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How Many People Are Killed By Diabetes Each Year?

Type 1 Diabetes Hypoglycemia Deaths Per Year

Type 1 Diabetes Hypoglycemia Deaths Per Year

Hi, thanks for the article. I am a Type 1 diabetic. I use the Mini Med Paradigm Revel pump also. I have been using an insulin pump for the past 26 years. I started out with MiniMed, and I’ve used their pumps ever since. My question for those that are reading this blog is: Has anybody experienced paralysis when their blood sugars are extremely low? Two years ago, I awoke and I was completely paralyzed on my right side. I could turn my head, and my speech was normal. I woke my husband up, and said “Somethings not right!” He then asked if my blood sugar was low, and at the time I had no symptoms of low blood sugar. He rushed and brought me orange juice anyway. I drank two 8 oz glasses of juice, and slowly my right side began functioning again. Why, it didn’t alarm me more as to being paralyzed with a possible stroke, I don’t know. I called my physician and he immediately wanted me to come in. He then hospitalized me, and they ran a lot of test. All test came back normal. Thankfully. The only conclusion was that my blood sugar had dropped dangerously low, which caused the hemi paralysis. Jump now to this week, and I have had two mornings of waking up with hallucinations. This morning was the worst. I was screaming and crying at the top of my lungs. My husband was holding me and saying “it’s ok, it’s ok” , I was convinced that there were small babies drowning right beside me and I couldn’t move to help them. My right side was slightly paralyzed this morning also. This really scares me. I have some CGM sensors, but don’t always wear one, mainly because they are so expensive, and they only last 4 – 5 days per sensor. I will put one one this afternoon however. Just curious as to has anybody else experienced paralysis with low blood sugars? Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Causes Of Death

The Top 10 Causes Of Death

Why do we need to know the reasons people die? Measuring how many people die each year and why they died is one of the most important means – along with gauging how diseases and injuries are affecting people – for assessing the effectiveness of a country’s health system. Cause-of-death statistics help health authorities determine the focus of their public health actions. A country in which deaths from heart disease and diabetes rise rapidly over a period of a few years, for example, has a strong interest in starting a vigorous programme to encourage lifestyles to help prevent these illnesses. Similarly, if a country recognizes that many children are dying of pneumonia, but only a small portion of the budget is dedicated to providing effective treatment, it can increase spending in this area. High-income countries have systems in place for collecting information on causes of death. Many low- and middle-income countries do not have such systems, and the numbers of deaths from specific causes have to be estimated from incomplete data. Improvements in producing high quality cause-of-death data are crucial for improving health and reducing preventable deaths in these countries. Continue reading >>

How Do People Die From Diabetes?

How Do People Die From Diabetes?

Q. How do people die from diabetes? A. People who have diabetes cannot regulate their blood sugar levels and if the disease isn’t tightly controlled, blood sugar can spike to abnormally high levels, a condition called hyperglycemia, or dip below normal, a condition called hypoglycemia. Both conditions are potentially life-threatening and can lead to coma and death if not promptly treated. But complications resulting from the disease are a more common cause of death. Heart disease strikes people with diabetes at significantly higher rates than people without diabetes, “and we don’t fully know why,” said Dr. Robert Gabbay, chief medical officer at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. People with diabetes develop heart disease at younger ages and are nearly twice as likely to die of heart attack or stroke as people who do not have diabetes. People with Type 2 diabetes, which is the more common form of the disease, are more likely to have elevated cholesterol, high blood pressure and obesity, Dr. Gabbay said, all risk factors for cardiovascular disease. “The good news,” he said, “is that a lot of treatments, like those for lowering cholesterol, are even more effective at lowering risk in people with diabetes than in people without.” Some new classes of diabetes medications used for Type 2 diabetes have also been shown to reduce cardiovascular risk, he said. People with Type 1 diabetes are also at increased risk for heart disease, though the reasons are less clear. Both types of diabetes can also lead to other long-term complications, like kidney disease, that may result in premature death. Problems like vision loss, nerve damage and infections that may lead to amputations can increase the likelihood of injuries and accidents. Good disease management starting ea Continue reading >>

