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How Many People In The World Have Type One Diabetes?

For The Last Time, I Have Type 1 Diabetes, Not Type 2 Diabetes! There’s A Big Difference

For The Last Time, I Have Type 1 Diabetes, Not Type 2 Diabetes! There’s A Big Difference

Here I go. But first, to all my brothers and sisters struggling with and managing Type 2 diabetes, my hat is off to all of you. As you endure the daily grind of judgment, fluctuating blood glucose levels, pain, diet, exercise, and scrutiny from society and loved ones, we, as Type 1s, empathize with you, but as you know, we are not you. Since you are strong in numbers, and we are not, (about 5 percent of the diabetes population), we ask that you stand with us and help us spread the word about the difference between your plight and ours. Remember that we are not trying to differentiate from you because we don’t understand what you go through on a daily basis, we just need a different set of diabetes social awareness and education. That being said... It was 1994 — I was a newly-hired diabetes sales representative, and I had an interesting conversation with a clinic doctor who was a month away from retirement at that time. Our conversation went something like this: Well-Meaning Doctor: “You know, Peg. If you loose 10 pounds, you could go off insulin.” Peg: “No. I have Type 1 diabetes.” Well-Meaning-But-Now-Defensive Doctor: “That doesn’t matter. All you need to do is lose some weight and then you wouldn’t be on insulin.” Peg: “No, Doc. I have Type 1 diabetes, not Type 2. It doesn’t matter how much I weigh, or what I eat, my kind of diabetes is always insulin-dependent, and I need it to stay alive.” Appallingly-Uninformed-Doctor-Who-In-My-Personal-Opinion-Needed-To-Go-Back-To-Medical-School interrupts here: “You’re wrong! Just lose some weight and you can go off insulin! You’re fat!” At this point, he is literally leaning across his desk with both hands gripping the wooden top, glaring at me. I could hear water dripping in a sink in another Continue reading >>

Famous Faces Of Type 1 Diabetes

Famous Faces Of Type 1 Diabetes

Academy-award winning actress Halle Berry was 23 when she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes after slipping into a coma during the taping of a television sitcom. Today, Berry, 42, is extremely careful with what she eats and keeps a strict exercise regime. Her routine also entails constantly checking her blood-sugar levels and giving herself insulin injections. Berry gave birth to her first child Nahla Ariela Aubry in March. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni Continue reading >>

Diabetes Information

Diabetes Information

Almost 30 million people in the United States have diabetes. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 diabetes, which is the most common form of the disease, usually occurs in people who are 45 years of age or older. However, the rate of diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents is increasing. Common Diabetes Terms (American Diabetes Association) Diabetes Can Be Silent | Definition of Diabetes | Warning Signs of Diabetes | Type 1 Diabetes | Type 2 Diabetes | Gestational Diabetes | Complications of Diabetes Diabetes can go silently undetected for a long time without symptoms. Many people first become aware that they have diabetes when they develop one of its potentially life-threatening complications, such as heart disease, blindness or nerve disease. Fortunately, diabetes can be managed with proper care. Diabetes is a chronic (life-long) condition that can have serious consequences. However, with careful attention to your blood sugar control, lifestyle modifications and medications, you can manage your diabetes and may avoid many of the problems associated with the disease. The Palo Alto Medical Foundation (PAMF) can help you make the transition of managing your disease easier. Back to top Definition of Diabetes Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. The cause of diabetes is a mystery, although both genetics and environmental factors such as obesity and lack of exercise appear to play roles. There are three types of diabetes: Type 1 Type 2 Gestational Diabetes Back to top Warning Signs of Diabetes Frequent urination Unusual thirst Extreme hunger Continue reading >>

What Is The Life Expectancy For Diabetics?

What Is The Life Expectancy For Diabetics?

Diabetes is recognized as one of the leading causes of disability and death worldwide. There was a time when Type 2 diabetes was common in people in their late forties and fifties. However, thanks to the easy availability of processed foods, sedentary lifestyles, poor sleep and a host of other unfavorable factors, type 2 diabetes affects millions of young adults throughout the globe today. A report was commissioned in 2010 by the National Academy on an Aging Society. It showed that diabetes cut off an average of 8.5 years from the lifespan of a regular, diabetic 50-year-old as compared to a 50-year-old without the disease. This data was provided by the Health and Retirement Study, a survey of more than 20,000 Americans over the age of 50, done every two years by the University of Michigan. Characterized by high blood glucose levels, T2D can be the result of a combination of genes, obesity and an unhealthy lifestyle. If left untreated, diabetes can be life-threatening. Complications of this disease can take a serious toll on a patient’s health and well-being. So, how long do diabetics live, you ask? Does having diabetes shorten one’s life? Let’s address these questions, one by one. MORE: Decoding The Dawn Phenomenon (High Morning Blood Sugar) How Long Do Diabetics Live? Diabetes is a system-wide disorder which is categorized by elevated blood glucose levels. This blood travels throughout the human body and when it is laden with sugar, it damages multiple systems. When the condition is left unchecked or is managed poorly, the lifespan of diabetic patients is reduced due to constant damage. Early diagnosis and treatment of diabetes for preventing its long-term complications is the best coping strategy. So, don’t ignore your doctor’s advice if you’re pre-diabeti Continue reading >>

