of diabetes during pregnancy increases the chances of problems for you and your baby. To help lower the chances talk to your health care team about A meal plan for your pregnancy A safe exercise plan How often to test your blood sugar Taking your medicine as prescribed. Your medicine plan may need to change during pregnancy. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

Diabetes Hits Women Hard At Menopause: Beat It Back

Diabetes Hits Women Hard At Menopause: Beat It Back

hits women hard, especially at midlife. In the United States, it’s the number 6 killer of women ages 45 to 54 and the number 4 killer of women ages 55 to 64. What’s more, diabetes increases your risk of heart disease, stroke, and many other serious conditions, including blindness, kidney disease, and nerve disease. Diabetes is on the rise in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 1 in 10 US adults has diabetes now, and if current trends continue, that figure could rise to 1 in 3 by 2050. The increase is nearly all because of the rise of type 2 diabetes, which is most common in obese people age 40 and older. (Type 1 diabetes is much less common and usually starts in childhood or adolescence.) A huge proportion of US adults—more than a third of all of them and half over age 65—have prediabetes, and thus are poised to develop the full-blown disease. Does menopause increase diabetes risk? That hasn’t been an easy question for researchers to answer. It’s hard to separate the effects of menopause from the effects of age and weight. But it does look like hormones do have something to do with it. If you are a woman over age 50, you’re especially vulnerable, and women pay a heavy price for the disease. They lose more years of life than men with diabetes do. In addition, the death rate for women with diabetes has risen dramatically since the 1970s, while it has not for men with the disease. Age and overweight (or obesity) are the most common traits that make someone likely to develop type 2 diabetes. A family history of diabetes, prediabetes, minority ethnicity (Hispanic, African American, Native American, Asian, or Pacific Islander), high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease or abnormal cholesterol levels, and inact Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevalence In Ireland

Diabetes Prevalence In Ireland

There are two types of diabetes, Type 1 diabetes and Type 2 diabetes. The differences and similarities between the two conditions are outlined here. In the absence of a register of people who have diabetes no-one can be entirely sure how many people in Ireland live with diabetes. Overview The total number of people living with diabetes in Ireland is estimated to be 225,840. The International Diabetes Federation Diabetes Atlas (2013) estimate that there are 207,490 people with diabetes in Ireland in the 20 – 79 age group (prevalence of 6.5% in the population) which is in line with previous estimates that by 2020 there would be 233,000 people with the condition, and by 2030 there would be 278,850 people with the condition. Type 1 Diabetes The prevalence of Type 1 Diabetes, an auto-immune condition, is on the rise and is typically diagnosed in childhood. People with type 1 diabetes account for approximately 14,000 – 16,000 of the total diabetes population in Ireland i.e. 10-15% of the population of people living with diabetes. It is estimated there are 2,750 people under 16 years of age living with Type 1 diabetes (based on the Irish Paediatric Diabetes Audit 2012) results and other young adults under 20 years attending transition clinics). Type 2 Diabetes According to the Healthy Ireland survey, 854,165 adults over 40 in the Republic of Ireland are at increased risk of developing (or have) Type 2 diabetes. More alarmingly, there are a further 304,382 in the 30 – 39 year age group that are overweight and not taking the weekly 150 minutes recommended physical activity, leaving them at an increased risk of chronic ill-health. This means that there are 1,158,547 adults in Ireland that need to consider making changes to their daily behaviours in terms of eating healthily Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms And Warning Signs In Women