Gun Death Rate Rose Again In 2016, C.d.c. Says

Gun Death Rate Rose Again In 2016, C.d.c. Says

Image The rate of gun deaths in the United States rose in 2016 to about 12 per 100,000 people, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a report released on Friday. That was up from a rate of about 11 for every 100,000 people in 2015, and it reflected the second consecutive year that the mortality rate in that category rose in the United States. The report, compiled by the C.D.C.’s National Center for Health Statistics, showed preliminary data that came after several years in which the rate was relatively flat. “The fact that we are seeing increases in the firearm-related deaths after a long period where it has been stable is concerning,” Bob Anderson, chief of the mortality statistics branch at the health statistics center, said in a telephone interview on Friday. “It is a pretty sharp increase for one year.” Mr. Anderson also said the rates for the first quarter of this year showed an upward trend, compared with the same three-month period of 2016. “It clearly shows an increase,” he said, while emphasizing the data was preliminary. “With firearm-related deaths it is seasonal — the rates generally are a little higher in the middle of the year than they are at the end of the year,” he added. “Homicides are more common in the summer.” Image More than 33,000 people die in firearm-related deaths in the United States every year, according to an annual average compiled from C.D.C. data. The data released on Friday did single out other causes of death in the United States that were higher than the firearm-related rate. The drug overdose rate, for example, was almost 20 deaths per 100,000 last year, up from 16.3 in 2015. The death rate for diabetes was about 25 per 100,000 people; cancer was 185 per l00,000, and heart disease about 196 dea Continue reading >>

Who: Diabetes Rates Skyrocketing Worldwide

Who: Diabetes Rates Skyrocketing Worldwide

Diabetes rates nearly doubled in the past three decades, largely due to increases in obesity and sugary diets, according to a report released Wednesday by the World Health Organization. The percentage of adults living with diabetes worldwide grew from 4.7% in 1980 to 8.5% in 2014. Overall, there was a nearly four-fold increase in worldwide cases: An estimated 422 million adults were living with diabetes in 2014, up from 108 million in 1980. The WHO describes diabetes as a serious, chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar, or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. In 2012, 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the population, had diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. About 1.4 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes every year, according to the organization. More than 8.1 million Americans with diabetes don't know it, putting them at greater risk of complications. The disease can develop slowly over time. In 2012, 86 million Americans age 20 and older had prediabetes, a condition in which blood sugar is higher than normal but doesn't yet qualify as diabetes. Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States, killing about 69,000 Americans a year. The disease contributes to an additional 234,000 deaths each year, according to the American Diabetes Association. Worldwide, diabetes killed 1.5 million people in 2012, according to the WHO report. High blood sugar caused an additional 2.2 million deaths by increasing the risks of heart disease and other chronic conditions. About 43% of these deaths occur before the age of 70. The percentage of deaths attributable to high blood glucose or diabetes that occur prior to age 70 is higher in l Continue reading >>

