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How Many People Are Suffering From Diabetes In India?

Hypertension, Diabetes High In Ts

Hypertension, Diabetes High In Ts

One out of every six persons aged over 25 years are diabetic in Hyderabad, the study says 20 per cent of Telangana people sufferfromhypertension; 6.3 per cent suffer from diabetes Khammam tops in diabetes, Medak in hypertension Hyderabad: The recent National Family Health Survey reveals that about 20 per cent of citizens (adults) in Telangana suffer from high blood pressure with over 140/90 and 6.3 per cent suffer from diabetes. According to the study, a total of 16 per cent adults living in Adilabad district suffer from hypertension while 4.2 per cent among them have high blood pressure rate with 160/100. The blood pressure of a healthy person is 120/80. The study says that Medak district has more number of persons suffering from high BP. As many as 24.4 percent of adults have BP over 140/90, followed by 23.1 per cent public in Warangal, 22 per cent in Mahbubnagar, 21.5 per cent in Rangareddy, 21per cent in Hyderabad, 19.5 per cent adults in Nizamabad, 19.2 per cent in Karimnagar, 19.1 per cent in Khammam and 18.1 per cent adults in Nalgonda. As many as 3.4 per cent adults in Telangana are diabetic, the study says. It revealed that 6.5 per cent in Karimnagar, 6.8 per cent in Mahbubnagar, 6.8 per cent in Nalgonda, 7.2 per cent in Rangareddy, 7.4 per cent in Nizamabad and 7.6 per cent adults in Khammam were diabetic. The study further says that one out of every six persons aged over 25 years living in Hyderabad are diabetic. It revealed that the diabetics have 140 mg blood sugar levels. Over 3.4 per cent of the diabetic persons in the State have over 190 mg blood sugar levels. Compared to the state average, districts like Nalgonda (3.8%), Hyderabad (3.9%), Mahbubnagar (4.0%), Rangareddy (4.0%), Khammam (4.1%), Nizamabad (4.25%) and Karimnagar (4.6%) have more citizens su Continue reading >>

More Than 77 Million People In India Have Pre-diabetes: Expert

More Than 77 Million People In India Have Pre-diabetes: Expert

There are an estimated 77.2 million people in India who are suffering from pre-diabetes. Pre-diabetes is a condition in which the patients have high blood glucose level but were not in the diabetes range. These people are at high risk of getting diabetes. The Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) estimated that the country already had around 65.1 million diabetes patients. Only China, with 98.4 million cases, has more diabetes patients globally, according to V. Mohan, president of Madras Diabetes Research Foundation. 22 per cent Chennai residents diabetic Addressing ‘ICE 2014,’ an international conference on endocrinology and metabolic diseases organised by Kovai Medical Center and Hospital (KMCH) here on Sunday, he said that another recent study had found that 22 per cent of Chennai residents had diabetes. India had dramatically changed in the last two decades. It had witnessed rapid urbanisation, demographic transition and lifestyle modifications. Tamil Nadu, where 50 per cent of the population now live in the cities, was the most urbanised State. This trend was causing an increase in stress, pressure and anxiety, all of which contributed to diabetes. Further, the ICMR study found that just over 5 per cent of the adults engaged in some form of physical activity. At least one out of every six adolescent in India was now overweight, he said. Diabetes was now found in persons as young as 15 years. Among the main reasons was sedentary lifestyle, Mr. Mohan said, adding that escalators, which have become ubiquitous now, shared a major portion of the blame. Mr. Mohan said that 17 million people suffered kidney problems arising out of diabetes, but only a few could afford the costs of treatment. As such, the focus must be on enacting preventive measures such as promot Continue reading >>