Diabetes Symptoms And Warning Signs In Women

Diabetes can happen at any age, though type 2 diabetes is more common in those over 45 years of age. Many of the risks for diabetes are the same between men and women, but there are some differences. The risk of developing diabetes is higher for people who: Are overweight or obese Are do not lead active lives Have high levels of fats called triglycerides, low levels of "good" cholesterol, or both Are a member of a high-risk race or ethnicity Have a history of high blood sugar Have a first-degree relative with diabetes Have conditions that are associated with the body not using insulin effectively (insulin resistance) Contents of this article: Women and diabetes One condition that is unique to women and linked to the body not using insulin effectively (insulin resistance) is polycystic ovarian syndrome. In this condition, the ovaries become enlarged and are unable to release eggs properly. Other unique risk factors include a history of gestational diabetes or having given birth to a baby weighing over 9 pounds. According to the National Institutes of Heath (NIH), close to one-third of women with diabetes do not know they have the disease. It is recommended that screening for adults of both genders be done in those over the age of 45 who are overweight or obese and who have one of the risk factors listed above. On the other hand, men are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than women. The exact reasons why are unclear, however. One possible reason could be that men tend to carry their weight in the belly area more often than women, which can increase insulin resistance. Men are also more likely than women to develop heart disease as a result of their diabetes. The risks become relatively similar between the sexes once women reach menopause. Complications of diabetes fo Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Between three and eight per cent of women will get gestational diabetes between the 24th and the 28th week of pregnancy, sometimes earlier. It usually goes away after the baby is born. Women who are more likely to get gestational diabetes are: older mothers women who have a family history of type 2 diabetes women who are overweight women who are from certain ethnic backgrounds, including South Asian, Vietnamese, Chinese, Middle Eastern and Polynesian/Melanesian. Other women at risk include those who have had gestational diabetes, polycystic ovarian syndrome, large babies or birth complications in the past What is gestational diabetes? The hormone insulin moves glucose or sugar from your blood and into your body’s cells, where it is used for energy. When you have diabetes, this process is blocked and your cells become 'insulin resistant'. This causes you to have too much glucose in your blood. In pregnancy, the hormones from the placenta, which help your baby to grow, can cause your cells to become insulin resistant. Usually in pregnancy the body produces more insulin to counter this. In some women, however, this doesn’t happen and they develop gestational diabetes. There are many health issues associated with gestational diabetes, including that both the mother and baby will have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. During the pregnancy, gestational diabetes can lead to excessive sugars and fats crossing the placenta, which can have an effect on the baby’s growth, usually making them bigger. Giving birth to larger babies can also lead to problems with the birth. Sometimes, even though it might not seem to make sense, some babies (particularly larger babies) are born with blood sugar levels that are too low – this is called hypoglycaemia Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes On The Rise: What Every Mom Should Know

Gestational Diabetes On The Rise: What Every Mom Should Know

The percentage of women diagnosed with gestational diabetes is increasing in the United States and the American Diabetes Association estimates that it will occur in up to 18 percent of all pregnancies. Experts agree that it’s not just a problem during pregnancy; it can actually cause a lifetime of complications in both mothers and their children. Learn what the latest research on gestational diabetes suggests and what you can do to prevent and manage it. Are you at risk? Gestational diabetes is a medical condition that causes blood sugar levels to rise during pregnancy. When you eat, the food is converted to glucose, which the body uses for energy. But the only way glucose gets into the cells is through insulin, and when the cells become resistant to insulin, diabetes occurs. Gestational diabetes can be genetic and some ethnic groups – American Indian, African American, Asian, and Hispanic – are more prone. Women over the age of 25, and especially those over 35, have a higher risk. If you had a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds, even if you were never diagnosed with gestational diabetes, chances are you could have it during your next pregnancy. Some studies show that 50 percent of women who have gestational diabetes have no other risk factors. Yet experts agree that lifestyle is the most important predictor. “More people are going into pregnancy overweight,” said Dr. Danine Fruge, director of women’s health and family medicine at the Pritikin Longevity Center and Spa in Miami, Fla. If you’re overweight or obese, your chances of having gestational diabetes is two and four times higher, respectively, than a woman at a normal weight, according to a report in the journal Diabetes Care. If you smoke, your chances double. Many women who aren’t diabetic going Continue reading >>

Women, Diabetes, & Cardiovascular Disease

Women, Diabetes, & Cardiovascular Disease

As a woman with diabetes, you have plenty of company. About 13 million women have diabetes, that about one in 10 women over age 20—have diabetes. Other facts include: The average age of diagnosis for women is 55 years old Certain racial and ethnic groups are at higher risk for diabetes. These include African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians, Native Hawaiian-Pacific Islander, and Asian Americans. If you have diabetes, you probably know about the potential for eye and foot problems. But how much do you know about the most common complication of diabetes cardiovascular disease? The fact is, people with diabetes are up to four times more likely to develop cardiovascular disease than are people who do not have diabetes. Overall, women with diabetes have a 31% risk of heart disease or stroke Unfortunately, about one-third of women with diabetes do not know they have the disease. For all these reasons, Cleveland Clinic experts in diabetes and heart disease recommend that every woman have her blood glucose tested, particularly those women with a family history of diabetes. When you know you have diabetes based on the results of a blood test, you can take steps to manage your condition and live a longer, healthier life. Diabetes is a disease of the pancreas. Situated behind the stomach, the pancreas is the organ responsible for producing the hormone insulin. After food is eaten, it is broken down into glucose, the simple sugar that is the main source of energy for the body's cells. Insulin helps glucose enter the cells where it is converted to energy. In diabetes, the pancreas either cannot produce enough insulin, cannot use insulin correctly or both. When insulin does not function properly, glucose cannot enter the cells. As a result, glucose levels in the blood increas Continue reading >>

How Many People Have Diabetes?