Mortality Rates For Type 1 Diabetes Patients Still Too High

Mortality Rates For Type 1 Diabetes Patients Still Too High

Despite major advances in the treatment of type 1 diabetes over the past 30 years, type 1 men are living approximately 11 fewer years than their non-diabetic peers. For women, the years lost is even higher at 13…. Scottish researchers examined data from a prospective cohort of patients in Scotland with type 1 diabetes who were aged 20 years or older from 2008 through 2010 and were in a nationwide register (n=24,691 contributing 67,712 person-years and 1,043 deaths). Life expectancy at an attained age of 20 years was an additional 46.2 years among men with type 1 diabetes and 57.3 years among men without it, an estimated loss in life expectancy with diabetes of 11.1 years (95% CI, 10.1-12.1). Life expectancy from age 20 years was an additional 48.1 years among women with type 1 diabetes and 61.0 years among women without it, an estimated loss with diabetes of 12.9 years (95% CI, 11.7-14.1). Even among those with type 1 diabetes with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 90 mL/min/1.73 m2 or higher, life expectancy was reduced (49.0 years in men, 53.1 years in women) giving an estimated loss from age 20 years of 8.3 years (95% CI, 6.5-10.1) for men and 7.9 years (95% CI, 5.5-10.3) for women. Overall, the largest percentage of the estimated loss in life expectancy was related to ischemic heart disease (36% in men, 31% in women) but death from diabetic coma or ketoacidosis was associated with the largest percentage of the estimated loss occurring before age 50 years (29.4% in men, 21.7% in women). The researchers concluded that, “Estimated life expectancy for patients with type 1 diabetes in Scotland based on data from 2008 through 2010 indicated an estimated loss of life expectancy at age 20 years of approximately 11 years for men and 13 years for women compared w Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease where your body cannot control its blood sugar levels properly – either because your body doesn’t make enough (or any) insulin, or because your cells have become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a chemical produced in the pancreas. It helps your body process sugars. If blood sugar levels aren’t kept under control, diabetes can be life-threatening. Diabetes can lead to other health conditions, including kidney failure, eye disease, foot ulceration and a higher risk of heart disease. Keeping your blood sugar at a safe level means you’re less likely to have other health problems. There’s no cure for diabetes, but there are things you can do to stay well. Support from your friends, whānau and health care providers can help. Heart and diabetes checks Diabetes is our largest and fastest growing health issue we face in New Zealand. Diabetes is closely linked with heart disease (also known as cardiovascular disease or CVD), and together they are responsible for the deaths of more New Zealanders each year than cigarettes are. Many of these deaths are preventable. The More Heart and Diabetes Checks Health Target has been established to help save these lives – aiming to have regular heart and diabetes checks for at least 90 percent of those at risk of developing these conditions. Find out more about heart and diabetes checks. How common is diabetes? There are over 240,000 people in New Zealand who have been diagnosed with diabetes (mostly type 2). It is thought there are another 100,000 people who have it but don’t know. Diabetes is most common among Māori and Pacific Islanders. They’re three times as likely to get it as other New Zealanders. South Asian people are also more likely to develop diabetes. The number of people with both types of Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Type 1

Diabetes, Type 1

YESTERDAY In the 1950s, about one in five people died within 20 years after a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. One in three people died within 25 years of diagnosis. About one in four people developed kidney failure within 25 years of a type 1 diabetes diagnosis. Doctors could not detect early kidney disease and had no tools for slowing its progression to kidney failure. Survival after kidney failure was poor, with one of 10 patients dying each year. About 90 percent of people with type 1 diabetes developed diabetic retinopathy within 25 years of diagnosis. Blindness from diabetic retinopathy was responsible for about 12 percent of new cases of blindness between the ages of 45 and 74. Studies had not proven the value of laser surgery in reducing blindness. Major birth defects in the offspring of mothers with type 1 diabetes were three times higher than in the general population. Patients relied on injections of animal-derived insulin. The insulin pump would soon be introduced but would not become widely used for years. Studies had not yet shown the need for intensive glucose control to delay or prevent the debilitating eye, nerve, kidney, heart, and blood vessel complications of diabetes. Also, the importance of blood pressure control in preventing complications had not been established yet. Patients monitored their glucose levels with urine tests, which recognized high but not dangerously low glucose levels and reflected past, not current, glucose levels. More reliable methods for testing glucose levels in the blood had not been developed yet. Researchers had just discovered autoimmunity as the underlying cause of type 1 diabetes. However, they couldn’t assess an individual’s level of risk for developing type 1 diabetes, and they didn’t know enough to even consider Continue reading >>

Death Rates Due To Diabetes

Death Rates Due To Diabetes

You asked Please could I obtain the death rates due to diabetes related causes within the UK during 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015. We said Thank you for your query on deaths related to diabetes. The number of deaths registered in England and Wales each year by sex, age and underlying cause are available from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) Mortality Statistics: Deaths Registered in England and Wales (Series DR) release. This is available on the ONS website: Special extracts and tabulations of mortality data, including the calculation of mortality rates for specific causes, are available to order (subject to legal frameworks, disclosure control, resources and agreements of costs, where appropriate). Such enquiries should be made to: [email protected] We recommend that you contact the Mortality Analysis team directly in order to discuss your data requirements in more detail. As this information is already available to you via this route ONS considers that S21(1) applies to this request and the information does not have to be supplied under the terms of the Freedom of Information Act. S21(1) is an absolute exemption and no consideration of the public interest test needs to be applied. Continue reading >>