Caroline’s Story: Overcoming Type 1 Diabetes With Real Food

Caroline’s Story: Overcoming Type 1 Diabetes With Real Food

Today, Caroline Potter from Colorful Eats, has an amazing story of recovery for you. She’s worked with the same nutritionist that I have these last few years, and has been able to treat Type 1 diabetes with a nutrient-dense diet and natural supplements. It’s another encouraging story of how food can play a significant role in our fight against disease! Treating Diabetes with Real Food Life in your 20s seems pretty grand. You feel powerful, youthful and energized. Dreams seem within your reach and challenges seem conquerable. Then out of the blue, college bliss turns into doctors offices and waiting rooms. Countless tests of all forms, vague results and no answers as to what was wrong with me. As I came home from college that winter for Christmas break, I laid on the couch for most of my vacation. I was constantly starving, eating everything in sight but quickly loosing weight. Finally, one day while out to dinner with my family, I broke down in tears because my mouth was so dry, I could barely talk. I was experiencing dry mouth, one of the major symptoms of diabetes. Diabetes? I was 20, a seemingly healthy young girl, who grew up in a home where my mother fed us all organic food. I was the one in school with her carrot sticks and tuna salad sandwiches. I never drank soda or ate Oreos, so the thought of diabetes was never even on my radar. Barely able to walk up a flight of stairs, I checked myself into the ER to discover my blood sugar levels were in a diabetic coma range. Later the next morning, the doctor diagnosed me with type 1 diabetes. I was scared, hopeless and confused. The days that followed were difficult to say the least. I still felt sick all the time, gained over 20 pounds in 2 weeks and felt terribly alone. My legs turned black and blue from giving mys Continue reading >>

T1d And T2d

T1d And T2d

Most people know at least one person with diabetes – a great uncle, a young neighbour. The disease is often described as a worldwide epidemic with a growing number of reported cases each year. Despite such incidence, diabetes is still not very well known. For instance, how many people know that there are different “types” of diabetes? And who is not taken aback when they learn that a child or a teenager is diabetic? Let’s review the facts and rectify some common myths. STATISTICS ON TYPE 1 DIABETES According to statistics from the Canadian Pediatric Society, 33,000 school age children (5-18 years old) in Canada have Type 1 Diabetes, and there are several thousands under the age of 5. An estimated 9 to 10% of all diabetics, including children and adults, are insulin-dependent. Based on data from the National Diabetes Surveillance System (NDSS), the Canadian Diabetes Association forecasts that diabetes will affect nearly 11% of the population by the year 2020. Approximately one million Canadians currently have diabetes without knowing it. Type 2 diabetes is affecting more and more people, young and old. A better awareness of diabetes among the general population is necessary, including the distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes. This disease, often described as an epidemic, is frequently misunderstood due to assumptions and misinformation. The media and people in general are rarely able to explain the distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes. The Diabetic Children’s Foundation would like to increase public awareness about both types of diabetes and dispel the myths that lead to a great deal of prejudice against children. For this reason, the Foundation seeks to encourage the media, its partners and its member families to raise public awareness abou Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Practice Essentials Type 1 diabetes is a chronic illness characterized by the body’s inability to produce insulin due to the autoimmune destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas. Although onset frequently occurs in childhood, the disease can also develop in adults. [1] See Clinical Findings in Diabetes Mellitus, a Critical Images slideshow, to help identify various cutaneous, ophthalmologic, vascular, and neurologic manifestations of DM. Signs and symptoms The classic symptoms of type 1 diabetes are as follows: Other symptoms may include fatigue, nausea, and blurred vision. The onset of symptomatic disease may be sudden. It is not unusual for patients with type 1 diabetes to present with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). See Clinical Presentation for more detail. Diagnosis Diagnostic criteria by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) include the following [2] : Lab studies A fingerstick glucose test is appropriate for virtually all patients with diabetes. All fingerstick capillary glucose levels must be confirmed in serum or plasma to make the diagnosis. All other laboratory studies should be selected or omitted on the basis of the individual clinical situation. An international expert committee appointed by the ADA, the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, and the International Diabetes Association recommended the HbA1c assay for diagnosing type 1 diabetes only when the condition is suspected but the classic symptoms are absent. [3] Screening Screening for type 1 diabetes in asymptomatic low-risk individuals is not recommended. [2] However, in patients at high risk (eg, those who have first-degree relatives with type 1 diabetes), it may be appropriate to perform annual screening for anti-islet antibodies before the age of 10 years, along with 1 additional Continue reading >>

