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How Many People Are Affected By Type 1 Diabetes?

Caffeine And Type 1 Diabetes

Caffeine And Type 1 Diabetes

Have you ever noticed a difference in your blood sugar after drinking a big cup of coffee or tea? According to the Mayo Clinic, caffeine can indeed have an affect on your blood glucose levels causing lower or higher fluctuations, so limited consumption is recommended for better control. Another study published by the ADA (2005) suggests that people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes can reduce their risk of hypoglycemia during the night by having a small to moderate amount of caffeine before bed. Some people also claim that symptoms of hypoglycemia become more noticeable when incorporating caffeine into their diet. The effects of caffeine on each person are varied though with the added factor of tolerance to the stimulant can build up as quantity increases. While some people claim that they see a noticeable difference in their BG levels when they drink caffeine, others say that they don’t have any issues incorporating caffeine with food. Let’s explore some variables that could contribute to the shift in BG levels in relation to caffeine consumption. Side effects Certain common side effects of caffeine consumption may often explain shifts in BG levels. Lack of sleep Not enough sleep has proven to contribute to insulin resistance in the body for people with Type 1. Too much caffeine could certainly contribute to insomnia, especially since caffeine tolerance decreases as we grow older. Elevated heart rate / “the jitters” Two common effects if too much caffeine is in the system, or if the body is not accustomed to it. These are also symptoms of hypoglycemia, which might cause someone with Type 1 to check their BG levels more frequently if mistaking the symptoms for a low. Heartburn / Upset stomach / Dehydration Some people are less tolerant to coffee and other caffeinat Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Overview Type 1 diabetes in children is a condition in which your child's body no longer produces an important hormone (insulin). Your child needs insulin to survive, so you'll have to replace the missing insulin. Type 1 diabetes in children used to be known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes. The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in children can be overwhelming at first. Suddenly you and your child — depending on his or her age — must learn how to give injections, count carbohydrates and monitor blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes in children requires consistent care. But advances in blood sugar monitoring and insulin delivery have improved the daily management of the condition. Symptoms The signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children usually develop quickly, over a period of weeks. These signs and symptoms include: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your child's bloodstream pulls fluid from tissues. As a result your child might be thirsty — and drink and urinate more than usual. A young, toilet-trained child might suddenly experience bed-wetting. Extreme hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs lack energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight — sometimes rapidly. Without the energy sugar supplies, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink. Unexplained weight loss is often the first sign of type 1 diabetes to be noticed in children. Fatigue. Lack of sugar in your child's cells might make him or her tired and lethargic. Irritability or behavior changes. In addition to mood problems, your child might suddenly have a decline in performance at school. Fruity-smelling breath. Bu Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mystery: Why Are Type 1 Cases Surging?

Diabetes Mystery: Why Are Type 1 Cases Surging?

When public health officials fret about the soaring incidence of diabetes in the U.S. and worldwide, they are generally referring to type 2 diabetes. About 90 percent of the nearly 350 million people around the world who have diabetes suffer from the type 2 form of the illness, which mostly starts causing problems in the 40s and 50s and is tied to the stress that extra pounds place on the body’s ability to regulate blood glucose. About 25 million people in the U.S. have type 2 diabetes, and another million have type 1 diabetes, which typically strikes in childhood and can be controlled only with daily doses of insulin. For reasons that are completely mysterious, however, the incidence of type 1 diabetes has been increasing throughout the globe at rates that range from 3 to 5 percent a year. Although the second trend is less well publicized, it is still deeply troubling, because this form of the illness has the potential to disable or kill people so much earlier in their lives. No one knows exactly why type 1 diabetes is rising. Solving that mystery—and, if possible, reducing or reversing the trend—has become an urgent problem for public health researchers everywhere. So far they feel they have only one solid clue. “Increases such as the ones that have been reported cannot be explained by a change in genes in such a short period,” says Giuseppina Imperatore, who leads a team of epidemiologists in the Division of Diabetes Translation at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “So environmental factors are probably major players in this increase.” A Challenge of Counting Type 1 and type 2 diabetes share the same underlying defect—an inability to deploy insulin in a manner that keeps blood sugar from rising too high—but they arise out of almos Continue reading >>

