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How Many Pieces Of Pizza Can A Diabetic Eat

Is It Okay To Eat Thin Crust Pizza?

Is It Okay To Eat Thin Crust Pizza?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I used to eat regular pizza and found my blood sugar went sky high. I pretty much stopped eating pizza but am now wondering if I can have thin crust pizza. I am a type 2 Diabetic on pills. Thanks. Not that my opinion matters, and im not a doctor and sorry if i sound rather frustrated (its not at you) but im merely just saying this because your here for suggestions. I was told that pizza can be very nutritous as long as it has veggies added to it, that is thin crust if at all possible and no extra cheese. And only two slices at the most. I guess your answer depends on your carb tolerance....1 slice of Pizza Hut Thin & Crispy pepperoni lovers pizza is 22 carbs, 1 slice of Thin & Crispy supreme is 23 carbs. For me, there is something in pizza that cause me to sky rocket....not sure if its the crust or the sauce. I had one piece of thin crust cheese pizza from Pizza hut and 2 hrs later was 180! I did try it again a few months later after taking a dose of apple cider vinegar and had 2 pieces...2 hrs later it was in the 120's...the vinegar is rough to stomach, but does work on post-meal levels...but I still had a higher fasting the next morning. If I were you and this was something I REALLY missed, try having a slice, check 1 hr and 2 hrs after your first bite and see how much it goes up...if your levels aren't bad then you may be able to tolerate it on occasion. I am a type 1 on the pump so my situation is different. I have had better luck bolusing with the tin crust pizza tha nregular. The thin has quite a bit less carbs then the regular pizza. I go for the veggie pizza and it does work very well Continue reading >>

Foods’ Strange Tricks

Foods’ Strange Tricks

You sit down to eat. How will your meal affect your blood glucose? If you’re on insulin, how much should you take? Turns out that counting carbohydrate will not always give you the answer. Food can affect you in strange ways. Do you know about the pizza effect? In a blog on glycemic index, I mentioned how plain pizza had a much higher glycemic index than a deluxe pizza with all the toppings. Plain dough and sauce raises your blood glucose way faster. What I didn’t mention was that all that carbohydrate in the deluxe pizza will get into your bloodstream eventually. You just don’t know when, unless you check your blood glucose every hour for four hours or even more. That’s because the fats and protein in the toppings slow down the absorption of carbohydrate. As a result, your blood glucose might spike two to five hours after the meal. Other meals that combine lots of carbohydrate with fats and/or proteins could have the same effect. Jan Chait posted here five years ago about a big spaghetti fest she had with her husband. The pasta was covered with a fatty sauce, with a side of garlic bread and lots of butter. Because of the fats (the pizza effect,) her blood glucose levels were up for two days, instead of just spiking high for an hour or two. One commenter posted on HealingWell.com that he injected enough insulin to cover the carbohydrate in a big Chinese meal, including lots of fried food. Two hours after eating, his glucose was 171, the same as it had been before the meal. But three hours later his sugar was over 500! It took him days to get back in control. Sometimes the pizza effect is helpful, like at bedtime. A bedtime snack that includes a small amount of fat and protein can help keep overnight levels from going too low. That way you don’t get a rebound e Continue reading >>

