diabetestalk.net

How Many People Have Diabetes In India?

Half Of Americans Have Diabetes Or A High Risk For It — And Many Of Them Are Unaware

Half Of Americans Have Diabetes Or A High Risk For It — And Many Of Them Are Unaware

That’s right. The metabolic condition is about as American as you can get, according to a new national report card on diabetes released Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The report shows that nearly half of Americans have diabetes or prediabetes, which puts them at high risk for the condition. A good number of these folks haven’t been diagnosed and don’t even realize their predicament. People with diabetes have too much sugar in their blood. If the disease isn’t controlled, they can wind up with heart disease, nerve damage, kidney problems, eye damage and other serious health problems. The new report combines data from the CDC, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Indian Health Service and the Census Bureau. Here’s a numerical look at what they reveal about diabetes in America. 30.3 million The number of people in the U.S. who had diabetes in 2015. The percentage of the U.S. population that has diabetes. That’s nearly 1 in 10. 1.5 million The number of newly diagnosed cases of diabetes among U.S. adults in 2015. That works out to 6.7 new cases per 1,000 people. 24% The percentage of Americans with diabetes who don’t even know they have it. That’s 7.2 million people. 7 Where diabetes ranked on the list of leading causes of death in the U.S. in 2015. Diabetes was listed as a cause of death on 252,806 death certificates that year, including 79,535 that identified diabetes as the primary cause of death. There were two kinds of diabetes included in the study. Type 1 diabetes (formerly known as juvenile diabetes) occurs when the immune system prevents the body from making insulin, and type 2 diabetes (formerly known as adult-onset diabetes) occurs when the body can’t make enough insulin or can’t use it well. About 95 Continue reading >>

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Prevalence (per 1,000 inhabitants) of diabetes worldwide in 2000 - world average was 2.8%. no data ≤ 7.5 7.5–15 15–22.5 22.5–30 30–37.5 37.5–45 45–52.5 52.5–60 60–67.5 67.5–75 75–82.5 ≥ 82.5 Disability-adjusted life year for diabetes mellitus per 100,000 inhabitants in 2004 No data <100 100–200 200–300 300–400 400–500 500–600 600–700 700–800 800–900 900–1,000 1,000–1,500 >1,500 Globally, an estimated 422 million adults are living with diabetes mellitus, according to the latest 2016 data from the World Health Organization (WHO).[1] Diabetes prevalence is increasing rapidly; previous 2013 estimates from the International Diabetes Federation put the number at 381 million people having diabetes.[2] The number is projected to almost double by 2030.[3] Type 2 diabetes makes up about 85-90% of all cases.[4][5] Increases in the overall diabetes prevalence rates largely reflect an increase in risk factors for type 2, notably greater longevity and being overweight or obese.[1] Diabetes mellitus occurs throughout the world, but is more common (especially type 2) in the more developed countries. The greatest increase in prevalence is, however, occurring in low- and middle-income countries[1] including in Asia and Africa, where most patients will probably be found by 2030.[3] The increase in incidence in developing countries follows the trend of urbanization and lifestyle changes, including increasingly sedentary lifestyles, less physically demanding work and the global nutrition transition, marked by increased intake of foods that are high energy-dense but nutrient-poor (often high in sugar and saturated fats, sometimes referred to as the Western pattern diet).[1][3] The risk of getting type 2 diabetes has been widely found to be associat Continue reading >>

How Many People Have Diabetes?

How Many People Have Diabetes?

