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How Many Type 1 Diabetics Are There In The World?

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is the type of diabetes that typically develops in children and in young adults. In type 1 diabetes the body stops making insulin and the blood sugar (glucose) level goes very high. Treatment to control the blood glucose level is with insulin injections and a healthy diet. Other treatments aim to reduce the risk of complications. They include reducing blood pressure if it is high and advice to lead a healthy lifestyle. What is type 1 diabetes? What is type 1 diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Diabetes mellitus (just called diabetes from now on) occurs when the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood becomes higher than normal. There are two main types of diabetes. These are called type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes usually first develops in children or young adults. In the UK about 1 in 300 people develop type 1 diabetes at some stage. With type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

Diabetesvoice December 2011 €¢ Volume 56 €¢ Special Issue 26

Diabetesvoice December 2011 €¢ Volume 56 €¢ Special Issue 26

estimating the worldwide burden of type 1 diabetes Leonor Guariguata Regional trends An estimated 24% of all children with type 1 diabetes live in the European region, where the most reliable and up-to-date estimates of the burden of diabetes are available. Two large in- ternational collaborative projects, the Diabetes Mondiale study (DiaMond) and the Europe and Diabetes study (EURODIAB) have been instrumental in monitoring developments in the in- cidence of type 1 diabetes in children, providing us with some of the best evi- dence on trends and prevalence for any region. These studies have shown that the rate of new cases in many countries is highest among younger children.2 There are a number of clinical implica- tions for this overall drop in the ages at which young people are being diag- nosed with type 1 diabetes. Diagnosis in many countries, the rate of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes is highest among younger children. Type 1 diabetes is one of the most com- mon endocrine and metabolic condi- tions among children. According to the latest edition of the Diabetes Atlas, an estimated 490,100 children below the age of 15 years are living with type 1 diabetes.1 A further 77,800 children un- der the age of 15 are expected to develop the disease in 2011 and there is evidence that the incidence is rising rapidly, es- pecially among the youngest children.2-4 Type 1 diabetes is increasing steeply in some central and eastern European countries, where the disease remains less common than in other regions.5 If these trends continue, it is inevitable that the total prevalence of people with type 1 diabetes will increase in coming years. providing an accurate estimate of the number of children with type 1 diabetes is an essential component of planning health policy, assessing th Continue reading >>

The Search For What Triggers Type 1 Diabetes

The Search For What Triggers Type 1 Diabetes

(CNN)People are often surprised to learn that Shelby Payne has type 1 diabetes -- because her identical twin sister, Sydney, does not. "Everyone's like, 'Wow, how in the world does (my sister) not have it?' " said Payne, 23, who once played forward on Stanford's soccer team, like her sister. "They can't really fathom it." Though experts agree that genetics influence who gets type 1 diabetes, Payne's story suggests that something other than genes must also be at play. And some researchers are focusing in on one family of viruses in particular. A new study from Finland joins decades of research suggesting that enteroviruses, which include over 100 individual virus types, may play a key role in triggering type 1 diabetes, which has no cure. In autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, the immune system backfires. Antibodies, small proteins that attack unwelcome guests like bacteria and viruses, in rare cases attack one's own cells. In Payne's case, those happen to be the insulin-producing cells of her pancreas. Without the ability to produce insulin, Payne has to work tirelessly to monitor her blood sugar levels. "You can't even turn off for five minutes," she said. "I have this big graph in my mind. When I wake up, everything starts off at zero." Doctors are not sure whether and how viruses trigger type 1 diabetes, but many point to a special property of enteroviruses: These viruses have a "tropism," or attraction, to those same insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, according to Dr. Heikki Hyöty, who led the new study at the University of Tampere in Finland. Hyöty and others believe the virus establishes a chronic infection in these cells, possibly leading to inflammation and self-attacking antibodies, known as autoantibodies. However, it is far from a smoking gun Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Type 1 Diabetes Statistics