How Many People Have Diabetes?

Rates of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are increasing globally. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Diabetes Atlas, here are the overall rates including both type 1 and type 2: 415 million adults have diabetes (1 in 11 adults) By 2040, 642 million adults (1 in 10 adults) are expected to have diabetes 46.5% of those with diabetes have not been diagnosed 1 in 7 births is affected by gestational diabetes 12% of global health expenditure is spent on diabetes ($673 billion) You can see an interactive map of global diabetes statistics at the IDF website. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the most current data is for 2012 (source): 29 million people in the United States (9.3 percent) have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. 1.7 million people aged 20 years or older were newly diagnosed with type or type 2 diabetes in 2012. Non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, and American Indian/Alaska Native adults are about twice as likely to have diagnosed with some form of diabetes as non-Hispanic white adults. 208,000 people younger than 20 years have been diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. 86 million adults aged 20 years and older have prediabetes. The percentage of U.S. adults with prediabetes is similar for non-Hispanic whites (35 percent), non-Hispanic blacks (39 percent), and Hispanics (38 percent). Similar data is available from a study called Prevalence and Incidence Trends for Diagnosed Diabetes Among Adults Aged 20 to 79 Years, United States, 1980-2012 published in Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). This study found that 49% to 52% of the adult population had either diabetes or prediabetes. Then came the most stunning number: 83% of adults over 65 have either diabetes or prediabetes! Thankfully, the authors of this s Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevalence

Diabetes Prevalence

Tweet Since 1996, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK has risen from 1.4 million to 3.5 million. Taking into account the number of people likely to be living with undiagnosed diabetes, the number of people living with diabetes in the UK is over 4 million. Diabetes prevalence in the UK is estimated to rise to 5 million by 2025. Type 2 diabetes in particular has been growing at the particularly high rate and is now one of the world’s most common long term health conditions. UK diabetes prevalence Currently, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK is estimated to be 3.5 million. [16] It is predicted that up to 549,000 people in the UK have diabetes that is yet to be diagnosed. This means that, including the number of undiagnosed people, there is estimated to be over 4 million people living with diabetes in the UK at present. This represents 6% of the UK population or 1 in every 16 people having diabetes (diagnosed and undiagnosed). The prevalence of diabetes in the UK (for adults) is broken down as follows: How many people have diabetes in the UK Country Number of People England 2,913,538 Northern Ireland 84,836 Scotland 271,312 Wales 183,348 The majority of these cases are of type 2 diabetes, which has been linked to increasing cases of obesity. Statistics suggest that a slightly higher proportion of adult men have diabetes. Men account for 56 per cent of UK adults with diabetes and women account for 44 per cent. World diabetes prevalence It is estimated that 415 million people are living with diabetes in the world, which is estimated to be 1 in 11 of the world’s adult population. 46% of people with diabetes are undiagnosed. The figure is expected to rise to 642 million people living with diabetes worldwide by 2040. Prevalence across Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Has your doctor diagnosed you with gestational diabetes (GD or GDM), a form of diabetes that appears only during pregnancy? While it might feel overwhelming at first, it turns out that this pregnancy complication is much more common than you might think. In fact, up to 9.2 percent of pregnant women have GD, according to a 2014 analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Know that with careful monitoring and treatment, it can be managed, and you can have a safe and healthy pregnancy. READ MORE: What causes gestational diabetes? Who's most at risk? What are the symptoms? How is it diagnosed? What are the complications? How can you prevent gestational diabetes? How is it treated? What happens to mom and baby after birth? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes usually starts between week 24 and week 28 of pregnancy when hormones from the placenta block insulin — a hormone produced in the pancreas that regulates the body's metabolism of fats and carbs and helps the body turn sugar into energy — from doing its job and prevent the body from regulating the increased blood sugar of pregnancy effectively. This causes hyperglycemia (or high levels of sugar in the blood), which can damage the nerves, blood vessels and organs in your body. Who’s most at risk for gestational diabetes? While researchers aren't certain why some women get gestational diabetes while others don’t, they do know that you may be at an increased risk if: You are overweight. Having a BMI of 30 or more going into pregnancy is one of the most common risk factors for gestational diabetes because the extra weight affects insulin's ability to properly keep blood sugar levels in check. You have a higher level of abdominal fat. Recent research published in the American Di Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sex