Rates of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are increasing globally. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Diabetes Atlas, here are the overall rates including both type 1 and type 2: 415 million adults have diabetes (1 in 11 adults) By 2040, 642 million adults (1 in 10 adults) are expected to have diabetes 46.5% of those with diabetes have not been diagnosed 1 in 7 births is affected by gestational diabetes 12% of global health expenditure is spent on diabetes ($673 billion) You can see an interactive map of global diabetes statistics at the IDF website. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the most current data is for 2012 (source): 29 million people in the United States (9.3 percent) have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. 1.7 million people aged 20 years or older were newly diagnosed with type or type 2 diabetes in 2012. Non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, and American Indian/Alaska Native adults are about twice as likely to have diagnosed with some form of diabetes as non-Hispanic white adults. 208,000 people younger than 20 years have been diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. 86 million adults aged 20 years and older have prediabetes. The percentage of U.S. adults with prediabetes is similar for non-Hispanic whites (35 percent), non-Hispanic blacks (39 percent), and Hispanics (38 percent). Similar data is available from a study called Prevalence and Incidence Trends for Diagnosed Diabetes Among Adults Aged 20 to 79 Years, United States, 1980-2012 published in Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). This study found that 49% to 52% of the adult population had either diabetes or prediabetes. Then came the most stunning number: 83% of adults over 65 have either diabetes or prediabetes! Thankfully, the authors of this s Continue reading >>

Delhi Has Maximum Diabetes Patients In Country: Study

Delhi Has Maximum Diabetes Patients In Country: Study

According to the study – “Diabetes on the Rise in India” – Delhi is leading the diabetes pack, followed by Mumbai, Ahmedabad, Bengaluru, Chennai. The study has also found that if change of lifestyle and food habits are not made, 125 million Indians are likely to become patients of diabetes by 2035. India fares poorly “Besides the cost burden imposed by the disease, the impact on quality of life and productivity of individuals is particularly severe, especially in later years. Recently World Health Organisation (WHO) released findings that placed India among the top three countries with the highest number of diabetes cases,’’ noted the study. According to the study, about 42.5 per cent of Delhi population suffers from diabetes, while in Mumbai and estimated 38.5 per cent of the total population is in the grip of the disease. In Ahmedabad 36 per cent people are diabetic, in Bangalore 26.5 per cent while in Chennai the percentage is estimated to be 24.5 per cent. In Hyderabad and Kolkata, the number of diabetes patients is estimated at 22.6 per cent and 19.7 per cent of the total population respectively. Even in rural areas, people are increasingly becoming patients of diabetes. “Timely screening and early identification of the disease can help the victim take immediate steps and improve the quality of life. To enable this, ASSOCHAM and its members, under CSR activities, are organising a series of free medical camps in Delhi, where comprehensive check-up, counselling, diet plan and information on diabetes management is being made available to participants,’’ said a release issued by ASSOCHAM. Speaking about the study, D.S. Rawat, secretary general, ASSOCHAM, said: “Diabetes today is one of the biggest health threats to our country and immediate steps Continue reading >>

100% Growth In Diabetes Patients In India In The Last 15 Years

100% Growth In Diabetes Patients In India In The Last 15 Years

Diabetes mellitus is a kind of metabolic ailment wherein either the body is incapable of producing insulin or the cells are not able to respond to insulin efficiently, leading to high blood glucose in the body. Obesity is one of the main causes of diabetes apart from other lifestyle factors. What was once majorly perceived as a western phenomenon has now crept deep into Asian lifestyles. "Diabetes, perhaps more than any other disease, is strongly associated with the western diet, as it was uncommon in cultures consuming a 'primitive diet'. However as cultures switch from their native diets, to the foods of commerce; their rate of diabetes increases eventually reaching the proportions seen in the western societies. However, what's alarming is the fact that India is home to 63 million diabetics and the number is estimated to be 100 million by 2030," noted weight management, fitness and nutrition expert, Shilpa Arora. According the official WHO estimates, the total global diabetic population in the year 2000 stood at 171,000,000 which is estimated to spike up to a whopping 366,000,000. India had an estimated 31,705,000 diabetics in the millennium year which is estimated to grow by over 100% to 79,441,000 by 2030. According to the International Diabetes Federation Atlas 2015, an estimated 69.2 million Indians are diabetic, which as per the WHO assessment, stood at 63 million in the year 2013. The estimates depict that diabetes prevalence has alarmingly doubled and so far has grown by over 100% in the past 15 years. Ahead of the World Health Day, WHO has urged all South Asian countries to take "vigorous and concerted" actions to battle the ever increasing prevalence of diabetes in the region. According to the global health organization, diabetes has the potential to become o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus And Its Complications In India