How Australians Die: Cause #5 – Diabetes

How Australians Die: Cause #5 – Diabetes

This is the final in the How Australians Die series that focuses on the country’s top five causes of death and how we can drive down rates of these illnesses. Previous series articles were on heart diseases and stroke, cancers, dementia and chronic lower respiratory diseases. Diabetes is rapidly emerging as a leading cause of death among Australians. It is also a leading cause of heart attacks, strokes, amputations, kidney failure, depression, dementia and severe infections – all of which themselves contribute to premature death. It never used to be this way. Thirty years ago, around 250,000 Australians had diabetes. Today that figure is around two million. Around the world in 2013, more than five million people between the ages of 20 and 79 died from diabetes, accounting for 8.4% of deaths among people in this age group. This translates to one death due to diabetes every six seconds. Tragically, nearly half of these were in people under 60. These figures likely underestimate the major role of diabetes in death as it frequently goes unreported as a cause of death. One study showed that only 35% to 40% of people with diabetes who died had the disease listed on their death certificate, while only about 10% to 15% had diabetes listed as the underlying cause of death. Which type of diabetes is worst? Diabetes is characterised by higher than normal levels of glucose in the blood, caused by having insufficient insulin production or function to keep glucose levels under control. This can come about if the immune system inadvertently destroys the insulin producing cells of the pancreas. This is called type 1 diabetes. It can occur at any age, but is most common in children and young adults. Ectopic fat – fat that accumulates outside the typical stores underneath your skin Continue reading >>

Fast Facts - Data And Statistics About Diabetes

Fast Facts - Data And Statistics About Diabetes

Unless otherwise noted, all references in Fast Facts are from the National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017 (link is external). The Fact Sheet is the product of a joint collaboration of the CDC, NIDDK, the American Diabetes Association, and other government and nonprofit agencies. Sources of data for Fast Facts that do not come from the Statistics Report: Approximately 1.25 million American children and adults have type 1 diabetes. Type 1 prevalence figure calculated from prevalence data from the CDC’s SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study and from data in the National Diabetes Statistics Report showing that type 1 diabetes represents 5% of diagnosed diabetes. Costs of diabetes. American Diabetes Association: Economic Costs of Diabetes in the United States in 2012. Diabetes Care 36: 1033—1046, 2013. 85.2% of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report MMWR 2003 The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes in the U.S. increased by 382% from 1988 to 2014 Calculated from NIHS data Diabetes kills more Americans every year than AIDS and breast cancer combined Diabetes: Health, United States, 2010: 69,201 deaths Breast cancer 40,676 deaths, 2009 AIDS, 21,601 deaths, 2009 A person with diagnosed diabetes at age 50 dies 6 years earlier than a counterpart without diabetes Diabetes Mellitus, Fasting Glucose, and Risk of Cause-Specific Death Other Sources of Statistics State by State and County Level Diabetes Statistics State by state diagnosed prevalence and county level diabetes statistics can be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's web site. Economic Cost of Diabetes in the US 2012 A summary and links to the study and supplementary data can be found on DiabetesPro at professional.diabetes.org/cost. Continue reading >>