Diabetes And Sex

Here is some more uplifting statistics. Women who have had gestational diabetes or have given birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds are at an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes later in life. The prevalence of diabetes is at least 2 – 4 times higher among African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, and Asian/Pacific Islander women than among white women. The risk for diabetes also increases with ag e. Because of the increasing lifespan of women and the rapid growth of minority populations, the number of women in the United States at high risk for diabetes and its complications is increasing. And to top all this off, when glucose isn’t under good control, a woman’s sex life can suffer. If your sugar is up, your libido may be down! Most of us associate diabetes and sexual problems with hubby, and indeed it is (hence all the TV commercials), yet women are effected, albeit somewhat indirectly also. Diabetes educator Ann Albright, PhD, RD says, “It’s not diabetes per se that harms your intimate life. It’s the complications of uncontrolled blood sugar levels that cause problems for both men and women — the only difference is that many women simply aren’t as aware of this complication as men are.” This problem was not widely recognized until a landmark study in 1971 showed, “35% of women with diabetes reported being unable to have an orgasm during intercourse, compared to just 6% of the women who didn’t have diabetes.” The mechanism was thought to be a decreased lubrication that may arise from elevated blood sugars. This dryness may mimic what is commonly seen in menopause where lubrication also declines which results in decreased sensitivity and even pain with intercourse. Let’s face it, if it hurts it’s hard to find pleasu Continue reading >>

Labour And Birth With Type 1 Or 2 Diabetes

Labour And Birth With Type 1 Or 2 Diabetes

Your birth experience may be different to the one that you had expected, and this can be hard to come to terms with. Finding out what might happen could help you feel mentally prepared for what may lie ahead. It can help to remember that although the birth itself is important, it is just one step in the journey towards having your baby. Where to give birth with type 1 or 2 diabetes If you have diabetes, it is recommended that you give birth in a hospital with the support of a consultant-led maternity team. It is not unusual for babies of mothers with diabetes to be larger than normal, which could lead to birth difficulties such as shoulder dystocia (in which the baby’s shoulder gets stuck during the birth). This means that options such as home birth are unlikely to be recommended. When to give birth with type 1 or 2 diabetes You will be advised to give birth early if you have diabetes. This is to reduce the risk of stillbirth. It is recommended by NICE that women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and no other complications should give birth between 37 weeks and 38 weeks +6 days – either by being induced or having a planned caesarean. If you have any complications that pose a risk to you or the baby, you might be offered an even earlier delivery. 'I had always been aware that I would be on the ward for high-risk cases. I am so grateful to be pregnant, I’m not going to complain about stuff like that. If there is an issue, I would rather be ready for it.' Svenja, mum-to-be How to give birth with type 1 or 2 diabetes As the recommendation is to give birth by 38+6 weeks, you are likely to be offered an induction or a caesarean section. Diabetes is not in itself a reason that you cannot have vaginal birth. Unless there are other complications there is no reason this should Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Pcos

Gestational Diabetes And Pcos

What is Gestational Diabetes and what does it mean to my unborn baby? Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is a common cause of female infertility because it causes many types of menstrual irregularities, including the absence of a period.4 If you don’t ovulate or this process is impaired, then pregnancy is unlikely. So treating PCOS symptoms and addressing a condition called Insulin Resistance, which influences PCOS, is very important for women wishing to conceive.4 If a woman does conceive in spite of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome it is not all smooth sailing. Unfortunately, there will be a new series of health issues concerning PCOS and pregnancy.3 Women with PCOS have a higher risk of several pregnancy problems, including gestational diabetes, miscarriage, premature delivery, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and babies with high birth weight.8 It is crucial for women with PCOS to work closely with their obstetrician during pregnancy to minimize the risk of these problems. What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes happens when a pregnant woman’s body has an impaired ability to process glucose. This results in high blood glucose levels that can cause serious complications for the woman and her growing baby.9 During pregnancy elevated blood sugar can be passed to the baby through the placenta producing a larger baby with potentially immature lungs. A large baby also means a more dangerous birth for both mother and child. Gestational diabetes affects about seven percent of all pregnancies and usually develops after the 20th week.5 Since gestational diabetes can be the cause of serious complications for both mother and baby, it is crucial to be under an obstetrician’s care, especially if you have PCOS or present with any other risk factors. Since PCOS in itself Continue reading >>

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