List Of People With Diabetes Mellitus Type 1

List Of People With Diabetes Mellitus Type 1

This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness. You can help by expanding it with reliably sourced entries. Diabetes mellitus type 1, also known as type 1 diabetes, or T1DM (formerly known as insulin-dependent diabetes or juvenile diabetes) is a condition in which the body does not produce insulin, resulting in high blood sugar levels in the body.[1][2] Whereas type 2 diabetes is typically diagnosed in middle age and treated via diet, oral medication and/or insulin therapy, type 1 diabetes tends to be diagnosed earlier in life, and people with type 1 diabetes require insulin therapy for survival.[1] The following is a list of notable people—including writers, artists, athletes, entertainers, and others—who have been documented as having type 1 diabetes. List of people[edit] Crystal Bowersox Damon Dash Sam Fuld Nick Jonas Este Haim Theresa May Mary Tyler Moore Anne Rice Derek Theler Name Lifespan Nationality Notability Ref. Akram, WasimWasim Akram 1966– Pakistani Cricketer, television personality [3] Bassinger, BrecBrec Bassinger 1999– American Actress [4] Bean, DexterDexter Bean 1987– American Auto racing driver [5] Bigard, Jean-MarieJean-Marie Bigard 1954– French Actor [6] Bowersox, CrystalCrystal Bowersox 1985– American Singer-songwriter and actress [7] Boynton, NickNick Boynton 1979– Canadian Ice hockey defenceman [8] Brass, DarrenDarren Brass 1972– American Tattoo artist [9] Burgalat, BertrandBertrand Burgalat 1963– French Musician and music producer [10] Canyon, GeorgeGeorge Canyon 1970– Canadian Country music singer [11] Channing, CarolCarol Channing 1921– American Actress, comedian [12] Clarke, BobbyBobby Clarke 1949– Canadian Ice hockey centre [13] Coker, BenBen Coker 1989– British Associ Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day Blog: Type 1 Diabetes Myth Busters

World Diabetes Day Blog: Type 1 Diabetes Myth Busters

Katie Greenfield, Communications and Engagement Officer for Wessex, blogs about managing her type 1 diabetes and tackles some of the most common myths. Before I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes aged 13, I only had a very vague idea about what diabetes was. I thought that people with the condition couldn’t eat sweet things; that only overweight people got diabetes and that it wasn’t very serious. Well, it turns out these are all myths. For World Diabetes Day, I’m myth-busting some of the most common misconceptions about type 1 diabetes. How many of these can you get right? True or False: You’re more likely to get diabetes if you’re overweight or don’t exercise FALSE..ish: It depends on the type of diabetes. Over 90% of people with diabetes have type 2, which is more likely to occur if you are overweight and don’t exercise. However, I have type 1 diabetes, which is not caused by lifestyle factors. It’s an autoimmune condition – the immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. No one knows why this happens and it’s not caused by anything an individual did, or didn’t do. One of the main symptoms of type 1 diabetes is unexplained weight loss. Everyone with diabetes can manage their diabetes through diet and exercise alone FALSE: Although many people with type 2 diabetes may, at least initially, be able to manage their condition through lifestyle factors, this is not the case for type 1. I wouldn’t survive beyond about 2 days if I stopped taking insulin. I used to take 4-8 injections of insulin a day. Now, I use an insulin pump instead. An insulin pump works just like a pancreas FALSE: My insulin pump delivers small amounts of insulin every few minutes through a cannula (a needle) that I insert under the Continue reading >>