Pizza And Diabetes: How To Eat Pizza Without Sabotaging Your Blood Sugars

Pizza And Diabetes: How To Eat Pizza Without Sabotaging Your Blood Sugars

Pizza and Diabetes: How to Eat Pizza Without Sabotaging Your Blood Sugars Pizza and Diabetes: How to Eat Pizza Without Sabotaging Your Blood Sugars A Type 1 writer gives guidelines on how to dose insulin so you can occasionally indulge in high-carb/high-fat foods without making your blood sugars soar. Diabetes doesn't have to end your love affair with pizza. If you're going to occasionally indulge, do some experimenting and take good notes to figure out the right way to dose your insulin.Photo by Cel Lisboa on Unsplash Just because you live with type 1 diabetes doesnt mean you cant enjoy a few slices of pizza, or lasagna, or Chinese food, or even...a cupcake with buttercream frosting! (Note: If youre a hardcore low-carber and you can willfully resist cake and pizza every day of the week, all year long, this article simply isnt for you!) Personally, I make sure that most of my diet (80 to 90%) consists of real food, and is generally very low-carb, too. And then that leaves room for the occasional gluten-free carb-loaded dessert (I love baking!) or one of my favorite gluten-free pizzas (white pizza with lots of cheese and red onions...please!). But managing your blood sugar around those luxury items that are both loaded with carbs and loaded with fat means your usual insulin dosing protocol isnt going to work. This applies to foods including: Lasagna (most cheese & pasta Italian dishes, actually) Cakes & Cupcakes with buttercream frosting Surprisingly, there are foods that you would think should be on this list that Ive found simply dont qualify because they do digest at a more normal rate, like cheesecake! So you really need to take good notes when indulging to figure out what other foods should be on this list for you. Mostly, I think youll find that the 5 listed above Continue reading >>

Eating Out When You Have Diabetes

Eating Out When You Have Diabetes

en espaolComer fuera de casa cuando tienes diabetes Whether it's the local pizza joint after a game, the food court at the mall, or barbecued ribs on your best friend's back porch, eating out is probably a part of your social scene. You don't want to miss the fun just because you have to watch what you eat, and the good news is that you don't have to. You can pretty much eat the same foods as your friends and family you just have to keep track of what you eat and enjoy certain foods in moderation. If you're choosing where to eat, think about the places that offer you the most options even fast-food places have healthy choices on their menus. Whenever possible, look for nutritional facts on the meal you plan to order like calorie, carbohydrate, and fat content. This information is available in many chain restaurants (you may need to ask for it) or online. Don't worry you're not limited to places that serve only soy burgers and carrot sticks. If you can order a meal that includes a good balance of proteins, fats, and carbohydrates, you're doing OK. But if you find that certain restaurants don't offer many vegetable choices or that they only serve fried food that's covered in cheese, you might want to pick a place that offers more options. You might find that there are more healthy breakfast choices like yogurt, fresh fruit, and scrambled eggs for you at the diner than at the coffeehouse, so convincing your friends to chow down on diner food is one option. But if your friends prefer the coffeehouse, one alternative is to buy something to drink and bring a snack in your backpack or purse that's easy to eat discreetly, like pretzels or raisins. Some people may be embarrassed or worried that the manager might give them a hard time, though. If you think you might be in a situ Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Pizza?

Can Diabetics Eat Pizza?

This is one of those yes and no questions, as it depends on the pizza in question. Pizza can be many things. On the one hand, it can be a thick, cheese-filled dough topped with a thick layer of gooey cheese along with loads of fatty, salty meats like pepperoni and sausage. On the other, pizza can be a thin whole wheat crust, topped with fresh tomatoes, a sprinkle of reduced fat cheese and loaded with veggies. Clearly, the type of pizza we're talking about is significant. In addition, how much to eat and how often to eat come into play. Consuming half of a large pizza (or more) would be extremely high in carbs, fat, and calories -- and is not recommended. However, eating a slice or two of pizza could more easily fit into a healthy eating plan. Also consider how often to eat pizza -- a few times a week is probably too much. Diabetes and pizza: What to do if you're a pizza fanatic? 1. Limit pizza intake and portion size. Consider trying to allow yourself pizza once or twice a month, and when you do enjoy it, try to limit your portion to one or two slices. 2. Choose healthier pizza options. Try rounding out the meal with a veggie-filled salad and some fruit. Choose thin crusts over thick or pan pizzas, and if your pizzeria offers whole wheat, give it a try. Ask them to go light on the cheese, skip the meats, and opt instead for fruits and veggies such as tomatoes, mushrooms, broccoli, pineapple, onions or peppers -- or any combination thereof. 3. Make your own pizza. You could also make your own pizza so you have more control over the toppings. You can make dough, buy dough or buy a pre-made crust. Use reduced fat cheese. You can make a quick pizza sauce by sauteing a bit of garlic in 1 tablespoon of olive oil, adding a 28 oz. can of crushed tomatoes, sprinkling of basil an Continue reading >>