5 Surprising Type 1 Diabetes Statistics

To be diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes is to become your own personal medical professional. Sometimes I think a diagnosis should come with a medical degree, because we have to learn so much about diabetes so quickly. But even if you’ve been managing diabetes for a long time like I have, every now and then, you still come across new information that surprises you. Here are five surprising type 1 diabestes statistics you may not have known: 1. The Number of Children Diagnosed T1 in the United States is Virtually the Same Number as the Number of Adults. This is surprising, because so many people still think of T1 as “juvenile diabetes.” The name was changed, in part, to reflect the reality, that Type 1 diabetes can happen just as often in a young adult as a child. Hence, according to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, the number of children diagnosed T1 is over 15,000. Same for the diagnosed adults. And overall, of course, most people who have “juvenile diabetes” are adults – 85 percent. 2. A Majority of People with Diabetes Don’t Make Use of Technology That Can Help. A recent study presented at a joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society found that nearly 70 percent of us don’t extract data about our blood sugar levels from our insulin pumps or other self-monitoring devices. Because of this, these devices “are not being used to their full potential,” says Dr. Jenise Wong, the study’s principal investigator, in Science Daily. 3. Hypos Happen, Even in Hospitals. A recent audit of hospital stays by people with diabetes found that 30 percent of Type 1 patients admitted to hospitals experienced “a severe hypo within the last seven days.” (They define severe as a blood glucose level below 3.0 mmol/l.) D Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Type 1

Diabetes, Type 1

YESTERDAY In the 1950s, about one in five people died within 20 years after a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. One in three people died within 25 years of diagnosis. About one in four people developed kidney failure within 25 years of a type 1 diabetes diagnosis. Doctors could not detect early kidney disease and had no tools for slowing its progression to kidney failure. Survival after kidney failure was poor, with one of 10 patients dying each year. About 90 percent of people with type 1 diabetes developed diabetic retinopathy within 25 years of diagnosis. Blindness from diabetic retinopathy was responsible for about 12 percent of new cases of blindness between the ages of 45 and 74. Studies had not proven the value of laser surgery in reducing blindness. Major birth defects in the offspring of mothers with type 1 diabetes were three times higher than in the general population. Patients relied on injections of animal-derived insulin. The insulin pump would soon be introduced but would not become widely used for years. Studies had not yet shown the need for intensive glucose control to delay or prevent the debilitating eye, nerve, kidney, heart, and blood vessel complications of diabetes. Also, the importance of blood pressure control in preventing complications had not been established yet. Patients monitored their glucose levels with urine tests, which recognized high but not dangerously low glucose levels and reflected past, not current, glucose levels. More reliable methods for testing glucose levels in the blood had not been developed yet. Researchers had just discovered autoimmunity as the underlying cause of type 1 diabetes. However, they couldn’t assess an individual’s level of risk for developing type 1 diabetes, and they didn’t know enough to even consider Continue reading >>

Uk Fifth Highest In World For Child Type 1 Diabetes

Uk Fifth Highest In World For Child Type 1 Diabetes

The UK ranks the fifth highest in the world for the rate of children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, figures reveal. Each year in the UK more than 24 in every 100,000 children aged 14 and younger are told that they have this form of diabetes, which must be treated with insulin. Experts say it is unclear why the figure is so high. Unlike type 2 diabetes, type 1 is not linked to obesity or lifestyle. Genes do appear to play a role. The government said it had introduced an "incentive scheme" to ensure that every child has the best care possible, along with regional networks to share expertise in children's diabetes care across the NHS. The league table, based on estimates from the International Diabetes Federation, includes most countries - apart from a few African nations, where often the rate of type 1 incidence is unknown. Of all the countries with data, only Finland, Sweden, Saudi Arabia and Norway have higher rates than the UK. The UK rate is double that in France (12.2 per 100,000) and Italy (12.1 per 100,000). UK charities Diabetes UK and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) say it is vital that people are aware of the symptoms of type 1 diabetes because if left undiagnosed and untreated, it can lead to serious illness and even death. A quarter of the 2,000 children a year who develop diabetes are only diagnosed once they are already seriously ill. Increasingly common Barbara Young, chief executive of Diabetes UK, said: "We do not fully understand why more children in the UK are developing type 1 diabetes than almost anywhere else in the world. But the fact that the rate is so high here in the UK means it is especially important that parents know the symptoms. "At the moment, poor understanding of type 1 diabetes symptoms is one of the main reasons that Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Figures