18 Celebrities With Type 2 Diabetes

18 Celebrities With Type 2 Diabetes

Famous people with diabetes People often think that type 2 diabetes strikes only the overweight and sedentary, or unhealthy eaters. But anyone can be diagnosed with diabetes, even world-class athletes, or the rich and famous. The following celebrities all had some risk factors for diabetes (such as weight, ethnicity, or family history), but many were still shocked to hear the diagnosis. They’ve all made healthy changes in their lives, and many now speak out about the dangers of type 2 diabetes. Gabourey Sidibe When Oscar nominee Gabourey Sidibe was diagnosed with diabetes, she took charge of her health, secretly going under the knife after more than a decade of trying to lose weight naturally. “I truly didn’t want to worry about all the effects that go along with diabetes,” she told People. “I genuinely [would] worry all the time about losing my toes.” Since having bariatric surgery in 2016, the Brooklyn-born actress, beloved for her breakout role in the 2009 film Precious, continued to make positive lifestyle changes by working with a nutritionist and amping up her fitness regimen. S. Epatha Merkerson This Emmy award-winning actress won us over as Lt. Van Buren on Law & Order and then as hospital administrator Sharon Goodwin on Chicago Med. In her off-screen life, Merkerson is both a diabetes patient and advocate. She encourages others to reach their A1c goals. Even though she had a family history of type 2 diabetes, “my diagnosis was a wake-up call,” she told USA Today in 2016. “I knew I had to start making serious changes to my lifestyle to take control of my health.” That included making more nutritious food choices and taking up brisk walking. Tom Hanks When Tom Hanks announced in 2013 that he had type 2 diabetes, he joined millions of other Ame Continue reading >>

Health Alert: Diabetes Deaths See A 50% Rise In India In 11 Years

Health Alert: Diabetes Deaths See A 50% Rise In India In 11 Years

Primarily because of changing lifestyles, deaths due to diabetes have increased by 50% in India between 2005 and 2015. The disease is now the seventh-most common cause of death in the country, up from 11th rank in 2005, according to data published by the Global Burden of Disease (GBD). Ischemic heart disease continues to be the highest cause of death, followed by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular disease, lower respiratory infection, diarrhoeal diseases and tuberculosis. In 2015, 3,46,000 people died of diabetes, which caused 3.3% of all deaths that year, with an annual increase of 2.7% from 1990, according to the GBD study. Nearly 26 people die of diabetes per 1,00,000 population; diabetes is also one of the top causes of disability and accounts for 2.4% of the disability-adjusted life-years lost (sum of years lost due to disability or premature death due to the disease). There are 69.1 million people with diabetes in India, the second-highest number in the world after China, which has 109 million people with diabetes. Of these, 36 million cases remain undiagnosed, according to a 2015 Diabetes Atlas released by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). Nearly nine per cent in the age group of 20-79 have diabetes. The figures are alarming since diabetes is a chronic disease that not just affects the pancreas’ ability to produce insulin but impacts the entire body. Complications caused due to diabetes include heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, vision loss and neuropathy or nerve damage leading to leg amputation. Unlike other countries, where a majority of people with diabetes are over 60 years old, the prevalence in India is among the 40-59 years age group, affecting productivity of the population. “Diabetes strikes Indians a decade earlie Continue reading >>

The Current State Of Diabetes Mellitus In India

The Current State Of Diabetes Mellitus In India

Diabetes is fast gaining the status of a potential epidemic in India with more than 62 million diabetic individuals currently diagnosed with the disease.1,2 In 2000, India (31.7 million) topped the world with the highest number of people with diabetes mellitus followed by China (20.8 million) with the United States (17.7 million) in second and third place respectively. According to Wild et al.3 the prevalence of diabetes is predicted to double globally from 171 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030 with a maximum increase in India. It is predicted that by 2030 diabetes mellitus may afflict up to 79.4 million individuals in India, while China (42.3 million) and the United States (30.3 million) will also see significant increases in those affected by the disease.3,4 India currently faces an uncertain future in relation to the potential burden that diabetes may impose upon the country. Many influences affect the prevalence of disease throughout a country, and identification of those factors is necessary to facilitate change when facing health challenges. So what are the factors currently affecting diabetes in India that are making this problem so extreme? The aetiology of diabetes in India is multifactorial and includes genetic factors coupled with environmental influences such as obesity associated with rising living standards, steady urban migration, and lifestyle changes. Yet despite the incidence of diabetes within India, there are no nationwide and few multi-centric studies conducted on the prevalence of diabetes and its complications. The studies that have been undertaken are also prone to potential error as the heterogeneity of the Indian population with respect to culture, ethnicity, socio- economic conditions, mean that the extrapolation of regional results may g Continue reading >>