The Great Pizza And Diabetes Experiment

The Great Pizza And Diabetes Experiment

I hate pizza. Sure, it has that great smell. Yeah, it has an amazing look, as steam rises up over a landscape of melted cheeses dotted with toasted veggies and crisp meats. Oh, and the taste is wonderful, a molten fusion of flavors that rocks the taste buds. But I still hate pizza. Because no matter what I do, it effs up my blood sugar. Big time. And I’m not alone. The problem is that every pizza is two glucose highs waiting to happen. There are fast sugars in the crust and in the sauce, and there are slow carbs in the cheeses and meats. And pizza’s challenges for the pancreatically-challenged are everywhere. Pan, hand-tossed, or thin crust? What toppings? How generous or stingy is the cook? Does one brand have more sugar in their sauce than another? And what about the slices? A “slice” of pizza has a published carb count in many cases, but rarely are pizzas cut uniformly. It’s a nightmare. In wondering how on earth we're supposed to deal with all of this, my solution has been to avoid pizza altogether. So you can imagine how I felt when the 'Mine team asked me to take on pizza as the next in our line of "great food experiments" that have included ketchup, coffee, and craft beer so far. Given that March is National Nutrition Month, it seemed like a perfect time for the so-called Great Diabetes and Pizza Experiment. Know Thy Enemy I started by studying the enemy. And there’s a lot of information out there, despite the fact that pizza sales are actually on the decline with only $38,504,164,116 in sales last year. For those of you who can’t count your commas, that's $38 billion! There are more than a dozen brands of pizza out there and they have a pretty big carb range. Or so it would appear at first glance. But something interesting is lurking in the math. A Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pizza: Can Diabetics Eat Pizza?

Diabetes And Pizza: Can Diabetics Eat Pizza?

When a person suffers from diabetes, he or she is always worried of everything that he or she eats. The disease is complicated and even a slight mistake as far as diet is concerned could be disastrous and damaging on the health. One such concern is about the inclusion of pizza in the diabetes meal plan. In this article, we shall deep dive and see if a person suffering from diabetes can have pizza it will be good or bad. So, join in for the article “Diabetes and Pizza: Can Diabetics Eat Pizza?” Risks Associated with Eating Pizza for Diabetics Let us look into the risks which eating of pizza can have in a person who suffers from diabetes: The crust of the pizza we love is made up of white flour. This white flour is rich in refined carbohydrates, something which is not considered healthy for diabetes patients. The crust of the pizza can give rise to the blood sugar levels of the body. Besides, the pizza we get in restaurants and fast food joints usually contain a lot of cheese. Cheese, can come in the way of healthy weight management and hence, pizza should be avoided. Besides, cheese is also known to contain too much of sugar, again not a healthy option for the diabetics. Pizza also tends to have very unhealthy toppings comprising meat, sausages, pepperoni, too much of salt, etc. which is really something that people suffering from diabetes should ideally avoid. Thus, pizza is not a very healthy option for the diabetics. However, it also depends on what type of pizza you are eating. If you can manage a pizza with a thin dough, light cheese, and healthy toppings, the fast food can be incorporated into your diet. The following paragraph explains some of the guidelines that you should keep in mind while you think of including pizza in your meal plan: Tips to Keep in Mind Continue reading >>

How Many Slices Of Pizza Can A Diabetic Have At One Time?

How Many Slices Of Pizza Can A Diabetic Have At One Time?