Diabetes Mellitus And Its Complications In India

India is one of the epicentres of the global diabetes mellitus pandemic. Rapid socioeconomic development and demographic changes, along with increased susceptibility for Indian individuals, have led to the explosive increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in India over the past four decades. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in Asian Indian people is characterized by a young age of onset and occurrence at low levels of BMI. Available data also suggest that the susceptibility of Asian Indian people to the complications of diabetes mellitus differs from that of white populations. Management of this disease in India faces multiple challenges, such as low levels of awareness, paucity of trained medical and paramedical staff and unaffordability of medications and services. Novel interventions using readily available resources and technology promise to revolutionise the care of patients with diabetes mellitus in India. As many of these challenges are common to most developing countries of the world, the lessons learnt from India's experience with diabetes mellitus are likely to be of immense global relevance. In this Review, we discuss the epidemiology of diabetes mellitus and its complications in India and outline the advances made in the country to ensure adequate care. We make specific references to novel, cost-effective interventions, which might be of relevance to other low-income and middle-income countries of the world. Anjana, R. M. et al. Prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes (impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance) in urban and rural India: phase I results of the Indian Council of Medical Research-INdia DIABetes (ICMR-INDIAB) study. Diabetologia 54, 3022–3027 (2011). Deepa, M., Anjana, R. M., Manjula, D., Narayan, K. M. & Mohan, V. Convergence Continue reading >>

The Current State Of Diabetes Mellitus In India

The Current State Of Diabetes Mellitus In India

Diabetes is fast gaining the status of a potential epidemic in India with more than 62 million diabetic individuals currently diagnosed with the disease.1,2 In 2000, India (31.7 million) topped the world with the highest number of people with diabetes mellitus followed by China (20.8 million) with the United States (17.7 million) in second and third place respectively. According to Wild et al.3 the prevalence of diabetes is predicted to double globally from 171 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030 with a maximum increase in India. It is predicted that by 2030 diabetes mellitus may afflict up to 79.4 million individuals in India, while China (42.3 million) and the United States (30.3 million) will also see significant increases in those affected by the disease.3,4 India currently faces an uncertain future in relation to the potential burden that diabetes may impose upon the country. Many influences affect the prevalence of disease throughout a country, and identification of those factors is necessary to facilitate change when facing health challenges. So what are the factors currently affecting diabetes in India that are making this problem so extreme? The aetiology of diabetes in India is multifactorial and includes genetic factors coupled with environmental influences such as obesity associated with rising living standards, steady urban migration, and lifestyle changes. Yet despite the incidence of diabetes within India, there are no nationwide and few multi-centric studies conducted on the prevalence of diabetes and its complications. The studies that have been undertaken are also prone to potential error as the heterogeneity of the Indian population with respect to culture, ethnicity, socio- economic conditions, mean that the extrapolation of regional results may g Continue reading >>