World Health Day 2016: Diabetes

World Health Day 2016: Diabetes

Every year, World Health Day is celebrated on 7 April to mark the anniversary of the founding of WHO in 1948. Each year a theme is selected that highlights a priority area of public health. The day provides an opportunity for individuals in every community to get involved in activities that can lead to better health. The theme for World Health Day 2016 is diabetes. Background In 2008, an estimated 347 million people in the world had diabetes and the prevalence is growing, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. India had 69.2 million people living with diabetes (8.7%) as per the 2015 data. Of these, it remained undiagnosed in more than 36 million people. Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar, gives us the energy that we need to live. If it cannot get into the cells to be burned as energy, sugar builds up to harmful levels in the blood. Over time, high blood sugar can seriously compromise every major organ system in the body, causing heart attacks, strokes, nerve damage, kidney failure, blindness, impotence and infections that can lead to amputations. Goal of World Health Day 2016: Scale up prevention, strengthen care, and enhance surveillance of diabetes The main goals of the World Health Day 2016 campaign aims to: Increase awareness about the rise in diabetes, and its staggering burden and consequences, in particular in low-and middle-income countries; Trigger a set of specific, effective and affordable actions to tackle diabetes. These will include steps to prevent diabetes and diagnose, treat and care for people with diabetes; and Launch the first Global report on diabetes, which will des Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Read on to learn some of the key facts and statistics about the people who have it and how to manage it. Risk factors Many risk factors for type 2 diabetes include lifestyle decisions that can be reduced or even cut out entirely with time and effort. Men are also at slightly higher risk of developing diabetes than women. This may be more associated with lifestyle factors, body weight, and where the weight is located (abdominally versus in the hip area) than with innate gender differences. Significant risk factors include: older age excess weight, particularly around the waist family history certain ethnicities physical inactivity poor diet Prevalence Type 2 diabetes is increasingly prevalent but also largely preventable. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults. The CDC also gives us the following information: In general Research suggests that 1 out of 3 adults has prediabetes. Of this group, 9 out of 10 don't know they have it. 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. More than one in every 10 adults who are 20 years or older has diabetes. For seniors (65 years and older), that figure rises to more than one in four. Cases of diagnosed diabetes cost the United States an estimated $245 billion in 2012. This cost is expected to rise with the increasing diagnoses. In pregnancy and parentingAccording to the CDC, 4.6 to 9.2 percent of pregnancies may be affected by gestational diabetes. In up to 10 percent of them, the mother is diagnosed w Continue reading >>

