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How Many People Are Suffering From Diabetes In India?

One Man’s Stand Against Junk Food As Diabetes Climbs Across India

One Man’s Stand Against Junk Food As Diabetes Climbs Across India

NEW DELHI — Rahul Verma’s son was born gravely ill with digestive problems, but over years of visits to the boy’s endocrinologist, Mr. Verma saw the doctor grow increasingly alarmed about a different problem, one threatening healthy children. Junk food, the doctor warned, was especially dangerous to Indians, who are far more prone to diabetes than people from other parts of the world. One day in the doctor’s waiting room, Mr. Verma noticed a girl who had gotten fat by compulsively eating potato chips. He decided he had to do something. “On one side you have children like my son, who are born with problems,” said Mr. Verma, “and on the other side you have children who are healthy and everything is fine and you are damaging them giving them unhealthy food.” Mr. Verma, who had no legal training, sat late into the nights with his wife, Tullika, drafting a petition in their tiny apartment, which was bedecked with fairy lights and pictures of the god Ganesh, who is believed to overcome all obstacles. He filed the public interest lawsuit in the Delhi High Court in 2010, seeking a ban on the sale of junk food and soft drinks in and around schools across India. The case has propelled sweeping, court-ordered regulations of the food industry to the doorstep of the Indian government, where they have languished. They have outsize importance in India, population 1.3 billion, because its people are far more likely to develop diabetes — which can lead to heart disease, kidney failure, blindness and amputations — as they gain weight than people from other regions, according to health experts. Since 1990, the percent of children and adults in India who are overweight or obese has almost tripled to 18.8 percent from 6.4 percent, according to data from the Institute for Continue reading >>

Govt Survey: Over 20 Per Cent Indians Suffer From Diabetes, Hypertension

Govt Survey: Over 20 Per Cent Indians Suffer From Diabetes, Hypertension

A government health survey conducted across 26 states and Union Territories has found that more than a fifth of India’s 125-crore population suffers from diabetes and hypertension. According to the National Family Health Survey-4, whose results were released on Tuesday, the overall incidence of diabetes was 20.3 per cent and that of hypertension 22.2 per cent. While there would be some commonality in the data — some people suffer from both — the actual numbers exceed the estimations. This is the first time the government has conducted a survey to find out the incidence of diabetes and hypertension. An earlier attempt to do so under the National programme for Prevention and Control of Cancer, Diabetes, Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke did not quite take off, and the initial data had suggested a far lower incidence — about 6 per cent for diabetes and 8 per cent for hypertension. However, as a senior health ministry official said, the sample size in NFHS is too small to be representative of the entire country. NFHS-4, conducted in 2015-16, recorded data from 6 lakh households, covering 7 lakh women and 1.3 lakh men. Some of the states where the incidence of diabetes was found to be higher than the national average include Goa (33.7 per cent), West Bengal (28.2 per cent), Assam (34.6 per cent) and Odisha (27.2 per cent). States with a higher incidence of hypertension include Punjab (35 per cent), Sikkim (44.8 per cent) and Maharashtra (26 per cent). The data shows that like in previous editions of the survey, deliveries by caesarean section are disproportionately high in private hospitals as compared to government ones, taking the overall incidence of such deliveries way above the 25 per cent that WHO says is the expected rate in any population. The percentage of c Continue reading >>

No Answers In Sight For India’s Diabetes Crisis

No Answers In Sight For India’s Diabetes Crisis

For nearly two years, Manoramani has made the three-hour bus journey on the first Sunday of the month to sit on a tiny plastic chair in a crowded hall and wait. Wrapped in a green sari, the portly 41-year-old was diagnosed with diabetes seven years ago. Her health deteriorated until a relative, and fellow diabetic, recommended she went to the Jnana Sanjeevini Medical Center in southern Bangalore, a long way from her small town in a neighboring state. The reason? Supplies of insulin and four other medicines, all free of charge. In recent years, the two-decade-old clinic has seen more and more Indians like Manoramani pass through its doors — patients who reflect the shifting demographics of the disease nationwide. They are younger and poorer. They come from rural areas. And they often have alarmingly minimal health education. At a small table in the clinic, a counselor reminds a diabetic from a nearby village, whose sugar levels remain persistently high, that she should eat more fresh fruit and vegetables. “We repeat the same thing every month,” says Vidula Krishnaswamy, a volunteer. “They’re not used to taking care of themselves.” While people in some parts of India continue to battle malnutrition, many residents in the wealthier states have, during the past two decades of the nation’s boom, faced a menace of excess. Rising incomes paired with sedentary lifestyles and starchy, sugary diets have helped diabetes spread furiously. For years, most Indian diabetics fit one profile: urban, educated, with a cozy office job. Now that’s changing. More and more, Indians in lower income brackets, often living in rural areas, are being diagnosed with the disease. With their incomes rising and job opportunities broadening, Indians have been performing less manual labo Continue reading >>