Epidemiology Of Type 1 Diabetes

Epidemiology Of Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes may present at any age, but most typically presents in early life with a peak around the time of puberty. Its incidence varies 50–100-fold around the world, with the highest rates in northern Europe and in individuals of European extraction. Both sexes are equally affected in childhood, but men are more commonly affected in early adult life. The distinction between type 1 and type 2 diabetes becomes blurred in later life, and the true lifetime incidence of the condition is therefore unknown. A variant form known as latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) has been described. The incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes is rising rapidly in all populations, especially in the under 5-year-old age group, with a doubling time of less than 20 years in Europe. The increasing incidence of type 1 diabetes suggests a major environmental contribution, but the role of specific factors such as viruses remains controversial. Incidence rates Type 1 diabetes has historically been most prevalent in populations of European origin, but is becoming more frequent in other ethnic groups. Within Europe the highest rates of childhood diabetes are found in Scandinavia and north-west Europe, with an incidence range from 57.4 cases/100,000 per year in Finland to 3.9/100,000 in Macedonia for children aged 0–14 years.[1] Genetically related populations may differ in incidence: for example, type 1 diabetes is more common in Norwegians than in Icelanders of largely Norwegian descent, while Finnish children have a threefold risk compared with Estonians.[2] The incidence of type 1 diabetes remains relatively low in populations of non-European descent around the world, but many of these now report a rising incidence of the disease. Kuwait, for example, now has an incidence of 22.3/ Continue reading >>

3.8 Million People In England Now Have Diabetes

3.8 Million People In England Now Have Diabetes

The new Diabetes Prevalence Model, produced by the Public Health England (PHE) National Cardiovascular Intelligence Network (NCVIN) and launched today at the PHE Conference at Warwick University, estimates the total number of adults with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in England. Whilst 3.8 million people are estimated to have both types of diabetes, approximately 90% of diabetes cases are Type 2; this is largely preventable or manageable by lifestyle changes and also provides additional benefits for health and wellbeing. The likelihood of developing Type 2 diabetes is increased by being overweight (although family history, ethnicity and age can also increase risk). The figures reiterate that diabetes is an increasing burden of ill health, underlining the need for urgent action to lessen the impact on individuals, as well as the health and social care system supporting them. The model suggests that 1 in 4 people with diabetes, an estimated 940,000, are unaware of their condition. The disease can lead to serious complications including foot amputation and kidney disease, and is associated with an increased risk of stroke and heart attack. John Newton, Chief Knowledge Officer at PHE, said: The number of people with diabetes has been steadily increasing and tackling it is fundamental to the sustainable future of the NHS. Diabetes can be an extremely serious disease for those that have it and treating it and its complications costs the NHS almost £10 billion a year. Developing Type 2 diabetes is not an inevitable part of aging, we have an opportunity through public health to reverse this trend and safeguard the health of the nation and the future of the NHS. The proportion of people who have diabetes increases with age: 9% of people aged 45 to 54 have diabetes, but for ov Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Type 1 Diabetes Statistics

5 Surprising Type 1 Diabetes Statistics

To be diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes is to become your own personal medical professional. Sometimes I think a diagnosis should come with a medical degree, because we have to learn so much about diabetes so quickly. But even if you’ve been managing diabetes for a long time like I have, every now and then, you still come across new information that surprises you. Here are five surprising type 1 diabestes statistics you may not have known: 1. The Number of Children Diagnosed T1 in the United States is Virtually the Same Number as the Number of Adults. This is surprising, because so many people still think of T1 as “juvenile diabetes.” The name was changed, in part, to reflect the reality, that Type 1 diabetes can happen just as often in a young adult as a child. Hence, according to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, the number of children diagnosed T1 is over 15,000. Same for the diagnosed adults. And overall, of course, most people who have “juvenile diabetes” are adults – 85 percent. 2. A Majority of People with Diabetes Don’t Make Use of Technology That Can Help. A recent study presented at a joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society found that nearly 70 percent of us don’t extract data about our blood sugar levels from our insulin pumps or other self-monitoring devices. Because of this, these devices “are not being used to their full potential,” says Dr. Jenise Wong, the study’s principal investigator, in Science Daily. 3. Hypos Happen, Even in Hospitals. A recent audit of hospital stays by people with diabetes found that 30 percent of Type 1 patients admitted to hospitals experienced “a severe hypo within the last seven days.” (They define severe as a blood glucose level below 3.0 mmol/l.) D Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevalence In Ireland