Number Of Diabetes Patients Doubles In 13 Years In India: Who

Number Of Diabetes Patients Doubles In 13 Years In India: Who

Diabetic patients are at greater risk of developing brain diseases.AlishaV/Flickr The number of diabetes patients is likely to rise to 101 million in India by 2030, estimates the World Health Organisation (WHO). The number doubled to 63 million in 2013 from 32 million in 2000 in the country. The states of Kerala, Tamil Nadu and Gujarat had the highest prevalence of diabetes in India, the Times of India reported. Nearly 8.2 percent of the adult male population in India suffered from diabetes whereas 6.8 percent of adult women were diabetic. The number of diabetic deaths stood at 75,900 for Indian men aged between 30-69 years as against 51,700 women in the same age group. Diabetes, although not as fatal as other non-communicable diseases as cancer and heart diseases, digs a bigger hole in pocket due to the treatment costs involved and the reduced productivity of patients in the later years of the disease. The WHO urged South-East Asian countries to take concrete action for prevention and treatment of diabetes. The organisation reports South-East Asia had a diabetic population of 46,903,000 which is expected to reach 119,541,000 by 2030. "Diabetes rarely makes headlines, and yet it will be the world's seventh largest killer by 2030 unless intense and focused efforts are made by governments, communities and individuals," Dr Poonam Khetrapal Singh, regional director, WHO South-East Asia, said in a statement. She added that diabetes is of particular concern in South East Asia, where one out of every four of the 3.7 million globally-reported diabetes-related deaths occurs. The WHO has urged governments to regulate the marketing of unhealthy foods and tax sugary beverages. "The governments must also increase access to health care and promote educational campaigns regarding self Continue reading >>

Why Are The Number Of People With Diabetes High In India?

Why Are The Number Of People With Diabetes High In India?

Diabetes has been called a disease of affluence due to its correlation with excess when it comes to lifestyle habits. It affects people pretty late in life. The weird part about this is that when it comes to the Indian context, the reason for the spike in diabetes cases is not so simple. Some points: 1. A large number of Indians have risen towards the middle class segment in the last 20 years. This has brought with it, lifestyle habits which may not sit well with our health. The sudden change may be the number one reason for the spike in diabetes occurrence. Link | 2. The Asian-Indian phenotype may also be another reason. Generally speaking Indians have lean mass but more central fat than any other phenotype in the world. Thus we are uniquely susceptible to heart issues and diabetes. Link | 3. Susceptibility to diabetes may also be predetermined during pregnancy. Studies have shown that if a pregnant mother does not consume and provide adequate nutrition to the growing fetus, then the fetus adapts by absorbing more glucose to keep its nutritional requirements on par. This leads to increasing insulin resistance. When the child grows up and reaches middle age, a combination of this and bad lifestyle habits may finally push the body into a diabetic state. This may also be a reason why and increasing number of younger people are being diagnosed with Diabetes in India. Link | Looking at all the points above, it seems to me that the only way to keep the risk of diabetes onset low is by planning and implementing positive lifestyle changes effectively. I work for the Habits Program (which focuses on lifestyle changes to reverse 'diabesity' (diabetes + obesity). I encourage everyone who is diabetic or pre-diabetic to give this a look. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

If you have diabetes you should aim to keep your blood pressure well controlled. Having high blood pressure (hypertension) is one of several risk factors that can increase your chance of developing heart disease, a stroke and some other complications. Treatment includes a change in lifestyle risk factors where these can be improved. Many people with diabetes need to take medication to lower their blood pressure. How common is high blood pressure in people with diabetes? In the UK, about half of all people aged over 65, and about 1 in 4 of all middle-aged adults, have high blood pressure (hypertension). It is less common in younger adults. High blood pressure is more common in people with diabetes. Around 3 in 10 people with type 1 diabetes and around 8 in 10 people with type 2 diabetes develop high blood pressure at some stage. People with diabetes are more at risk of developing high blood pressure if they: Are of African-Caribbean origin. Are from the Indian sub-continent. Have a family history of high blood pressure. Have certain lifestyle factors - for example, those who: Are overweight. Eat a lot of salt. Do not eat much fruit and vegetables. Do not take much exercise. Drink a lot of alcohol. What is high blood pressure? This is not as simple to answer as it may seem. In general, the higher the blood pressure, the greater the risk to health. Depending on various factors, the level at which blood pressure is said to be high (hypertension) can vary from person to person. The cut-off point for blood pressure that is said to be high is 140/80 mm Hg or above for people with diabetes and 130/80 mm Hg for those with diabetes and complications (for example, kidney disease). These are lower than the cut-off point for people who do not have diabetes. Note: high blood pressure Continue reading >>