How many slices of pizza can a diabetic have at one time? Just curious. I do not have it at all but my uncle does well he actually has pre-diabetes Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: 2 slices of a medium supreme is all I can have for my carb count. Its actually the crust of the pizza that gets ya into trouble. Also the fat that is in it can delay blood sugar readings also. Its about 46 carbs for the pizza I eat out. Source(s): I am diabetic, been to a diabetic counselor and counts carbs I Have Diabetes And Eat Pizza Once A Week. But Eat Thin Crust- Vegi- And Only 2 Slices. I Read From The ADA That Its Ok. And My Sugar Level Doesn,t Go Up Much More Than Eating Other Food. Source(s): Destroy Diabetes Starting Today : Source(s): Secrets To Reverse Diabetes - It would depend on what his sugar level is at the time of the meal, how much he weighs, what the pizza has on it and how big the slices. I think you are concerned because of love but most diabetics learn to control their diabetes and how to take care of themselves. I am one diabetic who gets irritated when others interject their thoughts about my disease and what to do about it. well i dont think pizza has any sugar so i wouldnt be worried about diabetes but i would worry about your cholesterol I think this question violates the Community Guidelines Chat or rant, adult content, spam, insulting other members, show more I think this question violates the Terms of Service Harm to minors, violence or threats, harassment or privacy invasion, impersonation or misrepresentation, fraud or phishing, show more If you believe your intellectual property has been infringed and would like to file a complaint, please see our Copyright/IP Policy I think this answer violates the Community Guidelines Chat or rant Continue reading >>

How To Order Fast Food When You Have Diabetes

How To Order Fast Food When You Have Diabetes

Although anyone may develop type 2 diabetes, this kind of diabetes is often caused by poor lifestyle choices, such as being overweight and not being physically active. Controlling your diet by avoiding typical fast-food choices can play a large role in helping control your blood sugar levels — a must when managing type 2 diabetes. Taking this important step may even reduce the amount of medication you need to take each day. But there are many reasons that you might need to rely on fast-food restaurants. For instance, you may work late hours or be pressed for time, and fast food might be the most convenient, or even the only, option available to you. There's no denying that these quick-bite chains seem to be everywhere — the United States has about 7.52 fast-food restaurants per 100,000 residents, according to a study published in December 2011 in the journal Critical Public Health. If you do find yourself needing to order at the drive-thru, don't fret. The key is knowing what to order to get the nutrition you need without jeopardizing your health. Type 2 Diabetes: Better Fast-Food Choices Common sense says that fast food isn't likely to be on the preferred-foods list for people with diabetes. After all, a typical fast-food breakfast can put you at or over your daily limit for fat, cholesterol, and carbohydrates. But many fast-food restaurants offer smart choices that can help you get the nutrition you need with the convenience you desire. For starters, fast food doesn’t have to mean fat-laden fare. Planning ahead is key, says Jenny Dejesus, NP, CDE, a diabetes educator at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City. Many fast-food chains now feature healthier choices, and these are the restaurants you want to go to. “If possible, look at the menu ahead of time Continue reading >>

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

David Kendall, M.D., is the chief scientific and medical officer of the The American Diabetes Association. The group’s 71st Scientific Sessions begin Friday in San Diego, California, with presentations of the latest research, treatment recommendations and advances toward a cure for diabetes. Each year diabetes accounts for more deaths than breast cancer and AIDS combined. While diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) is ever more manageable because of advances in medication, a better understanding of blood glucose monitoring and new technologies for delivering insulin, uncontrolled or undiagnosed diabetes still remains the leading cause of blindness in adults, kidney failure and amputation. There are many myths about diabetes - myths that can do much harm. Many believe that diabetes is “just a touch of sugar,” or only something we develop in later life. Although diabetes is manageable, the diabetes epidemic continues to grow; every 17 seconds someone is diagnosed with diabetes and at the current rate, one in three people in the U.S. will have diabetes by the year 2050. Knowing the facts (and your own risk) can help all of us fight the misconceptions associated with this awful disease and ultimately stop diabetes. So take a minute to learn the facts about diabetes. The more we know, the better equipped we are to detect, prevent and treat diabetes and its deadly complications. 1) Myth: Diabetes is really no big deal. Fact: As I’ve already noted, diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. The risk of heart problems is more than twice as high in people with diabetes and two out of three people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke. Uncontrolled diabetes also leads to a host of other complications. 2) Myth: Eating too much sugar cause Continue reading >>