Diabetes Prevalence In Ireland

There are two types of diabetes, Type 1 diabetes and Type 2 diabetes. The differences and similarities between the two conditions are outlined here. In the absence of a register of people who have diabetes no-one can be entirely sure how many people in Ireland live with diabetes. Overview The total number of people living with diabetes in Ireland is estimated to be 225,840. The International Diabetes Federation Diabetes Atlas (2013) estimate that there are 207,490 people with diabetes in Ireland in the 20 – 79 age group (prevalence of 6.5% in the population) which is in line with previous estimates that by 2020 there would be 233,000 people with the condition, and by 2030 there would be 278,850 people with the condition. Type 1 Diabetes The prevalence of Type 1 Diabetes, an auto-immune condition, is on the rise and is typically diagnosed in childhood. People with type 1 diabetes account for approximately 14,000 – 16,000 of the total diabetes population in Ireland i.e. 10-15% of the population of people living with diabetes. It is estimated there are 2,750 people under 16 years of age living with Type 1 diabetes (based on the Irish Paediatric Diabetes Audit 2012) results and other young adults under 20 years attending transition clinics). Type 2 Diabetes According to the Healthy Ireland survey, 854,165 adults over 40 in the Republic of Ireland are at increased risk of developing (or have) Type 2 diabetes. More alarmingly, there are a further 304,382 in the 30 – 39 year age group that are overweight and not taking the weekly 150 minutes recommended physical activity, leaving them at an increased risk of chronic ill-health. This means that there are 1,158,547 adults in Ireland that need to consider making changes to their daily behaviours in terms of eating healthily Continue reading >>

32 Famous People With Type 1 Diabetes

32 Famous People With Type 1 Diabetes

Test strips, blood sugar monitors, and insulin pumps are all part of a day in the life of someone living with Diabetes. Several famous actors, musicians, and athletes have Type I Diabetes. Some of these celebrities were diagnosed with diabetes when they were children, while others developed the disease later on in life. Who is the most famous person with Type I Diabetes? Sharon Stone tops our list. The "Basic Instinct" star was diagnosed with Type I diabetes. Mary Tyler Moore was diagnosed with Type I diabetes around the time she was filming "The Mary Tyler Moore Show." She is now an outspoken advocate who brings awareness to the disease. "American Idol" alum Crystal Bowersox has been hospitalized due to complications with Type I diabetes. Several famous men also have Type I diabetes. Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler was diagnosed with Type I diabetes in 2008. Poison front man Bret Michaels was diagnosed with Type I diabetes when he was 6 years old. Pop star Nick Jonas was diagnosed with Type I diabetes in 2005. In 1957, Jackie Robinson was diagnosed as a type 1 diabetic. Are you surprised that so many celebrities have Type I diabetes? Share your thoughts in the comments section. Continue reading >>

How Mary Tyler Moore Helped Me Live With Type 1 Diabetes

How Mary Tyler Moore Helped Me Live With Type 1 Diabetes

When I was 9 years old, suddenly finding out I would have to inject myself with insulin and watch what I ate every day was quite a heavy load. But Mary Tyler Moore gave me hope that I was gonna make it after all. Back then, in 1973, she was the only famous person I knew with Type 1 diabetes. She never looked depressed or unhappy – quite the opposite. Daily shots couldn't be that bad, I reasoned, if Mary can do it and still turn the world on with her smile. Moore, who died Wednesday at the age of 80, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at 33, just as The Mary Tyler Moore Show was getting off the ground. She would become a double hero for me, as much for the strong single working-woman character she portrayed on the show as for her real life, lived so fully with Type 1 diabetes. Moore spent decades advocating for diabetes research and for people with diabetes, including testifying in front of Congress and public service campaigns for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, now known as JDRF. (The organization has set up a website for people to post tributes to Moore.) Soon after my diagnosis, I wrote her a letter telling her how much she had helped me accept my diabetes. Weeks later, I received a beautiful autographed photo of her. The autograph was preprinted, but still ... Maybe she'd actually read my letter! In August 1997, I had the chance to meet her when she spoke during a ceremony held at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., to announce three federally-funded projects related to diabetes, including one specifically for Type 1. Then-President Bill Clinton thanked Moore for her "long, tireless and selfless efforts" and was whisked off at the end of the event. But she stayed, chatting with attendees. I shyly approached her and introduced myself as a medical Continue reading >>