Health Alert: Diabetes Deaths See A 50% Rise In India In 11 Years

Health Alert: Diabetes Deaths See A 50% Rise In India In 11 Years

Primarily because of changing lifestyles, deaths due to diabetes have increased by 50% in India between 2005 and 2015. The disease is now the seventh-most common cause of death in the country, up from 11th rank in 2005, according to data published by the Global Burden of Disease (GBD). Ischemic heart disease continues to be the highest cause of death, followed by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular disease, lower respiratory infection, diarrhoeal diseases and tuberculosis. In 2015, 3,46,000 people died of diabetes, which caused 3.3% of all deaths that year, with an annual increase of 2.7% from 1990, according to the GBD study. Nearly 26 people die of diabetes per 1,00,000 population; diabetes is also one of the top causes of disability and accounts for 2.4% of the disability-adjusted life-years lost (sum of years lost due to disability or premature death due to the disease). There are 69.1 million people with diabetes in India, the second-highest number in the world after China, which has 109 million people with diabetes. Of these, 36 million cases remain undiagnosed, according to a 2015 Diabetes Atlas released by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). Nearly nine per cent in the age group of 20-79 have diabetes. The figures are alarming since diabetes is a chronic disease that not just affects the pancreas’ ability to produce insulin but impacts the entire body. Complications caused due to diabetes include heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, vision loss and neuropathy or nerve damage leading to leg amputation. Unlike other countries, where a majority of people with diabetes are over 60 years old, the prevalence in India is among the 40-59 years age group, affecting productivity of the population. “Diabetes strikes Indians a decade earlie Continue reading >>

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Prevalence (per 1,000 inhabitants) of diabetes worldwide in 2000 - world average was 2.8%. no data ≤ 7.5 7.5–15 15–22.5 22.5–30 30–37.5 37.5–45 45–52.5 52.5–60 60–67.5 67.5–75 75–82.5 ≥ 82.5 Disability-adjusted life year for diabetes mellitus per 100,000 inhabitants in 2004 No data <100 100–200 200–300 300–400 400–500 500–600 600–700 700–800 800–900 900–1,000 1,000–1,500 >1,500 Globally, an estimated 422 million adults are living with diabetes mellitus, according to the latest 2016 data from the World Health Organization (WHO).[1] Diabetes prevalence is increasing rapidly; previous 2013 estimates from the International Diabetes Federation put the number at 381 million people having diabetes.[2] The number is projected to almost double by 2030.[3] Type 2 diabetes makes up about 85-90% of all cases.[4][5] Increases in the overall diabetes prevalence rates largely reflect an increase in risk factors for type 2, notably greater longevity and being overweight or obese.[1] Diabetes mellitus occurs throughout the world, but is more common (especially type 2) in the more developed countries. The greatest increase in prevalence is, however, occurring in low- and middle-income countries[1] including in Asia and Africa, where most patients will probably be found by 2030.[3] The increase in incidence in developing countries follows the trend of urbanization and lifestyle changes, including increasingly sedentary lifestyles, less physically demanding work and the global nutrition transition, marked by increased intake of foods that are high energy-dense but nutrient-poor (often high in sugar and saturated fats, sometimes referred to as the Western pattern diet).[1][3] The risk of getting type 2 diabetes has been widely found to be associat Continue reading >>