Best Low Carb Pizza For Diabetics Ever 4

Best Low Carb Pizza For Diabetics Ever 4

All hail FAT HEAD pizza crust, the best low carb, pizza for diabetics EVER!!! The crust’s recipe comes from Tom Naughton’s Fat Head site, Tom’s a super cool dude and some say he’s EVEN funnier than me… it’s true. :) Mouthwatering Pizza Pictures! Best Low Carb Pizza Recipe Low Carb Pizza Topping Preparation When you first start your ‘low carb paleo’ journey, eating a variety of foods is important for some. Once I discovered these recipes Low Carb Pizza Crust, Low Carb Faux Spaghetti and Low Carb Paleo Chili, I knew that I could survive and thrive on a ‘low carb paleo’ meal plan. Today I rarely eat replacement foods like this pizza, I have gravitated to simpler foods typically eating fatty meats and leafy green veggies for most of my meals. The low carb pizza crust in this post truly is THE best pizza crust I’ve ever tasted, bar none. Even better, its a great low carb pizza for diabetics … too! :) Diabetes Friendly Pizza Crust Here is the recipe post on Fat Head Crust Ingredients: 1 1/2 cups shredded mozzarella ¾ cup almond flour 2 tbs cream cheese 1 egg Garlic salt Parchment paper and cookie sheet. Instructions: put mozzarella & cream cheese in a medium size microwaveable bowl Microwave for 1 min, stir and then another 30 sec, stir (very hot!) Wet hands and spread “dough” thin on parchment paper. It should spread evenly with dough-like consistency (if “stringy” then your cheese has hardened too much— just put it back in the microwave for maybe another 20 seconds) Dock (poke rows of holes) with a fork to avoid bubbling Sprinkle with garlic salt Put in 425 degree oven After about 8 minutes, check it and poke holes where any large bubbles may be. Continue cooking for a total 12-14 min, or until slightly brown on top. Note: If you like your Continue reading >>

Too Many Carbs In Pizza To Give Insulin??

Too Many Carbs In Pizza To Give Insulin??

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Too many carbs in pizza to give insulin?? I am newly diagnosed and new to carb counting so easily confused! I have just ordered a pizza to share with my other half, each slice is roughly 20g of carbs and I will have 6 slices, so that's 120g of carbs. I'll also be getting some cheesy fries which roughly seem to be 40g, so that totals 160g of carbs for my meal. I'm currently giving 1unit to 10g, so I'll need to give 16units... that seems like so much. I've never given more than 9. Is it okay to give 16units in one go and in one site? Pizza is the hardest to sort out because of the affect of fat. When I ate 'normal' I'd split my dose. For example I'd have to give 32 units for that meal so I'd take half 30 minutes before then the rest about an hour after eating. I'd test like mad then and correct as needed. Never cracked it. One of the reasons I went lchf as soon as I learned of it and got if the roller coaster. Good luck. I wouldn't advise to eat so many carbs in one go, especially if you are new to diabetes and carb counting. Pizza is one of the most difficult foods to handle (due to high fat content). Can you half the portion? And dont give yourself whole dose straight away. Split it into 2 injection taken apart of at least 2h If you want the pizza and fries , and that's your ratio , then you need x amount of insulin, that's what you need. Not an ideal meal in so many ways but, speaking for myself I do have the odd day off just as non diabetics following a healthy diet do. Not going to fib I have injected that amount in one place but there are things to bear in mind, sugar level wise. You may be okay injecting in one place or you may be low or high 2 h Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Pizza

Can Diabetics Eat Pizza

A diabetic can eat anything but it doesn’t mean you can eat them with abandon. So for the question: Is pizza incompatible with diabetes? The answer is absolutely not. Balanced nutrition and careful planning play vital role in managing your diabetes. The real question is that how do we manage to perfectly incorporate pizza into our diet without suffering from marked hyperglycemia. Pizza Pizza can be lots of things you need to know. On the one hand, you should know it can be a cheese-filled, thick dough topped with the thick layer of the gooey cheese as well as loads of salty, fatty meats such as sausage and pepperoni. On the other hand, pizza can be the thin whole wheat crusts topped with a sprinkle of reduced fatty cheese, tomatoes along with loaded with veggies. Obviously, the type of pizza is more important to diabetics. Additionally, how often to consume and how much to consume come into play. Eating half of a big pizza or more will be very high in calories, fat and carbohydrates – and is not recommended. But, consuming a slice can more conveniently fit into your healthy eating plan. You still need to consider how often to consume pizza. Don’t eat too much a week. Pizza crust typically contains the crust made from a refined carbohydrate, white flour. To avoid causing rapid spikes in our blood sugar levels, so limit the amount of pizza we consume at any one time. Opt for the whole wheat pizza crust and thin crust pizza. Your choice of toppings always proves significant in managing your diabetes. Cheese includes some sugar, also a great source of calcium. Opt for a pizza along with light cheese, also manage your cholesterol and weight to control your diabetes. Opt for chicken as a meat topping rather than pepperoni. Some complex carbohydrates like spinach, green Continue reading >>