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Figures

The incidence of type 1 diabetes is growing at an alarming rate. View the latest figures and links to national public information resources below. Quick facts Approximately 400,000 people are currently living with type 1 diabetes in the UK, with over 29,000 of them children Incidence is increasing by about four per cent each year, particularly in children under five, with a five percent increase each year in this age group over the last 20 years Type 1 diabetes affects 97 per cent of all children with diabetes in England 90 per cent of people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes have no family history of the condition Although it used to be referred to as ‘juvenile diabetes’, around half of newly diagnosed cases are in people over the age of 18 The UK has one of the highest rates of type 1 diabetes in the world, for reasons that are currently unknown A person with type 1 diabetes will have around 65,000 injections and measure their blood glucose over 80,000 times in their lifetime Public information resources National Diabetes Audit – One of the largest annual clinical audits in the world. It measures the effectiveness of diabetes care against National Institute of Clinical Excellence clinical guidelines and quality standards. Quality and Outcomes Framework – This is the annual programme that details GP practice achievement results and rewards practices for the achievement of quality care. The QOF awards practices achievement points for managing some of the most common chronic diseases, diabetes being one. Continue reading >>

Diabetes By The Numbers: Facts, Statistics, And You

Diabetes By The Numbers: Facts, Statistics, And You

Insulin acts as a “key.” It allows the glucose to go from the blood into the cells. It also helps you store energy. Insulin is a vital part of metabolism. Without it, your body isn’t able to function or perform properly. Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to serious complications. It can cause damage to small and large blood vessels and organs. This can often lead to heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, nerve damage, and eye disease. Managing diabetes requires keeping track of blood glucose levels. Treatment may include taking insulin or other medications. Healthy eating habits and regular exercise can also help manage diabetes. Types of Diabetes There are different types of diabetes. Each has something to do with insulin and blood glucose. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is a disorder in which the pancreas cannot longer produce insulin. It used to be called juvenile diabetes. It’s also sometimes called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. There is no cure. If you have it, you must take insulin to survive. Type 2 diabetes In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas can produce insulin, at least initially. But the body doesn’t respond to it or use it effectively. This is called insulin resistance. Over time, the ability of the pancreas to make insulin decreases. Then blood sugars go up. Some, but not all people with type 2 diabetes need to take insulin. Most of the time a proper diet, exercise, and medications can manage the disease. Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy. According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), women with gestational diabetes have a 35 to 60 percent chance of developing type 2 diabetes within 20 years. Prediabetes When blood glucose levels are higher than they should be, but no Continue reading >>

Is There Connection Between Type 1 Diabetes And Cleanliness? Finland Serves As A Model.

Is There Connection Between Type 1 Diabetes And Cleanliness? Finland Serves As A Model.

It may come as a surprise that Finland — one of the least polluted, wealthiest countries, where average life expectancy is among the world’s highest — has the highest rate of Type 1 diabetes. Each year, there are about 58 cases diagnosed per 100,000 children; in the United States there are 24 cases per 100,000, according to the International Diabetes Federation. Some researchers suspect there may be a connection between Finland’s cleanliness and the incidence of the disease there. They are investigating whether the lack of exposure to a specific group of bacteria found in the intestine may be causing weaker immune systems in Finnish children, making them more susceptible to Type 1 diabetes. This so-called hygiene hypothesis — that cleaner living can result in a weaker immune system — has also been linked to ailments such as asthma, allergies and other autoimmune diseases. “We are working along the idea that we have a trigger which most likely is an infectious agent,” said Mikael Knip, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Helsinki who has been studying diabetes for 30 years. “There is an association between such infections and appearance of antibodies.” Just as there are microbes that trigger the disease, Knip says there are also some bacterial or viral infections that, if they occur at an early age, can protect a young child from developing Type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, which affects approximately 37 million people worldwide, is an autoimmune disease in which the body does not produce sufficient insulin, a hormone needed to break down sugars. Typically diagnosed in children, teens and young adults, the disease can eventually damage the eyes and organs such as the kidneys, and it increases the likelihood of stroke and heart failure. Type Continue reading >>

On World Diabetes Day 2017, What Is Diabetes, What’s The Difference Between Types 1 And 2 And What Are The Signs?