Current Scenario Of Diabetes In India

Current Scenario Of Diabetes In India

Abstract India, a country experiencing rapid socioeconomic progress and urbanization, carries a considerable share of the global diabetes burden. Studies in different parts of India have demonstrated an escalating prevalence of diabetes not only in urban populations, but also in rural populations as a result of the urbanization of lifestyle parameters. The prevalence of prediabetes is also high. Recent studies have shown a rapid conversion of impaired glucose tolerance to diabetes in the southern states of India, where the prevalence of diabetes among adults has reached approximately 20% in urban populations and approximately 10% in rural populations. Because of the considerable disparity in the availability and affordability of diabetes care, as well as low awareness of the disease, the glycemic outcome in treated patients is far from ideal. Lower age at onset and a lack of good glycemic control are likely to increase the occurrence of vascular complications. The economic burden of treating diabetes and its complications is considerable. It is appropriate that the Indian Government has initiated a national program for the management and prevention of diabetes and related metabolic disorders. Lifestyle modification is an effective tool for the primary prevention of diabetes in Asian Indians. The primary prevention of diabetes is urgently needed in India to curb the rising burden of diabetes. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Read on to learn some of the key facts and statistics about the people who have it and how to manage it. Risk factors Many risk factors for type 2 diabetes include lifestyle decisions that can be reduced or even cut out entirely with time and effort. Men are also at slightly higher risk of developing diabetes than women. This may be more associated with lifestyle factors, body weight, and where the weight is located (abdominally versus in the hip area) than with innate gender differences. Significant risk factors include: older age excess weight, particularly around the waist family history certain ethnicities physical inactivity poor diet Prevalence Type 2 diabetes is increasingly prevalent but also largely preventable. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults. The CDC also gives us the following information: In general Research suggests that 1 out of 3 adults has prediabetes. Of this group, 9 out of 10 don't know they have it. 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. More than one in every 10 adults who are 20 years or older has diabetes. For seniors (65 years and older), that figure rises to more than one in four. Cases of diagnosed diabetes cost the United States an estimated $245 billion in 2012. This cost is expected to rise with the increasing diagnoses. In pregnancy and parentingAccording to the CDC, 4.6 to 9.2 percent of pregnancies may be affected by gestational diabetes. In up to 10 percent of them, the mother is diagnosed w Continue reading >>

The Current State Of Diabetes Mellitus In India

The Current State Of Diabetes Mellitus In India

Diabetes is fast gaining the status of a potential epidemic in India with more than 62 million diabetic individuals currently diagnosed with the disease.1,2 In 2000, India (31.7 million) topped the world with the highest number of people with diabetes mellitus followed by China (20.8 million) with the United States (17.7 million) in second and third place respectively. According to Wild et al.3 the prevalence of diabetes is predicted to double globally from 171 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030 with a maximum increase in India. It is predicted that by 2030 diabetes mellitus may afflict up to 79.4 million individuals in India, while China (42.3 million) and the United States (30.3 million) will also see significant increases in those affected by the disease.3,4 India currently faces an uncertain future in relation to the potential burden that diabetes may impose upon the country. Many influences affect the prevalence of disease throughout a country, and identification of those factors is necessary to facilitate change when facing health challenges. So what are the factors currently affecting diabetes in India that are making this problem so extreme? The aetiology of diabetes in India is multifactorial and includes genetic factors coupled with environmental influences such as obesity associated with rising living standards, steady urban migration, and lifestyle changes. Yet despite the incidence of diabetes within India, there are no nationwide and few multi-centric studies conducted on the prevalence of diabetes and its complications. The studies that have been undertaken are also prone to potential error as the heterogeneity of the Indian population with respect to culture, ethnicity, socio- economic conditions, mean that the extrapolation of regional results may g Continue reading >>

Diabetes In India

Diabetes In India

Tweet Over 30 million have now been diagnosed with diabetes in India. The CPR (Crude prevalence rate) in the urban areas of India is thought to be 9 per cent. In rural areas, the prevalence is approximately 3 per cent of the total population. The population of India is now more than 1000 million: this helps to give an idea of the scale of the problem. The estimate of the actual number of diabetics in India is around 40 million. This means that India actually has the highest number of diabetics of any one country in the entire world. IGT (Impaired Glucose Tolerance) is also a mounting problem in India. The prevalence of IGT is thought to be around 8.7 per cent in urban areas and 7.9 per cent in rural areas, although this estimate may be too high. It is thought that around 35 per cent of IGT sufferers go on to develop type 2 diabetes, so India is genuinely facing a healthcare crisis. In India, the type of diabetes differs considerably from that in the Western world. Type 1 is considerably more rare, and only about 1/3 of type II diabetics are overweight or obese. Diabetes is also beginning to appear much earlier in life in India, meaning that chronic long-term complications are becoming more common. The implications for the Indian healthcare system are enormous. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes Continue reading >>