Overview Of Diabetes Burden

Overview Of Diabetes Burden

Every year, around 5.8 million Indians die from noncommunicable diseases including heart diseases, lung diseases, stroke, cancer, diabetes and others These diseases now affect younger and younger people. The greatest risk factors contributing to NCDs are unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, tobacco and alcohol use and air pollution. The good news is that the majority of illnesses and deaths due to NCDs can be delayed or avoided by preventing and controlling the risk behaviours. Diabetes is a chronic disease, which occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin (type 1 diabetes), or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces (type 2 diabetes). This leads to raised blood glucose (sugar) level and over time, serious damage to many of the body's systems, especially the nerves and blood vessels. About 422 million people worldwide have diabetes. India has over 60 million diabetics out of a population of 1.3 billion. In 2015, over 0.9 million deaths in India were attributed to diabetes directly or indirectly. The number of diabetics in the country is expected to increase to a staggering 109 million cases by 2035 out of an estimated population of 1.5 billion1. The World Health Organization (WHO) projects that diabetes will be the 7th leading cause of death by 2030. The NCD Country Profiles 2014 published by WHO reveals the large share of mortality is due to NCDs. In India, an estimated 7.8% of the population above 18 years of age has raised blood glucose level or are on treatment for diabetes. 2However, nearly half of the population with diabetes is unaware about their disease. Apart from the health burden, diabetes also imposes an economic burden. The costs associated with diabetes include cost of care, productivity loss and disability, which can be Continue reading >>

More Than 77 Million People In India Have Pre-diabetes: Expert

More Than 77 Million People In India Have Pre-diabetes: Expert

There are an estimated 77.2 million people in India who are suffering from pre-diabetes. Pre-diabetes is a condition in which the patients have high blood glucose level but were not in the diabetes range. These people are at high risk of getting diabetes. The Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) estimated that the country already had around 65.1 million diabetes patients. Only China, with 98.4 million cases, has more diabetes patients globally, according to V. Mohan, president of Madras Diabetes Research Foundation. 22 per cent Chennai residents diabetic Addressing ‘ICE 2014,’ an international conference on endocrinology and metabolic diseases organised by Kovai Medical Center and Hospital (KMCH) here on Sunday, he said that another recent study had found that 22 per cent of Chennai residents had diabetes. India had dramatically changed in the last two decades. It had witnessed rapid urbanisation, demographic transition and lifestyle modifications. Tamil Nadu, where 50 per cent of the population now live in the cities, was the most urbanised State. This trend was causing an increase in stress, pressure and anxiety, all of which contributed to diabetes. Further, the ICMR study found that just over 5 per cent of the adults engaged in some form of physical activity. At least one out of every six adolescent in India was now overweight, he said. Diabetes was now found in persons as young as 15 years. Among the main reasons was sedentary lifestyle, Mr. Mohan said, adding that escalators, which have become ubiquitous now, shared a major portion of the blame. Mr. Mohan said that 17 million people suffered kidney problems arising out of diabetes, but only a few could afford the costs of treatment. As such, the focus must be on enacting preventive measures such as promot Continue reading >>

Indians With Diabetes May Number 120 Million In 20 Years: Indian Institute Of Public Health

Indians With Diabetes May Number 120 Million In 20 Years: Indian Institute Of Public Health