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes share the problem of high levels of blood sugar. The inability to control blood sugar causes the symptoms and the complications of both types of diabetes. But type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are two different diseases in many ways. According to the latest (2014) estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people, or 9.3 percent of the U.S. population, have diabetes. Type 1 diabetes affects just 5 percent of those adults, with type 2 diabetes affecting up to 95 percent. Here’s what else you need to know to be health-savvy in the age of the diabetes epidemic. What Causes Diabetes? "Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease — the body's immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas that make insulin," a hormone, says Andjela Drincic, MD, associate professor of internal medicine in the division of diabetes, endocrinology, and metabolism at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. The exact cause is not known, but it's probably a combination of the genes a person is born with and something in the environment that triggers the genes to become active. "The cause of type 2 diabetes is multifactorial," says Dr. Drincic. "People inherit genes that make them susceptible to type 2, but lifestyle factors, like obesity and inactivity, are also important. In type 2 diabetes, at least in the early stages, there is enough insulin, but the body becomes resistant to it." Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include a family history of the disease, a poor diet, a sedentary lifestyle, and obesity. African-Americans, Latin Americans, and certain Native American groups have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes than Caucasian Americans. Juvenile or Adult-Onset: When Does Diabetes Start? Usually, type 1 diabetes in dia Continue reading >>

Is It Time To Screen The General Population For Type 1 Diabetes?

Is It Time To Screen The General Population For Type 1 Diabetes?

Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D), also referred to as insulin-dependent, childhood-onset, or juvenile diabetes, is an autoimmune disease that occurs when insulin-producing β cells in the pancreas are aberrantly targeted and destroyed by a person’s immune system, usually leading to an absolute insulin deficiency.1 A diagnosis of T1D is made when a patient has glycemic abnormalities, which often result in clinical symptoms. The American Diabetes Association annually publishes guidelines for diagnosis of T1D using these metabolic measurements, which are widely accessible for use. Of importance, the autoimmune disease process begins long before clinical onset of T1D and can be identified by the presence of serum islet autoantibodies (IAs) that are directed against proteins in insulin-producing β cells. Currently four major antibodies are measured, including insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), islet antigen 2 (IA-2), and zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8). The ability to accurately measure multiple IA makes T1D a predictable disease. To date, targeted screening for IA has been performed in first-degree relatives (FDRs) of people having T1D or those having high-risk human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes. HLA genes confer more than 50 % of the genetic risk for T1D. After the development of two or more IAs, an individual will almost always develop clinical T1D given enough time.2 The incidence of developing clinical T1D after ≥2 IAs are present is 11 % each year and approximately 70 % in the ensuing 10 years. With the ability to measure IA and predict T1D risk, the next step in disease prevention is screening the general population. There are a number of reasons to screen the general population for T1D risk by measuring IA but also an equal number of arguments against screenin Continue reading >>

Quick Facts Diabetes In Minnesota

Quick Facts Diabetes In Minnesota

How many adults in Minnesota have diabetes? 2015, 7.6% of Minnesota adults (about 320,000)1 had been diagnosed with diabetes (type 1 or 2). Around 18,000 new cases are diagnosed in Minnesota each year (2010)1 Around 1 in 4 people with diabetes do not know that they have the disease2. For information about diabetes in the US, please read the National Diabetes Statistics Report 2017. Are there disparities in diabetes rates in Minnesota? Disparities happen when the health of a group of people are negatively affected by factors like how much money they earn, their race or ethnicity, or where they live. In Minnesota, we currently collect data specific to two of these factors. Education: In 2015, about 5.4 percent1* of adults who have a college degree report having diabetes compared with 8.5 percent1* of adults who do not. Income: Health survey data from 2013 through 2015 show that self-reported diabetes rates are higher for people living in households that earn lower incomes1*. How is Minnesota monitoring diabetes management? Healthcare providers measure five diabetes goals to monitor how well a patient’s diabetes is controlled. These goals are influenced by a number of different factors: individual factors, community-level factors, and healthcare-related factors. This information is reported as the Optimal Diabetes Care measure. Overall in Minnesota, 53 percent of adults met all five diabetes goals3. There are disparities in the percentage of people who meet all five diabetes goals. We show some of the disparities observed in 2014 below: Race: 31 percent of American Indian or Alaska Native meet the Optimal Diabetes Care measure as compared to 59 percent of Asian adults3. Ethnicity: 46 percent of Hispanic or Latino adults meet the Optimal Diabetes Care measure as compared Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Vs Type 2