If You Have Diabetes, Here's Exactly What To Order At 8 Types Of Restaurants​

If You Have Diabetes, Here's Exactly What To Order At 8 Types Of Restaurants​

When you have diabetes, eating out can seem more complicated than deciphering the new tax code. But it doesn’t have to be. “People with diabetes can enjoy most any kind of restaurant,” says Jill Weisenberger, RDN, CDE, author of Diabetes Weight Loss Week by Week. “The key is to stick as closely to your usual meal plan as possible.” Here’s how. (Find out how to stop the craving cycle before it starts and burn fat around the clock with the naturally sweet, salty, and satisfying meals in Eat Clean, Lose Weight & Love Every Bite.) Worried about all that crust? Go with one slice of thin crust pizza and you’ll lighten the carb count of your slice by a third compared to a regular slice. If a single slice sounds too skimpy, pump up the volume—and the fiber—by adding plenty of chopped veggies. And speaking of veggies, filling up on a salad before your pie arrives can also put the breaks on hunger. These pita pizzas will totally change the way you think about dinner: “Given that pasta is packed with carbohydrates, it’s probably not the best idea to make it the center of your meal,” says Weisenberger. Just one order of spaghetti and meatballs can easily pack 150 grams of carbs. That doesn’t mean you have to go 100% pasta-free though. Weisenberger recommends ordering pasta as a side dish and limiting your portion to a half-cup, or about the size of a tennis ball. Pair it with an order of mussels fra diavolo, chicken cacciatore, or grilled calamari. (And make sure you try these 6 ways to make Italian food flat belly-friendly!) We hope you enjoy the products we're recommending as much as we do! Just so you know, Prevention may get a share of sales from the links on this page. If you’re eating Chinese food, chances are there’s going to be rice on your pla Continue reading >>

Pizza And Blood Sugar Control: (not Quite) Easy As Pie

Pizza And Blood Sugar Control: (not Quite) Easy As Pie

by gary scheiner, MS, CDE Since the beginning of time, when cave people discovered the joys of combining cheese, sauce, and crust, people with diabetes have been perplexed on how to manage blood sugar levels when eating pizza. Things became even more complicated during the "toppings revolution" of the Renaissance, when folks started putting everything from salted fish to pineapple on their favorite pies. Today, even with an assortment of new tools and techniques for managing blood sugar, the "pizza effect" continues to elude the masses. Many find it nearly impossible to figure out the carbs-per-slice, whether it be thin-crust, hand-tossed, or deep-dish. For some, indulging in a few slices results in an inexplicable blood sugar drop after eating, followed by a momentous sugar surge. For others, the blood sugar doesn't start to head skyward until many hours later, perhaps overnight. For those who enjoy a slice (or two, or six...), here are three ideas that might help you find that delicate balance between the pizza you love and the healthy blood sugar you covet. 1. counting pizza carbs To count the carbs in pizza, you'll need a hand. Your hand, to be exact. You can estimate the number of carbs in pizza pretty well by using your hand as a measuring tool. A traditional, hand-tossed pizza that is the size of the average adult's hand contains approximately 30g of carb. And don't forget to include the corners! A traditional, hand-tossed pizza that is the size of the average adult's hand contains approximately 30g of carb. And don't forget to include the corners! In this example, the slice of pizza is slightly larger than an adult woman's hand, so we'll call it 35g. An adult's hand-size slice of thin-crust? Go with 20g. Deep-dish, pan or Sicilian? Call it 45g. To see if your ha Continue reading >>

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