Quick Facts Diabetes In Minnesota

Quick Facts Diabetes In Minnesota

How many adults in Minnesota have diabetes? 2015, 7.6% of Minnesota adults (about 320,000)1 had been diagnosed with diabetes (type 1 or 2). Around 18,000 new cases are diagnosed in Minnesota each year (2010)1 Around 1 in 4 people with diabetes do not know that they have the disease2. For information about diabetes in the US, please read the National Diabetes Statistics Report 2017. Are there disparities in diabetes rates in Minnesota? Disparities happen when the health of a group of people are negatively affected by factors like how much money they earn, their race or ethnicity, or where they live. In Minnesota, we currently collect data specific to two of these factors. Education: In 2015, about 5.4 percent1* of adults who have a college degree report having diabetes compared with 8.5 percent1* of adults who do not. Income: Health survey data from 2013 through 2015 show that self-reported diabetes rates are higher for people living in households that earn lower incomes1*. How is Minnesota monitoring diabetes management? Healthcare providers measure five diabetes goals to monitor how well a patient’s diabetes is controlled. These goals are influenced by a number of different factors: individual factors, community-level factors, and healthcare-related factors. This information is reported as the Optimal Diabetes Care measure. Overall in Minnesota, 53 percent of adults met all five diabetes goals3. There are disparities in the percentage of people who meet all five diabetes goals. We show some of the disparities observed in 2014 below: Race: 31 percent of American Indian or Alaska Native meet the Optimal Diabetes Care measure as compared to 59 percent of Asian adults3. Ethnicity: 46 percent of Hispanic or Latino adults meet the Optimal Diabetes Care measure as compared Continue reading >>

The Fitness Routine Of Top 5 Indian Celebrities Suffering From Diabetes

The Fitness Routine Of Top 5 Indian Celebrities Suffering From Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus has grown at an alarming pace all over the world, particularly in India. On the International Day of Yoga, PM Narendra Modi told: “India has become the Diabetes capital of the world.” Even youngsters are not immune to it. Once diagnosed, many diabetics find it difficult to keep pace with the modified dietary requirements, their exercise and medicine schedules. Thus, over a period, they succumb to complications of diabetes and the increased need for medical attention. However, there are many people, who have taken this bull head on and have modified their lifestyle including their diet, exercise and medicines so that their diabetes no longer interferes with their life. Now let us review how some of the Indian celebrities with diabetes have modified their lifestyle and their fitness routine to lead a productive life: Sonam Kapoor: Sonam Kapoor was detected with diabetes when she was still a teenager. That explains a lot about her childhood obesity. Sonam is on antidiabetic medication since several years and has to take insulin injection regularly, every day. Sonam’s fitness routine: Sonam eats several small meals regularly and never misses out her workout sessions. She starts her day with jogging followed by yoga and meditation. She chooses a combination of power yoga, pilates, and weight training. Sonam is also a Kathak dancer that helps her maintain a well-toned body. The actor also loves to play squash and makes it a point to play at least two days a week. Kamal Haasan: This versatile actor suffers from Type-1 diabetes. He can mould his physique easily, which helps him sport any look. He did not allow diabetes to overrule his life and has chosen to spread the awareness about diabetes. Kamal Haasan’s fitness routine: This actor has his ways of Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Diabetes In India

Prevalence Of Diabetes In India

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), diabetes is currently one of the biggest health concerns that the world is faced with. WHO defines diabetes as “a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces”. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. A common effect of diabetes is Hyperglycemia or increased blood sugar. Diabetes causes some serious health issues including blindness, kidney failure, stroke and heart diseases. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body produces insufficient quantities of insulin. It is usually detected more in children. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not effectively use the insulin produced. This is very frequently due to lack of physical activity, obesity, or incorrect dietary habits. Gestational diabetes occurs among pregnant women. In about 90 percent of cases, it is Type 2 diabetes that people are suffering from. The occurrence of Type 2 diabetes or Diabetes Mellitus may be prevented or delayed by adopting a healthy lifestyle. Diabetes can be identified by telltale symptoms – frequent urination, unusual thirst, excessive fatigue and hunger, weight loss, and wounds that take long to heal. Type 2 diabetes, however, may remain unnoticed and patients may not display any signs for years. Prevalence of Diabetes in India According to statistics from the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), India has more diabetics than any other nation of the world. Current estimates peg the number of diabetics in the country at about 62 million – an increase of over 10 million from 2011 when estimates suggested that about 50.8 million people in the country were suffering from the disease. If you think the disease has already reac Continue reading >>