Type 1 Diabetes Vs Type 2

National Diabetes Month is coming to a close. Unfortunately, diabetes isn’t going away any time soon. According to the American Diabetes Association, 1.4 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes each year. And 86 million people in the United States with prediabetes are headed towards developing Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes isn’t unique to the United States: It’s a global issue, affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Many people describe diabetes as being a pandemic. When people are diagnosed with diabetes, they often have many questions, especially about the differences between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. There are, in fact, multiple different forms of diabetes (too many to get into in this week’s posting!), but the more common forms are Type 1 and Type 2. Let’s take a look at these this week and hopefully clear up any confusion or questions you may have. Type 1 diabetes Name: Type 1 diabetes was formerly known as “juvenile diabetes” and “insulin-dependent diabetes.” These terms are inaccurate and obsolete. We know that it’s not just “juveniles” who get Type 1 diabetes — adults get Type 1, too, and many people who have Type 2 diabetes must take insulin. So, Type 1 diabetes is the correct term. Definition: Type 1 diabetes (also known as Type 1 diabetes mellutis, or T1DM) is an autoimmune condition. This means that the body’s immune system turns on itself; in this case, it attacks the beta cells of the pancreas. These are the cells that produce insulin. As a result, the pancreas produces very little, if any, insulin. Causes: Scientists don’t exactly know what causes Type 1 diabetes. However, it’s likely that genetics and environmental factors, such as certain types of viruses, play a role. Prevalence: Type 1 diabetes accounts Continue reading >>

The Causes Of Insulin Resistance In Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes And Prediabetes (video)

The Causes Of Insulin Resistance In Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes And Prediabetes (video)

Most people believe that people with type 1 diabetes are not insulin resistant simply because they are not overweight. This could not be farther from the truth. While insulin resistance affects many overweight individuals, many people with type 1 diabetes remain skinny their entire lives despite a large degree of insulin resistance (1–3). Over the past decade, I have helped many people with type 1 diabetes measure, track and reverse insulin resistance. In practice, 100% of all my clients with type 1 diabetes suffer from insulin resistance despite the assumption that they were insulin sensitive. By measuring their baseline insulin resistance, we were able to identify an impaired ability to utilize glucose as a fuel, and through dedicated diet modification and frequent exercise, some of my clients have reduced their insulin usage by as much as 60%. If you have type 1 diabetes, do not be fooled into thinking that you are insulin sensitive simply because you are skinny. Insulin resistance is a hidden condition, and affects both normal weight and overweight individuals (1–3). What Causes Insulin Resistance? Insulin resistance underlies all forms of diabetes, and is a condition which primarily affects your muscles, liver and adipose tissue. Many people think that diabetes is caused by an excess intake of sugar and candy starting from a young age. While eating artificial sweeteners and drinking soda can certainly increase your risk for the development of insulin resistance and diabetes, in most cases diabetes is caused by excessive FAT intake. The most important thing you can do as a person with diabetes is understand the following: Diabetes is caused by a fat metabolism disorder, which results in a glucose metabolism disorder. At the heart of all forms of diabetes is insu Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Tips

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Tips

Type 1 diabetes can also be called insulin-dependent diabetes because people with type 1 must take insulin in order to live. Type 1 diabetes used to be called juvenile diabetes because it was diagnosed mainly in children. However, that name is no longer accurate because children are increasingly developing another type of diabetes—type 2 diabetes. Also, it is possible for adults to be diagnosed as type 1, so the name “juvenile diabetes” isn’t accurate. Researchers aren’t exactly sure what causes type 1 diabetes, although they have some clues, including genetics and environmental triggers. Researchers have noticed that more cases of type 1 diabetes are diagnosed in northern climates, leading them to suggest that environmental triggers play a role in the development of type 1. Specifically, viral infections (which happen more often in colder northern climates where people are in close proximity) may trigger type 1. Type 1 diabetes is far less common than type 2: about 90% of people with diabetes have type 2. With tight blood glucose control, you can avoid many of the short- and long-term complications associated with type 1 diabetes, including foot problems and nerve pain. Exercise is an important part of keeping diabetes under control. Many famous people have type 1 diabetes, including: Jay Cutler (quarterback for the Chicago Bears), Billie Jean King, Ron Santo (Chicago Cubs player), Halle Berry, Mary Tyler Moore, and Nick Jonas. Type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) is more common than type 1 diabetes. Around 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National 2014 Diabetes Statistics Report, 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the US population have diabetes. T Continue reading >>

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