14 Realities Of Having Type 1 Diabetes In Your 20s

14 Realities Of Having Type 1 Diabetes In Your 20s

Today is World Diabetes Day and while millions of people live with the condition, only 10% of them have Type 1 – which develops when insulin-producing cells have been destroyed and the body is unable to produce enough. Type 1 is usually diagnosed in children, so what is it like to find out you have it as an adult? Lauren Proctor, 25, developed diabetes in March 2009, during her second year of university at Keele in Staffordshire, England. She now works as a PA in London. Here, Lauren explains the reality of suffering from the lifelong condition in your twenties. 1. The symptoms are not totally obvious. I brushed off my symptoms as all part of being a student. The tiredness especially, I couldn’t get through the day without having an afternoon nap. And I was drinking a lot of water, once I had to ask a girl I didn’t know sitting next to me in a lecture if I could have some of her water, because I was parched. I’d get through an entire bottle of squash in a day. Over a month I just felt worse but when I went to the toilet five times in one night, and was almost in a car crash because my vision had started to be affected, I Googled my symptoms. 2. No one expects adults to be diagnosed with Type 1. Type 1 is also known as juvenile diabetes because most cases are found in children. To be diagnosed at the age of 19 was pretty rare. After Googling I was convinced I had Type 2 diabetes and went to the campus surgery. The nurses said because I was young and slim it wouldn’t be diabetes, I’d be fine. Then they took my blood sugar and it was 15.5 – a normal reading would be six to eight. So I was taken to hospital where I was diagnosed as Type 1, and the doctors were really surprised because of my age. 3.The reality that diabetes is going to affect the rest of your l Continue reading >>

Facts About Diabetes And Insulin

Facts About Diabetes And Insulin

Diabetes is a very common disease, which, if not treated, can be very dangerous. There are two types of diabetes. They were once called juvenile-onset diabetes and adult diabetes. However, today we know that all ages can get both types so they are simply called type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1, which occurs in approximately 10 percent of all cases, is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system, by mistake, attacks its own insulin-producing cells so that insufficient amounts of insulin are produced - or no insulin at all. Type 1 affects predominantly young people and usually makes its debut before the age of 30, and most frequently between the ages of 10 and 14. Type 2, which makes up the remaining 90 percent of diabetes cases, commonly affects patients during the second half of their lives. The cells of the body no longer react to insulin as they should. This is called insulin resistance. In the early 1920s, Frederick Banting, John Macleod, George Best and Bertram Collip isolated the hormone insulin and purified it so that it could be administered to humans. This was a major breakthrough in the treatment of diabetes type 1. Insulin Insulin is a hormone. Hormones are chemical substances that regulate the cells of the body and are produced by special glands. The hormone insulin is a main regulator of the glucose (sugar) levels in the blood. Insulin is produced in the pancreas. To be more specific, it's produced by the beta cells in the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas. When we eat, glucose levels rise, and insulin is released into the bloodstream. The insulin acts like a key, opening up cells so they can take in the sugar and use it as an energy source. Sugar is one of the top energy sources for the body. The body gets it in many forms, but mainly as carbohydr Continue reading >>

'an Escalating Crisis': People With Diabetes Struggle To Afford Life-saving Insulin

'an Escalating Crisis': People With Diabetes Struggle To Afford Life-saving Insulin

The high cost of insulin for Jessica Price, diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus as a child sometimes leaves her with difficult life choices, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017. Michelle Pemberton/IndyStar ​​​​​​For the first two decades that Jessica Price had diabetes, she never worried about the price of her insulin and supplies, because her mother’s insurance covered the cost. Then she switched to her employer’s high-deductible insurance plan. All of the sudden, she was facing bills of a few thousand dollars each time she went to the pharmacy to purchase her supplies for the next three months. “It’s never a question of if I’m going to hit my deductible, but a question of how quickly can I hit it,” said Price, who works for a nonprofit and has found herself having to borrow from her parents to help with the bills. “If I don’t hit my deductible until June or July, I start to worry.” ► In other Lilly news: Lilly CEO says 3,500 job cuts will make company healthier, stronger ► More: No fertility treatments, but multiple surprises. It's quadruplets for Noblesville couple. ► More: Think you need to go to ER? If your insurer doesn't agree, you could pay Increasingly over the past decade, people with diabetes such as Price find themselves saddled with hefty bills for the insulin they require to survive. Of the 6 million or people in the United States who depend on insulin, about 1.25 million of those are people who have Type I diabetes, a condition in which their pancreases don’t produce the hormone insulin, according to the American Diabetes Association. The remainder have Type II diabetes and take insulin to help out their bodies, which do not produce sufficient insulin on their own. Historically, obtaining sufficient insulin did not require t Continue reading >>

Is There Connection Between Type 1 Diabetes And Cleanliness? Finland Serves As A Model.

Is There Connection Between Type 1 Diabetes And Cleanliness? Finland Serves As A Model.