Mortality Due To Diabetes

Mortality Due To Diabetes

Key Messages Canada receives a “C” and ranks 15th out of 17 peer countries on mortality due to diabetes. Two million Canadians suffer from diabetes, a figure that is expected to increase to three million over the next decade. The prevalence of diabetes in Canada continues to increase. Putting mortality due to diabetes in context Diabetes is a global epidemic and, according to the International Diabetes Federation, “one of the most challenging health problems in the 21st century.” In 2011, diabetes accounted for about 4.6 million deaths worldwide.1 Globally, it is estimated that more than 350 million people suffer from diabetes; this number is expected to jump to over 550 million by 2030, if nothing is done.2 An estimated 280 million people worldwide have an impaired glucose tolerance—a precursor to diabetes. This number is projected to reach 398 million by 2030, or 7 per cent of the adult population.3 Diabetes has also shifted down a generation—from a disease of the elderly to one that affects those of working age or younger. According to the International Diabetes Federation, as a result of decreasing levels of physical activity and increasing obesity rates, type 2 diabetes in children has the potential to become a global public health issue.4 If you enjoyed this research, get regular updates by signing up to our monthly newsletter. Please enter your e-mail. Your e-mail was not in the correct format. It should be in the form [email protected] What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic, often debilitating, and sometimes fatal disease that occurs when there are problems with the production and use of insulin in the body, ultimately leading to high blood sugar levels. Long-term complications from diabetes include kidney disease, diminishing sight, loss of feeling in t Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Read on to learn some of the key facts and statistics about the people who have it and how to manage it. Risk factors Many risk factors for type 2 diabetes include lifestyle decisions that can be reduced or even cut out entirely with time and effort. Men are also at slightly higher risk of developing diabetes than women. This may be more associated with lifestyle factors, body weight, and where the weight is located (abdominally versus in the hip area) than with innate gender differences. Significant risk factors include: older age excess weight, particularly around the waist family history certain ethnicities physical inactivity poor diet Prevalence Type 2 diabetes is increasingly prevalent but also largely preventable. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults. The CDC also gives us the following information: In general Research suggests that 1 out of 3 adults has prediabetes. Of this group, 9 out of 10 don't know they have it. 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. More than one in every 10 adults who are 20 years or older has diabetes. For seniors (65 years and older), that figure rises to more than one in four. Cases of diagnosed diabetes cost the United States an estimated $245 billion in 2012. This cost is expected to rise with the increasing diagnoses. In pregnancy and parentingAccording to the CDC, 4.6 to 9.2 percent of pregnancies may be affected by gestational diabetes. In up to 10 percent of them, the mother is diagnosed w Continue reading >>

Exercise Strategies That You Can Implement Today

Exercise Strategies That You Can Implement Today

The New Year is traditionally a time for resolutions but change can be overwhelming. To help turn this year’s resolutions into a permanent lifestyle I am providing one health tip each day in January. I chose this approach because the most complex tasks can be made easy if you just take one step at a time. These daily tips are an empowering and invaluable resource for beginners and experts alike. Together, these 30 tips will form a comprehensive guide that will allow you to take control of your health. Just a few of the topics addressed are: What to eat and when to eat it Exercise strategies that you can implement today The power of emotional health Enhancing your health with essentials like air, sunshine and water How to get the restorative sleep that your body requires Remember starting January 1, a new tip will be made available each day, free of charge, to Mercola subscribers. Whether you are making major changes or just want to stay focused on maintaining healthy habits, this 30-Day Resolution Guide will be your ultimate health resource. Continue reading >>

371 Million People Have Diabetes Globally, About Half Undiagnosed

371 Million People Have Diabetes Globally, About Half Undiagnosed

Diabetes is now a disease that affects 371 million people worldwide, and 187 million of them do not even know they have the disease, according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). That represents an increase from last year's estimate, which showed 366 million people had the disease. While 4 million people died from the diabetes in 2011, estimates show that 4.8 million people will die this year from complications from the disease -- with people under 60 accounting for half the deaths. The results were released on Nov. 14, World Diabetes Day 2012, in order to bring awareness to the global problem. Researchers estimate that the diabetes dilemma will only increase. By 2030, they expect 552 million people will have the disease. "As millions of undiagnosed people develop diabetes complications, we can expect to see the mortality rate climb," Jean Claude Mbanya, President of the IDF, said in a press release. "On World Diabetes Day, we want to raise awareness that this disease can be controlled and in some cases prevented." The seventh leading cause of death in the U.S., diabetes is a problem that occurs when blood glucose levels are above normal, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports. Glucose is the sugar that is processed from the food we eat, and our pancreas is supposed to make a hormone called insulin which helps the glucose get into our cells to give them energy. Having diabetes indicates that your body is not making enough insulin or isn't utilizing insulin as it should be. There are many types of diabetes, but the most common are Type 1 diabetes (5 percent of diagnosed cases), Type 2 diabetes (about 90 to 95 percent of diagnosed cases) and gestational diabetes (about 2 to 10 percent of diagnosed cases). Type 2 diabetes risk factors include ag Continue reading >>

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