On World Diabetes Day 2017, What Is Diabetes, What’s The Difference Between Types 1 And 2 And What Are The Signs?

DIABETES is a life-long health condition which affects around 3.5 million people in the UK alone. Today is World Diabetes Day, and experts estimate there are up to 549,000 people living with diabetes who don't know it yet. But what is it exactly and what are the difference between the two types? Getty Images What is diabetes? It is a condition caused by high levels of glucose - or sugar - in the blood. Glucose levels are so high because the body is unable to properly use it. In people diagnosed with diabetes, their pancreas doesn't produce any insulin, or not enough insulin. Getty Images Insulin is a hormone typically produced by the pancreas and allows glucose to enter the cells in the body, where it's used for energy. What are the signs to look out for with diabetes? The common signs you may have diabetes include: going to the toilet a lot, especially at night being really thirsty feeling more tired than usual losing weight, without trying to genital itching or thrush cuts and wounds that take longer to heal blurred vision The symptoms are caused by high levels of glucose remaining in the blood, where it cannot be used as energy. These signs are common in children and adults alike. But, adults suffering type 1 diabetes can find it harder to recognise their symptoms. Diabetes UK's four T's campaign aims to raise awareness of the key signs. What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? All types of diabetes cause blood glucose levels to be higher than normal, but the two different types do this in different ways. The distinction lies in what is causing the lack of insulin - often described as the key, that allows glucose to unlock the door to the cells. With type 1 diabetes, a person’s pancreas produces no insulin, but in type 2 cells in the body become r Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus (DM), is a metabolic disorder in which the body cannot properly store and use sugar. It affects the body's ability to use glucose, a type of sugar found in the blood, as fuel. This happens because the body does not produce enough insulin, or the cells do not correctly respond to insulin to use glucose as energy. Insulin is a type of hormone produced by the pancreas to regulate how blood sugar becomes energy. An imbalance of insulin or resistance to insulin causes diabetes. Diabetes is linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, vision loss, neurological conditions, and damage to blood vessels and organs. There is type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. They have different causes and risk factors, and different lines of treatment. This article will compare the similarities and differences of types 1 and 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnancy and typically resolves after childbirth. However, having gestational diabetes also increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, so patients are often screened for type 2 diabetes at a later date. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people in the United States (U.S.) have diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1. For every person with type 1 diabetes, 20 will have type 2. Type 2 can be hereditary, but excess weight, a lack of exercise and an unhealthy diet increase At least a third of people in the U.S. will develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. Both types can lead to heart attack, stroke, nerve damage, kidney damage, and possible amputation of limbs. Causes In type 1 diabetes, the immune system mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. These cells are destro Continue reading >>

Epidemiology Of Type 1 Diabetes

Epidemiology Of Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes may present at any age, but most typically presents in early life with a peak around the time of puberty. Its incidence varies 50–100-fold around the world, with the highest rates in northern Europe and in individuals of European extraction. Both sexes are equally affected in childhood, but men are more commonly affected in early adult life. The distinction between type 1 and type 2 diabetes becomes blurred in later life, and the true lifetime incidence of the condition is therefore unknown. A variant form known as latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) has been described. The incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes is rising rapidly in all populations, especially in the under 5-year-old age group, with a doubling time of less than 20 years in Europe. The increasing incidence of type 1 diabetes suggests a major environmental contribution, but the role of specific factors such as viruses remains controversial. Incidence rates Type 1 diabetes has historically been most prevalent in populations of European origin, but is becoming more frequent in other ethnic groups. Within Europe the highest rates of childhood diabetes are found in Scandinavia and north-west Europe, with an incidence range from 57.4 cases/100,000 per year in Finland to 3.9/100,000 in Macedonia for children aged 0–14 years.[1] Genetically related populations may differ in incidence: for example, type 1 diabetes is more common in Norwegians than in Icelanders of largely Norwegian descent, while Finnish children have a threefold risk compared with Estonians.[2] The incidence of type 1 diabetes remains relatively low in populations of non-European descent around the world, but many of these now report a rising incidence of the disease. Kuwait, for example, now has an incidence of 22.3/ Continue reading >>