Quick Facts Diabetes In Minnesota

Quick Facts Diabetes In Minnesota

How many adults in Minnesota have diabetes? 2015, 7.6% of Minnesota adults (about 320,000)1 had been diagnosed with diabetes (type 1 or 2). Around 18,000 new cases are diagnosed in Minnesota each year (2010)1 Around 1 in 4 people with diabetes do not know that they have the disease2. For information about diabetes in the US, please read the National Diabetes Statistics Report 2017. Are there disparities in diabetes rates in Minnesota? Disparities happen when the health of a group of people are negatively affected by factors like how much money they earn, their race or ethnicity, or where they live. In Minnesota, we currently collect data specific to two of these factors. Education: In 2015, about 5.4 percent1* of adults who have a college degree report having diabetes compared with 8.5 percent1* of adults who do not. Income: Health survey data from 2013 through 2015 show that self-reported diabetes rates are higher for people living in households that earn lower incomes1*. How is Minnesota monitoring diabetes management? Healthcare providers measure five diabetes goals to monitor how well a patient’s diabetes is controlled. These goals are influenced by a number of different factors: individual factors, community-level factors, and healthcare-related factors. This information is reported as the Optimal Diabetes Care measure. Overall in Minnesota, 53 percent of adults met all five diabetes goals3. There are disparities in the percentage of people who meet all five diabetes goals. We show some of the disparities observed in 2014 below: Race: 31 percent of American Indian or Alaska Native meet the Optimal Diabetes Care measure as compared to 59 percent of Asian adults3. Ethnicity: 46 percent of Hispanic or Latino adults meet the Optimal Diabetes Care measure as compared Continue reading >>

Review Diabetes Care In India

Review Diabetes Care In India

Abstract Diabetes has become a major health care problem in India with an estimated 66.8 million people suffering from the condition, representing the largest number of any country in the world. The rising burden of diabetes has greatly affected the health care sector and economy in India. The goal of health care experts in India is to transform India into a diabetes care capital in the world. An expert detailed review of the medical literature with an Asian Indian context was performed. Recent epidemiologic studies from India point to a great burden from diabetes. Diabetes control in India is far from ideal with a mean hemoglobin A1c of 9.0%—at least 2.0% higher than suggested by international bodies. Nearly half of people with diabetes remain undetected, accounting for complications at the time of diagnosis. Screening can differentiate an asymptomatic individual at high risk from one at low risk for diabetes. Despite the large number of people with diabetes in India, awareness is low and needs to be addressed. Other challenges include balancing the need for glycemic control with risk reduction due to overly tight control, especially in high-risk groups and taking into account health care professional expertise, attitudes, and perceptions. Pharmacologic care should be individualized with early consideration of combination therapy. Regular exercise, yoga, mindful eating, and stress management form a cornerstone in the management of diabetes. Considering the high cost incurred at various steps of screening, diagnosis, monitoring, and management, it is important to realize the cost-effective measures of diabetes care that are necessary to implement. Result-oriented organized programs involving patient education, as well as updating the medical fraternity on various deve Continue reading >>

Diabetes Education

Diabetes Education

The prevalence of diabetes for American Indian Elders across the United States is almost three times higher than the national average. American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) suffer from diabetes more than any ethnic group and the disease is increasingly affecting younger Indians, according to Indian Health Service (IHS) records. In some communities, the prevalence rate is as high as 60 percent among adults. Indian Health Service (IHS) Diabetes Care & Outcomes Audit Mean A1C 1996-2011 *p < 0.0001 comparing mean HbA1 levels in FY96 and FY09 Source: IHS National Diabetes Program Statistics 1996-2011 Background For three decades, the IHS has served as a leader in the fight against the diabetes epidemic in AI/AN communities, earning national and international recognition for diabetes quality improvement. Major accomplishments include developing monitoring systems of diabetes clinical care, such as the annual IHS Diabetes Care and Outcomes Audit, and creating diabetes surveillance systems for tracking diabetes prevalence and complications. The IHS Division of Diabetes Treatment and Prevention (DDTP) has also developed and mobilized an extensive network to conduct diabetes treatment and prevention programs and activities throughout the Indian health system. Given the limited resources available for diabetes care, the IHS focuses on applying scientifically proven methods to prevent the onset of diabetes and costly diabetes-related complications such as cardiovascular, eye, nerve, and kidney disease. Status In the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, Congress established the Special Diabetes Program for Indians (SDPI) and provided $150 million over 5 years for “the prevention and treatment of diabetes in American Indians and Alaska Natives.” Funds have been reauthorized at $150 Continue reading >>