The Burden Of Diabetes In India

The Burden Of Diabetes In India

India, the second most populous country of the world, has been severely affected by the global diabetes epidemic. As per the International Diabetes Federation (2013), approximately 50% of all people with diabetes live in just three countries: China (98.4 million), India (65.1 million) and the USA (24.4 million)[1]. There is clear evidence to show that diabetes prevalence is rapidly increasing, especially in urban India. The conventional risk factors of urbanization, unhealthy eating habits and physical inactivity, coupled with inherent genetic attributes and differences in body composition are propelling the increase in cases of diabetes. Accordingly, diabetes related complications are also on the rise and contribute significantly to overall morbidity and mortality. The low levels of education and poor awareness of the disease in the country are enhancing its impact on health of the population. While communicable diseases are slowly getting controlled in low and middle income countries (LMIC), such as India, there is a significant increase in the burden of non communicable diseases, including but not restricted to diabetes. Going by the model of four phases of health transition, India is currently in the age of man-made and degenerative diseases. This age is characterised by a life expectancy close to 50-60 years and unhealthy lifestyles which promote diseases like cardiovascular disease and hypertension. Prevalence/ incidence While comprehensive data are not available, smaller studies have been performed in various states of India to study the prevalence of diabetes. Based on these studies, the highest prevalence reported is from Ernakulum in Kerala (19.5%) and the lowest from Kashmir valley (6.1%). Most other areas have prevalence above 10%. While most prevalence stud Continue reading >>

World Health Day 2016: Diabetes

World Health Day 2016: Diabetes

Every year, World Health Day is celebrated on 7 April to mark the anniversary of the founding of WHO in 1948. Each year a theme is selected that highlights a priority area of public health. The day provides an opportunity for individuals in every community to get involved in activities that can lead to better health. The theme for World Health Day 2016 is diabetes. Background In 2008, an estimated 347 million people in the world had diabetes and the prevalence is growing, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. India had 69.2 million people living with diabetes (8.7%) as per the 2015 data. Of these, it remained undiagnosed in more than 36 million people. Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar, gives us the energy that we need to live. If it cannot get into the cells to be burned as energy, sugar builds up to harmful levels in the blood. Over time, high blood sugar can seriously compromise every major organ system in the body, causing heart attacks, strokes, nerve damage, kidney failure, blindness, impotence and infections that can lead to amputations. Goal of World Health Day 2016: Scale up prevention, strengthen care, and enhance surveillance of diabetes The main goals of the World Health Day 2016 campaign aims to: Increase awareness about the rise in diabetes, and its staggering burden and consequences, in particular in low-and middle-income countries; Trigger a set of specific, effective and affordable actions to tackle diabetes. These will include steps to prevent diabetes and diagnose, treat and care for people with diabetes; and Launch the first Global report on diabetes, which will des Continue reading >>

42.5% Delhiites Suffer From Diabetic; Women Are More Prone To Diabetes

42.5% Delhiites Suffer From Diabetic; Women Are More Prone To Diabetes

Due to sedentary lifestyle, erratic eating habits including higher consumption of fast food and stress render are more prone to diabetic, according to a paper brought out by ASSOCHAM on the occasion of ‘World Diabetic day’ on 14 November. ASSOCHAM recent survey on “Diabetic on the rise in India” conducted ahead of the World Diabetic Day reveals that that currently 68 million Indians suffer from diabetes, the number of which was 25 million in 2006. The Health Committee of the Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry of India (ASSOCHAM) has estimated that by 2035, 125 million Indians might become victim of diabetes if their current lifestyle and food habits do not change for better coupled with balanced diet. Commenting on the diabetic domestic scenario, the paper reveals that about 42.5% of Delhi population suffers from this disease which in case of Mumbai is estimated at 38.5% of its total population. 36% of Ahemdabad population is diabetic, Bangalore at 26.5% suffers from diabetic while in Chennai, and its percentage estimated is at 24.5%. Even in rural areas, people are increasingly becoming victims of Diabetic. In Hyderabad and Kolkata, the number of diabetic patients is estimated at 22.6% and 19.7% of their total population, said ASSOCHAM Secretary General, Mr. D. S Rawat commenting on findings of the Paper. “Delhiites consume high amount of oil/ghee/butter in various cooked products. This has evidently increased the number of obesity and hypertension cases, giving a rise to number of diabetics. The increase in diabetic cases among men grew by 25 percent while that among women made a whooping increase of 42%,” reveals ASSOCHAM findings. The survey included the major cities like Delhi-NCR, Mumbai, Bangalore, Kolkata, Chennai, Ahmedabad, Hyderabd, Pune Continue reading >>

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