The Rise Of Childhood Type 1 Diabetes In The 20th Century

The Rise Of Childhood Type 1 Diabetes In The 20th Century

The incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes increased worldwide in the closing decades of the 20th century, but the origins of this increase are poorly documented. A search through the early literature revealed a number of useful but neglected sources, particularly in Scandinavia. While these do not meet the exacting standards of more recent surveys, tentative conclusions can be drawn concerning long-term changes in the demography of the disease. Childhood type 1 diabetes was rare but well recognized before the introduction of insulin. Low incidence and prevalence rates were recorded in several countries over the period 1920–1950, and one carefully performed study showed no change in childhood incidence over the period 1925–1955. An almost simultaneous upturn was documented in several countries around the mid-century. The overall pattern since then is one of linear increase, with evidence of a plateau in some high-incidence populations and of a catch-up phenomenon in some low-incidence areas. Steep rises in the age-group under 5 years have been recorded recently. The disease process underlying type 1 diabetes has changed over time and continues to evolve. Understanding why and how this produced the pandemic of childhood diabetes would be an important step toward reversing it. At the start of the 20th century, childhood diabetes was rare and rapidly fatal. By its end, some 3–4 children per 1,000 in Western countries would require insulin treatment by the age of 20 years, and a steady rise in incidence had been reported from many other parts of the world. This increase has been extensively documented over the past two decades, over which time standard means of data collection have been agreed, central registries have been established, and numerous epidemiological stu Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics Around The World

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics Around The World

Type 2 diabetes statistics worldwide continue to mount to epidemic proportions. And it's fair to say that type 2 diabetes is now one of the most common chronic diseases around the globe. And if you've wondered just how many people are affected by it? These statistics will help showcase the full extent of what's occurring on a global scale. When you're finished reading, please share our infographic (below) to help inform others. JUMP TO: Type 1 vs. type 2 diabetes | Risk factors for diabetes | Complications of diabetes | Worldwide stats | US | UK | Australia | Canada | India | China | Ethnicity and type 2 diabetes | How to lower your risk of diabetes | View/share our infographic Type 1 vs. Type 2 Diabetes Although most available statistics do not differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, according to the CDC, 90-95% of all cases of diabetes are type 2, though many stats state it is closer to 95%. Type 1 diabetes is much less common than type 2, making up 5% of all cases of diabetes. Type 1 is sometimes referred to as “childhood onset diabetes” because it is frequently recognized early on, though it still can develop later in life. While both types of diabetes involve high blood sugar levels, the origins of the high blood sugar are different. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that attacks the pancreas, causing it to stop producing insulin. Without insulin, sugar from the food you eat cannot get into body cells and be used for energy. Because of this, type 1 diabetics must take shots of insulin with meals in order to survive. In type 2 diabetes, the condition results from the body’s ineffective use of insulin, and generally comes down to one of, or a combination of two things – insulin resistance or pancreatic function decline. Insulin resistance is Continue reading >>

Living With Type 1 In A Type 2 World

Living With Type 1 In A Type 2 World

Not all diabetes is created equal. Only about 5 percent of people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. This means that 95 percent of people living with diabetes have type 2. While the two conditions are often lumped together, they are very different. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults and was previously known as juvenile diabetes. It is an autoimmune disease where the body’s immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Type 2 diabetes is when your body is insulin resistant, and it generally occurs later in life and is more closely tied with metabolic syndrome and lifestyle factors, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Nikki Sheriff, Julia Flaherty, Jewels Doskicz, and Chris Clement all have type 1 diabetes, and they shared their thoughts on what it is like living with type 1 in a type 2 world. Are people with type 1 forgotten? Nikki: I do feel like type 1 diabetics get forgotten in the sense that we are grouped together with type 2 diabetics. People who don't understand diabetes assume we are all the same, including type 2 diabetics. I feel like in my experience, it's only us with type 1 and the people closest to us that truly understand the difference. Julia: Type 1 can often appear to be secretive to the public, which is not exactly fair to those managing the condition, because this implies it should be hidden. However, for those managing it, we know how identifiable the symptoms are, how brutal the randomness of the disease is, and how obnoxious the attention it requires is. People with type 1 often get put into a corner because of the lack of awareness in our communities. Jewels: Well, first, you have to consider this Continue reading >>

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