Number Of Diabetes Patients Doubles In 13 Years In India: Who

Number Of Diabetes Patients Doubles In 13 Years In India: Who

Diabetic patients are at greater risk of developing brain diseases.AlishaV/Flickr The number of diabetes patients is likely to rise to 101 million in India by 2030, estimates the World Health Organisation (WHO). The number doubled to 63 million in 2013 from 32 million in 2000 in the country. The states of Kerala, Tamil Nadu and Gujarat had the highest prevalence of diabetes in India, the Times of India reported. Nearly 8.2 percent of the adult male population in India suffered from diabetes whereas 6.8 percent of adult women were diabetic. The number of diabetic deaths stood at 75,900 for Indian men aged between 30-69 years as against 51,700 women in the same age group. Diabetes, although not as fatal as other non-communicable diseases as cancer and heart diseases, digs a bigger hole in pocket due to the treatment costs involved and the reduced productivity of patients in the later years of the disease. The WHO urged South-East Asian countries to take concrete action for prevention and treatment of diabetes. The organisation reports South-East Asia had a diabetic population of 46,903,000 which is expected to reach 119,541,000 by 2030. "Diabetes rarely makes headlines, and yet it will be the world's seventh largest killer by 2030 unless intense and focused efforts are made by governments, communities and individuals," Dr Poonam Khetrapal Singh, regional director, WHO South-East Asia, said in a statement. She added that diabetes is of particular concern in South East Asia, where one out of every four of the 3.7 million globally-reported diabetes-related deaths occurs. The WHO has urged governments to regulate the marketing of unhealthy foods and tax sugary beverages. "The governments must also increase access to health care and promote educational campaigns regarding self Continue reading >>

Diabetes In India Rising, With Women At A Particular Disadvantage

Diabetes In India Rising, With Women At A Particular Disadvantage

KS Harikrishnan IPS, part of the Guardian development network The disease itself may not discriminate on the basis of gender, but when it comes to healthcare for patients with diabetes, women in India find themselves at a disadvantage compared with men. This is the conclusion of a study, Impact of Gender on Care of Type 2 Diabetes in Varkala, Kerala, which analysed gender roles, norms and values in a household and found women patients to be more vulnerable. This vulnerability influences all phases of diabetic care, according to the paper by Dr Mini P Mani at the Achutha Menon Centre for Health Science Studies (AMCHSS) in Thiruvananthapuram, the capital of the southern state of Kerala. Even when they suffer from diabetes, women cannot abandon the "caretaker role" in the family and have to continue to prioritise the health of other family members above their own, the study found. Inequitable access to resources prevents early diagnosis of the disease in women. Women pay more attention to the health of the men and children in the family, leaving them with less time to devote to their own wellbeing, said Rosy Raphy, who teaches at a school in Munambam, near the central Kerala town of Kochi. "As someone who has lived with diabetes for 26 years," Raphy told IPS, "I can say that I was not aware of the disease and did not take due care because I was preoccupied with matters of the family. As a result, my case got aggravated." Of particular concern to women and gynaecologists in the country is gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a form of the disease that affects pregnant women. The incidence of GDM has grown fourfold in the past 10 years, according to Dr B Rajkumar, a doctor of Indian systems of medicine at the Keezhariyoor government ayurveda dispensary in the state's norther Continue reading >>

The Burden Of Diabetes In India

The Burden Of Diabetes In India

India, the second most populous country of the world, has been severely affected by the global diabetes epidemic. As per the International Diabetes Federation (2013), approximately 50% of all people with diabetes live in just three countries: China (98.4 million), India (65.1 million) and the USA (24.4 million)[1]. There is clear evidence to show that diabetes prevalence is rapidly increasing, especially in urban India. The conventional risk factors of urbanization, unhealthy eating habits and physical inactivity, coupled with inherent genetic attributes and differences in body composition are propelling the increase in cases of diabetes. Accordingly, diabetes related complications are also on the rise and contribute significantly to overall morbidity and mortality. The low levels of education and poor awareness of the disease in the country are enhancing its impact on health of the population. While communicable diseases are slowly getting controlled in low and middle income countries (LMIC), such as India, there is a significant increase in the burden of non communicable diseases, including but not restricted to diabetes. Going by the model of four phases of health transition, India is currently in the age of man-made and degenerative diseases. This age is characterised by a life expectancy close to 50-60 years and unhealthy lifestyles which promote diseases like cardiovascular disease and hypertension. Prevalence/ incidence While comprehensive data are not available, smaller studies have been performed in various states of India to study the prevalence of diabetes. Based on these studies, the highest prevalence reported is from Ernakulum in Kerala (19.5%) and the lowest from Kashmir valley (6.1%). Most other areas have prevalence above 10%. While most prevalence stud Continue reading >>