HYDERABAD: The number of diabetes patients in the country is likely to go up to 120 million in next 20 years as against the current 70 million, an official of Indian Institute of Public Health (IIPH) has said. Also, on an average every diabetic spends about Rs 25,000 annually to manage the disease and its associated complications, IIPH, Hyderabad, Director GVS Murthy said today on the eve of World Health Day. "India has the second largest number of people with diabetes which is at 70 million, next only to China which has about 110 million. The number of diabetes patients in India is expected to touch 120 million during the next two decades, due to a variety of reasons," Murthy told PTI. According to him, in 50 per cent of adult deaths, diabetes is an underlying condition causing the demise. It is estimated that globally the health expenditure due to diabetes among adults is USD 673 billion. The expenditure on diabetes is at the government level as well as the individual patient/family level, he said. "The per person annual cost of managing diabetes in India is Rs 25,000 approximately. There will be a wide variation based on complications, etc. Unfortunately insurance schemes in India do not cover the cost of care for diabetes," he further said. He said the theme of the 2017 World Health Day campaign is depression. The World Health Day is observed on April 7 every year to mark the anniversary of the founding of WHO. Murthy said diabetes may also cause depression in a patient if the disease is not properly controlled. "The diabetes patients need to take medication life long. Some of the important organs like eyes and kidneys may be affected if diabetes is not controlled. These kind of issues may cause depression. So the patients are to be counselled before hand," he said. Continue reading >>

Don’t Let Diabetes Win

Don’t Let Diabetes Win

With the advancement of technology, preventive health services have also evolved significantly. Traditionally, the treatment of diabetes remained at prescribing anti-diabetic drugs to patients along with managing their blood pressure and cholesterol. However, things have come a long way with a multidisciplinary approach and team work involving diabetes educators, dieticians, psychologists, diabetic nurses and super-specialists (endocrinologists). Earlier, it was acceptable for patients to travel long distances and wait for hours on end to be able to see the doctor for only a couple of minutes. However, that aspect of health care delivery has now shifted towards patient-friendly services where one expects to see the doctor at convenient times and the patient is also supported by a team of medics along with a host of facilities like telemedicine and home care teams. With the advancement of technology, preventive health services have also evolved significantly. The motive now is for patients to focus on their careers and personal lives whilst their diabetes is looked after by health care providers, explains Dr Shyam Kalavalapalli, a senior consultant endocrinologist. Q. What was the drawback of the traditional methods of treatment? Traditional treatment methods led to a lot of anxiety about diabetes as well as myths and ignorance about people’s health. At times, due to compromised care, many patients even developed complications and some ended up as emergency cases due to hypoglycemic episodes or low blood sugar. But new drugs have led to a reduction in the usage of insulin, thereby causing fewer incidences of hypoglycemia or anxiety associated with insulin injections. Q. Presently, there is a lot of stress on checking patients in the pre-diabetic stage. What are the maj Continue reading >>

One Man’s Stand Against Junk Food As Diabetes Climbs Across India

One Man’s Stand Against Junk Food As Diabetes Climbs Across India

NEW DELHI — Rahul Verma’s son was born gravely ill with digestive problems, but over years of visits to the boy’s endocrinologist, Mr. Verma saw the doctor grow increasingly alarmed about a different problem, one threatening healthy children. Junk food, the doctor warned, was especially dangerous to Indians, who are far more prone to diabetes than people from other parts of the world. One day in the doctor’s waiting room, Mr. Verma noticed a girl who had gotten fat by compulsively eating potato chips. He decided he had to do something. “On one side you have children like my son, who are born with problems,” said Mr. Verma, “and on the other side you have children who are healthy and everything is fine and you are damaging them giving them unhealthy food.” Mr. Verma, who had no legal training, sat late into the nights with his wife, Tullika, drafting a petition in their tiny apartment, which was bedecked with fairy lights and pictures of the god Ganesh, who is believed to overcome all obstacles. He filed the public interest lawsuit in the Delhi High Court in 2010, seeking a ban on the sale of junk food and soft drinks in and around schools across India. The case has propelled sweeping, court-ordered regulations of the food industry to the doorstep of the Indian government, where they have languished. They have outsize importance in India, population 1.3 billion, because its people are far more likely to develop diabetes — which can lead to heart disease, kidney failure, blindness and amputations — as they gain weight than people from other regions, according to health experts. Since 1990, the percent of children and adults in India who are overweight or obese has almost tripled to 18.8 percent from 6.4 percent, according to data from the Institute for Continue reading >>

More in diabetes