It may come as a surprise that Finland — one of the least polluted, wealthiest countries, where average life expectancy is among the world’s highest — has the highest rate of Type 1 diabetes. Each year, there are about 58 cases diagnosed per 100,000 children; in the United States there are 24 cases per 100,000, according to the International Diabetes Federation. Some researchers suspect there may be a connection between Finland’s cleanliness and the incidence of the disease there. They are investigating whether the lack of exposure to a specific group of bacteria found in the intestine may be causing weaker immune systems in Finnish children, making them more susceptible to Type 1 diabetes. This so-called hygiene hypothesis — that cleaner living can result in a weaker immune system — has also been linked to ailments such as asthma, allergies and other autoimmune diseases. “We are working along the idea that we have a trigger which most likely is an infectious agent,” said Mikael Knip, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Helsinki who has been studying diabetes for 30 years. “There is an association between such infections and appearance of antibodies.” Just as there are microbes that trigger the disease, Knip says there are also some bacterial or viral infections that, if they occur at an early age, can protect a young child from developing Type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, which affects approximately 37 million people worldwide, is an autoimmune disease in which the body does not produce sufficient insulin, a hormone needed to break down sugars. Typically diagnosed in children, teens and young adults, the disease can eventually damage the eyes and organs such as the kidneys, and it increases the likelihood of stroke and heart failure. Type Continue reading >>

Diabetesvoice December 2011 €¢ Volume 56 €¢ Special Issue 26

Diabetesvoice December 2011 €¢ Volume 56 €¢ Special Issue 26

estimating the worldwide burden of type 1 diabetes Leonor Guariguata Regional trends An estimated 24% of all children with type 1 diabetes live in the European region, where the most reliable and up-to-date estimates of the burden of diabetes are available. Two large in- ternational collaborative projects, the Diabetes Mondiale study (DiaMond) and the Europe and Diabetes study (EURODIAB) have been instrumental in monitoring developments in the in- cidence of type 1 diabetes in children, providing us with some of the best evi- dence on trends and prevalence for any region. These studies have shown that the rate of new cases in many countries is highest among younger children.2 There are a number of clinical implica- tions for this overall drop in the ages at which young people are being diag- nosed with type 1 diabetes. Diagnosis in many countries, the rate of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes is highest among younger children. Type 1 diabetes is one of the most com- mon endocrine and metabolic condi- tions among children. According to the latest edition of the Diabetes Atlas, an estimated 490,100 children below the age of 15 years are living with type 1 diabetes.1 A further 77,800 children un- der the age of 15 are expected to develop the disease in 2011 and there is evidence that the incidence is rising rapidly, es- pecially among the youngest children.2-4 Type 1 diabetes is increasing steeply in some central and eastern European countries, where the disease remains less common than in other regions.5 If these trends continue, it is inevitable that the total prevalence of people with type 1 diabetes will increase in coming years. providing an accurate estimate of the number of children with type 1 diabetes is an essential component of planning health policy, assessing th Continue reading >>

18 Truths People With Type 1 Diabetes Wish Others Understood

18 Truths People With Type 1 Diabetes Wish Others Understood

Diabetes affects more than 29 million Americans and 380 million people worldwide. By 2030, the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that number to more than double. Diabetes takes the life of one American every three minutes, and it’s a leading cause of blindness, kidney failure, amputations, heart failure and stroke. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are the most common forms of the disease; type 1 is a more severe autoimmune form of diabetes that generally develops in children and teenagers and requires life-long insulin therapy, whereas type 2 typically appears during adulthood and can usually be managed through diet and exercise. Despite the large numbers above, diabetes remains a widely misunderstood disease — many do not even realize more than one type exists. The Mighty teamed up with Diabetes Research Institute to ask their community what they want others to understand about type 1 diabetes. Here’s what they had to say: 1. “It’s insulin or death. No pills, no diet, no exercise will make it go away.” —Kelly Connelly Enriquez 2. “It’s bad, but please don’t make that face and say ‘I’m sorry!’” —Dawn Melvin Bobbitt 3. “I wish people understood the difference between type 1 and type 2.” —Lisa Inglis 4. “There is nothing I or my parents could have done to avoid having to live with type 1 diabetes.” —Jalissa Gascho 5. “It takes over your life.” —Adrienne Roberts 6. “It’s very unpredictable.” —Nicole Porth 7. “Over the years, the one thing that really annoys me is when people ask ‘should you be eating that.’ If someone with diabetes is eating something, you can be sure they know what they are doing.” —Sue Langdon 8. “Appearance does not show that every week [a person with diabetes] has to endure an averag Continue reading >>

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