Diabetes Emerges As Japan’s Hidden Scourge

Diabetes Emerges As Japan’s Hidden Scourge

Reading a review of British writer Bee Wilson’s “First Bite: How We Learn to Eat” in the London Review of Books, I stumbled on an astonishing figure: 4 million people in the U.K. have diabetes. An unhealthy diet and increasingly sedentary lifestyle have taken their toll, causing a 65 percent surge in cases in the past decade alone. Treating this epidemic is costing the National Health Service an estimated £1 million (roughly ¥155 million) an hour. Obesity is the main culprit, and one major dietary factor is the high-sugar content in many processed foods. It was astounding to learn that tomato ketchup (22.8 percent) has a higher sugar content than Coca-Cola (10.6 percent), and that we consume far more glucose-fructose syrup and other sugary ingredients than most people are probably aware of. Globalization in eating habits has spread a craving for what dieticians call “SFS”: sugar, fat, salt. Sweet-salty food with an undercurrent of fat is a global crowd-pleaser and the mainstay at fast-food restaurants, but is not good for our health. Coffee itself isn’t bad for you, but all those flavored lattes are oozing sugar and calories. Given the longevity enjoyed by Japanese, often attributed to their healthy diet, I never really thought about the incidence of diabetes here. America, after all, is the homeland of spandex for a good reason, but obesity in Japan seems relatively rare. Yet as of 2015, Japan has 7.2 million people diagnosed with diabetes. The average cost per patient is more than ¥400,000 a year, mostly covered by national health insurance. About 7.6 percent of adults between the ages of 20 and 79 are diabetic and it is estimated that Japan may have more than 3 million undiagnosed cases. Part of the reason for the sharp increase of diabetes in Japan is Continue reading >>

50% Rise In Diabetes Deaths Across India Over 11 Years

50% Rise In Diabetes Deaths Across India Over 11 Years

With a genetic predisposition brought to the fore by changing lifestyles, deaths due to diabetes increased 50% in India between 2005 and 2015, and is now the seventh most common cause of death in the country, up from the 11th rank in 2005, according to data published by the Global Burden of Disease (GDB). Ischemic heart disease continues to be the highest cause of death, followed by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular disease, lower respiratory infection, diarrhoeal diseases and tuberculosis. In 2015, 346,000 people died of diabetes, which caused 3.3% of all deaths that year, with an annual increase of 2.7% from 1990, according to the GDB study. Nearly 26 people die of diabetes per 100,000 population; diabetes is also one of the top causes of disability and accounts for 2.4% of the disability adjusted life years lost (sum of years lost due to disability or premature death due to the disease). Source: Global Burden of Disease, Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) There are 69.1 million people with diabetes in India, the second highest number in the world after China, which has 109 million people with diabetes. Of these, 36 million cases remain undiagnosed, according to this 2015 Diabetes Atlas released by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). Nearly 9% in the age group of 20-79 have diabetes. The figures are alarming since diabetes is a chronic disease that not just affects the pancreas’ ability to produce insulin but affects the entire body. Complications caused due to diabetes include heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, vision loss and neuropathy or nerve damage leading to leg amputation. Unlike other countries, where a majority of people with diabetes are over 60 years old, the prevalence in India is among the 40-59 years a Continue reading >>

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